Historic Fort Snelling

Historic Fort Snelling With a human history more than 10,000 years in the making, the area today known as Fort Snelling means different things to different people.
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Explore the past through tours, demonstrations, conversations, and more! The history of this place is more than just the story of the fort itself. The junction of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers is a place of major social, cultural, and historical significance to all people inhabiting the region, a place whose history evokes both pride and pain. It is a place of cultural importance to many Da

Explore the past through tours, demonstrations, conversations, and more! The history of this place is more than just the story of the fort itself. The junction of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers is a place of major social, cultural, and historical significance to all people inhabiting the region, a place whose history evokes both pride and pain. It is a place of cultural importance to many Da

Operating as usual

Photos from Minnesota Historical Society's post
08/26/2021

Photos from Minnesota Historical Society's post

Did you know the Minnesota State Fair was held at Fort Snelling in 1860? The fair was held within the walls of the "old"...
08/26/2021

Did you know the Minnesota State Fair was held at Fort Snelling in 1860? The fair was held within the walls of the "old" fort. This was after the site was sold by the War Department and closed as a military post by the end of the 1850s.

Fort Snelling was reopened in 1861 when the American Civil War broke out and would remain an active military post until 1946.

Photo Credit: MNHS Collections

http://collections.mnhs.org/cms/display?irn=10616008&return=q%3DMN%2520State%2520Fair%25201860

Did you know the Minnesota State Fair was held at Fort Snelling in 1860? The fair was held within the walls of the "old" fort. This was after the site was sold by the War Department and closed as a military post by the end of the 1850s.

Fort Snelling was reopened in 1861 when the American Civil War broke out and would remain an active military post until 1946.

Photo Credit: MNHS Collections

http://collections.mnhs.org/cms/display?irn=10616008&return=q%3DMN%2520State%2520Fair%25201860

Archaeology Day at Historic Fort Snelling will be held on September 11, from 10 am-3 pm, and will include access to the ...
08/20/2021

Archaeology Day at Historic Fort Snelling will be held on September 11, from 10 am-3 pm, and will include access to the History Under the Floorboards exhibit and an opportunity to see archaeologists in action.

Visitors can preview findings from the recent archaeological work related with the revitalization project, visit the History Under the Floorboards exhibit as archaeologists prepare it for next season, and see a demonstration of flintknapping and experimental tool use with opportunity to create your own tools. This projectile point, an example of flintknapping, was unearthed on Fort Snelling's grounds during excavations in 1973-1974. Learn more in the MNHS collections listing:

https://bit.ly/37OlDgf

Archaeology Day at Historic Fort Snelling will be held on September 11, from 10 am-3 pm, and will include access to the History Under the Floorboards exhibit and an opportunity to see archaeologists in action.

Visitors can preview findings from the recent archaeological work related with the revitalization project, visit the History Under the Floorboards exhibit as archaeologists prepare it for next season, and see a demonstration of flintknapping and experimental tool use with opportunity to create your own tools. This projectile point, an example of flintknapping, was unearthed on Fort Snelling's grounds during excavations in 1973-1974. Learn more in the MNHS collections listing:

https://bit.ly/37OlDgf

Many thanks to our dedicated Garden Volunteers who have been tending our Three Sisters Garden since spring!  This year w...
08/06/2021

Many thanks to our dedicated Garden Volunteers who have been tending our Three Sisters Garden since spring! This year we are growing Flint (Mandan) Corn, Mandan squash, Hidatsa Painted Shield Beans, and Hidatsa Sunflowers.

08/05/2021
Recruitment

Interested in being part of the Historic Fort Snelling Staff?

We currently have a Facilities Maintenance Technician position open. This position conducts and oversees maintenance and repairs at Historic Fort Snelling, including the buildings, equipment, grounds, hardware, mechanical, and safety and security systems.

Follow the link for more details.

https://bit.ly/3jD6xQf

Historic Fort Snelling was recently featured by WCCO Channel 4 in a story about our archaeology program, which has been ...
08/04/2021
Did You Know Fort Snelling Has An Archaeology Program?

