The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass

The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass Dedicated to presenting and promoting the art work of Louis C. Tiffany, with a special emphasis on Tiffany's history in Corona, Queens. The mission of The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass is to preserve, interpret, and develop its holdings of Tiffany lamps, windows, glass, and related objects.
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The collection is accessible through changing exhibitions, public programs, and publications. A distinctive feature of the Neustadt Collection is its commitment to foster a better understanding of Tiffany by making its objects available through traveling exhibitions to museums and galleries around the country. Additional activities include cataloguing the Neustadt's nearly 300,000 pieces of flat and pressed glass used by the Tiffany Studios. An archive containing representative samples of each type, color, texture and pattern of this material is being established for exhibition and study. The Neustadt Collection is also gathering oral histories from the families of former Tiffany employees in order to record and preserve the names and stories of the people who played an important role in Louis C. Tiffany's success.

Operating as usual

We’re bringing the sunshine on this cloudy Monday with our bright and cheery Dragonfly Hanging Shade ​☀️​​​​​The swarm o...
06/21/2021

We’re bringing the sunshine on this cloudy Monday with our bright and cheery Dragonfly Hanging Shade ​☀️​
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​​The swarm of dragonflies in this one-of-a-kind shade gives it a kinetic energy that perfectly captures our excitement for summer. We especially love how turquoise “jewels” punctuate the swirling design with bright pinpoints of light.
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​​​📸​ Dragonfly Hanging Shade, ca. 1905
​​Photos: David Schlegel

We want to hear from you!Can you spare three minutes to complete this short survey about our virtual programs? Your inpu...
06/17/2021

We want to hear from you!

Can you spare three minutes to complete this short survey about our virtual programs? Your input will shape the direction of our future offerings: https://bit.ly/3cOSYuf

To thank you for your time, you’ll be entered into a drawing for your choice of a Tiffany tote bag or umbrella. The winner will be announced July 1 on social media and contacted by email. Thank you!

We want to hear from you!

Can you spare three minutes to complete this short survey about our virtual programs? Your input will shape the direction of our future offerings: https://bit.ly/3cOSYuf

To thank you for your time, you’ll be entered into a drawing for your choice of a Tiffany tote bag or umbrella. The winner will be announced July 1 on social media and contacted by email. Thank you!

At the turn of the century, peacocks became a popular artistic motif because of an increased interest in exoticism. Tiff...
06/08/2021

At the turn of the century, peacocks became a popular artistic motif because of an increased interest in exoticism. Tiffany used the peacock motif repeatedly across all forms of art, including his leaded glass windows and lampshades, blown glass vases, and mosaics. Tiffany’s interest in this exotic bird extended beyond his artistic practice. He kept peacocks as pets at his estate on Long Island, and he even hosted a “Peacock Feast” for 150 guests, which included a procession of Tiffany’s daughters and their friends in various forms of peacock-themed costumes.
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​​Tiffany’s glass was the perfect medium to capture the marvelous colors of peacock feathers, as we can see here in this Peacock lamp from The Neustadt’s collection. The swirling green blown glass base makes this particular example quite rare.
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​​​📸​ Peacock Library Lamp, ca. 1905. Photos: David Schlegel

This Sunday, come learn the fascinating, little-known story of the talented women behind Tiffany’s extraordinary lamps. ...
06/04/2021

This Sunday, come learn the fascinating, little-known story of the talented women behind Tiffany’s extraordinary lamps. Join Neustadt Executive Director and Curator, Lindsy Parrott, for a Zoom talk, hosted by the Nassau County Museum of Art, putting these beloved stained glass objects in a completely new light. Register here: https://bit.ly/2TLlyGp
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​​The Ladies Behind Tiffany's Lamps
​​Sunday, June 6 | 3:00 pm via ZOOM
$10 Members, $20 Non-members
Pre-registration required, member discount applied at checkout
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​​​📸​ Reed Young

This Sunday, come learn the fascinating, little-known story of the talented women behind Tiffany’s extraordinary lamps. Join Neustadt Executive Director and Curator, Lindsy Parrott, for a Zoom talk, hosted by the Nassau County Museum of Art, putting these beloved stained glass objects in a completely new light. Register here: https://bit.ly/2TLlyGp
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​​The Ladies Behind Tiffany's Lamps
​​Sunday, June 6 | 3:00 pm via ZOOM
$10 Members, $20 Non-members
Pre-registration required, member discount applied at checkout
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​​​📸​ Reed Young

