Adams National Historical Park

Adams National Historical Park Grounds will be open July 6 Adams National Historical Park, formerly Adams National Historic Site, in Quincy, Massachusetts, preserves the home of Presidents of the United States John Adams and John Quincy Adams, of U.S.
(16)

Ambassador to Great Britain, Charles Francis Adams, and of the writers and historians Henry Adams and Brooks Adams. The national historical park's eleven buildings tell the story of five generations of the Adams family (from 1720 to 1927) including Presidents, First Ladies, U.S. Ministers, historians, writers, and family members who supported and contributed to their success. In addition to Peacefield, home to four generations of the Adams family, the park's main historic features include the John Adams Birthplace (October 30, 1735), the nearby John Quincy Adams Birthplace (July 11, 1767), and the Stone Library (built in 1870 to house the books of John Quincy Adams and believed to be the first presidential library), containing more than 14,000 historic volumes in 12 languages. There is an off-site visitor center less than a mile (1.6 km) away. Regularly scheduled tours of the houses are offered in season (April 19 to November 10), by guided tour only, using a tourist trolley provided by the Park Service between sites. Access to United First Parish Church is provided by the congregation for which they ask a small donation. The church is across the street from the visitor center. There is a parking garage located on Saville Ave. just off of Hancock St. behind the Visitor Center. Please bring parking stub into the Visitor Center with you for validation of parking.

Operating as usual

"We had a severe Shock of an Earthquake. It continued near four minutes. I was then at my Fathers in Braintree, and awok...
11/09/2020
Massachusetts Historical Society: The Cape Ann Earthquake of November 1755

"We had a severe Shock of an Earthquake. It continued near four minutes. I was then at my Fathers in Braintree, and awoke out of my sleep in the midst of it. The house seemed to rock and reel and crack as if it would fall in ruins about us. 7 Chimnies were shatter'd by it within one mile of my Fathers house." - John Adams Diary, 18 November 1755

The earthquake John Adams described is known as the Cape Ann earthquake. It was probably a 6.0 to 6.3 magnitude on the Richter Scale and caused damage across New England. The Massachusetts Historical Society has an article about the Cape Ann earthquake linked below.

Residents of southern New England felt an earthquake yesterday, 8 November 2020. Yesterday's earthquake is listed as a 3.6 magnitude on the Richter Scale and people felt the earth quaking as far away as Long Island.

Image: Text on a sepia-toned paged entitled "Verses."

https://www.masshist.org/object-of-the-month/objects/the-cape-ann-earthquake-of-november-1755-2005-11-01

Jeremiah Newland's Verses Occasioned by the Earthquakes in the Month of November, 1755 reminded readers of the hand of God at work in the natural environment. His use of the word "earthquakes" in the title was no mistake--just 17 days prior to the Cape Ann earthquake, a massive earthquake struck Lis...

Day of my father's birth, I hail thee yet. What though his body moulders in the grave, Yet shall not Death th'immortal s...
10/30/2020

Day of my father's birth, I hail thee yet.
What though his body moulders in the grave,
Yet shall not Death th'immortal soul enslave.
The sun is not extinct-his orb has set.
And where on earth's wide ball shall man be met,
While time shall run, but from thy spirit brave
Shall learn to grasp the boon his Maker gave,
And spurn the terror of a tyrant's threat?
Who but shall learn that freedom is the prize
Man still is bound to rescue or maintain;
That nature's God commands the slave to rise,
And on the oppressor's head to break his chain.
Roll, years of promise, rapidly roll round
Til not a slave on this earth be found.

Poem composed by John Quincy Adams #onthisdate, 30 October 1826, to mark his father's birthday. John Quincy Adams was President of the United States at the time, and John Adams had passed away in July of 1826.

Image: John Quincy Adams by George Healy. He is seated with his right arm over a table. He is wearing a dark suit.

John Adams was born #onthisdate in 1735.  Happy 285th Birthday!Image: John Adams by Jane Stuart (a copy of the original ...
10/30/2020

John Adams was born #onthisdate in 1735. Happy 285th Birthday!

