Adams National Historical Park

Adams National Historical Park Adams National Historical Park, formerly Adams National Historic Site, in Quincy, Massachusetts, preserves the home of Presidents of the United States John Adams and John Quincy Adams, of U.S.
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Ambassador to Great Britain, Charles Francis Adams, and of the writers and historians Henry Adams and Brooks Adams. The national historical park's eleven buildings tell the story of five generations of the Adams family (from 1720 to 1927) including Presidents, First Ladies, U.S. Ministers, historians, writers, and family members who supported and contributed to their success. In addition to Peacef

Ambassador to Great Britain, Charles Francis Adams, and of the writers and historians Henry Adams and Brooks Adams. The national historical park's eleven buildings tell the story of five generations of the Adams family (from 1720 to 1927) including Presidents, First Ladies, U.S. Ministers, historians, writers, and family members who supported and contributed to their success. In addition to Peacef

Temporarily closed

Happy Birthday Brooks Adams!We commemorate Peter Chardon Brooks Adams, John Adams’s youngest great-grandson, as we ackno...
06/24/2021

Happy Birthday Brooks Adams!

We commemorate Peter Chardon Brooks Adams, John Adams’s youngest great-grandson, as we acknowledge Brooks as the "founder" of our park. He was the last of the Adams family to live in the “Old House” and made arrangements for it to be shown as a museum dedicated to preserving the legacy of his forefathers. He was born in Quincy and died in Boston. He and his wife, Evelyn “Daisy” lived in the house during the summer months and a Boston home in the winter. He left the Old House in November of 1925 but did not return, dying in Boston. His nieces and nephews continued his arrangements showing the “Old House” as a museum until they deeded the property and home to the NPS in 1946.

Image: Brooks and Evelyn greeting their dogs on the front lawn of the Old House.

Happy Birthday Brooks Adams!

We commemorate Peter Chardon Brooks Adams, John Adams’s youngest great-grandson, as we acknowledge Brooks as the "founder" of our park. He was the last of the Adams family to live in the “Old House” and made arrangements for it to be shown as a museum dedicated to preserving the legacy of his forefathers. He was born in Quincy and died in Boston. He and his wife, Evelyn “Daisy” lived in the house during the summer months and a Boston home in the winter. He left the Old House in November of 1925 but did not return, dying in Boston. His nieces and nephews continued his arrangements showing the “Old House” as a museum until they deeded the property and home to the NPS in 1946.

Image: Brooks and Evelyn greeting their dogs on the front lawn of the Old House.

Juneteenth commemorates the end of slavery in the United States, when federal troops entered Galveston, TX on June 19, 1...
06/19/2021

Juneteenth commemorates the end of slavery in the United States, when federal troops entered Galveston, TX on June 19, 1865. It was a long fight to get to this point.

Decades early, John Quincy Adams attempted to slow the progress of slavery across the United States. An episode in history that demonstrates John Quincy's anti-slavery sentiments was his efforts in preventing the annexation of Texas. John Quincy was convinced that the addition of Texas would expand the power of the Southern states and expand slavery across the southwest. In 1838, Adams staged a 22-day filibuster that blocked annexation.

John Quincy did not live to see the Emancipation Proclamation or June 19, 1865. However, in 1842, Adams argued in front of Congress that a war power could be used to emancipate slaves in the United States. Ultimately, that's what happened.

Image: Congressional desk of John Quincy Adams.

Juneteenth commemorates the end of slavery in the United States, when federal troops entered Galveston, TX on June 19, 1865. It was a long fight to get to this point.

Decades early, John Quincy Adams attempted to slow the progress of slavery across the United States. An episode in history that demonstrates John Quincy's anti-slavery sentiments was his efforts in preventing the annexation of Texas. John Quincy was convinced that the addition of Texas would expand the power of the Southern states and expand slavery across the southwest. In 1838, Adams staged a 22-day filibuster that blocked annexation.

John Quincy did not live to see the Emancipation Proclamation or June 19, 1865. However, in 1842, Adams argued in front of Congress that a war power could be used to emancipate slaves in the United States. Ultimately, that's what happened.

Image: Congressional desk of John Quincy Adams.

Saturday, June 19th  - Self-guided outdoor tours of the Dorothy Quincy Homestead will be offered between 11am – 2pm (sit...
06/18/2021

Saturday, June 19th - Self-guided outdoor tours of the Dorothy Quincy Homestead will be offered between 11am – 2pm (site closes at 2:00 p.m.) and will feature information about the Edmund Quincy family and the property. Docents will be available on site to answer visitors' questions. Current Covid-19 protocols will be followed during the event (masks and social distancing required). Please check our website nscdama.org or our page Quincy Homestead 1686 for schedule changes.