Join our friends at Art Glass Forum  NY next Tuesday, June 8 for their annual Emerging Scholars lecture series. This yea...
06/02/2021
Emerging Glass Scholars: From Caliphate Archaeology to Gilded Age Landmarks

Join our friends at Art Glass Forum NY next Tuesday, June 8 for their annual Emerging Scholars lecture series. This year’s speakers have crawled into buildings' crannies, delved into archives, and analyzed glass shards to make groundbreaking discoveries. Read more about their fascinating talks below:

Focusing on ancient Abbasid glass from modern-day Iran, Iraq, and Syria, Matthew Elliott Gillman (PhD candidate, Columbia University) will discuss glass artists' little-understood techniques, hard-to-trace identities, and the unknowns of tantalizingly off-limits archaeological sites.

Kayli Rideout (PhD candidate, Boston University) will explore Tiffany Studios' Confederacy memorial windows commissioned by churches and universities across the South, recontextualizing the Studios’ work from the Gilded Age to the period of Jim Crow.

Lea Stephenson (PhD candidate, University of Delaware) has documented a little-known stained-glass maker, D. Turno, which collaborated on Aesthetic Movement buildings designed by luminaries including McKim, Mead & White. Turno, based in New York, innovatively synthesized Queen Anne, American Colonial Revival, Japanese and Islamic influences.

RSVP for this FREE public event on Eventbrite: https://bit.ly/3yWiXcu

PhD candidates share exciting new discoveries and analysis of glass across the ages.

Today we remember America’s servicemen and women who courageously put our country’s freedom ahead of their own personal ...
05/31/2021

Today we remember America’s servicemen and women who courageously put our country’s freedom ahead of their own personal safety.
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​​This mosaic panel—”Prayer of the Christian Solider”—is a World War I memorial honoring five parishioners from the First Presbyterian Church in Binghamton, New York. The extraordinary beauty of the panel, which is one of Tiffany Studios’ finest, speaks to the congregation’s profound sense of loss. These young men were well loved and had bright futures ahead of them: two had degrees from Yale, another from Harvard; one was a civil servant, and two practiced law in the community; one was described as among the most popular young men in Binghamton, while the memorial service of another set an attendance record. All were mourned and missed.
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​​The panel’s design of an armored soldier on horseback, set against a shimmering background featuring the Lord’s Prayer in Gothic script, is a fitting memorial for these young men. Not only does this imagery embody their valor and heroism, but the use of luminous iridescent glass imparts an ethereal, spiritual quality to this panel honoring the five bright lives lost to war.
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​​​📸​ Prayer of the Christian Soldier, 1919. Tiffany Studios, designed by Frederick Wilson. Located at the United Presbyterian Church (formerly First Presbyterian Church), Binghamton, New York
​​Photos: The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York
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​​#louiscomforttiffany #tiffanystudios #tiffanyglass #tiffanylamp #tiffanylamps #frederickwilson #glassmosaic #iridescent #glassart #decorativearts #designhistory #memorial #memorialday #memorialdayweekend #landofthefree #homeofthebrave #landofthefreebecauseofthebrave #worldwar1

Though there are many Tiffany lamps that share the same design, each one is unique thanks to the power of glass selectio...
05/27/2021

Though there are many Tiffany lamps that share the same design, each one is unique thanks to the power of glass selection 💥

Compare two Wisteria lamps in The Neustadt’s collection and let us know which glass palette you prefer in the comments below 👇
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📸 David Schlegel

We’re buzzing with excitement because love is in the air! Cicada Season is upon us once again, and after a 17-year hiatu...
05/26/2021

We’re buzzing with excitement because love is in the air! Cicada Season is upon us once again, and after a 17-year hiatus, billions of cicadas across the eastern US have emerged from the ground to find a mate. The loud buzzing drone you hear is actually their mating call.