Image: John Adams by Jane Stuart (a copy of the original by her father, Gilbert Stuart). John Adams is bald on top with grey hair around the sides. He is wearing a dark suit with a white shirt and sitting on a red sofa.

Hello again from Women’s Rights National Historical Park! The Grimkés, particularly Angelina, were involved in the Phila...
10/09/2020

Hello again from Women’s Rights National Historical Park! The Grimkés, particularly Angelina, were involved in the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society alongside of women who later became organizers of the First Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls. Lucretia Mott, well known for her role in the abolition movement, and Mary Ann M’Clintock, who later moved from Philadelphia to Waterloo, New York, were among the founders of the Society. Established in 1833 as a racially integrated organization, the Society circulated anti-slavery petitions, distributed abolitionist publications, and sent delegates to anti-slavery conventions. The Society’s seal appealed to society’s sentiments regarding gender with the question, “Am I not a woman and a sister?”

The First Women’s Rights Convention, held in Seneca Falls in 1848, is widely considered the start of the formal women’s rights movement. Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society founders Lucretia Mott and Mary Ann M’Clintock were among the organizers, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Martha C. Wright, and Jane Hunt. These women had experience participating in conventions and organizing events through their work in the abolition movement. Involvement in anti-slavery societies provided women with the tools necessary to lead the women’s rights movement and challenged the “proper” place of women in society and reform.

Image: Seal of the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society, Historical Society of Pennsylvania

Image alt-text: An enslaved person with chains on their wrists kneels and looks toward the sky. The seal’s text reads “Am I not a woman and a sister?”

#WomensHistory #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #FindYourVirtualPark #NationalParkService #ParkSwap #NationalParkSocialMediaSwap #SocialMediaSwap #NPS19th

Women’s Rights National Historical Park rangers here! Women in the early 1800s played an important role in the many refo...
10/07/2020

Women’s Rights National Historical Park rangers here! Women in the early 1800s played an important role in the many reform movements that were being established to cure society’s “ills.” The abolition, or anti-slavery, movement grew during this period, with women becoming involved in anti-slavery organizations. While women were gaining important organizational skills through their involvement in reform movements, debates raged over whether their involvement was appropriate. Angelina and Sarah Grimké were noted abolitionists who challenged gender norms by speaking publicly against slavery, even addressing mixed crowds of men and women.

Learn more about the Grimké sisters at https://www.nps.gov/wori/learn/historyculture/grimke-sisters.htm.

Images: Angelina Grimke (1) and Sarah Grimke (2). Both images are black and white woodcuts. Both Angelina and Sarah are wearing dresses as well as a bonnet tied under the chin. Angelina is looking straight at the camera while Sarah's head is cocked slightly.

#WomensHistory #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #FindYourVirtualPark #NationalParkService #ParkSwap #NationalParkSocialMediaSwap #SocialMediaSwap #NPS19th
Post Image: link for WORI Grimké sisters page

Greetings from Seneca Falls, New York! We, the rangers Women’s Rights National Historical Park, are excited to partner w...
10/05/2020

Greetings from Seneca Falls, New York! We, the rangers Women’s Rights National Historical Park, are excited to partner with Adams National Historical Park to bring you the story of influential women in the early 1800s, women in the anti-slavery movement, and how women’s anti-slavery work influenced the women’s rights movement. Follow both parks here on Facebook this week in order to see the story unfold!

Before we dive in, we want to share a bit about us: Women’s Rights National Historical Park preserves the site of the First Women’s Rights Convention, held July 19-20, 1848, in Seneca Falls, NY. The Convention’s Declaration of Sentiments called for equal rights for women, including the right to vote, and the event is considered the start of the formal women’s rights movement in the U.S.

Learn more about Women’s Rights National Historical Park by visiting https://www.nps.gov/wori/index.htm.

Image: Declaration Park, the Wesleyan Chapel, and Visitor Center at Women’s Rights National Historical Park. Panoramic view of the 2-story brick Wesleyan Chapel, 3-story brick visitor center, a mural depicting 6 women and 1 man, and a water wall featuring the text of the Declaration of Sentiments.

