Military History Society of Rochester

Military History Society of Rochester A not-for-profit historical society chartered by the Board of Regents of the State of New York, under Federal 501(c)3 guidelines. Come see where military heritage lives!
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Our goal is to promote a knowledge of the rich military-history belonging to the city of Rochester and the surrounding areas. Our collection and library includes artifacts and material from all eras of the military history of the United States and is open to the general public free of charge. On display in our main gallery is a large collection of Civil War items focusing on artillery. You can learn about the most common field artillery pieces, the projectiles fired and the batteries in which they fought. Immerse yourself further into the lives of the fighting Rochestarian by viewing their day-to-day equipment, uniforms and weaponry. Also, you can stay and relax while reading something from our collection of over 2,000 books. For the gun enthusiast, we have a large display of muskets, rifles and carbines which leads you through the transition of the major U. S. firearms from the Revolutionary War to World War Two. In our back gallery, see items from World War One, World War Two, Vietnam and more modern times including uniforms and a D-Day diorama. There is also an extensive collection of Navy and Air Force combat aircraft models from World War One to the present day.

Operating as usual

Margaretha Geertruida MacLeod (7 August 1876 – 15 October 1917), better known by the stage name Mata Hari, was a Dutch e...
02/13/2021

Margaretha Geertruida MacLeod (7 August 1876 – 15 October 1917), better known by the stage name Mata Hari, was a Dutch exotic dancer and courtesan who was convicted of being a spy for Germany during World War I. Despite her having admitted under interrogation to taking money to work as a German spy, many people still believe she was innocent because the French Army needed a scapegoat. She was executed by a firing squad of 12 French soldiers on 15 October 1917 in France. According to an eyewitness account by British reporter Henry Wales, she was not bound and refused a blindfold. She defiantly blew a kiss to the firing squad. After the volley of shots rang out, "Slowly, inertly, she settled to her knees, her head up always, and without the slightest change of expression on her face. For the fraction of a second it seemed she tottered there, on her knees, gazing directly at those who had taken her life. Then she fell backward, bending at the waist, with her legs doubled up beneath her." A non-commissioned officer then walked up to her body, pulled out his revolver, and shot her in the head to make sure she was dead.
MILITARY HISTORY SOCIETY OF ROCHESTER
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John Aaron Rawlins was a general officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War and a cabinet officer in the Gr...
02/13/2021

John Aaron Rawlins was a general officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War and a cabinet officer in the Grant administration. A longtime confidant of Ulysses S. Grant, Rawlins served on Grant's staff throughout the war, rising to the rank of brevet major general, and was Grant's chief defender against allegations of insobriety. He was appointed Secretary of War when Grant was elected President of the United States.
Isaac Hull was a Commodore in the United States Navy. He commanded several famous U.S. naval warships including USS Constitution and saw service in the undeclared naval Quasi War with the revolutionary French Republic 1796–1800; the Barbary Wars, with the Barbary states in North Africa; and the War of 1812, for the second time with Great Britain. In the latter part of his career he was Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard in the national capital of Washington, D.C., and later the Commodore of the Mediterranean Squadron. For the infant U.S. Navy, the battle of USS Constitution vs HMS Guerriere on August 19, 1812, at the beginning of the war, was the most important single ship action of the War of 1812 and one that made Isaac Hull a national hero.
Alvin Cullum York, also known as Sergeant York, was one of the most decorated United States Army soldiers of World War I. He received the Medal of Honor for leading an attack on a German machine gun nest, taking at least one machine gun, killing at least 25 enemy soldiers and capturing 132. York's Medal of Honor action occurred during the United States-led portion of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in France, which was intended to breach the Hindenburg line and force the Germans to surrender. He earned decorations from several allied countries during WWI, including France, Italy and Montenegro.
Ernest Jennings Ford, known professionally as Tennessee Ernie Ford, was an American singer and television host who enjoyed success in the country and Western, pop, and gospel musical genres. During World War 2 he was a B-29 bomber navigator. Noted for his rich bass-baritone voice and down-home humor, he is remembered for his hit recordings of "The Shotgun Boogie" and "Sixteen Tons"
Harold Gregory Moore Jr. was a United States Army lieutenant general and author. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the U.S. military's second-highest decoration for valor, and was the first of his West Point class to be promoted to brigadier general, major general, and lieutenant general. Moore is remembered as the lieutenant colonel in command of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, at the Battle of Ia Drang in 1965, during the Vietnam War. The battle was detailed in the 1992 bestseller We Were Soldiers Once… and Young, co-authored by Moore and made into the film We Were Soldiers in 2002, which starred Mel Gibson as Moore; Moore was the "honorary colonel" of the regiment. Moore was awarded the Order of Saint Maurice by the National Infantry Association as well as the Distinguished Graduate Award by the West Point Association of Graduates.
Charles Elwood Yeager (February 13, 1923 – December 7, 2020) was a United States Air Force officer, flying ace, and record-setting test pilot who in 1947 became the first pilot in history confirmed to have exceeded the speed of sound in level flight. Yeager's career began in World War II as a private in the United States Army, assigned to the Army Air Forces in 1941.[a] After serving as an aircraft mechanic, in September 1942, he entered enlisted pilot training and upon graduation was promoted to the rank of flight officer (the World War II Army Air Force version of the Army's warrant officer), later achieving most of his aerial victories as a P-51 Mustang fighter pilot on the Western Front, where he was credited with shooting down 11.5 enemy aircraft (the half credit is from a second pilot assisting him in a single shootdown). On October 12, 1944, he attained "ace in a day" status, shooting down five enemy aircraft in one mission.
MILITARY HISTORY SOCIETY OT ROCHESTER
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02/12/2021

