Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, Inc.

Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, Inc. The Museum of the National Center of Afro American Artists (NCAAA) is dedicated to the celebration, exhibition, collection and criticism of black visual arts heritage worldwide.

The Museum presents a wide range of historical and contemporary exhibitions in many media, including painting, sculpture, graphics, photography and decorative arts. Among the resources offered at the Museum are its African, Afro-Latin, Afro-Caribbean and African American collections; an extensive slide archive, and a rich variety of education programs for young people and adults.

Operating as usual

We are excited for the virtual launch of Kitchen Table Conversations: Celebrating the Life, Legacy and 100th Year of Mis...
09/11/2021

We are excited for the virtual launch of Kitchen Table Conversations: Celebrating the Life, Legacy and 100th Year of Miss Elma Lewis! This monthly live video podcast series launches on her birthday, September 15, 2021. Please join the celebration and record a Birthday video message in our Digital Guest Book, https://videobooth.app/happybirthdayelmalewis100

We are excited for the virtual launch of Kitchen Table Conversations: Celebrating the Life, Legacy and 100th Year of Miss Elma Lewis! This monthly live video podcast series launches on her birthday, September 15, 2021. Please join the celebration and record a Birthday video message in our Digital Guest Book, https://videobooth.app/happybirthdayelmalewis100

07/17/2021

Abbotsford, the historic mansion that houses the National Center of Afro-American Artists (NCAAA) and its museum, is getting a much-needed new roof that will return it to slate and copper, the original material when it was first occupied circa 1872. Read more... https://ncaaa.org/news/abbotsford-is-getting-a-new-roof/

07/16/2021

Since 1968, The National Center for Afro-American Artists (NCAAA) has stood as New England’s most revered institution celebrating the arts heritage of the African-American and African diasporan cultures in the visual and performing arts.

Housed since 1980 in the historic Abbotsford Estate in Boston’s Roxbury neighborhood, NCAAA has provided a continual platform for established, new, and underrepresented artists of the African diaspora, harnessing the power of art to bring people together, catalyze movements and address issues of social justice race and power.

In addition to presenting critically acclaimed exhibitions and serving as a cultural and academic repository, NCAAA houses a collection of over 3,000 objects and its music division produces and performs its distinctive Black Nativity as written by Langston Hughes. Over fifty years, Black Nativity has become a cherished Boston tradition.

Like many arts and cultural organizations nationwide, NCAAA is emerging from the pandemic contemplative about its future. The pandemic highlighted that the NCAAA financial and operating model is not serving us well and we are not getting the commitment in terms of fundraising and participation that we believe an organization with our depth of history and quality of programming merits.

And while NCAAA remains committed to its legacy programming including Black Nativity, the Board of Directors recognizes that it is time to assess how best to steward our rich history in a way that is relevant for the next generation of artists, scholars, visitors, and supporters.

To that end, NCAAA is pausing public visitation to the museum building at 300 Walnut Street. During this time, the building will undergo needed repairs, as the planning committee is actively working with supporters and partners to develop a dynamically reconceived organization. It is the Board’s intention to ensure that NCAAA exists as a community asset long into the future.

Please join us this Saturday July 10th from 11AM – 2PM for our 9th annual Putting Your Touch on Greatness Day at the Mus...
07/05/2021

Please join us this Saturday July 10th from 11AM – 2PM for our 9th annual Putting Your Touch on Greatness Day at the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, 300 Walnut Ave, Roxbury, MA

Please join us this Saturday July 10th from 11AM – 2PM for our 9th annual Putting Your Touch on Greatness Day at the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, 300 Walnut Ave, Roxbury, MA

Please join us for a Nubian Geographic Virtual Museum Open House.  No pre-registration is required. This event will be h...
06/24/2021

Please join us for a Nubian Geographic Virtual Museum Open House. No pre-registration is required. This event will be held outdoors on our museum grounds at 300 Walnut Avenue, Roxbury, MA, this Saturday, June 26th from noon to 4pm!

Please join us for a Nubian Geographic Virtual Museum Open House. No pre-registration is required. This event will be held outdoors on our museum grounds at 300 Walnut Avenue, Roxbury, MA, this Saturday, June 26th from noon to 4pm!

