The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass

The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass Dedicated to presenting and promoting the art work of Louis C. Tiffany, with a special emphasis on Tiffany's history in Corona, Queens. The mission of The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass is to preserve, interpret, and develop its holdings of Tiffany lamps, windows, glass, and related objects.
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The collection is accessible through changing exhibitions, public programs, and publications. A distinctive feature of the Neustadt Collection is its commitment to foster a better understanding of Tiffany by making its objects available through traveling exhibitions to museums and galleries around the country. Additional activities include cataloguing the Neustadt's nearly 300,000 pieces of flat and pressed glass used by the Tiffany Studios. An archive containing representative samples of each type, color, texture and pattern of this material is being established for exhibition and study. The Neustadt Collection is also gathering oral histories from the families of former Tiffany employees in order to record and preserve the names and stories of the people who played an important role in Louis C. Tiffany's success.

Operating as usual

Celebrate the birth of creative virtuoso Louis C. Tiffany, born #onthisday in 1848, by tuning into our next Tête-à-Tête:...
02/18/2021

Celebrate the birth of creative virtuoso Louis C. Tiffany, born #onthisday in 1848, by tuning into our next Tête-à-Tête: Tiffany and the Lure of Egypt!
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​​Tiffany’s lifelong fascination with Egypt, sparked by a trip there as a young painter, fueled an enduring design influence on the work produced at the Tiffany Studios. Concurrent with the craze for ‘Egyptomania,’ Egyptian motifs, such as scarabs, papyrus, and winged suns, graced virtually every decorative medium produced at the Studios, from blown and leaded glass to mosaic and metalwork.
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​​This Egyptian influence found its most spectacular expression in Tiffany’s 1913 Egyptian Fête, a grand ball that closed the social season. Four hundred of society’s most influential members, all dressed in elaborate costumes, gathered at the Tiffany Studios on Madison Avenue, where they enjoyed performances by leading actors and dancers of the day. The New York Times raved that the event “eclipsed any fancy dress function ever presented in New York.”
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​​Join Neustadt curators Lindsy Parrott and Morgan Pruden on Tuesday, February 23 for a transportive evening with special guest Dr. Cynthia Williams, glass scholar, educator, and Neustadt Board President. Discover the origins of ‘Egyptomania,’ explore its influence over Tiffany’s own work, and delight in the spectacle of his legendary Egyptian Fête!
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​​Tickets available here: https://bit.ly/2MWjWG4
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​​​📸​ Louis C. Tiffany costumed for the spectacular Egyptian Fête he staged at the Tiffany Studios in 1913.

We’re celebrating #PresidentsDay with one of Tiffany’s most important commissions – the White House! In 1882, President ...
02/15/2021

We’re celebrating #PresidentsDay with one of Tiffany’s most important commissions – the White House! In 1882, President Chester A. Arthur commissioned Louis C. Tiffany and Company, Associated Artists, one of Tiffany’s earliest design firms, to redecorate a number of rooms on the State Floor of the White House, including the Entrance Hall, the Blue Room, and the Red Room.

Nicknamed "Elegant Arthur" for his flair for fashion (he reportedly own 80 pairs of pants!), he sought aesthetic interiors and furnishings, like those he was accustom to in Gilded Age New York, for his new residence in Washington. Tiffany's inspired mixing of patriotic symbols with exotic motifs were met with acclaim.

Swipe ➡️ to compare original photographs of the Entrance Hall and Blue room along with colored reconstructions.

She’s ready for her closeup! 🦋With its dazzling array of iridescent glass, our Butterfly shade can be tricky to photogra...
02/11/2021

She’s ready for her closeup! 🦋

With its dazzling array of iridescent glass, our Butterfly shade can be tricky to photograph. Thankfully we’re in the most capable of hands with our photographer.