MILITARY HISTORY SOCIETY OF ROCHESTER

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Robert Ransom Jr. (February 12, 1828 – January 14, 1892) was a major general in the Confederate States Army during the A...
02/12/2021

Robert Ransom Jr. (February 12, 1828 – January 14, 1892) was a major general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. His brother Matt W. Ransom was also a Confederate general officer and U.S. Senator.
Charles Carroll Walcutt (February 12, 1838 – May 2, 1898) was an American surveyor, soldier, and politician, and a maternal cousin to Davy Crockett. He served as a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War, in which he was wounded twice. After the war, Walcutt was warden of the Ohio State Penitentiary and also was active in civic affairs in Ohio, and his death was attributed to his wounds from the Civil War.
Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was a senior officer of the United States Army during and after World War II, holding the rank of General of the Army. Bradley was the first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and oversaw the U.S. military's policy-making in the Korean War.
Vasily Ivanovich Chuikov (Russian: Васи́лий Ива́нович Чуйко́в; 12 February 1900 – 18 March 1982) was a Soviet military commander and Marshal of the Soviet Union. He is best known for commanding the 62nd Army which saw heavy combat during the Battle of Stalingrad in the Second World War.
Andrew Jackson Goodpaster (February 12, 1915 – May 16, 2005) was an American Army General. He served as NATO's Supreme Allied Commander, Europe (SACEUR) from July 1, 1969, and Commander in Chief of the United States European Command (CINCEUR) from May 5, 1969, until his retirement December 17, 1974.
Ira Hamilton Hayes (January 12, 1923 – January 24, 1955) was a Pima Native American and a United States Marine during World War II. Hayes was an enrolled member of the Gila River Pima Indian Reservation located in Pinal and Maricopa counties in Arizona. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps Reserve on August 26, 1942, and, after recruit training, volunteered to become a Paramarine. He fought in the Bougainville and Iwo Jima campaigns in the Pacific War. Hayes was generally known as one of the six flag raisers immortalized in the iconic photograph Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima by photographer Joe Rosenthal.
MILITARY HISTORY SOCIETY OF ROCHESTER
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Robert Fulton was an American engineer and inventor who is widely credited with developing a commercially successful ste...
02/11/2021

Robert Fulton was an American engineer and inventor who is widely credited with developing a commercially successful steamboat; the first was called North River Steamboat (later Clermont). In 1807 that steamboat traveled on the Hudson River with passengers, from New York City to Albany and back again, a round trip of 300 miles (480 km), in 62 hours.