Historic Fort Snelling was recently featured by WCCO Channel 4 in a story about our archaeology program, which has been ongoing since the 1970s.

If you love archaeology, on September 11 we will have an "Archaeology Day" featuring some items discovered during our revitalization work, some of the work we've completed for the History Under the Floorboards project, and demonstrations of flintknapping and the use of traditional tools.

The Minnesota Historical Society has run an archaeology program there since the 1970s, and they're still uncovering priceless finds today, Mike Augustyniak reports (3:57). WCCO Saturday Morning - July 31, 2021

On this day in 1858, Fort Snelling closed (for the first time).By the time the State of Minnesota was created in 1858, t...
07/19/2021
Map of the city of Fort Snelling, Minnesota : at the confluence of the Mississippi & Minnesota rivers / surveyed August 1857 by Thomas I. Moncure. : Collections Online : mnhs.org

On this day in 1858, Fort Snelling closed (for the first time).

By the time the State of Minnesota was created in 1858, the U.S. military had established forts to the west of Fort Snelling. Consequently, the federal government deemed that Fort Snelling was no longer needed since the "frontier" had pushed further west. 8,000 acres of the former military reservation (including part of present-day south Minneapolis) was purchased by former fort sutler Franklin Steele, who planned to plot out individual lots for sale in his proposed “City of Fort Snelling.” His plans never materialized, and the fort’s parade ground became a pasture for Steele’s sheep.

The fort would reopen three years later at the start of the Civil War, and continue to operate as an active U.S. military base until after the end of WWII in 1946.

http://collections.mnhs.org/cms/display?irn=10576530&return=q%3Dcity%2520of%2520fort%2520snelling

Display larger version Collections items are not for sale. A photo reproduction can be purchased. Titles Map of the city of Fort Snelling, Minnesota : at the confluence of the Mississippi & Minnesota rivers / surveyed August 1857 by Thomas I. Moncure. Description This 1857 map shows the city Frankli...

On this date in 1865, the 2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry regiment returned home after nearly four years of service in ...
07/15/2021

On this date in 1865, the 2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry regiment returned home after nearly four years of service in the Civil War.

The survivors of the regiment were greeted by cheering, celebrating crowds in Minnesota. William Bircher, who had served with the regiment as a drummer, remembered arriving in St. Paul on the morning of July 15, 1865: “At last we landed, amid booming of cannon and the cheering of multitudes of people. Bells were rung, people paraded the streets to welcome us home, and everybody was glad beyond a possibility of expression.”

Following a banquet provided by the citizens of St. Paul, the regiment boarded the steamboat that would take them the short distance to Fort Snelling. There the soldiers would soon be officially mustered-out of federal service, receive their final pay, and end their military service.

You can learn more about the 2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry regiment’s history by visiting MNopedia:
mnopedia.org/group/second-minnesota-volunteer-infantry-regiment

Photo: Volunteers and Historic Fort Snelling Staff representing the 2nd Minnesota "returning home" in 2015 (photo credit unknown)

On this date in 1865, the 2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry regiment returned home after nearly four years of service in the Civil War.

The survivors of the regiment were greeted by cheering, celebrating crowds in Minnesota. William Bircher, who had served with the regiment as a drummer, remembered arriving in St. Paul on the morning of July 15, 1865: “At last we landed, amid booming of cannon and the cheering of multitudes of people. Bells were rung, people paraded the streets to welcome us home, and everybody was glad beyond a possibility of expression.”

Following a banquet provided by the citizens of St. Paul, the regiment boarded the steamboat that would take them the short distance to Fort Snelling. There the soldiers would soon be officially mustered-out of federal service, receive their final pay, and end their military service.

