WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict

WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict is an upcoming exhibit that will be housed at the main location of the St. Joseph Museums, Inc.

National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City defaced
06/20/2019
National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City defaced

National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City defaced

Kansas City Police Chief Rick Smith said two men were responsible for the vandalism spray painted “Xs” over the faces of World War I generals and “communist symbols” just before 1 a.m. Tuesday morning.

On this day 100 years ago, the 18th Amendment was passed. Come check out its local impact at the tail end of our WWI exh...
01/16/2019

On this day 100 years ago, the 18th Amendment was passed. Come check out its local impact at the tail end of our WWI exhibit at the St Joseph Museums Inc.

Originally designed as a rationing method to preserve grain for the war effort, the 18th Amendment was ratified on this day in history, 99 years ago today. With the Armistice signed in nearly three months prior, many American soldiers remained in war torn Europe, aiding the French, British, and German citizens in rebuilding their nations' infrastructure and assuring peace. The occupation of Germany was extended for a second time following the Armistice on this day as well, assuring troops would remain for at least another month. As troops began trickling homeward, plagued by the newly realized physical and mental strains of modern warfare, they were faced with a changed America where alcohol was forbidden to be sold. Visit the St Joseph Museums Inc. WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict exhibit to learn more about how our very own Goetz Brewing Company survived and thrived during Prohibition in the post-war era.

Happy Birthday #PaperPershing
09/13/2018

Happy Birthday #PaperPershing

#PaperPershing hasn't had a chance to make it to the Missouri and the Great War traveling exhibit at the East Hills Mall...
08/28/2018

#PaperPershing hasn't had a chance to make it to the Missouri and the Great War traveling exhibit at the East Hills Mall yet. Have you? The exhibit will be moving to Independence after Labor Day so use this weekend to enjoy this amazing free exhibit while it's in town.

Come visit the Missouri and the Great War traveling exhibit at the East Hills Shopping Center. The exhibit was created by the Missouri Humanities Council and serves as a companion to our WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict exhibit.

#PaperPershing admiring the Missouri memorial in Cheppy, France. The memorial was erected and maintained by the State of...
07/24/2018

#PaperPershing admiring the Missouri memorial in Cheppy, France. The memorial was erected and maintained by the State of Missouri in memory of the numerous Missouri men who died in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Many American soldiers were buried in France and are still being returned home to this day. One such soldier was our very own Guy Rosecrans for whom the airfield was named.

07/24/2018
Missouri State Archives

Missouri State Archives

Upon entering World War I in 1917, the United States government and its civilian agencies produced roughly 3,000 different wartime posters. These artistic renderings depicted the ideals of patriotism, beauty, adventure and protection, and strongly contributed to the successful mobilization of citizens during the Great War. In Join, Save, Buy: U.S. World War I Posters on the Home Front, Amanda Langendoerfer, Associate Dean of Libraries for Special Collections and Museums at Truman State University’s Pickler Memorial Library, along with Assistant Professor of History Dr. Jason McDonald and University Art Gallery Director Dr. Heidi Cook will examine a selection of never-before-exhibited World War I posters from Truman State’s E.M. Violette Museum Collection. Their program will provide an opportunity to view samples from one of the U.S. government’s major historical marketing endeavors and to recognize the impact of the war on American citizens, both home and abroad.

St. Joe Live
07/20/2018
St. Joe Live

St. Joe Live

“As we reflect on it, we say ‘What did we learn from World War I?’ That’s been a big question. It was ‘The War to End All Wars,’ and obviously, we still go to war. So how do we process that and what do we learn?” - Sara Wilson, executive director for St. Joseph Museums.

#PaperPershing got caught up playing our copy of Battlefield 1. The game's opening sequence shows the harsh realities of...
07/16/2018

#PaperPershing got caught up playing our copy of Battlefield 1. The game's opening sequence shows the harsh realities of dealing with PTSD and the human level of the war. In a game series most notable for its online multiplayer where death has little consequence, the campaign mode places you in the shoes of individuals, telling their story of the war and adapting to life afterwards, while the opening scene gives you birth and death dates should you fail, driving home the harsh reality of the war which inspired the game.