The Homestead was purchased in 1904 by the NSCDA-MA. The grounds and buildings are owned by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) and operated in cooperation with NSCDA-MA in a public-private partnership. Only dogs on leash are allowed on the property per DCR.

Image: The Dorothy Quincy House. A yellow house with a formal garden in front, and an easel in front with historic images.

Saturday, June 19th - Self-guided outdoor tours of the Dorothy Quincy Homestead will be offered between 11am – 2pm (site closes at 2:00 p.m.) and will feature information about the Edmund Quincy family and the property. Docents will be available on site to answer visitors' questions. Current Covid-19 protocols will be followed during the event (masks and social distancing required). Please check our website nscdama.org or our page Quincy Homestead 1686 for schedule changes.

The Homestead was purchased in 1904 by the NSCDA-MA. The grounds and buildings are owned by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) and operated in cooperation with NSCDA-MA in a public-private partnership. Only dogs on leash are allowed on the property per DCR.

Image: The Dorothy Quincy House. A yellow house with a formal garden in front, and an easel in front with historic images.

The first of Abigail Adams’s York Roses has bloomed! Abigail Adams brought these roses from Great Britain to her new hom...
05/29/2021

The first of Abigail Adams’s York Roses has bloomed! Abigail Adams brought these roses from Great Britain to her new home at Peace field in 1788.

The first of Abigail Adams’s York Roses has bloomed! Abigail Adams brought these roses from Great Britain to her new home at Peace field in 1788.

In honor of #NationalPreservationMonth, we pay homage to the men and women who dedicated time and money to preserve the ...
05/28/2021

In honor of #NationalPreservationMonth, we pay homage to the men and women who dedicated time and money to preserve the Adams Legacy which the National Park Service preserves and protects today. In the 1920s, Brooks Adams began arranging the furnishings in the “Old House” as a historical memorial to his ancestors. He had closely followed the preservation efforts of the Daughters of the Revolution as well as the Mount Vernon Ladies. His mother had been a public supporter of the Mount Vernon Ladies Association. For his birthday in June 1925, Brooks invited his nieces and nephews to the “Old House” for lunch. He proposed his desire that the "Old House" remain in the family and be shown as a museum. He established a fund and the Adams Memorial Society to maintain the stewardship of the home and property. Upon his death in 1927, the Society began showing the house as a museum but wars, economic hardships, and the upkeep made it impossible to maintain. In 1946, the Society donated five acres of land and five historic buildings, containing original family furnishings, to the National Park Service. The purpose of the park is to preserve and protect the grounds, homes, and personal property of four generations of the Adams family and to inspire current and future generations.

Image: The Adams Memorial Society in 1929. A black and white image of men and women, both standing and seated, in front of Old House.

In honor of #NationalPreservationMonth, we pay homage to the men and women who dedicated time and money to preserve the Adams Legacy which the National Park Service preserves and protects today. In the 1920s, Brooks Adams began arranging the furnishings in the “Old House” as a historical memorial to his ancestors. He had closely followed the preservation efforts of the Daughters of the Revolution as well as the Mount Vernon Ladies. His mother had been a public supporter of the Mount Vernon Ladies Association. For his birthday in June 1925, Brooks invited his nieces and nephews to the “Old House” for lunch. He proposed his desire that the "Old House" remain in the family and be shown as a museum. He established a fund and the Adams Memorial Society to maintain the stewardship of the home and property. Upon his death in 1927, the Society began showing the house as a museum but wars, economic hardships, and the upkeep made it impossible to maintain. In 1946, the Society donated five acres of land and five historic buildings, containing original family furnishings, to the National Park Service. The purpose of the park is to preserve and protect the grounds, homes, and personal property of four generations of the Adams family and to inspire current and future generations.

Image: The Adams Memorial Society in 1929. A black and white image of men and women, both standing and seated, in front of Old House.

Preservation at Adams National Historical Park is an important part of what we do. Many people equate Park Rangers with ...
05/21/2021

Preservation at Adams National Historical Park is an important part of what we do. Many people equate Park Rangers with leading tours from the Grand Canyon to Presidential sites. A variety of activities goes on behind the scenes that most people never see. Preservation is everyone’s job when they work for the National Park Service. We take an oath “to preserve and protect." Preservation can mean you work outside maintaining buildings or gardens, or you are a trained archeologist or museum manager - it also means you could be a guide or accountant. Some Rangers give tours, others cut the grass and trim trees, some monitor the environment, complete inventory, or take photographs. A lot of what we do is ensuring things are taken care of for today and for future generations - making book boxes, cleaning and repairing artifacts, and answering lots of questions.

Each Park has a core group of Permanent employees, seasonal and volunteers. Each area of work has unique training and skills. We all come together as a team to bring our knowledge and skillsets to fulfill the mission of the National Park Service “preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations.”