You can learn more about the 2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry regiment’s history by visiting MNopedia:
mnopedia.org/group/second-minnesota-volunteer-infantry-regiment

Photo: Volunteers and Historic Fort Snelling Staff representing the 2nd Minnesota "returning home" in 2015 (photo credit unknown)

On this date in 1862, the 3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry regiment surrendered to Confederate forces near Murfreesboro,...
07/13/2021
Third Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment | MNopedia

On this date in 1862, the 3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry regiment surrendered to Confederate forces near Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

Organized at Fort Snelling in October and November, 1861, the 3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry spent its first several months of service on garrison duty in both Kentucky and Tennessee.

Early in the morning of July 13, 1862, Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest's small force surprised the Minnesotans, resulting in the controversial surrender of the Minnesota regiment. After a short captivity the soldiers of the 3rd were paroled in St. Louis and returned to Minnesota. Many of the soldiers went on to serve under General Henry Sibley in the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, and then returned to fight in the Civil War.

In September, 1863 the 3rd Minnesota participated in the campaign to capture the Confederate-held city of Little Rock, Arkansas. Their march into the town was captured in a painting by Stanley M. Arthurs, which decorated the Governor's reception room in the Minnesota State Capitol.

Learn more about the 3rd Minnesota below:
mnopedia.org/group/third-minnesota-volunteer-infantry-regiment

The Third Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment's record of service varied greatly. The regiment endured a controversial surrender in Tennessee, played a decisive role in the climactic battle of the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, and helped win Union control of the vital Mississippi River.

On this day, July 2, 1863: In a critical moment at Gettysburg, 262 members of the First Minnesota Regiment charge a much...
07/02/2021
28th Virginia battle flag : Collections Online : mnhs.org

On this day, July 2, 1863: In a critical moment at Gettysburg, 262 members of the First Minnesota Regiment charge a much larger Confederate force, succeeding in slowing its advance but suffering 215 casualties, a stunning 82 percent. The action buys valuable time for Union forces to reform their lines.

The next day the remaining soldiers of the First Minnesota would help repel Pickett's charge, capturing the flag of the 28th Virginia Regiment in the process. Today, the First Minnesota's regimental flag, along with the state's other civil war regimental flags, resides in the state capitol. The flag of the 28th Virginia is held by the Minnesota Historical Society.

http://collections.mnhs.org/cms/display?irn=10132836&return=q%3D28th%2520

Display larger version Collections items are not for sale. A photo reproduction can be purchased. Titles 28th Virginia battle flag Description The Army of Northern Virginia Confederate battle flag of the 28th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment. The flag was captured by Private Marshall Sherman of....

New stories from the past surface all the time and are added to those we share at Historic Fort Snelling. Read more abou...
06/30/2021
Wounded MN soldier used shirt to save his life

New stories from the past surface all the time and are added to those we share at Historic Fort Snelling. Read more about this Civil War battlefield artifact recently acquired by MNHS that may one day be on view at our historic site.

The Minnesota Historical Society has acquired a rare Civil War battlefield relic. The descendants of a Minnesota soldier wounded near Nashville, Tenn., in 1864 have donated a Confederate uniform shirt Henry Mills used to bind his wound, survive the war and return to St. Paul.

On this day in 1861, the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry leaves Fort Snelling for Washington, DC and service in the Civ...
06/22/2021

On this day in 1861, the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry leaves Fort Snelling for Washington, DC and service in the Civil War.

Minnesota was the first state to promise soldiers to the Union army, and the first 1,000 recruits made up the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Coming from all across the state, the volunteers rendezvoused at Fort Snelling where they received their initial military training. On June 22, 1861 the regiment boarded steamships and left Minnesota for Washington, DC where they would be incorporated into the Army of the Potomac. From there the regiment would serve with distinction at several major battles, including First Bull Run, Antietam, and Gettysburg.