#PaperPershing reflects on the trench warfare the 35th Infantry faced during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. After seven mo...
06/19/2018

#PaperPershing reflects on the trench warfare the 35th Infantry faced during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.

After seven months of training, the 35th Infantry Division, comprised of 27,000 troops from Missouri and Kansas, deployed to France, landing in May of 1918. They were stationed in the quiet sector of the Vosges, a range of low mountains near the German border, until they were deployed as reserve for the Battle of St. Mihiel on September 12. The battle went well and the 35th was never used.

They camped out in the wet, wooded area under German shellfire until they were moved into position to begin the Meuse-Argonne Offensive on September 26. Artillery began preparations at 2:30 a.m. and the advance began shortly after at 5:30. The 35th captured the villages of Baulny, Vauquois, and Cheppy, and were positioned between Varennes and Charpentry.

A second advance was planned for 5:30 the following morning, but without artillery preparation and support, the 35th was forced to dig in and make slow progress. The third morning was cold with a fine mist in the air. The German forces counter attacked at 6:30 that morning, but were repelled by the 35th. The next morning they faced heavy machine gun and artillery fire north of Baulny from the Montrebeau Woods, but were able to advance to the edge of the forest.

On the morning of September 30, again facing heavy machine gun and artillery fire and gas, the 35th failed to take a hill over Exermont and were forced to retreat into trenches along the Baulny Ridge. They were relieved by the First Division, having suffered a total of 7,913 casualties in five days.

The Trench Room at the St Joseph Museums Inc. offers an atmospheric experience with equipment belonging to local soldiers used in the trenches of Europe lining the walls, a large trench replica, ambient lighting and sound effects to place visitors in the mindset of those brave men who held the lines nearly one hundred years ago.

#PaperPershing marches down our Hall of Mirrors in the WWI Exhibit. The mirrors are meant to represent the waves of marc...
06/12/2018

#PaperPershing marches down our Hall of Mirrors in the WWI Exhibit. The mirrors are meant to represent the waves of marching soldiers heading to our trench room in the back of the exhibit space, placing the visitor's reflection among the troops as they march on. When returning from the trench room, the experience is reversed as you head to the There and Back Again room which displays the stories of those who returned while honoring those who did not. The reflective soldiers create a ghostly reminder of those who marched off to Europe, never to return home.

#PaperPershing stops by the Red Cross case to honor the volunteers from St. Joseph who provided much needed medical supp...
05/23/2018

#PaperPershing stops by the Red Cross case to honor the volunteers from St. Joseph who provided much needed medical supplies to the front.

#PaperPershing popped into the Homefront diorama to inspect the military drill this child is conducting. He was not impr...
05/22/2018

#PaperPershing popped into the Homefront diorama to inspect the military drill this child is conducting. He was not impressed by the soldiers' marching lines or the artillery placement.

05/21/2018
OMGFacts

We have a donut girl poster in our collections and on display. Come on by to learn more about these heroes of WWI and while you’re near, why not swing by BIG SKY Donuts just down the street from us in honor of the donut girls and doughboys

The true heroes of WWI were donuts. 🍩

Missouri State Archives
05/18/2018
Missouri State Archives

Missouri State Archives

#OnThisDay in 1917, Congress passed the Selective Service Act allowing the federal government to conscript an army for service overseas during World War I. Over 9.5 million men registered for the draft, including more than 750,000 Missourians. Find record of these individuals now using FamilySearch’s United States World War I Draft Registration Card database!

#PaperPershing is impressed with the efforts St. Joseph made on the Homefront, rationing our sugar and finding alternati...
05/18/2018

#PaperPershing is impressed with the efforts St. Joseph made on the Homefront, rationing our sugar and finding alternatives to wheat so the boys overseas could eat. Our diorama in the WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict exhibit shows a typical home scene from the period while discussing rationing around town and changes in the education system. How did the war effect home life in St. Joseph? Come the the St Joseph Museums Inc. to find out.