MILITARY HISTORY SOCIETY OF ROCHESTER
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Levin August Gottlieb Theophil Graf von Bennigsen (Russian: Ле́вин А́вгуст Го́тлиб Теофи́ль фон Бе́ннигсен, romanized: L...
02/11/2021

Levin August Gottlieb Theophil Graf von Bennigsen (Russian: Ле́вин А́вгуст Го́тлиб Теофи́ль фон Бе́ннигсен, romanized: Lévin Ávgust Gótlib Teofíl' fon Bénnigsen, also Лео́нтий Лео́нтьевич Бе́ннигсен (Leóntii Leónt'yevich); 10 February 1745 – 3 December 1826) was a German general in the service of the Russian Empire.
Rear Admiral Benjamin Franklin Sands (February 11, 1811 – June 30, 1883) was an officer in the United States Navy during the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War. He was appointed a midshipman on April 1, 1828, and was promoted to passed midshipman in 1834, to Lieutenant in 1840, and to Commander in 1855. He demonstrated a special aptitude for naval surveying and hydrography, and among his inventions was a device for deep sea sounding.
William Anderson Pile (February 11, 1829 – July 7, 1889) was a nineteenth-century politician and minister from Missouri, as well as a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was Governor of New Mexico Territory from 1869 to 1871. William was one half Native American (from his mother), most likely Choctaw. His father's name was Jacob Pile and his mother's name was Comfort Williams.
Samuel Dana Greene, Sr. (February 11, 1839 – December 11, 1884) was an officer in the United States Navy during the American Civil War, mostly noted for his service aboard the USS Monitor during the Battle of Hampton Roads.
Albert Henry Woolson (February 11, 1850 – August 2, 1956) was the last known surviving member of the Union Army who served in the American Civil War; he was also the last surviving Civil War veteran on either side whose status is undisputed. At least three men who followed him in death claimed to be Confederate veterans, but one has been debunked and the other two are unverified. The last surviving Union soldier to see combat was James Hard (1843–1953).
Daniel "Chappie" James Jr. (February 11, 1920 – February 25, 1978) was an fighter pilot in the United States Air Force who, in 1975, became the first African American to reach the rank of four-star general in the United States Armed Forces. James attended the famous Tuskegee Institute and instructed African American pilots during World War II.
MILITARY HISTORY SOCIETY OF ROCHESTER
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1962 – Francis Gary Powers, an American who was shot down over the Soviet Union while flying a CIA spy plane in 1960, is...
02/10/2021

1962 – Francis Gary Powers, an American who was shot down over the Soviet Union while flying a CIA spy plane in 1960, is released by the Soviets in exchange for the U.S. release of a Russian spy. The exchange concluded one of the most dramatic episodes of the Cold War. Powers had been a pilot of one of the high altitude U-2 spy planes developed by the United States in the late-1950s. Supposedly invulnerable to any Soviet antiaircraft defense, the U-2s flew numerous missions over Russia, photographing military installations. On May 1, 1960, Powers’ U-2 was shot down by a Soviet missile. Although Powers was supposed to engage the plane’s self-destruct system (and commit suicide with poison furnished by the CIA), he and much of the plane were captured. The United States at first denied involvement with the flight, but had to admit that Powers was working for the U.S. government when the Soviets presented incontrovertible evidence.
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HARDING, Abner Clark, a Representative from Illinois; born in East Hampton, Middlesex County, Conn., February 10, 1807; ...
02/10/2021

HARDING, Abner Clark, a Representative from Illinois; born in East Hampton, Middlesex County, Conn., February 10, 1807; attended Hamilton Academy, Clinton, N.Y.; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Oneida County, N.Y., about 1827; moved to Monmouth, Warren County, Ill., in 1838 and continued the practice of law; member of the State constitutional convention in 1848; member of the State house of representatives 1848-1850; during the Civil War enlisted as a private in the Union Army in the Eighty-third Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, later was commissioned colonel, and in 1863 was promoted to brigadier general.
William Read Scurry was born in Gallatin, Tennessee, and moved to Texas at the age of sixteen. While in Texas he studied law, and served as a congressman, as well as a member of the House of Representatives. Scurry participated in the Secession Conference of Texas. Scurry was a veteran of the Mexican-American War, and at the outbreak of the American Civil War, he entered the Confederate Army as a lieutenant colonel with the Fourth Texas Cavalry.
Charles William de la Poer Beresford, 1st Baron Beresford’s career was marked by a longstanding dispute with Admiral of the Fleet Sir John Fisher, over reforms championed by Fisher introducing new technology and sweeping away traditional practices. Fisher, slightly senior to Beresford and more successful, became a barrier to Beresford's rise to the highest office in the navy. Beresford rose to occupy the most senior sea commands, the Mediterranean and Channel fleets, but failed in his ambition to become First Sea Lord.
Fanny Efimovna Kaplan (Russian: Фа́нни Ефи́мовна Капла́н; real name Feiga Haimovna Roytblat, Фейга Хаимовна Ройтблат; February 10, 1890 – September 3, 1918) was a Russian-Jewish woman, Socialist-Revolutionary, and early Soviet dissident who was convicted of attempting to assassinate Vladimir Lenin and executed by the Cheka in 1918.
Harold Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander, British general. He fought with distinction in World War I and led a brigade on the North-West Frontier Province, India. In World War II Alexander commanded the British 1st Corps at Dunkirk, where he helped direct the evacuation of 300,000 troops; he was the last man to leave the beaches.
Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC, FRS (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986) was a British Conservative politician who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. Caricatured as "Supermac", he was known for his pragmatism, wit and unflappability. Macmillan was badly injured as an infantry officer during the First World War. He suffered pain and partial immobility for the rest of his life.
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02/09/2021