#WomensHistory #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #FindYourVirtualPark #NationalParkService #ParkSwap #NationalParkSocialMediaSwap #SocialMediaSwap #NPS19th

Challenge Accepted! #FatBookWeek #LONG #MABI #HAMP #ADAMThis fat book was always kept on a table in front of the south w...
10/03/2020

Challenge Accepted! #FatBookWeek #LONG #MABI #HAMP #ADAM

This fat book was always kept on a table in front of the south window near John Adams’s chair in the study. It is a large Funk & Wagnalls New Standard Dictionary. When tourists first began to pass the house going to Plymouth in the early twenties, Mr. Brooks Adams heard the bus driver (with one of those megaphones) telling the group that the large book in the window was the Adams' family Bible. Mr. Brooks Adams said he did not object to the public knowing that the Adamses read their Bibles daily; but he thought it was too bad to spread false rumors, so he had the dictionary moved away from the window. The dictionary is L 32 cm x W 26.5 cm x H 14 cm.

Story per Mrs. Wilhelmina Harris, Adams NHP HFR. Vol.3.
Funk & Wagnalls New Standard Dictionary of the English Language

Published by Funk & Wagnalls Company (Jan. 1, 1913)
2,915 pages

Three Images
Image 1: A top view of a very thick book. The title reads, "Funk & Wagnalls New Standard Dictionary of the English Language." The cover is brown with dark engravings blow the title that depict an eagle in the center and circles with crosses around the eagle.
Image 2: A side view of the dictionary on a table highlighting the width of the book.
Image 3: The side of the dictionary highlighting the width of the book. Tabs are present to indicate each section, by letter, of the dictionary.

You may notice some different stories than you’re used to on our page next week.  From October 5 to October 9 the ranger...
10/02/2020

You may notice some different stories than you’re used to on our page next week. From October 5 to October 9 the rangers from Women’s Rights National Historical Park will be taking over our Facebook feed! We will be returning the favor for them. Be sure to follow @womensrightsnps to see the connection between the two parks and get the full, exciting story. You won’t want to miss this fascinating glimpse into the anti-slavery and women’s rights movements!

https://www.nps.gov/wori

Image: Inside the Women's Rights National Historical Park Visitor Center. A collection of statues representing individuals who participated in the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848.

#WomensHistory #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #FindYourVirtualPark #National Park Service #ParkSwap #NationalParkSocialMediaSwap #SocialMediaSwap #NPS19th

Some #wildlifewednesday photos from Peace field!Image #1: A yellow and black dragonfly perched on a plant.  A corner of ...
09/30/2020

Some #wildlifewednesday photos from Peace field!

Image #1: A yellow and black dragonfly perched on a plant. A corner of the Stone Library is in the background to the right of the image.

Image #2: A rabbit munching on some small, pink flowers.

Today is #NationalPublicLandsDay.  Today is a day to celebrate our connections with green spaces in our communities - wh...
09/26/2020

Today is #NationalPublicLandsDay. Today is a day to celebrate our connections with green spaces in our communities - whether for education, recreation, or the health benefits of being outside. Today is the day to go outside and enjoy the green spaces closest to you.

Perhaps the closest green spaces to you are the gardens by the Birthplaces of Presidents John and John Quincy Adams or Old House at Peace field! We ask that you follow CDC and Commonwealth of Massachusetts guidelines while exploring the gardens for a self guided visit. The gardens are open from dawn to dusk.

Image: A silhouette of a park ranger facing to the right with hair flowing behind them. Inside the silhouette are superimposed, colorful drawings of outdoor experiences across the National Park system.

#OnThisDate, 22 September 1862, Abraham Lincoln issued the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.  This declared that al...
09/22/2020

#OnThisDate, 22 September 1862, Abraham Lincoln issued the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. This declared that all slaves in a state rebelling against the Union would be freed on 1 January 1863.

Charles Francis Adams (son of John Quincy Adams) was serving as Lincoln's ambassador to Great Britain at this time. He received word of the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation in October, 1862. He recorded his thoughts in his diary:

"The news from America is again quite exciting. The President has issued a proclamation virtually declaring a policy of emancipation.... [I]t is impossible to deny that the adoption of such a policy is a mere question of time. This is the real difficulty in America. And whether the Union be or not be preserved the very existence of the war renders a retreat from it impossible. I do not pretend to peer into the future. But this terrible series of calamities appears as a just judgment upon the country for having paltered with the evil so long. God have mercy on us, miserable offenders." - Diary of Charles Francis Adams, 4 October 1862

Image: Charles Francis Adams by Frederick P. Vinton. He is looking to the left. He wears a dark suit jacket with a white shirt. He is bald with grey hair to the sides and a grey beard that goes under his chin.