Having a few things re-photographed and can’t wait to share the professional shots. In the meantime, check out our stories to go behind the scenes 📸

Flying into the week on the wings of our Dragonfly lamp!...#louiscomforttiffany #tiffanystudios #tiffanylamp #tiffanygla...
02/08/2021

Flying into the week on the wings of our Dragonfly lamp!
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#louiscomforttiffany #tiffanystudios #tiffanylamp #tiffanyglass #gildedage #decorativearts #designhistory #dragonfly #mondaymood #mondaymotivation

Louis C. Tiffany’s lifelong fascination with Egypt began in 1870, when he traveled there as a young painter eager to cap...
02/04/2021

Louis C. Tiffany’s lifelong fascination with Egypt began in 1870, when he traveled there as a young painter eager to capture the glorious colors of the desert and other exotic landscape scenes. This trip, and the treasures he saw, not only inspired his early paintings, but also became an enduring design influence.

Over the next few decades, Egyptian motifs, such as scarabs, papyrus, and winged suns, steadily made their way into the designs of the Tiffany Studios, appearing in virtually every decorative medium from blown and leaded glass to mosaic and metalwork. This Egyptian influence found its most spectacular expression in Tiffany’s 1913 Egyptian Fête, a grand ball that closed the social season. Four hundred of society’s most influential members, all dressed in elaborate costumes, gathered at the Tiffany Studios on Madison Avenue, where they enjoyed performances by leading actors and dancers of the day. The New York Times raved that the event “eclipsed any fancy dress function ever presented in New York."

Join Neustadt curators Lindsy Parrott and Morgan Pruden on Tuesday, February 23 for a transportive evening with special guest Dr. Cynthia Williams, glass scholar, educator, and Neustadt Board President. Discover the origins of ‘Egyptomania,’ explore its influence over Tiffany’s own work, and delight in the spectacle of his legendary Egyptian Fête!

Get your tickets here: https://bit.ly/2MWjWG4

We’re celebrating #BlackHistoryMonth by highlighting​​the life and work of architect, decorative artist, and stained-gla...
02/01/2021

We’re celebrating #BlackHistoryMonth by highlighting
​​the life and work of architect, decorative artist, and stained-glass designer William A. Hazel (1854-1929), who worked for Tiffany during the late 1880s as a representative in the Northwest during a construction surge. Tiffany hoped to leverage Hazel’s excellent reputation and connections to secure decorating commissions with the many new churches and civic buildings being built.
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​​Hazel had more than a decade of on-the-job training with leading architects in Boston and New York beginning in the 1870s. He also spent eight years in Boston with a well-known stained-glass firm, likely John La Farge during his groundbreaking work on Trinity Chapel.
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​​In 1887, Hazel moved from the East Coast to Minneapolis and then, in 1890, to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he oversaw the stained glass department at Forman, Ford & Co. and Brown & Haywood, respectively.
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​​He quickly earned the respect and admiration of his community not only for his design work but also because of his passionate advocacy for equal rights and the personal actions he took to fight discrimination. Hazel filed lawsuits under the Minnesota Civil Rights Act of 1885 on at least two separate occasions after a hotel and a restaurant denied him service. He won one suit and settled the other. These legal battles were widely covered in the newspapers, and Hazel was lauded by his community for standing up for Black rights. He went on to serve as Secretary of the Minnesota Civil Rights Committee, and, some years later, to teach architecture at the Tuskegee Institute and Howard University.
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​​Although working with Tiffany, the leading decorative firm of the day, was a significant accomplishment, it was quite a small one when considered against Hazel’s other professional accomplishments. Be sure to check out our highlight on Hazel to learn more about his commissions.

On January 27, 1880, Thomas Edison received patent no. 223.898 for his long-burning electric light bulb. After thousands...
01/27/2021

On January 27, 1880, Thomas Edison received patent no. 223.898 for his long-burning electric light bulb. After thousands of failed experiments testing different filaments, Edison finally found success with a carbon filament inside an oxygen-free bulb. With this combination the bulb could burn for up to 1,200 hours, helping pave the way for modern life. Three decades later, when asked to identify his greatest invention, Edison wrote in large script across the bottom of a letter: “Incandescent Electric Lighting and Power System.” 💡

⏳ Only a few hours left to get your ticket to ‘Ask A Tiffany Curator,’ our live Q&A session where Neustadt curators will...
01/26/2021

⏳ Only a few hours left to get your ticket to ‘Ask A Tiffany Curator,’ our live Q&A session where Neustadt curators will answer all your burning Tiffany questions 🔥

Join us here https://bit.ly/2YfX1YR

A special piece of “cylinder glass” in our Tiffany Glass Archive. The name refers to a glassmaking method in which glass...
01/25/2021

A special piece of “cylinder glass” in our Tiffany Glass Archive. The name refers to a glassmaking method in which glass is blown and shaped into a cylinder and then scored along its length. When placed in an annealing oven, the cylinder begins to unfurl and eventually forms a sheet like the one you see here.