#PaperPershing visiting a photo of his old friend Pancho Villa at the St Joseph Museums Inc. Three years after this phot...
05/17/2018

#PaperPershing visiting a photo of his old friend Pancho Villa at the St Joseph Museums Inc. Three years after this photo was taken, Pancho Villa led a raid into US territory and attacked Columbus, New Mexico. Pershing was tasked with pursuing the invading forces, leading to a nearly year long expedition throughout Mexico. The pursuit made Pershing a national hero and with the untimely death of his superior General Frederick Funston merely a few days after the campaign came to a close, Pershing was raised to the position of head of the American Expeditionary Forces preparing for America's entrance into WWI. Two months later, the United States declared war on Germany with Pershing leading the troops across Europe.

To learn more about the complicated military and political history between the United States, Mexico, and the Great War overseas, visit the WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict exhibit. Bonus points if you can name the WWII hero standing behind Pershing's shoulder in the right corner of this image.

#PaperPershing is visiting the WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict exhibit at the St Joseph Museums ...
05/16/2018

#PaperPershing is visiting the WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict exhibit at the St Joseph Museums Inc. The helmet housed in our exhibit's introduction bears the Santa Fe Trail wagon wheel emblem, the symbol of the 35th Infantry comprised of Missouri and Kansas soldiers in August 1917.

Missouri State Archives
05/16/2018

Missouri State Archives

Want a #PaperPershing for yourself? Use the template below to print one or stop by the reference room to pick up your very own, then post pictures of him helping with your WWI related family history research or visiting landmarks around the state. (Be sure to include the tag!)

Here’s #PaperPershing helping staff member Mary S. give a talk on WWI records in the Archives’ collection at a genealogy seminar in Springfield.

100 Years Ago: France in the Final Year of World War I
05/04/2018
100 Years Ago: France in the Final Year of World War I

100 Years Ago: France in the Final Year of World War I

In 1918, the American photographer Lewis Hine traveled across France, photographing refugee families, orphaned children, wounded and shell-shocked soldiers, the nurses and volunteers who cared for them all, and the ruined buildings they fled.

Truman Library Institute
04/26/2018

Truman Library Institute

While Captain Harry Truman was serving in France in World War I, he wrote back to his fiancee Bess: “You’ve no idea what immense responsibility it is to take 194 men to the front.”

Captain Truman's experience in World War I helped transform him into the leader who would one day guide our nation through the next world war. See that captivating story on display this year only at the Harry S. Truman Library & Museum. Plan your visit to this special exhibition today: http://bit.ly/2tqlLRN

Polygon
04/25/2018
Polygon

Polygon

Aardman, the studio behind Wallace and Gromit, Chicken Run and Shaun the Sheep, is making a WWI-themed video game.

National WWI Museum and Memorial
04/06/2018

National WWI Museum and Memorial

#WarPosterWednesday today is in honor of Library Week which begins April 8! Pictured from the Collection: a 1918 Library War Service poster calling for book donations for soldiers to be sent to the Kansas City Public Library. "He craves new books, just as he did at home."

Have extra books at your house? Organizations like Operation Paperback and Books for Soldiers continue to ship reading material to our military around the world.

St Joseph Public Library
02/26/2018

St Joseph Public Library

History Speaks is coming up on March 3 at 2 p.m. at the Downtown Library.

Originally designed as a rationing method to preserve grain for the war effort, the 18th Amendment was ratified on this ...
01/16/2018

Originally designed as a rationing method to preserve grain for the war effort, the 18th Amendment was ratified on this day in history, 99 years ago today. With the Armistice signed in nearly three months prior, many American soldiers remained in war torn Europe, aiding the French, British, and German citizens in rebuilding their nations' infrastructure and assuring peace. The occupation of Germany was extended for a second time following the Armistice on this day as well, assuring troops would remain for at least another month. As troops began trickling homeward, plagued by the newly realized physical and mental strains of modern warfare, they were faced with a changed America where alcohol was forbidden to be sold. Visit the St Joseph Museums Inc. WWI Saint Joseph: Reflections on Community and Conflict exhibit to learn more about how our very own Goetz Brewing Company survived and thrived during Prohibition in the post-war era.