We’re embracing the impending chorus of cicadas with this delightful enamel-on-copper Cicada Box from Louis C. Tiffany’s personal collection (now in the collection of the VMFA Virginia Museum of Fine Arts). Though wee in size, this decorative box packs a punch with its dreamy iridescent enamels. Who knew bugs could be so chic!?!
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​​​📸​ Cicada Box, ca. 1900. Enamel on copper. Overall: 2 1/8 × 4 3/4 in. Inscribed on base: 154 A-coll. L.C. Tiffany. Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

Don't miss your chance this evening at 5:30 pm (EST) to learn about the extraordinary Tiffany-designed Ayer Mansion, the...
05/25/2021

Don't miss your chance this evening at 5:30 pm (EST) to learn about the extraordinary Tiffany-designed Ayer Mansion, the Boston private residence whose future is uncertain. Built and decorated between 1899 and 1902, the Ayer Mansion is considered the most comprehensive surviving example of Tiffany’s residential work. Its design also anticipates the ideas Tiffany explored and developed at his own country estate, Laurelton Hall, which was destroyed by fire in 1957.

The Ayer Mansion was recently offered for sale by the nonprofit who owns it, and preservationists are concerned that the ongoing efforts to painstakingly preserve this National Historic Landmark will be halted, subject to a lower standard of restoration, or worse. Public access and scholarly study may also be significantly impacted.

Located in Boston’s posh Back Bay neighborhood, the Ayer Mansion stands out as the tallest and most striking home on the block — a towering five stories of modern white granite clad in colorful stone and glass mosaic, amidst a sea of red-brick and brownstone townhomes. Created for textile magnate and art collector Frederick Ayer, its daring Near Eastern-inspired design must have shocked conservative Bostonians.

Ornately patterned leaded-glass windows and skylights, bands of richly colored glass mosaic inlaid into marble, and monumental glass vases transformed into electric lamps are among the artistic marvels decorating the mansion’s interior. The most stunning feature, however, is the trompe l’oeil peristyle pavilion on the stair landing in the entrance hall. Made entirely of glass mosaic and accented with gold leaf, the pavilion shimmers as if illuminated by the rising or setting sun.

Please join us for a fascinating evening with guest speaker Jeanne Pelletier, Preservation Advisor for the Campaign for the Ayer Mansion, to learn about this nationally-landmarked treasure whose future is uncertain. Tickets available here: http://bit.ly/33E143I

Don't miss your chance this evening at 5:30 pm (EST) to learn about the extraordinary Tiffany-designed Ayer Mansion, the Boston private residence whose future is uncertain. Built and decorated between 1899 and 1902, the Ayer Mansion is considered the most comprehensive surviving example of Tiffany’s residential work. Its design also anticipates the ideas Tiffany explored and developed at his own country estate, Laurelton Hall, which was destroyed by fire in 1957.

The Ayer Mansion was recently offered for sale by the nonprofit who owns it, and preservationists are concerned that the ongoing efforts to painstakingly preserve this National Historic Landmark will be halted, subject to a lower standard of restoration, or worse. Public access and scholarly study may also be significantly impacted.

Located in Boston’s posh Back Bay neighborhood, the Ayer Mansion stands out as the tallest and most striking home on the block — a towering five stories of modern white granite clad in colorful stone and glass mosaic, amidst a sea of red-brick and brownstone townhomes. Created for textile magnate and art collector Frederick Ayer, its daring Near Eastern-inspired design must have shocked conservative Bostonians.

Ornately patterned leaded-glass windows and skylights, bands of richly colored glass mosaic inlaid into marble, and monumental glass vases transformed into electric lamps are among the artistic marvels decorating the mansion’s interior. The most stunning feature, however, is the trompe l’oeil peristyle pavilion on the stair landing in the entrance hall. Made entirely of glass mosaic and accented with gold leaf, the pavilion shimmers as if illuminated by the rising or setting sun.

Please join us for a fascinating evening with guest speaker Jeanne Pelletier, Preservation Advisor for the Campaign for the Ayer Mansion, to learn about this nationally-landmarked treasure whose future is uncertain. Tickets available here: http://bit.ly/33E143I

Shellebrate #WorldTurtleDay by taking a closer look at Tiffany’s “turtleback” tiles. So-called because they resemble the...
05/23/2021

Shellebrate #WorldTurtleDay by taking a closer look at Tiffany’s “turtleback” tiles. So-called because they resemble the shallow-domed shells of turtles, these tiles were used to embellish leaded-glass windows, lighting fixtures, lampshades and bases, and even wall mosaics. Pictured here is our dreamy Turtleback Chandelier which features two different applications of turtleback tiles: whole tiles are inset along the top border while hand-chipped facets form decorative balls below.

