Northwest Carriage Museum

Northwest Carriage Museum Featuring magnificently restored horse-drawn carriages, the museum will transport you back in time!! Adults and kids love the interactive back room!
(122)

Come get carried away at the Northwest Carriage Museum! Featuring 43 magnificently restored horse-drawn carriages, the museum will transport you back in time!! Adults and kids love the interactive back room. Drive the talking horse, climb on the three spring democrat and dress in period clothes! Stroll among the Luxury Carriages, some used in Movie Classic's "Gone with the Wind & Gentleman Jim" to name a couple! Peek in side the 1888 Stagecoach and imagine life in the late 1800's! Check out our unique gift shop too! We have something for everyone!

Taking a peek at an ad from the past, ahhh the good ol' days!
05/19/2020

Taking a peek at an ad from the past, ahhh the good ol' days!

Ever wonder about parts? Thanks to Hansen Wheel & Wagon shop for sharing!
05/18/2020

Ever wonder about parts? Thanks to Hansen Wheel & Wagon shop for sharing!

Terminology on horse-drawn vehicles can be pretty confusing, especially when you introduce a buggy top with lots of small components!
This drawing is very helpful, especially if you're missing some of these parts.

This drawing is an excerpt originally from Carriage Monthly publication, which was reprinted in the book "Conservation and restoration of Horse-Drawn Vehicles", available for sale online at: http://www.hansenwheel.com/store/books-plans-gear/books/conservation-and-restoration-of-horse-drawn-vehicles.html
It is especially helpful for anyone interested in learning more about conserving their vehicle to maintain its integrity and value

From our friends at the Poulson Museum!
05/17/2020
Polson Museum

From our friends at the Poulson Museum!

If you're all tapped out watching your favorite re-runs during the coronavirus stay home order, allow us to suggest this link to TV Washington's 11-part upload of the Schafer Bros. Logging Co.'s 1926 "A Story of West Coast Lumber". Bar none, this is the best logging and saw milling film of this era and we're lucky it was all filmed in Grays Harbor County!

https://www.tvw.org/blog/2020/03/binge-worthy-tvw-a-story-of-west-coast-lumber/

We love and miss our members and guests! Received a few photos in the mail that brought smiles to our faces! Thank you R...
05/17/2020

We love and miss our members and guests! Received a few photos in the mail that brought smiles to our faces! Thank you Ruthie! Be well, stay safe and see you all after this Covid 19 closure comes to an end!

Something fun to participate in for all you carriage enthusiasts! 😃
05/16/2020

Something fun to participate in for all you carriage enthusiasts! 😃

We are excited to start Quiz Nights in June! To get ready we will be doing some smaller quizzes on Wednesdays in May. We hope you'll join us for this free activity!

Anyone else starting to get cabin fever? 😆 Hopefully we can open up our doors again soon and welcome you back with open ...
05/15/2020

Anyone else starting to get cabin fever? 😆 Hopefully we can open up our doors again soon and welcome you back with open arms! 🤗

Gift certificates are now available for purchase from our website! Follow the link below to give someone the gift of car...
05/14/2020
Gift Certificates – Northwest Carriage Museum

Gift certificates are now available for purchase from our website! Follow the link below to give someone the gift of carriage history- our doors won't be closed forever and they can also be used for gift shop items!

https://nwcarriagemuseum.org/product/gift-certificate/

Let them choose their own adventure with a gift certificate! Give the gift of an engaging experience, exploring history, science and more through the hands-on and beautiful exhibits here at the Northwest Carriage Museum. With older generations being hard to buy for, and younger folks valuing minimal...

The Museum is fortunate to have talented members! Just love this card!
05/12/2020

The Museum is fortunate to have talented members! Just love this card!

Carriage Museum of America
05/11/2020

Carriage Museum of America

As we have been featuring some rare carriages here on our page lately including some pony vehicles and skeleton breaks, this undated photo from the CMA archives is of a skeleton break ordered from Brewster & Co. in 1892 by Frederick William Vanderbilt and bears Serial No. 19613. Also on this Specification sheet note that it is from Drawing No. 100.