102 years ago today, Woodrow Wilson married his second wife, Edith. President Wilson's first wife, Ellen Axson, passed a...
12/18/2017
Edith Bolling Galt Wilson | The White House

102 years ago today, Woodrow Wilson married his second wife, Edith. President Wilson's first wife, Ellen Axson, passed away while he was in office in August of 1914. Stricken with grief and in deep mourning, President Wilson withdrew from the public eye for months while World War I was beginning in Europe. By the following year, the president had met and fallen in love with Edith Bolling Galt, herself a widow as well. As First Lady, Mrs. Wilson practiced rationing to rally support for the war and used sheep to maintain the White House lawn as opposed to workers who were needed in the war effort. The wool from these sheep was donated to the American Red Cross. As the stress of the war strained on the president's mind, his health began to fail, resulting in a stroke in 1919. Edith had accompanied the president throughout the peace negotiations in Europe and when he was incapacitated, she handled many of the presidential affairs, resulting in many to refer to her as the "First Woman President"
https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/first-ladies/edith-bolling-galt-wilson/

Edith Bolling Galt Wilson was second wife of the 28th President, Woodrow Wilson. She served as First Lady from 1915 to 1921. After the President suffered a severe stroke, she pre-screened all matters of state, functionally running the Executive branch of government for the remainder of Wilson’s se...

09/26/2017

Karl Muck was born in Germany in 1859. He and his family moved to Switzerland and he received Swedish citizenship at the age of 21. Muck studied piano, received several degrees from German universities, and began his conducting career through small German provinces before rising to the principal conductor of the Berlin Court Opera in 1892. He was favored by Kaiser Wilhelm, but instead of becoming the Kaiser’s personal conductor, he instead brought German music to America and became the music director for the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1906.
When the United States entered WWI, the tradition of performing "The Star Spangled Banner" at the beginning of orchestral performances began to show support and patriotism to the American audience. It was by no means an enforced rule, but was expected in wartime. Muck’s connections to the Kaiser and his sympathies towards the nation in which he had built his career made several patrons nervous of his allegiance. Realizing this conflict, Muck offered to step down from his position during the war, but was convinced to remain for five more years.
"The Providence Journal" began raising concerns of Muck’s allegiance in their paper prior to his visit in October of 1917. Run by editor and publisher John R. Rathom, whose motto was “raise hell and sell newspapers,” the "Journal" focused on Muck’s pro-German sympathies and use of German works in his program. A local patriotic organization and music club wrote to the Symphony requesting "The Star Spangled Banner," but Muck did not receive the letters until after his performance. When Muck failed to perform the national anthem prior to his show, the paper falsely claimed he had refused, accusing the conductor of being a treasonous spy. Though the Boston Symphony returned to Boston and New York with sold out shows and performed "The Star Spangled Banner" at each, Muck’s fate in the public eye was sealed.
In March of 1918, Muck was arrested as an enemy alien. Despite being a Swiss citizen, a loophole in the Espionage Act allowed for his arrest as he was born in Germany prior to the rise of the Empire. The police searched his papers and scores, believing them to contain secret coded messages. Twenty-nine of his fellow German musicians from the Boston Symphony were arrested as well. Muck was interned at Fort Oglethorpe which housed other German-American citizens. During his internment, Muck performed German songs for his fellow prisoners, raising their spirits through the troubling time. In August 1919, Muck and his wife were placed on a ship and sent back to Europe. He vowed never to return to America and told reporters “I am not a German, although they said I was. I considered myself an American.”
Muck returned to post-war Germany and led the Hamburg Philharmonic Orchestra from 1922 until 1933. He resigned due to his discomfort in the rise of Nazi authority. Karl Muck was an example of how WWI affected German-American citizens. From the onset of the war, you were either American or the enemy. Countless citizens lost their personal freedoms while countless others lost the traditions and heritage which made them unique in an attempt to avoid suspicion, arrest, internment, and deportation from the country they considered their home.

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