Can you believe it? The first signs of autumn are here. We noticed that the leaves on the yellowwood tree (planted by Jo...
09/18/2020

Can you believe it? The first signs of autumn are here. We noticed that the leaves on the yellowwood tree (planted by John Quincy Adams, c. 1830) at Peace field have started to turn yellow.

Image: a large tree in the middle of a formal garden. The tree is mostly green while some of the leaves on the edge of the branches are yellow.

#OnThisDate"Monday September 9, 1776.Resolved, that in all Continental Commissions, and other Instruments where heretofo...
09/09/2020

#OnThisDate

"Monday September 9, 1776.
Resolved, that in all Continental Commissions, and other Instruments where heretofore the Words, "United Colonies," have been used, the Stile be altered for the future to the United States." - Autobiography of John Adams

Image: John Adams by John Singleton Copley. John is facing to the left but looking at the artist. He is wearing a powdered wig with curls by the ear and held in a ponytail in the back. He is wearing a brown jacket with a white cravat. He is holding a rolled up piece of paper in his right hand.

"On Wednesday the third day of this Month, the American Ministers met the British Minister at his Lodgings at the Hôtel ...
09/03/2020

"On Wednesday the third day of this Month, the American Ministers met the British Minister at his Lodgings at the Hôtel de York, and signed, sealed and delivered the Definitive Treaty of Peace between the United States of America and the King of Great Britain. Altho’ it is but a Confirmation or Repetition of the Provisional Articles, I have the honor to congratulate Congress upon it, as it is a Completion of the work of Peace, and the best we could obtain." - John Adams to the President of Congress, 5 September 1783

#OnThisDate, 3 September 1783, the American Revolutionary War officially ended when the Treaty of Paris was signed. Artist Benjamin West painted "American Commissioners of the Preliminary Peace Agreement with Great Britain" to show the negotiations. The British delegation never posed so the painting remains unfinished. The delegates (from left to right) are John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens (standing), and William Temple Franklin. The original painting is at the Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library. A copy hangs in the Stone Library.

Image: The framed painting of "American Commissioners of the Preliminary Peace Agreement with Great Britain." It is unfinished. There is a table in the middle with the Treaty of Paris on it. To the left of the table are the 5 American delegates. John Jay is standing and holding what appears to be something rolled in his right hand. John Adams is seated with his left arm over the treaty (his hand is unfinished and would have been on the treaty). Benjamin Franklin sits to the left of John Adams. Standing to the left of Franklin is Henry Laurens. William Temple Franklin is seated to the left of the standing Laurens. The entire right half of the painting is blank as that is where the British delegates would have been.

"I am very impatient to receive a letter from you. You indulged me so much in that Way in your last absence, that I now ...
09/02/2020

"I am very impatient to receive a letter from you. You indulged me so much in that Way in your last absence, that I now think I have a right to hear as often from you as you have leisure and opportunity to write. I hear that [Samuel Adams] wrote to his Son and [Thomas Cushing] to his Lady, but perhaps you did not know of the opportunity." - Abigail to John Adams, 2 September 1774 #onthisdate

Does your significant other or child not respond to your letters (or, in 2020, texts) as frequently as you'd wish? Abigail Adams understood.

Image: Abigail Adams by Benjamin Blythe. Abigail is around 22 years old at the time this portrait was painted. She is facing to the right. She has dark hair which is tied behind her neck. She is wearing a v neck dress with a pearl necklace choker. The dress is blue and pink.