As so many records and histories of carriages have disappeared, it is always great to be able to put together a vehicle's history. As this skeleton break bears a Brewster serial number, the first place to look for further information is to the Carriage Association of America, Inc. Members of the CAA around the world not only receive the award-winning The Carriage Journal five times yearly but also CAA members around the world members have full access to the digitized Brewster & Company specification sheets through the CAA website. Shown here is a portion of the specification sheet for this Skeleton Break No. 19613.

Also on this Specification sheet note that it is from Drawing No. 100. The original drawings from Brewster & Co. are housed at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and a large portion of them have undergone digitization through support provided by the Carriage Association of America, Inc., CMA, and other dedicated donors. All those interested in the history of carriages must thank Merri Ferrell for her tireless work on this Brewster drawings project. Through her years of tireless work traveling in her limited free time and on her own dime into the city to catalog the thousands of drawings we can now go directly to the Met's website and pull right up Drawing No. 100 for this Skeleton Break, attached here.

This break undoubtedly once resided at the famous Vanderbilt residence (now National Historic Site) at Hyde Park, New York. F. W. Vanderbilt also built Rough Point in Newport, R.I., most recently owned by the late Doris Duke. In 1895, Frederick and Louise Vanderbilt purchased a 612-acre estate in Hyde Park, New York. They hired renowned New York City architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White to design the couple’s mansion, but when they decided to replace cow barns on the southwestern portion of the property with a stylish coach house, they hired architect Robert H. Robertson. Robertson had previously designed the house and barns for Vanderbilt’s sister and her husband in Shelburne, Vermont.

The coach house’s English-inspired Queen Anne-style building was a distinct contrast to the couple’s mansion, which was designed in a beaux-arts style. That likely resulted in the decision to locate the coach house approximately 2,000 feet from the mansion to prevent the two styles from clashing.

As with the mansion’s construction, Norcross Brothers Contractors was chosen to build the coach house. It featured a multitude of gabled, high-pitched roofs, cladding in brick, stucco, and half-timbering, along with a huge cupola and red tile roof.

Featuring two stories and an attic, the coach house’s first-floor central court was used to wash carriages, while adjacent space was occupied by 21 horse stalls, a large carriage house and auxiliary rooms to store blankets, feed and an office. Its second level included living quarters for the stable staff.

The central court featured a cathedral ceiling and was accessed by the structure’s main entrance, a high double-wide doorway on its west side. The structure was described in one newspaper account as, “The showplace of the estate, second only to the mansion.”

The coach house was completed in December 1897 and the following May Vanderbilt transported his stable of horses and carriages from New York City to Hyde Park on special railroad cars. He would transfer them to and from the city throughout his years in Hyde Park.

John Donnelly was the Vanderbilt’s coachman and he supervised two men living there to assist him. When Vanderbilt added automobiles to the operation, two chauffeurs were hired, bringing the staff to five.

Louise Vanderbilt died in 1926 and following Frederick’s death in 1938, the estate was left to a niece, Daisy Van Alen. With no intention to live there and failing to sell the estate, in 1940 she donated it to the National Park Service to serve as a park and museum, at the suggestion of U.S. President and neighbor Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The coach house saw immediate use as a Civil Conservation Corps (CCC) camp through 1942 when it was converted into barracks to house members of the 240th Army Military Police, assigned to guard the president when he was in Hyde Park. Officers in the unit occupied the third floor of the mansion.

When the military moved out in November 1945, the building went through another overhaul — this time to serve as the administrative offices of the Roosevelt-Vanderbilt Historic Sites. That staff utilized the structure through 1957 and when they relocated to another building on the property the coach house was designated a maintenance facility and remains so today.

The National Parks Service photographed the coach house around 1943, and although the horses had gone, some carriages and limousines remained, and the once spectacular structure was gradually falling into disrepair. These photos of the coach house courtesy in the Library of Congress.

Happy Mother's Day!
05/10/2020

Happy Mother's Day!