The chunkiest of Tiffany’s “jewels,” turtleback tiles were were made by pressing molten glass into an iron mold. Swipe to see a picture of former Tiffany Studios foreman, Henry Wahlers, doing just that!
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📸 Pressing “Turtleback” Tiles at Louis C. Tiffany Furnaces, Inc., Corona, New York, 1925. Photo courtesy of Paul Doros.

Celebrating #NationalMaritimeDay with this marine dream from the Tiffany Glass Company. Made in 1890 for St. Andrew’s Du...
05/22/2021

Celebrating #NationalMaritimeDay with this marine dream from the Tiffany Glass Company. Made in 1890 for St. Andrew’s Dune Church in Southhampton, New York, this breathtaking memorial window is brimming with marine life…literally! A border of mussels, oysters, and turkey wing clam shells, accented by quartz stones and pebbles from shores of nearby beaches, frame a glorious sun-lit crown. Our favorite feature is the memorial inscription housed in a piece of Tiffany’s famed “drapery” glass -- the ridges of which simulate those of a large clam shell. Overall the most perfect window for a seaside church!
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​​​📸​ Mary E. Holbrook Memorial Window, ca. 1890. St. Andrew’s Dune Church, Southampton, New York.

Designed and decorated by Louis C. Tiffany between 1899 and 1902, the Ayer Mansion in Boston has a long and storied hist...
05/20/2021

Designed and decorated by Louis C. Tiffany between 1899 and 1902, the Ayer Mansion in Boston has a long and storied history. Once home to textile magnate Frederick Ayer (1822-1918), today, the Ayer Mansion is considered the most comprehensive surviving example of Tiffany’s residential work and is filled with artistic marvels like ornately patterned leaded-glass windows and skylights, bands of richly colored glass mosaic, and monumental green glass vases transformed into electric lamps.

Recently offered for sale by the nonprofit who owns it, preservationists are concerned that the ongoing efforts to painstakingly preserve this National Historic Landmark will be halted, subject to a lower standard of restoration, or worse. Public access and scholarly study may also be significantly impacted.

Join us next Tuesday, May 25, at 5:30 pm (EST) for a special lecture with Jeanne Pelletier, Preservation Advisor for the Campaign for the Ayer Mansion, to learn more about this Tiffany treasure whose future hangs in the balance.

Tickets available here: https://bit.ly/33E143I

Along with the rest of the world, museums have changed drastically over the past year. Despite all the difficulties that...
05/18/2021

Along with the rest of the world, museums have changed drastically over the past year. Despite all the difficulties that came with adjusting to this “new normal,” it forced us to rethink how we fulfill our mission of helping people #experiencetiffanyglass. We’re glad to have had this time to develop new digital programs, like our monthly Zoom series Tiffany Tête-à-Tête, that allow us to cary on with fulfilling our mission while reaching an even broader audience outside of New York City. And while we eagerly await the day we can welcome you back to our Tiffany Glass Archive (with open arms!), we’re excited to continue to develop our digital offerings. You can look forward to more virtual lectures and even virtual exhibitions in the near future. Stay tuned for all that and more!
​​
​​#InternationalMuseumDay
​​@icomofficiel

Along with the rest of the world, museums have changed drastically over the past year. Despite all the difficulties that came with adjusting to this “new normal,” it forced us to rethink how we fulfill our mission of helping people #experiencetiffanyglass. We’re glad to have had this time to develop new digital programs, like our monthly Zoom series Tiffany Tête-à-Tête, that allow us to cary on with fulfilling our mission while reaching an even broader audience outside of New York City. And while we eagerly await the day we can welcome you back to our Tiffany Glass Archive (with open arms!), we’re excited to continue to develop our digital offerings. You can look forward to more virtual lectures and even virtual exhibitions in the near future. Stay tuned for all that and more!
​​
​​#InternationalMuseumDay
​​@icomofficiel