#NationalPreservationMonth

Image: A National Park Service Employee works to preserve one of Abigail Adams's dresses.

Preservation at Adams National Historical Park is an important part of what we do. Many people equate Park Rangers with leading tours from the Grand Canyon to Presidential sites. A variety of activities goes on behind the scenes that most people never see. Preservation is everyone’s job when they work for the National Park Service. We take an oath “to preserve and protect." Preservation can mean you work outside maintaining buildings or gardens, or you are a trained archeologist or museum manager - it also means you could be a guide or accountant. Some Rangers give tours, others cut the grass and trim trees, some monitor the environment, complete inventory, or take photographs. A lot of what we do is ensuring things are taken care of for today and for future generations - making book boxes, cleaning and repairing artifacts, and answering lots of questions.

Each Park has a core group of Permanent employees, seasonal and volunteers. Each area of work has unique training and skills. We all come together as a team to bring our knowledge and skillsets to fulfill the mission of the National Park Service “preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations.”

#NationalPreservationMonth

Image: A National Park Service Employee works to preserve one of Abigail Adams's dresses.

Chinese Export porcelain was available in European port cities as early as the 14th Century and was considered a househo...
05/14/2021

Chinese Export porcelain was available in European port cities as early as the 14th Century and was considered a household luxury. During the 16th century, trade routes to Asian and European capitals had expanded and interest in these exotic goods became more widespread and available. Exported objects to the West were expanded and began coming in great quantity. Porcelain was a small part of this trade that included tea, silk, and ivory.

Blue and white tableware made up a significant portion of the export trade. By the 18th Century, European countries began building their own porcelain factories and Chinese porcelain became too plentiful and less interesting in Europe, but a commodity in the American Colonies. Abigail used her greatest angst to her advantage. With John assigned to duties in Europe, she made requests for goods unavailable to her at home.

In a letter Abigail wrote to John on November 24th, 1780. “I have twice before enclosed a set of Bills, received from Mr. Lovell for you. I ventured to detain one hopeing for an opportunity to send to Holland. I enclose it now together with a list of the Articles if you think you can afford them to me.... 1 doz. of blew and white china tea cups and sausers....”

Image: Some of the "blew and white" porcelain requested by Abigail Adams. It includes a tea cup, plate, and a cup and saucer. It's blue images of towns and landscapes.

#AsianAmericanandSouthPacificIslandHeritageMonth

Chinese Export porcelain was available in European port cities as early as the 14th Century and was considered a household luxury. During the 16th century, trade routes to Asian and European capitals had expanded and interest in these exotic goods became more widespread and available. Exported objects to the West were expanded and began coming in great quantity. Porcelain was a small part of this trade that included tea, silk, and ivory.

Blue and white tableware made up a significant portion of the export trade. By the 18th Century, European countries began building their own porcelain factories and Chinese porcelain became too plentiful and less interesting in Europe, but a commodity in the American Colonies. Abigail used her greatest angst to her advantage. With John assigned to duties in Europe, she made requests for goods unavailable to her at home.

In a letter Abigail wrote to John on November 24th, 1780. “I have twice before enclosed a set of Bills, received from Mr. Lovell for you. I ventured to detain one hopeing for an opportunity to send to Holland. I enclose it now together with a list of the Articles if you think you can afford them to me.... 1 doz. of blew and white china tea cups and sausers....”

Image: Some of the "blew and white" porcelain requested by Abigail Adams. It includes a tea cup, plate, and a cup and saucer. It's blue images of towns and landscapes.

#AsianAmericanandSouthPacificIslandHeritageMonth

"My lot in life has been almost always cast at a distance from her. I have enjoyed but for short seasons, and at long, d...
05/09/2021

"My lot in life has been almost always cast at a distance from her. I have enjoyed but for short seasons, and at long, distant intervals, the happiness of her society, yet she has been to me more than a mother. She has been a spirit from above watching over me for good, and contributing by my mere consciousness of her existence to the comfort of my life." - John Quincy Adams describing his mother, Abigail Adams, in 1818.

The American Revolution and his diplomatic career meant that John Quincy Adams was frequently separated from his mother, but he always knew she was watching out for him. Adams National Historical Park wishes a Happy Mother's Day to mothers everywhere today.

Images:
1.) Abigail Adams by Jane Stuart after Gilbert Stuart
2.) John Quincy Adams after Sully and Stuart

To celebrate the contributions of the many arts and cultures represented in the Asian and South Pacific countries, Adams...
05/07/2021

To celebrate the contributions of the many arts and cultures represented in the Asian and South Pacific countries, Adams National Historical Park would like to share some of the rich treasures associated with the multiple generations of the Adams Family.