LAST CHANCE before Mother's Day to pick up items from our gift shop! How about some yard art to decorate the garden with...
05/09/2020

LAST CHANCE before Mother's Day to pick up items from our gift shop! How about some yard art to decorate the garden with? Give us a call at 360-942-4150 or shoot us a direct message, we are happy to accommodate!

Beautiful glass photo frames, frame box and night light available in the gift shop.
05/08/2020

Beautiful glass photo frames, frame box and night light available in the gift shop.

Our staff is getting restless...We miss our visitors! Be well, stay safe and we'll see you in the future!
05/07/2020

Our staff is getting restless...
We miss our visitors! Be well, stay safe and we'll see you in the future!

Mail call! If you lived out on a homestead in the late 1800s then your mail may have been delivered in a buggy similar t...
05/07/2020

Mail call! If you lived out on a homestead in the late 1800s then your mail may have been delivered in a buggy similar to this one- not very quickly, however 😉

Carriage Association of America, Inc.
05/06/2020

Carriage Association of America, Inc.

The Kay Keating Carriages
Katherine Keating was the first woman in the Navy to rise to Captain of the Medical Service Corp. After leaving the Navy, she moved to Beulah, Colorado, running the KK Ranch and Carriage Museum. In Navy Medicine - "Keating said her favorite memory of her teamster days was driving the Silver Queen in a two seat carriage in the State Fair parade (the fair sponsors a Silver Queen Contest conducted for residents of nursing homes throughout the Rocky Mountain Region. The Silver Queen reigns for a year until the next fair.) The horse stepped out in the street and she told me. 'Seventy eight years ago today I rode in a carriage just like this on my wedding day.' She died not long after but I was glad I could give her that ride Keating said." The Pueblo Heritage Museum now has some of her vehicles on display in Pueblo, Colorado.

#Colorado #NationalCarriageMonth #CAA #CarriageAssociationofAmerica

Interesting local history from Ilwaco!
05/04/2020

Interesting local history from Ilwaco!

Photo Thursday: Pioneer Stage Driver John A. Morehead

Page after page has been written about the exploits and adventures of the old stage drivers of the mountains and plains, but one of those spectacular drivers would have had an experience he never dreamed of had he found himself on the weather beach with a heavy load of passengers, two or three hours before daylight in the morning with an eighty-mile gale blowing the cutting sand into his face and a ten-foot tide shooting drift logs past his horses on top of swells that could only be kept out of the stage by careful and watchful driving.

Their task was easy compared with that of the ocean beach driver who, three times a week, was obliged to get out of bed at the unholy hours of two o'clock in the morning, go to the barn and feed, groom and harness his horses, eat his breakfast, hitch up and drive about the town and out on the oysterbeds, gathering up his load to leave the hotel door promptly at four o'clock.

All this was done by the light of a smoky lantern, and very often in a driving storm. As the steamer awaited the return of the stage to Oysterville, and another was waiting at Ilwaco, he was hurried at every point of his trip.

However, three mornings in the week he could sleep until the late hour of four in the morning when only local mail and passengers were carried. On these days heavy loads of freight were taken, oysters out of Oysterville, and general freight from Ilwaco and all points on Shoalwater Bay, and as far as Grays Harbor.

Looking back over the old stage books, it is noted that this incoming freight was made up largely of beer, and saloon supplies. They had the right of way over luxuries such as flour and bacon. The books also show the names of most of the old pioneers as they traveled by stage.

The lot of the old stage driver was a particularly hard one. His days were long, often more than sixteen hours, and their responsibility was great. He had no assistance in loading and unloading those heavy trunks and articles of freight. He must account for every passenger, every piece of baggage, and every pound of freight carried by both the stage and freight wagons, collect all bills and be on the job seven days a week. He had no holidays or vacations, nor anyone to make the trip for him if he felt indisposed. That mail must go, and to the credit of the drivers, it was never known to miss a trip.