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William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military officer and politician who served as ...
02/09/2021

William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military officer and politician who served as the ninth president of the United States in 1841. He died of either typhoid, pneumonia, or paratyphoid fever 31 days into his term, becoming the first president to die in office and the shortest-serving U.S. president in history.
John Alexander Logan (February 9, 1826 – December 26, 1886) was an American soldier and politician. He served in the Mexican–American War and was a general in the Union Army in the American Civil War. He served the state of Illinois as a State Senator, a Congressman, and a U.S. Senator and was an unsuccessful candidate for Vice President of the United States with James G. Blaine in the election of 1884. As the 3rd Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, he is regarded as the most important figure in the movement to recognize Memorial Day (originally known as Decoration Day) as an official holiday.
Waldo Brian Donlevy (February 9, 1901 – April 6, 1972), For over four decades he was popular character performer in feature films and television. At age 14, he lied about his age to join the US Army and served as a pilot with the Lafayette Escadrille, French Air Force, comprised of American and Canadian pilots, during World War I. He usually appeared in supporting roles. Among his best-known films are Beau Geste (1939), The Great McGinty (1940) and Wake Island (1942), in which he played the lead.
Dean Rusk (1909-1994) was the United States Secretary of State between 1961 and 1969. Rusk was born in rural Georgia, attended college in North Carolina and studied at Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. During World War II he served in the Army Reserve as an intelligence officer, working primarily in Asia and ending the war as a colonel. U.S. secretary of state during the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson administrations who became a target of antiwar hostility as he consistently defended the United States’ participation in the Vietnam War.
William O. Darby (8 February 1911 – 30 April 1945) was a career United States Army officer who fought in World War II, where he was killed in action in Italy. He was posthumously promoted to brigadier general. Darby led the famous Darby's Rangers, which evolved into the United States Army Rangers.
G.I. Joe is a line of action figures owned and produced by the toy company Hasbro. The initial product offering represented four of the branches of the U.S. armed forces with the Action Soldier (U.S. Army), Action Sailor (U.S. Navy), Action Pilot (U.S. Air Force), Action Marine (U.S. Marine Corps) and later on, the Action Nurse. The name is derived from the usage of "G.I. Joe" for the generic U.S. soldier, itself derived from the more general term "G.I.". The development of G.I. Joe led to the coining of the term "action figure.”
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250 N Goodman St, Fl 2nd
Rochester, NY
14607

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Thursday 12:00 - 16:00
Friday 12:00 - 16:00
Saturday 12:00 - 16:00

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General Trexler's Trout's... Allentown PA
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Please help us spread the word: The Accidental Hero is returning to Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place next weekend (June 1-4) for its 13th engagement in Rochester, following recent performances in the Czech Republic. It is the extraordinary story of the actor's grandfather - a WWII officer who hit Omaha Beach, was a hero in the Battle of the Bulge, and liberated the same Czech towns where his grandparents lived. Tickets are $25, but WWII veterans are admitted free and other veterans receive 1/2 price tickets. It's a remarkable tribute, and we appreciate your help in getting the word out. Tickets may be reserved by calling (585) 325-4370, and more information can be found at