Join us on Tuesday, May 25 at 5:30 pm (EST) for a special lecture on Boston’s magnificent Ayer Mansion, designed and dec...
05/13/2021

Join us on Tuesday, May 25 at 5:30 pm (EST) for a special lecture on Boston’s magnificent Ayer Mansion, designed and decorated by Tiffany between 1899 and 1902 and considered the most comprehensive surviving example of Tiffany’s residential work.
​​
​​Recently offered for sale by the nonprofit who owns it, preservationists are concerned that the ongoing efforts to painstakingly preserve this National Historic Landmark will be halted, subject to a lower standard of restoration, or worse. Public access and scholarly study may also be significantly impacted.
​​
​​Located in Boston’s posh Back Bay neighborhood, the Ayer Mansion stands out as the tallest and most striking home on the block — a towering five stories of modern white granite clad in colorful stone and glass mosaic, amidst a sea of red-brick and brownstone townhomes. Created for textile magnate and art collector Frederick Ayer, its daring Near Eastern-inspired design must have shocked conservative Bostonians.
​​
​​Ornately patterned leaded-glass windows and skylights, bands of richly colored glass mosaic inlaid into white marble, and monumental green glass vases transformed into electric lamps are among the artistic marvels decorating the mansion’s interior. The most stunning feature, however, is the trompe l’oeil peristyle pavilion on the stair landing in the entrance hall. Made entirely of glass mosaic and accented with gold leaf, the pavilion shimmers as if illuminated by the rising or setting sun.
​​
​​Please join us for a fascinating evening with guest speaker Jeanne Pelletier, Preservation Advisor for the Campaign for the Ayer Mansion, to learn about this nationally-landmarked treasure whose future is uncertain.

Tickets available here: https://bit.ly/33E143I

Join us on Tuesday, May 25 at 5:30 pm (EST) for a special lecture on Boston’s magnificent Ayer Mansion, designed and decorated by Tiffany between 1899 and 1902 and considered the most comprehensive surviving example of Tiffany’s residential work.
​​
​​Recently offered for sale by the nonprofit who owns it, preservationists are concerned that the ongoing efforts to painstakingly preserve this National Historic Landmark will be halted, subject to a lower standard of restoration, or worse. Public access and scholarly study may also be significantly impacted.
​​
​​Located in Boston’s posh Back Bay neighborhood, the Ayer Mansion stands out as the tallest and most striking home on the block — a towering five stories of modern white granite clad in colorful stone and glass mosaic, amidst a sea of red-brick and brownstone townhomes. Created for textile magnate and art collector Frederick Ayer, its daring Near Eastern-inspired design must have shocked conservative Bostonians.
​​
​​Ornately patterned leaded-glass windows and skylights, bands of richly colored glass mosaic inlaid into white marble, and monumental green glass vases transformed into electric lamps are among the artistic marvels decorating the mansion’s interior. The most stunning feature, however, is the trompe l’oeil peristyle pavilion on the stair landing in the entrance hall. Made entirely of glass mosaic and accented with gold leaf, the pavilion shimmers as if illuminated by the rising or setting sun.
​​
​​Please join us for a fascinating evening with guest speaker Jeanne Pelletier, Preservation Advisor for the Campaign for the Ayer Mansion, to learn about this nationally-landmarked treasure whose future is uncertain.

Tickets available here: https://bit.ly/33E143I

Address

5-26 46th Avenue
Queens, NY
11101

General information

THE NEUSTADT is a premier collection of Louis C. Tiffany’s celebrated lamps, windows, metalwork, and rare archival materials, including over a quarter of a million pieces of original Tiffany flat glass and glass jewels used to create his iconic designs. Dedicated to preservation, scholarship, education, and connoisseurship, the organization provides an in-depth look at the artistry of the Tiffany Studios and its contribution to a uniquely American chapter in the history of stained glass. The Neustadt is committed to sharing this story and its collections with diverse audiences through its gallery at the Queens Museum in New York City and exhibitions that travel to museums nationwide.

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Comments

Saw some beautiful Tiffany windows at Flagler College in St. Augustine, FL. It was the former Ponde De León Hotel. Didn't get to the tour of the dining room withTiffany windows
Congratulations, Lindsay! You are doing great work.
The Neustadt collection is simply engaging art.