While the driver may have thought his task somewhat strenuous, it was not to be compared with that of those horses that were obliged to do this work. The driver could quit his job at any time, but the horse well knew that the moment they slackened up on those traces, that four lash would be swung across their bodies by one whose job depended on his willingness and ability to swing it. There was one horse on this line that was driven continuously for six years. In that time she traveled more than thirty thousand miles, often dragging a load more than the weight of her own body.

From 1882 to 1886 John Morehead drove the stagecoach between Oysterville and Ilwaco. This is his reminiscence published in the Ilwaco Tribune, August 8, 1952

CPHM Photo Collection - Ilwaco - Oysterville Stagecoach 1885

#historicnorthbeachpeninsula #PNW
#discoverilwaco #longbeachwashington

Carriage Association of America, Inc.
05/03/2020

Carriage Association of America, Inc.

The Edward S. Orr Stage Company was one of stage lines which operated from Valdez-to-Fairbanks and Chitina-Fairbanks in Alaska. It was very successful and bought out the Kennedy Stage Company, making it the largest such company in Alaska in 1909. The fare from for the 360 mile trip from Valdez to Fairbanks was a whopping $150, the return trip was $125, on sleighs which could carry 10 passengers on four double seats. Horses were changed out every 20-25 miles. - Resource: Alaskan History Magazine
#NationalCarriageMonth #CAA #FromSeaToShiningSea #Alaska

05/02/2020
Don't miss out when we go LIVE today at 1pm from the museum gift shop in preparation for Mother's Day- we look forward t...
05/02/2020
NW Carriage Museum Gift Shop Facebook Live 05/02/2020 Raymond, Washington, Facebook Live from the NW Carriage Museum Gift Shop - Special Events Event | Grays Harbor Event Central

Don't miss out when we go LIVE today at 1pm from the museum gift shop in preparation for Mother's Day- we look forward to seeing you there!

The Northwest Carriage Museum will be going Live on Facebook at 1pm on Saturday, May 2nd from the museum gift shop in preparation for Mother's Day. We will be available to answer calls, take direct messages and chat with viewers who would like to purchase items virtually. Pickup and delivery options

Happy May Day!
05/01/2020

Happy May Day!

We will be standing by during the live stream to chat and answer phone calls regarding your order- we greatly value and ...
04/30/2020

We will be standing by during the live stream to chat and answer phone calls regarding your order- we greatly value and appreciate your support! 😊

History often has two sides to the stories, and our carriages are no exception! Our beautiful natural wood Summer Coupe ...
04/29/2020

History often has two sides to the stories, and our carriages are no exception! Our beautiful natural wood Summer Coupe Brougham was owned by a fascinating lady named Grace Masury. Depending on who's running the tour, she could be a rags-to-riches Cinderella, or a scheming gold digger! Who knows which one is really true...

We have been gifted some fascinating, unique artifacts over the years! Can anyone guess what this spiky tool was used fo...
04/28/2020

We have been gifted some fascinating, unique artifacts over the years! Can anyone guess what this spiky tool was used for?

Mother's Day is coming up soon and we want to help you find the perfect gift for Mom! 🌷 Join us this Saturday, May 2nd (...
04/27/2020

Mother's Day is coming up soon and we want to help you find the perfect gift for Mom! 🌷 Join us this Saturday, May 2nd (time TBD) for a LIVE "show and tell" from our gift shop. We will be ready to take your call or direct message and arrange delivery!

Here are some “behind the scenes” shots from our virtual tour of the museum yesterday! Thank you to everyone who tuned i...
04/26/2020

Here are some “behind the scenes” shots from our virtual tour of the museum yesterday! Thank you to everyone who tuned in and gave us such wonderful feedback! We look forward to sharing more educational videos with you all in the future 🤗

04/25/2020
04/25/2020
Talk about riding in style! 🤩
04/24/2020

Talk about riding in style! 🤩

Spring was always a special time for the Vanderbilts as they enjoyed the beauty of Biltmore’s grounds awakening from winter. For several years during Cornelia Vanderbilt’s childhood, her family, along with estate residents and members of the local community, celebrated the season with a parade of flower-decked carriages in Biltmore Village.