We begin this week with an object not on our property, but one of the most magnificent pieces of sculpture admired by thousands of people every year. The Adams Memorial is an allegorical sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, commissioned by Henry Adams as a memorial to his wife, “Clover." In 1886, Henry Adams traveled to Japan to seek refuge from his grief after Clover's death. He traveled with John LaFarge who was also traveling looking for inspiration. They went seeking beauty, refuge, peace, and Nirvana.

Henry found the escape he was looking for, but no one can run forever. Instead he commissioned this figure to represent contemplation, pain, peace, and serenity. It became a place for him to go in Rock Creek Cemetery in Washington, D.C. where he could be in tune with the love and pain that is universal to all people. We hope as we kick off this month featuring Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage, we celebrate the history and arts associated with the Adams family, we recognize our Asian neighbors and appreciate the arts and cultures they have brought to the City of Quincy and across the country.

The Adams Memorial today resides in Rock Creek Cemetery (first image) with a cast at @SaintGaudensNPS (second image).

Images:
1.) The Adams Memorial at Rock Creek Park. A figure is wearing a cloak with one of the hands touching their face.

2.) A cast of the Adams Memorial at Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park. A side view of the first image with snow on the top and in the background.

The apple trees in the orchard are flowering!
05/04/2021

The apple trees in the orchard are flowering!

The apple trees in the orchard are flowering!

In honor of #ArborDay, we want to recognize a beautiful tree on our property that we care for and maintain.  This beech ...
04/30/2021

In honor of #ArborDay, we want to recognize a beautiful tree on our property that we care for and maintain. This beech tree (Fagus sylvatica) was probably planted in the mid- 1900’s. Although it sits on the same property as the John Adams Birthplace, it was planted by the Craig or McCausland Family who had homes on this site in the 1900’s. These houses were removed by the City in the 1950’s and 1970’s. There were many Beech trees in Quincy over the past two hundred years, but many have been lost to a disease, just like the elm trees that were so prominent in the City.

Taken from the Cultural Landscape Report: Adams National Historical Park, 2014

#ConnectedConservation

In honor of #ArborDay, we want to recognize a beautiful tree on our property that we care for and maintain. This beech tree (Fagus sylvatica) was probably planted in the mid- 1900’s. Although it sits on the same property as the John Adams Birthplace, it was planted by the Craig or McCausland Family who had homes on this site in the 1900’s. These houses were removed by the City in the 1950’s and 1970’s. There were many Beech trees in Quincy over the past two hundred years, but many have been lost to a disease, just like the elm trees that were so prominent in the City.

Taken from the Cultural Landscape Report: Adams National Historical Park, 2014

#ConnectedConservation

Address

1250 Hancock St
Quincy, MA
02169

Red Line to Quincy Center. Exit toward Hancock Street

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I thought you might enjoy a collection of historically-oriented songs that I just released about U.S. Presidents. It has songs about both Adams and JQ Admas. Most lyrics are first-person fictional narratives. Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nfE28vA4KXUTqfLemy-o-YQz2T7hfMwl0 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/3zZCxRmv1Ikos9yhRsOMUE Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/album/potus/1533596042 Lyrics and Commentary: http://davidwj.com/potus.shtml
Hi, is the visitor center going to open with Phase 3 next week?
Are both John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams buried near Quincy, Massachusetts? What is the exact locations of their burial places?
I am just reading Marianne North's autobiography in which she states that she visited "Peacefield" in July - August 1871. She says, " He was a remarkably quiet man, but his good wife made up for it, and her genial chatter used to make him sit and shake with laughter". "It was a very pleasant family to be in, all the sons and their daughter had such a thorough respect for their parents".
I remember visiting this historical site, and I liked the staircase that is painted white, and a red carpet runner on it.
Awesome !
Couldn't make the name of the form of government that Adams advocated when it was a "Jeopardy" answer. Would anyone mind telling me, as it wasn't mentioned during my August visit.
https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&f%5Bcollection_name_ssim%5D%5B%5D=Leon+Abdalian+Collection&f%5Binstitution_name_ssim%5D%5B%5D=Boston+Public+Library&q=quincy Photos by Leon Abdalian were recently added to the digital commonwealth repository. The photos are from 1929, and include Peacefield, the birthplaces, United First Parish
Had a fantastic visit today! Very much enjoyed Ranger Jane and Ranger Mike. Their enthusiasm and knowledge about the subject was evident!!
So sad!
Lovely visit today! I'll have to come back another time.
I have often believed that John Adams was slighted by historians until David McCullough reversed this almost 20 years ago. I'd like to mention two points that IMHO make Adams the most important Founding Father other than Washington. 1) In the inaugural election, Adams received the second most electoral votes. Proof of how much esteem his fellow countrymen had for him. 2) An often overlooked precedent President Adams set. After losing the election of 1800, he didn't protest or raise an army to hold on to power. What did he do? He went home. Setting the precedent for the peaceful transfer of power.