Though typically associated with window production, Tiffany’s glassblowers adapted this method to create intricately patterned glass that could be used to create mosaics.

Trying to warm up in the glow of Tiffany lamps. 💡🧤🧤....#berniesanders #berniesandersmemes #tiffanylamps #theneustadt #qu...
01/23/2021

Trying to warm up in the glow of Tiffany lamps. 💡🧤🧤
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#berniesanders #berniesandersmemes #tiffanylamps #theneustadt #queensmuseum #louiscomfortiffany @berniesanders @queensmuseum

A beautiful angel on the bench, patiently waiting her turn to be re-leaded 👼 Did you know that when you donate to The Ne...
01/22/2021

A beautiful angel on the bench, patiently waiting her turn to be re-leaded 👼

Did you know that when you donate to The Neustadt, you’re supporting important conservation projects like this? To learn more about ways you can contribute, visit https://bit.ly/39ZbIow.

As the ancient symbol of unity, this Tree of Life window is the perfect image to capture the spirit of today. Let us be ...
01/20/2021

As the ancient symbol of unity, this Tree of Life window is the perfect image to capture the spirit of today. Let us be rooted in unity throughout the bud, bloom, and blossom of this next administration 🇺🇸
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📸 Allen P. Northrop Memorial Window: Tree of Life, 1903. Designed by Agnes Northrop (1857-1953). The Reformed Church of Flushing (now Bowne Street Community Church), Flushing, NY.

Next Tuesday, Neustadt curators are shining a light on everything from how Tiffany’s unique glass was made to the proces...
01/19/2021

Next Tuesday, Neustadt curators are shining a light on everything from how Tiffany’s unique glass was made to the process behind putting together exhibitions 💡

Join us on January 26 for this special ‘Ask A Curator’ episode of Tiffany Tête-à-Tête, where we’ll answer YOUR questions live! You can submit questions 3 ways:
❓Drop them in the comments below, or via the question tab in our stories.
❓Email your question to [email protected].
❓Ask questions live through the chat function on Zoom.

Get your tickets here: bit.ly/3qnY3hA

Ever wonder how a Tiffany lamp is made? Or what makes Tiffany glass so unique? Curious about the women who worked for Ti...
01/15/2021

Ever wonder how a Tiffany lamp is made? Or what makes Tiffany glass so unique? Curious about the women who worked for Tiffany? You’re in luck because we’re kicking off our 2021 Tête-à-Tête season with a live Q&A session! Join Neustadt curators Lindsy Parrott and Morgan Pruden on Tuesday, January 26 for our special ‘Ask A Curator’ episode. Drawing on their 30 years of combined experience specializing in all things Tiffany, Lindsy and Morgan welcome all your burning Tiffany questions.

Submit your questions two ways:
1. For a more in-depth, illustrated answer, email your question ahead of time to [email protected]. Please include “Ask A Tiffany Curator” in your subject line.
2. Ask questions live during the Tête-à-Tête through the chat function on Zoom.

Get your tickets here: https://bit.ly/3qnY3hA

Hand-chipped to create facets that flash like gemstones, or pressed in molds to produce smooth, regular surfaces, glass ...
01/13/2021

Hand-chipped to create facets that flash like gemstones, or pressed in molds to produce smooth, regular surfaces, glass “jewels” were available in a tantalizing assortment of colors, opacities, textures, shapes, and sizes. They were used to embellish lampshades and bases, adorn bronzework, and add extra dimension to windows and wall mosaics. Pictured here is a small sampling of the more than 110,000 jewels we have in our Tiffany Glass Archive 🌈

This Grape Library Lamp takes its form from the Wisteria, the first of the “flowering tree” models designed by Clara Dri...
01/11/2021