Learn more: http://ow.ly/ClzF50z4Al0

Photo: Cornelia and Edith Vanderbilt in a carriage decorated with flowers for the 1905 Flower Carriage Parade in Biltmore Village.

04/23/2020
GHoodStock 2.0 -the sequel

Join us LIVE on Saturday, April 25th for a virtual tour of the Northwest Carriage Museum from 3-4pm PST! Don’t miss this special opportunity for us to visit YOU in the comfort of your own home 🤗

Schedule of performances:

Saturday April 25th:

2-3: Terrence Henry (Beautiful music on the piano!): https://www.facebook.com/groups/2396038827342792/

3-4pm: NW Carriage Museum special tour:https://www.facebook.com/NWCMuseum/

4-5 pm: Captain's Daughter (Celtic Duo): https://www.facebook.com/groups/2396038827342792/

5-6: Bell Bill Seaman:(one man band) https://www.facebook.com/bill.seaman1

6-7 pm: Jon Reynolds (all around good guy with a great voice): https://www.facebook.com/jonreynolds30

7-8pm: Tiffany & Co (excellent group singing oldies, and new hits with an oldies twist): https://www.facebook.com/tiffanymakimusic/

8-9: Daniel Walker - https://www.facebook.com/dan.walker.731

(9:45)10-11: Mystic Sound and Light (Live feed actually begins at 9:45, with music starting at 10) (DJ mix): https://www.msaldj.com/live

Sunday April 26th:

2-2:30pm: Historical Seaport-Special Tour at the GH Historical Seaport: https://www.facebook.com/GHHSA/

2:30-3:30pm: Hank Cramer: https://www.facebook.com/hank.cramer.14

4-5pm: Ben Fagerstedt: (Harbor youth with an amazing voice, usually singing hits of the past) https://www.facebook.com/benfagerstedtmusic/

5-6 pm: Tyler Markz (Young nurse that will be singing his own music, as well as a few covers): https://www.facebook.com/tyler.markz.79

6-7 pm: Jon Reynolds: https://www.facebook.com/jonreynolds30

7-8 pm: Arlene Hoiland and Dr. Mark (ballroom dancing: https://www.facebook.com/mark.vanhemert.5

Address

314 Alder St
Raymond, WA
98577

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(360) 942-4150

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Northwest Carriage Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Northwest Carriage Museum:

Videos

Category

Our Story

Come get carried away at the Northwest Carriage Museum! Featuring 57 magnificently restored horse-drawn carriages, the museum will transport you back in time!! Adults and kids love the interactive back room. Drive the talking horse, climb on the three spring democrat and dress in period clothes! Stroll among the Luxury Carriages, some used in Movie Classic's "Gone with the Wind & Gentleman Jim" to name a couple! Peek in side the 1888 Stagecoach and imagine life in the late 1800's! Check out our unique gift shop too! We have something for everyone! Open daily 10-4pm!

Nearby museums


Other Raymond museums

Show All

Comments

This is in Raymond?? I'll definately be in the next time i cruise down to the harbor
Thank you for the excellent guided tour and lunch. All the Oregon Mini Society Friends had a fantastic time. We appreciated the time that your organization takes to preserve these fabulous Transportation timepieces. Your team delivered a 5-star experience. Our only regret was not scheduling more time to hang out in the museum.
Some years ago, James Lovejoy & I discovered this regional gem of a museum, with glee. When we visited, we loved it. Have repeated visit a few times in the years since. Staff were kind enough to assist James with a question about historical carriage names and types used in various historical locations (Georgian London specifically), and they referred us to the Remington Carriage Museum in Cardston, Alberta, Canada as well. We visited there a couple of years later (OMG, carriages stacked three levels high in the industrial section!). And James has been an on-and-off member of the Northwest museum since that first visit. I thought the Museum staff would enjoy knowing that the fruits of James' research has now been published. Available from Amazon in trade paperback and e-book editions since yesterday. Thank you!
Great place for a visit...
Calling this a museum doesn’t do it justice. This place is awesome and the docents are phenomenal. A must see in the area!
This place is wonderful! Highly recommend.