Happy Juneteenth! The Boston Juneteenth Commitee and the NCAAA are presenting the 11th Annual Juneteenth Emancipation Ob...
06/19/2021

Happy Juneteenth! The Boston Juneteenth Commitee and the NCAAA are presenting the 11th Annual Juneteenth Emancipation Observance, Virtual Edition, today!
PART I : 11 AM & 1PM EST
PART II : 4:00PM & 9PM EST

Airing on Boston Neighborhood Network (BNN) or register to view online.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bostons-11th-annual-juneteenth-emancipation-observance-2021-virtual-tickets-155245035079

Happy Juneteenth! The Boston Juneteenth Commitee and the NCAAA are presenting the 11th Annual Juneteenth Emancipation Observance, Virtual Edition, today!
PART I : 11 AM & 1PM EST
PART II : 4:00PM & 9PM EST

Airing on Boston Neighborhood Network (BNN) or register to view online.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bostons-11th-annual-juneteenth-emancipation-observance-2021-virtual-tickets-155245035079

Please join us for the 11th Annual Juneteenth Emancipation Observance this Saturday, June 19, 2021PART I : 11 AM & 1PM E...
06/18/2021
Boston's 11th Annual Juneteenth Emancipation Observance 2021 (VIRTUAL)

Please join us for the 11th Annual Juneteenth Emancipation Observance this Saturday, June 19, 2021
PART I : 11 AM & 1PM EST
PART II : 4:00PM & 9PM EST
[THIS IS A VIRTUAL EVENT] Be sure to register to view online, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bostons-11th-annual-juneteenth-emancipation-observance-2021-virtual-tickets-155245035079

Boston's Juneteenth Committee presents the 11th Annual Juneteenth Emancipation Observance

04/02/2021

The Light Is Coming - All of us at the National Center of Afro-American Artists thank all of you for your support and concern over the period of COVID-19 distress. Though we’re not out of the woods yet, we think we see light at the end of the tunnel, and we hope to have exciting announcements by early summer. After all, spring is upon us already and, like summer, comes full of hope and new energy.... https://ncaaa.org/news/the-light-is-coming/

12/29/2020

Thank you for supporting Black Nativity: 50 Years of Triumph and Transitions! Our Black Fine Arts Auction still has items you may bid on. Don't miss out, the auction closes on December 30, visit bidpal.net/blacknativity50

12/21/2020

Fine Arts and Cultural Auction, bidding now open through Wednesday, December 30th. Note:
• Items that have received a bid by 11:59 p.m. on 12/23 will close on 12/23 at 11:59 p.m.
• Items that have not received a bid by 11:59 p.m. will remain open until 12/30 at 11:59 p.m.

To see art works beautifully made by African and African American artists and place your bid visit https://one.bidpal.net/blacknativity50/welcome.

12/21/2020

The Black Nativity 50th Celebration was a great success. The Fine Arts and Cultural Auction, part of this celebration, continues until Dec. 23. To see art works beautifully made by African and African American artists and place your bid visit https://one.bidpal.net/blacknativity50/welcome.

HOME | Black Nativity 50
12/03/2020
HOME | Black Nativity 50

HOME | Black Nativity 50

Black Nativity, a cherished fifty-year tradition in Boston, is again offered as a Christmas gift from the City's Black community to all women and men of "good will." Traditionally produced by the National Center of Afro-American Artists as live performances with a cast of more than 75, the show neve...

12/01/2020

Black Nativity, a cherished fifty-year tradition in Boston, is again offered as a Christmas gift from the City's Black community to all people of "good will." Traditionally produced by the National Center of Afro-American Artists as live performances with a cast of more than 75, the show never failed to lift hearts and spirits at Christmas time. This year, due to COVID-19, the NCAAA has reimagined our 50th season. We invite you to join us on December 12, 2020 for a virtual gala reception and auction featuring the premier screening of Black Nativity: 50 Years of Triumph and Transition, a video remembrance in lieu of its traditional live performances. You will gain fresh insights on legendary arts visionaries Elma Lewis and John Andrew Ross and meet the personalities behind our present production. To learn more and purchase tickets to the gala reception and Black Nativity: 50 Years of Triumph and Transition, please visit https://www.blacknativity50.org. Your contribution will help us continue the legacy of changing perceptions and transforming lives through live performances.

11/27/2020

Black Nativity Celebrates 50 Years in 2020! Join us for a special virtual Gala Reception and Auction on Saturday, Dec. 12 at 6:00pm. The evening will feature the premiere screening of "Black Nativity: 50 Years of Triumph and Transition," a digital remembrance celebrating the rich history of Black Nativity in Boston. Tickets will become available in the coming days. For more info, please email [email protected].