This Grape Library Lamp takes its form from the Wisteria, the first of the “flowering tree” models designed by Clara Driscoll in 1901. In this ingenious design, a bronze tree trunk supports a leaded glass canopy of red and purple grapes. This stunning shade is, in turn, suspended by a tangle of gnarled bronze branches. Not only do the branches enhance the realism of the shade, but the small openings between them allowed for the intense heat of early lightbulbs to easily escape. ♨️

📸 Grape Library Lamp, ca. 1905. The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass

This photo was taken almost 5 years ago, when Neustadt curators were researching Tiffany’s glass mosaics in the great ci...
01/06/2021

This photo was taken almost 5 years ago, when Neustadt curators were researching Tiffany’s glass mosaics in the great city of Chicago. Pictured is Assistant Curator Morgan Pruden, taking some detail shots of the fabulous glass mosaic and mother-of-pearl inlay at what was once the Chicago Public Library (now Chicago Cultural Center). Completed in 1897, the Chicago Public Library was one of Tiffany’s largest and most ambitious glass mosaic commissions.

Our hope for this year is to be able to travel again (safely) and explore more breathtaking Tiffany sites across the county. In preparation, we’re thinking of putting together a Tiffany Travel Guide for 2021 — what cities or states should we include? Let us know in the comments below 👇

Today is #NationalBirdDay, and we’re celebrating by paying homage to Tiffany’s favorite bird and avian muse: the peacock...
01/05/2021

Today is #NationalBirdDay, and we’re celebrating by paying homage to Tiffany’s favorite bird and avian muse: the peacock 🦚

Peacock feathers were one of Tiffany’s most beloved design motifs, and his artisans translated their resplendent colors into virtually every decorative medium, including glass, enamelware, metalwork, mosaic, and jewelry.

Our Peacock Library Lamp (pictured here) is one of only a handful of examples of this design extant today. The feather motif that decorates its colorful leaded-glass shade is also repeated on the foot of the bronze base, which is inlaid with iridescent glass.
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📸 Peacock Library Lamp, ca. 1905. The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass N.86.GL.07a,b.

Seeing as it’s #NationalTriviaDay, we thought we’d put together a fun little quiz about our Tiffany Glass Archive. Test ...
01/04/2021

Seeing as it’s #NationalTriviaDay, we thought we’d put together a fun little quiz about our Tiffany Glass Archive. Test your knowledge about all things #tiffanyglass over on our stories!

Starting our week off by sharing this snowy scene from a church in Norfolk, Connecticut. The panoply of colors present i...
12/28/2020

Starting our week off by sharing this snowy scene from a church in Norfolk, Connecticut. The panoply of colors present in Tiffany’s opalescent glass perfectly captures the beauty of fresh snow ❄️
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📸 Tiffany Studios. “Winter,” 1928. Battell Chapel, Church of Christ Congregational, Norfolk, Connecticut. Photo: Wayne Boucher

Nothing says “Season’s Greetings” quite like these radiant red poinsettias! Wishing all who celebrate a very Merry Chris...
12/25/2020

Nothing says “Season’s Greetings” quite like these radiant red poinsettias! Wishing all who celebrate a very Merry Christmas 🎄🎁🎅

Made in 1900 by the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, this beautiful memorial window depicts the three Wise Men best...
12/24/2020

Made in 1900 by the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, this beautiful memorial window depicts the three Wise Men bestowing their gifts upon the new baby Jesus. For Nativity scenes like this, also known as the “Adoration of the Magi,” Tiffany’s designers often took inspiration from turn-of-the-century painters like Heinrich Hoffmann (German, 1824-1911). For more Tiffany Nativity scenes, visit our Pinterest board “Yultide Tiffany”: https://bit.ly/2KXa6CM
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📸 Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company. Gates, Montieth, Bradford and Boyd Memorial Window: Nativity, 1900. First Congregational Church of Elyria, Elyria, Ohio. Photo: Donald Traser
📸 Adoration of the Magi, from Heinrich Hoffman’s 1887 series “Come Unto Me”

Americana Week is going virtual this year, and we’re joining in on the fun by giving our friends at  The Decorative Arts...
12/21/2020