Years later, veteran James A. Wright remembered the day:

“Everything we proposed to carry with us was reduced to its smallest proportion and packed into the roll of blankets; a day’s ration of meat and bread was put into our haversacks; and our breakfasts were eaten….At the call, we were ready to fall in with ‘all our traps and calamities,’ as one of the boys from the country expressed it... A picture of the regiment as it appeared that morning would be a prize — at least, it would be highly prized by any of the old members now living. It was indeed a manly sight. A thousand men in red shirts and slouch hats gathered for war. It was not a beauty contest, and the men had not been selected altogether for their good looks — in fact, it had nothing to do with it — but there were many men of fine features and physique.”
- James A. Wright, No More Gallant a Deed, p. 32-33 (2001)

Learn more about the 1st Minnesota Infantry: mnopedia.org/group/first-minnesota-volunteer-infantry-regiment

Image: First Minnesota Regiment Civil War snare drum made in 1861 (MNHS Collections)

On this day in 1861, the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry leaves Fort Snelling for Washington, DC and service in the Civil War.

Minnesota was the first state to promise soldiers to the Union army, and the first 1,000 recruits made up the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Coming from all across the state, the volunteers rendezvoused at Fort Snelling where they received their initial military training. On June 22, 1861 the regiment boarded steamships and left Minnesota for Washington, DC where they would be incorporated into the Army of the Potomac. From there the regiment would serve with distinction at several major battles, including First Bull Run, Antietam, and Gettysburg.

Years later, veteran James A. Wright remembered the day:

“Everything we proposed to carry with us was reduced to its smallest proportion and packed into the roll of blankets; a day’s ration of meat and bread was put into our haversacks; and our breakfasts were eaten….At the call, we were ready to fall in with ‘all our traps and calamities,’ as one of the boys from the country expressed it... A picture of the regiment as it appeared that morning would be a prize — at least, it would be highly prized by any of the old members now living. It was indeed a manly sight. A thousand men in red shirts and slouch hats gathered for war. It was not a beauty contest, and the men had not been selected altogether for their good looks — in fact, it had nothing to do with it — but there were many men of fine features and physique.”
- James A. Wright, No More Gallant a Deed, p. 32-33 (2001)

Learn more about the 1st Minnesota Infantry: mnopedia.org/group/first-minnesota-volunteer-infantry-regiment

Image: First Minnesota Regiment Civil War snare drum made in 1861 (MNHS Collections)

June 19 is known as Juneteenth, which recognizes this date in 1865 when enslaved African Americans in Texas received the...
06/19/2021
Juneteenth: Freedom At Last

June 19 is known as Juneteenth, which recognizes this date in 1865 when enslaved African Americans in Texas received the news that they had been freed by the Emancipation Proclamation, two and a half years after its issue.

Gen. Gordon Granger was dispatched to Galveston, TX with 2,000 soldiers to establish official U.S. government control in the wake of the Civil War. On June 19, Granger publicly read General Order No. 3 which stated “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.” Even though the late President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect on Jan. 1, 1863, its provisions for ensuring freedom to enslaved people couldn't be enforced until the Union defeated the Confederacy.

In the decades following, June 19 became a day of celebration for African American communities around the country.

http://sites.mnhs.org/civil-war/node/12 Slavery persisted in the South even after the Emancipation Proclamation and the passage of the 13th Amendment. In the...

Why Canoes?
06/16/2021
Why Canoes?

Why Canoes?

This exhibit honors the interconnectedness between the Native Canoe Program, U of M students, faculty, staff, & members of Indigenous communities. Free.

We invite you to share your views on the Riverview Corridor Modern Streetcar project, a proposed public transit service ...
06/15/2021
Riverview Corridor | Ramsey County

We invite you to share your views on the Riverview Corridor Modern Streetcar project, a proposed public transit service that would connect downtown St. Paul with the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport and the Mall of America transit hub. The line would include a stop near historic Fort Snelling. Project planners will gather perspectives from community members to help guide their decisions at a virtual open house on June 23. Join them and make your voice heard! Follow the link for more details and to register.

The Riverview Corridor is a 12-mile planned transportation connection between neighborhoods and anchor destinations and employers in downtown Saint Paul, Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport and the Mall of America.

June 14 is National Flag Day, which commemorates the resolution adopted by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1...
06/14/2021

June 14 is National Flag Day, which commemorates the resolution adopted by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777 which called for an official United States Flag. For decades, Flag Day was celebrated primarily by local communities and school children around the country. Here we see a unit at Fort Snelling marching in review as part of the post’s Flag Day celebration in 1942. Note the wooden training rifles they are carrying.