An Appeal to Friends of the NCAAA - NCAAA
09/02/2020
An Appeal to Friends of the NCAAA - NCAAA

An Appeal to Friends of the NCAAA - NCAAA

Support the NCAAA programs that promote humane and restorative values and sustain diversity within our community of cultural institutions.

National Center of Afro-American Artists (NCAAA)
07/13/2020
National Center of Afro-American Artists (NCAAA)

National Center of Afro-American Artists (NCAAA)

“Public space has always been a battle terrain especially for those with really progressive points of view. Public space generally reflects the voice and vision of the status quo. And what does that do? You find facile explanations of the relationships between one group and another that are simply false to human experience.” - Barry Gaither, Executive Director and Curator, NCAAA.

Read Barry's other comments in the Boston Globe article here >

https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/07/10/arts/weighing-best-options-disposing-or-adapting-old-monuments/

In Memory of ALLAN ROHAN CRITE (1910-2007) http://ncaaa.org/allan-crite/
06/20/2020
Allan Crite - NCAAA

In Memory of ALLAN ROHAN CRITE (1910-2007)
http://ncaaa.org/allan-crite/

For nearly ninety years, Allan Rohan Crite was rarely seen without a pencil and pad in hand. He was known for paintings of lower Roxbury/South End

06/19/2020
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Hopefully you were able to tune into the live stream of the 10th Annual Juneteenth Emancipation Observance hosted by the Boston Juneteenth Committee and the National Center of Afro-American Artists. We will have a second viewing at 8PM tonight. In the meantime, please join the MFA's Juneteenth celebration today at 4PM.

This year, we are taking our eighth-annual Juneteenth community celebration online to honor the contributions of Black creatives, scholars, and artists to the City of Boston. Juneteenth is the oldest nationally observed commemoration of the ending of slavery in the U.S. We wish to commemorate this day with joy and resolve as we strive for justice and liberty in the continued fight for equity.

The event features:

4 pm • The City Talks: Juneteenth Every Day, a panel discussion moderated by Makeeba McCreary, Patti and Jonathan Kraft Chief of Learning and Community Engagement, and featuring artist Rob "Problak" Gibbs, Boston Globe columnist Adrian Walker, and trillfit CEO Heather White

5 pm • Story time with artist and children's book illustrator Ekua Holmes, who will read "Black Is a Rainbow Color" by Angela Joy

5:10 pm • Art making led by artist and educator Chanel Thervil and inspired by Roberto Lugo's ceramic work "Law and Order: The Reincarnation of Frederick Douglass"

5:20 pm • Spotlight Talk with artist Roberto Lugo, moderated by Michelle Millar Fisher, Ronald C. and Anita L. Wornick Curator of Contemporary Decorative Arts

5:40 pm • Recitations of speeches, poems, and song lyrics by participants in the MFA's teen programs

6 pm • Performance by Débo Ray and DJ Where's Nasty, curated by BAMS Fest

Sponsored by Chase. The City Talks is presented with support from the Dori H. Rahbar and Cameron R. Rahbar Fund.

Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, Inc.'s cover photo
06/18/2020

Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, Inc.'s cover photo

A note from the director: On the will to be freeWhen Meta Warrick Vaux Fuller (1877-1968) completed Spirit of Emancipati...
06/18/2020

A note from the director: On the will to be free

When Meta Warrick Vaux Fuller (1877-1968) completed Spirit of Emancipation in 1913 in observance of the fifty anniversary of the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation, she offered a bold but cautious vision for black Americans. She visualized women and men who would stride forth in the world exercising their own power and guided by their own agendas. They would not expect others to give them anything, especially not for President Abraham Lincoln to give them freedom. Rather, by their actions and the power of their own volition, they would shape their tomorrows. Even as Fuller expressed these ideas in bronze, she knew there would be those who would strive to stifle black progress and to retard black advancement on every front. She symbolized those racist forces as vestigial limbs that stretched over the emerging freedwoman and freedman threating to pull them back into the darkness. Despite the threat, her freedwoman and freedman escape the violent grip of reactionary forces and strive toward fully realizing themselves—both singly and as a couple. Conceptually, her figures become the parents of successive generations of African Americans who refuse to be quieted and robbed of their potential. The youth in the streets protesting today are their great grand children that have been endowed with the will to resist and the boldness to force change now. These youth demand respect for their humanity and are unafraid of confrontation, because the terms of their survival have demanded surviving violence—especially state violence. I cannot look at Trayvon Martin or Sandra Bland without seeing generations of strong but ordinary black families that have sustained African American communities in cities and rural hamlets across the United States. Their flame of resistance can no longer be quelled by violence and suppression, because at last their fellow Americans have realized that the denial of freedom and agency to black Americans is ultimately the denial of freedom and agency to all Americans. The Spirit of Emancipation must speak to all of us-black, Latino, Asian, white, LGBTQ—if our nation is to become whole and just.