Americana Week is going virtual this year, and we’re joining in on the fun by giving our friends at The Decorative Arts Trust a behind-the-scenes tour of our Tiffany Glass Archive. Tune in live on January 20 to experience this unique collection of more than a quarter of a million pieces of original Tiffany glass. If you can’t watch live, feat not! With your registration you will also receive a link to the recording to watch at your own convenience. For more information, and to register for this not-to-be-missed event, visit: https://bit.ly/2KKCU1y

Tiffany’s leaded-glass lamps were first conceived in 1898, just after Clara Driscoll returned to the studios for her thi...
12/18/2020

Tiffany’s leaded-glass lamps were first conceived in 1898, just after Clara Driscoll returned to the studios for her third and final tenure. Although Clara’s earliest lamp designs featured unique-shaped lampshades and elaborate mosaic bases, she quickly figured out how to cleverly balance her inclination towards these ambitious designs with the more practical need to manage production costs.

She began designing lampshades that could be made on the same mold, standardizing production without sacrificing her signature artistry. For example, the wooden mold used to create her iconic Wisteria lamp was reused for the Grape and Apple Blossom lamps you see here.

If you missed our Tête-à-Tête on Clara Driscoll, fear not! The recording is available for purchase here: https://bit.ly/2KCylWS
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📸 Wisteria Library Lamp, ca. 1901
📸 Grape Library Lamp, ca. 1905
📸 Apple Blossom Library Lamp, ca. 1905
The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass

Don't be late to the party! Remember to get your tickets for our upcoming Tête-à-Tête celebrating Tiffany designer Clara...
12/14/2020

Don't be late to the party! Remember to get your tickets for our upcoming Tête-à-Tête celebrating Tiffany designer Clara Driscoll's birthday.

Join Neustadt curators tomorrow evening as they take a closer look at Clara's remarkable life, starting with her early artistic training and design influences all the way through her three separate tenures at the Tiffany Studios. And we have a special surprise in store: we'll be sharing some never-before-seen photos of Clara, courtesy of her family! Get your tickets here: https://bit.ly/3qXTDPg

Completed in 1895 for the lobby of the Marquette Building in downtown Chicago, this Tiffany mosaic mural consists of six...
12/11/2020

Completed in 1895 for the lobby of the Marquette Building in downtown Chicago, this Tiffany mosaic mural consists of six panels that form a decorative frieze depicting the life and death of Jacques Marquette (French, 1637–1675), a Jesuit missionary who traveled down the Mississippi River in 1673.

Native American figures feature heavily in the mural, as Marquette encountered — and was aided by — many different tribes during his expedition. Based on Marquette’s own journal, we know that one such tribe was the Peoria, who were part of the Illinois Confederation, an alliance of tribes who lived in the Mississippi River Valley.

The figures in Tiffany’s mural, are supposed to represent the Peoria, however, they appear to be dressed as Plains Indians, an entirely separate group of tribes who inhabited the Great Plains. (There are also teepees pitched throughout the background, which were the homes of the nomadic tribes of the Great Plains, whereas the Peoria lived in longhouses.)

While this discrepancy is certainly disappointing, it’s not all that surprising given the climate of the time. At the turn of the century, there was a heightened fascination with the American West, and traveling shows that romanticized life on the frontier, like Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, became wildly popular. Many of these shows hired Native Americans from around the country to perform as “Show Indians.” No matter their tribal affiliation, though, they were often dressed as Plains Indians, surely contributing to the stereotypical image of Native Americans in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Address

5-26 46th Avenue
Queens, NY
11101

General information

THE NEUSTADT is a premier collection of Louis C. Tiffany’s celebrated lamps, windows, metalwork, and rare archival materials, including over a quarter of a million pieces of original Tiffany flat glass and glass jewels used to create his iconic designs. Dedicated to preservation, scholarship, education, and connoisseurship, the organization provides an in-depth look at the artistry of the Tiffany Studios and its contribution to a uniquely American chapter in the history of stained glass. The Neustadt is committed to sharing this story and its collections with diverse audiences through its gallery at the Queens Museum in New York City and exhibitions that travel to museums nationwide.

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Comments

Saw some beautiful Tiffany windows at Flagler College in St. Augustine, FL. It was the former Ponde De León Hotel. Didn't get to the tour of the dining room withTiffany windows
Congratulations, Lindsay! You are doing great work.
The Neustadt collection is simply engaging art.