On Aug. 3, 1949 Flag Day went from a local to an annual national celebration when President Truman signed an Act of Congress designating June 14 as National Flag Day.

Image: Flag Day ceremonies at Fort Snelling, 1942 (MNHS Collections)

June 14 is National Flag Day, which commemorates the resolution adopted by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777 which called for an official United States Flag. For decades, Flag Day was celebrated primarily by local communities and school children around the country. Here we see a unit at Fort Snelling marching in review as part of the post’s Flag Day celebration in 1942. Note the wooden training rifles they are carrying.

On Aug. 3, 1949 Flag Day went from a local to an annual national celebration when President Truman signed an Act of Congress designating June 14 as National Flag Day.

Image: Flag Day ceremonies at Fort Snelling, 1942 (MNHS Collections)

Address

200 Tower Avenue
Saint Paul, MN
55111

Light Rail Line runs near Historic Fort Snelling; Metro Transit Bus Line 7 run to the site on weekends and holidays (https://www.metrotransit.org/route/7/0/36)

General information

Memorial Day Weekend - Labor Day Weekend: Tues - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 12 - 5 pm *Open Memorial Day, Independence Day & Labor Day 10 am - 5 pm Fall Hours (Sept-Oct) Sat 10 am - 5 pm School tours available in Spring and Fall (call for details) Admission: $11 Adults $9 Seniors $9 College Students $6 Children ages 6-17 FREE for children age 5 and under and MHS members.

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Comments

Are retired military allowed on Fort Snelling yet? Tried to get on a month or so ago and they wouldn't let me!!🧐
As a retired USAF MSGT would I be able to get onto the Fort to shop at the BX or get gas? Last time I was there, a few months ago, I was refused entry and I can not find the current situation. Or was it because I had Wisconsin License Plates and a GB Packers decal on the car?🤪
This dog is missing near you. Please share so we can get him back to his family!
I am a retired USAF MSgt with almost 44 years of service. I tried to enter into Ft. Snelling on May 20th to visit the AAFES Exchange as I was down that way from WIS for a VA Appointment. I was refused entrance into the area with no explanation. The guard did NOT look at my retired military ID card just refused me entry. Was he correct in his actions and since I am going to be down there again at the end of this week was wondering if I can get in this time? Roger L Robertson MSgt, USAF (Ret)
My 3rd Great Grandfather was at Fort Snelling with the 20th as a Laborer Sub Dept in 1873. Is there anyway I can find out more about what he was doing?
Quit Wasting Time and Money talking about NAME CHANGES! This is ridiculous!
Leave the name a lone. What is wrong with you nuts? Its history the states history.
Can we bring food into the fort? I'm talking about simple things like sandwiches
This place is amazing! You learn so much, it's a great experience for adults and kids. Shooting off a cannon is not something you see everyday!
Will be sad when the funding for this amazing place is cut short, because of the politicians and the people who run the historical society can not get their act together... We so need new people in office, and need to replace the people who make decisions at the historical society. Fort Snelling needs to stay around for generation after generation to experience...😞
Historic Fort Snelling at Bdote is hiring for site guide positions. The summer program is set up in areas that concentrate on specific information. For instance, there is an area that concentrates on the site as Bdote—a sacred site of Dakota creation. Programming also focuses on Indigenous history at the site stretching back thousands of years and that the site resides on Dakota homeland. Another station concentrates on trade, including before Europeans arrived on the continent. The history of treaties between the Dakota and the US government, including the US-Dakota War of 1862 are also told at the site. A number of areas explore the histories of slavery, the Japanese language school in WW2, labor and class, immigration and other relevant subjects. We are looking for prospective employees with backgrounds in Native American, African American, and/or Japanese history and culture. Candidates with knowledge of the Dakota or Japanese languages would be especially helpful to the program. If anyone is interested in learning more about new programming at the site please contact us.