"As if you love me, proverbially, you must love my dog." - Abigail Adams to Caroline Amelia Smith de Windt, 26 February ...
08/27/2020

"As if you love me, proverbially, you must love my dog." - Abigail Adams to Caroline Amelia Smith de Windt, 26 February 1811

Abigail's love of dogs passed through the generations. The doghouse built by Brooks Adams (Abigail's great-grandson) in 1905 remains on the property of Peace field. In a belated celebration of #nationaldogday, we are sharing an image of Brooks and Evelyn "Daisy" Adams with four of their dogs.

Please note: while dogs are allowed on the Adams National Historical Park grounds they must be on their leash at all times.

Image:
1.) A Black and white image of Brooks and Evelyn "Daisy" Adams with four dog, likely either Scottish or Irish Terriers. Evelyn is standing to the left of the image in a floor-length patterned dress, wearing a hat, and looking down at the dogs. To the right is Brooks Adams in a light colored hat and darker suit looking down at the fourth dog. The dogs appear to be looking up at Brooks. They are standing outside on the lawn in front of a bush.

"The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State...
08/26/2020
20 Suffragists To Know for 2020 - Women's History (U.S. National Park Service)

"The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

#OnThisDay in 1920, Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby certified the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, completing a decades-long fight for women's right to vote.

#OnThisDate #Centennial #19thAmendment #Ratification

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/womenshistory/20-for-2020.htm

National Park Service
08/25/2020

National Park Service

On August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act creating the National Park Service, a new federal bureau in the Department of the Interior responsible for protecting the 35 national parks and monuments. Today, 104 years later, the National Park Service comprises 419 park sites covering more than 84 million acres in 50 states, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, Saipan, and the Virgin Islands. These parks preserve our nation’s pristine scenery, natural wonders, cultural and historical monuments, places of deep meaning, and moments of great change.

Share your favorite park adventure, memory, or story!

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/nps-birthday.htm

Image: Bison group on the move at sunrise in Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park NPS / Jacob W. Frank

#NPSBirthday #FoundersDay

Address

1250 Hancock St
Quincy, MA
02169

Red Line to Quincy Center. Exit toward Hancock Street

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(617) 770-1175

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Adams National Historical Park posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Adams National Historical Park:

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Comments

I thought you might enjoy a collection of historically-oriented songs that I just released about U.S. Presidents. It has songs about both Adams and JQ Admas. Most lyrics are first-person fictional narratives. Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nfE28vA4KXUTqfLemy-o-YQz2T7hfMwl0 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/3zZCxRmv1Ikos9yhRsOMUE Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/album/potus/1533596042 Lyrics and Commentary: http://davidwj.com/potus.shtml
Hi, is the visitor center going to open with Phase 3 next week?
Are both John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams buried near Quincy, Massachusetts? What is the exact locations of their burial places?
I am just reading Marianne North's autobiography in which she states that she visited "Peacefield" in July - August 1871. She says, " He was a remarkably quiet man, but his good wife made up for it, and her genial chatter used to make him sit and shake with laughter". "It was a very pleasant family to be in, all the sons and their daughter had such a thorough respect for their parents".
I remember visiting this historical site, and I liked the staircase that is painted white, and a red carpet runner on it.
Awesome !
Couldn't make the name of the form of government that Adams advocated when it was a "Jeopardy" answer. Would anyone mind telling me, as it wasn't mentioned during my August visit.
https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&f%5Bcollection_name_ssim%5D%5B%5D=Leon+Abdalian+Collection&f%5Binstitution_name_ssim%5D%5B%5D=Boston+Public+Library&q=quincy Photos by Leon Abdalian were recently added to the digital commonwealth repository. The photos are from 1929, and include Peacefield, the birthplaces, United First Parish
Had a fantastic visit today! Very much enjoyed Ranger Jane and Ranger Mike. Their enthusiasm and knowledge about the subject was evident!!
So sad!
Lovely visit today! I'll have to come back another time.
I have often believed that John Adams was slighted by historians until David McCullough reversed this almost 20 years ago. I'd like to mention two points that IMHO make Adams the most important Founding Father other than Washington. 1) In the inaugural election, Adams received the second most electoral votes. Proof of how much esteem his fellow countrymen had for him. 2) An often overlooked precedent President Adams set. After losing the election of 1800, he didn't protest or raise an army to hold on to power. What did he do? He went home. Setting the precedent for the peaceful transfer of power.