Edmund Barry Gaither
Executive Director
Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists

The Boston Juneteenth Committee and the National Center of Afro-American Artists present the 10th Annual Juneteenth Eman...
06/14/2020

The Boston Juneteenth Committee and the National Center of Afro-American Artists present the 10th Annual Juneteenth Emancipation Observance featuring an address by
Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley on June 19, 2020 as a virtual gathering. Watch the Juneteenth Observance on Friday, June 19, at 1:00 and 8:00pm on BBN Television, (COMCAST 23), RCN 83, and VERIZON 1960. You may also sign up for tickets via Eventbrite to receive information on links to the online virtual viewing locations of the Boston Juneteenth 2020 Emancipation Observance, BOSTONJUNETEENTH2020.EVENTBRITE.COM

Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, Inc.'s cover photo
06/12/2020

Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, Inc.'s cover photo

A note from the director: Deferred No MoreDisregard for black lives cannot stand blocking the way to a new day. That is ...
06/12/2020

A note from the director: Deferred No More

Disregard for black lives cannot stand blocking the way to a new day. That is the lesson each day teaches us as we watch daily protests in the streets. We are harvesting the accumulated anger and disappointment that has festered in black America since its inception. Black men and women fought in the American revolution on both sides seduced by promises of freedom. They fought in the War of 1812 and for the Union in the Civil War. The latter seemed certain to fulfill guarantees of Emancipation and full civic and social participation, especially with the commencement of Reconstruction. Yet what followed was dehumanization, racial discrimination, Jim Crow, social and economic oppression. Black people sought freedom and opportunity everywhere, even by massive migrations, but alas, it could not be reliably found anywhere. Where freedom and opportunity should have been, there was only rejection and violence. Two World wars and a Civil Rights Movement later, it remained clear that black lives did not matter. But now a new generation has come, and it will not accept hopeless, nor will it submit to violence. Full freedom and dignity are now the agenda. Less cannot buy quiet and peace.

In this moment, new hope for change is manifested as the streets fill with young black people and their allies—Asian, Latino, Native American, LGBTQ and white. The alliance now holds more promise than at any time since our nation was born. I hope we have come to the place for which Langston Hughes appealed when he wrote “let America be America to me.” No longer can the dream be deferred.

Edmund Barry Gaither
Executive Director
National Center of Afro-American Artists

Join us Thursday December 12th
12/10/2019

Join us Thursday December 12th

09/11/2019
09/11/2019

Address

300 Walnut Ave
Roxbury, MA
02119

From MBTA Ruggles Station on the Orange Line, or Dudley Station, take bus #22 (Ashmont Station/Ruggles Station) to Walnut Avenue at Seaver Street. Walk along Walnut Avenue—away from Franklin Park—for three blocks. The Museum entrance gate will be in the third block just beyond the David A. Ellis school. The #22 bus runs approximately every 15 minutes. Alternately, take the #42 bus from Ruggles Station on the Orange Line, or Dudley Station and get off on Washington Street at the Bragdon Street stop. Cross Washington Street and bear left to Cobden Street. Walk to the top of Cobden Street and the Museum entrance is across the street . Bus #42 runs every 20 minutes.

General information

Located at 300 Walnut Avenue in Roxbury, The Museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 1pm until 5pm. Adult admission to the Museum is $5.00. Seniors and children admission is $4.00. Group tours are available.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 1pm - 5pm
Wednesday 1pm - 5pm
Thursday 1pm - 5pm
Friday 1pm - 5pm
Saturday 1pm - 5pm
Sunday 1pm - 5pm

Telephone

(617) 442-8014

Website

Products

The museum has a small sales shop with mainly cards and catalogues.

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