George Eastman Museum

George Eastman Museum World's foremost museum of photography and cinema located on the historic estate of George Eastman, the pioneer of popular photography.
(975)

Operating as usual

03/19/2021
Too Much Johnson | George Eastman Museum

Grab your popcorn! Orson Welles's once thought lost and recently restored cinematic gem, TOO MUCH JOHNSON (1938), is online and ready for movie night.

A lively, vibrant, funny, and exciting homage to silent film comedy, TOO MUCH JOHNSON stands on its own as a cinematic gem. Featuring a piano accompaniment composed and performed by Philip C. Carli.

00:00 Introduction by Anthony L'Abbate, Preservation Manager, Moving Image Department and Caroline Yeager, Associate Curator, Moving Image Department 06:44 Too Much Johnson

“He boasted of being a good cook…I can vouch for his being a good cook. I never ate better beefsteak.” Victoria Powers s...
03/18/2021
The Eastman Diet- The Daily Eating Habits of George Eastman

“He boasted of being a good cook…I can vouch for his being a good cook. I never ate better beefsteak.” Victoria Powers said this about Eastman's cooking. Learn more about what he liked to eat and cook on our blog from digital engagement intern Anna Kneeland.

“On several occasions, Mr. Eastman gave us an exhibition of his mastery of the cooking arts… I can see him in his shirt sleeves, a white…

On this day in 2020, the museum closed for COVID-19 and launched a week of badly photoshopped cats. In honor of that, he...
03/16/2021

On this day in 2020, the museum closed for COVID-19 and launched a week of badly photoshopped cats. In honor of that, here are a few of our favorite Eastman Kitties!

Join us Thursday, March 18, 6 p.m. for Citlali Fabián, a Yalalteca, Mexican visual artist and storyteller who uses photo...
03/15/2021
ONLINE—Future / Present: Citlali Fabián | George Eastman Museum

Join us Thursday, March 18, 6 p.m. for Citlali Fabián, a Yalalteca, Mexican visual artist and storyteller who uses photography to explore identity and its connections with territory, migration, and community bonds.

Who We Are: Decolonizing Visual Narratives | Citlali Fabián is a Yalalteca, Mexican visual artist and storyteller who uses photography to explore identity and its connections with territory, migration, and community bonds.

Address

900 East Ave
Rochester, NY
14607

RTS Rt 17 : East Ave RTS Rt 18 : University Ave

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(585) 271-3361

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Museum History

Entrepreneur George Eastman (1854–1932), the pioneer of popular photography, completed his Colonial Revival mansion on East Avenue in Rochester in 1905 and resided there until his death. He bequeathed most of his assets to the University of Rochester, expressing a desire that his mansion serve as the residence for the university president. The large house, measuring 35,000 square feet, proved far too large for this purpose, especially without a large service staff.

In 1947, the Board of Regents of the State of New York chartered George Eastman House Inc. as an independent nonprofit educational institution—specifically, a museum of photography and allied pursuits created as a memorial to George Eastman. The next year, the University of Rochester donated Eastman’s mansion and surrounding property to the museum. The institution altered its name several times over the ensuing decades, but its mission has remained steadfast: to collect, preserve, study, and exhibit photographic and cinematic objects and related technology from the inception of each medium to the present.

At the museum’s opening in 1949, it was one of only two American museums with a photography department and one of only two American museums with a film department (the Museum of Modern Art also had both). In 1951, the museum opened the beautiful Dryden Theatre, with seating for more than five hundred people, to exhibit films.


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Wondering what the capacity of the museum is?
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I would like to know why the picnic tables which were located at the northeast corner of the property have been moved inside a fenced area. They had been located in an area that was accessible to everyone. Many of us, who live in this area, reside in apartments and condominiums which means that we don’t have our own outdoor space. Personally, I met friends there several times. It was wonderful to enjoy a meal in the beautiful gardens there. We never caused a disturbance, and we made sure to not leave any garbage behind. We all agreed that it was gracious, kind, and neighborly for the GEM to share that space while providing us a place to socialize and maintain safe social distancing. Frankly, moving the tables to within a fenced area seems mean spirited. Mr. Eastman was so generous to the Rochester community! I feel certain that he would want to do whatever he could to help us now. Please consider moving some of the picnic tables back to an area where they can be enjoyed by all!
Hello, I had the pleasure of visiting the estate and museum several years ago. Recently, I posted this estate on a page called Mansions of the Gilded Age. When I did so, I referred to the ghastly act by the University of Rochester President Valentine on removing the “excess” from the mansion, beautiful carved mouldings, wanescotings, and the exquisite painted glass. All of which, to my recollection of the docent’s guided tour, cost the preservation society a considerable sum to reproduce. I’ve tried to research more on the destruction of these precious “excesses,” but to no avail. Am I correct in my recollection, and if so, what were Valentine’s reasons for doing so? Purely religious, derived from his Quaker denomination??
Awesome garden tour via Zoom, thanks you Laura Abbott
Para quem gosta de fotografia antiga, de arquivo de imagem e museu de equipamento fotografico, o antigo Museu Kodak, agora George Eastman Museum, vale a pena a visita. A entrada e' gratuita e f**a ali mesmo ao virar dum 'click'
Hope you find this film interesting showing the Eastman Dental Dispensary in 1954-55. The film is about 10 mins and the Dispensary is shown after about 4 minutes.😀