Plaistow Historical Society, Inc

Plaistow Historical Society, Inc Plaistow Historical Society, Inc. 127 Main St. Plaistow NH 03865 USA The Plaistow Historical Society museum, houses in the former firehouse is filled with displays of our collection of local artifacts and genealogical information about Plaistow and its history.
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Operating as usual

01/18/2021

1837 diary:

"January 18th- A comfortable day. The Mechanics of the village are taking extravagant sleigh rides. They sent to Boston for their sleighs and horses which cost 20 young fellows $300."

01/17/2021

Isaac's diary for this day in 1837:

"January 17th- Fine day. The members of the North Parish convened at J. Bricketts this evening to consult on the expediancy of having an exparte counsel soon to confer with Peckham and the Church relative to his discharge from his present ministrations and contract."

01/16/2021

1837 diary:

"January 16th- Pleasant. J. Harris called and is collecting money to aid Mr Bartlett."

01/15/2021

Diary for today in 1837:

"January 15th- Coldest day this year. Mr Peckham preached. Thermometer 15 degrees below zero. R. F. Williams called. The house of James Bartlett in the Northerly part of Plaistow caught fire at half past one this afternoon and was entirely consumed with nearly all its contents. The fire caught on the roof. Loss 500 dollars."

We're not sure exactly where this house was located. It's possible Isaac is referring to a house on Sweet Hill.

Here’s another class picture from Pollard School, this one the 8th grade graduating class of 1939. Most students were 14...
01/14/2021

Here’s another class picture from Pollard School, this one the 8th grade graduating class of 1939. Most students were 14.

We have the names for the 22 class members, but not the flower boy and girl.

Apologies to Scott Thompson Young who had requested the Class of 1969. Unfortunately, the latest class picture we have is 1965.

If you all like these Pollard School class pictures, we will post one each week. Let us know which years you are interested in. We don’t have every year, but we do have quite a few, going back to the early 1900s, some with name, others without.

Also, we will post a list of years we are missing and hopefully someone has a copy they could scan and give to us.

01/14/2021

1837 diary:

"January 14th- Saturday. Cold day. Returned a lot of shoes to Brickett & Noyes. This is the coldest night this year."

01/13/2021

"January 13th- **** William **** called. I went down to Bricketts evening and rode home with****Williams and Mr Tukesbury."

**** designates the diary was eaten by mice

Plaistow didn't get electricity until 1911, but 17 residents had telephones as early as July 11, 1898. This document is ...
01/12/2021

Plaistow didn't get electricity until 1911, but 17 residents had telephones as early as July 11, 1898.

This document is from a speech made on October 23, 1958 at the cornerstone laying for the new telephone building at 95 Main Street (on the east side two up from the corner of Pollard Road). It lists the subscribers in Plaistow and Newton in 1904. Many of the subscribers in Plaistow were store owners and rich enough to afford the new-fangled contraption. The town doctor, Dr. Landman, then living at 161 Main Street on the corner of Maple Avenue, now had a phone to make and receive emergency calls.

The speech-maker that day in 1958 is unknown, but likely worked for the telephone company or was a town selectman. He or she was proud to brag about the 1,500 subscribers expected on the 1959 directory.

The population of the town was 1,027 in 1900 and 2,915 in 1960, but the number of residences and businesses was probably 1/2 of each number, so virtually everyone had a phone by 1960 compared to maybe only 5% in 1904. Back then, you could pay the store owners to use their phone in emergencies. Cass’s Store (located on the west side just before the railroad crossing at 142 Main Street) even had a pay phone

Today, the brick building at 95 Main is still occupied by a phone company, now Fair Point Communications, part of their Northern New England operation.

The 1958 cornerstone is still there in the southern corner. We have tried calling the office to see if they had any records of the cornerstone containing documents to be opened in the future. They haven’t returned the calls and seem to have little interest.

01/12/2021

1837 diary:

"January 12th- ****Fair weather and not very cold."

**** designates the diary was eaten by mice

01/11/2021

Isaac's diary from 1837:

"January 11th- **** sledding is all improved. Mrs H. **** then set out for home at Hampstead."

**** designates the diary was eaten by mice

Pollard School was built in 1911. Here's a class from 1923 gathered on the north-side entrance. None will win an award f...
01/10/2021

Pollard School was built in 1911. Here's a class from 1923 gathered on the north-side entrance.

None will win an award for smiling, especial Mrs. Maude Duston, the teacher. Can you find the one kid with at least a half-smile. Maybe indigestion?

01/10/2021

1837 diary:

"January 10th- Quite a pleasant day. Sleighing very complete. William M. Quimby began to work for me and agrees to make 3 prs of imitation half heels per day for 3 months and I agree to give him $13.00 per month and board him."

01/09/2021

Diary for today in 1837:

"January 9th- Cold morning. Subscription papers are circulating to assist Mr.Dow. I hope the rich will give with liberal hands"

01/08/2021

We’re trying to get a hold of Pam Kimball Field who now lives in Newport RI or her brother Daniel Firld who lives in Atkinson. We tried messaging them but no reply.

Does anyone know them and can let them know we’d like to talk with them?

1837 diary:"January 8th- Fair weather and not very cold. About half past four this morning Joshua Dow's house in Plaisto...
01/08/2021

1837 diary:

"January 8th- Fair weather and not very cold. About half past four this morning Joshua Dow's house in Plaistow caught fire and was entirely consumed together with all the buildings adjoining and almost all their contents. The fire caught in the shoe shop by means of a fire board through which the funnel passed. Dow was insured 600 and his loss will be from 1200 to 1600 dollars Cyrus Ayer boarded there and he lost three or four hundred dollars. Dows papers were all burnt. Great loss. Leavitt, C. Ayers apprentice was badly burnt. "

This house was rebuilt and is currently the house at 56 Forrest street. Here's Isaac's actual diary entry.

01/07/2021

Isaac's diary for this day in 1837:

"January 7th- Fair weather and a heavy wind...Went down to Bricketts."

Who misses the Dairy Queen? The Grand Opening was in June of 1966. Were you there to grab a Brazier Burger, fries and a ...
01/06/2021

Who misses the Dairy Queen?

The Grand Opening was in June of 1966. Were you there to grab a Brazier Burger, fries and a sundae or a Dilly Bar?

Located at 49 Plaistow Road (Route 125) below Garden Road, this was the go-to spot for ice cream many years.

Why it closed is a mystery given its popularity, but that property is now for sale as the auto loan company has closed. If you're brave you can still get a Dairy Queen franchise!

Most importantly, whoever buys it should be required to keep the cut-through there open!

01/06/2021

1837 diary:

"January 6th- Fair weather and very blustering."

The Plaistow Lions Club has served our town now for 71 years. Sorry we missed commemorating them on their 70th!The chart...
01/05/2021

The Plaistow Lions Club has served our town now for 71 years. Sorry we missed commemorating them on their 70th!

The charter was issued on May 18th of 1949 and 38 members signed it. The original is kept at the Historical Society Museum. (Maybe some current members didn't know that.)see scan of charter.

Five of the charter members were photographed by the Plaistow News in 1969 at the 20th anniversary as shown on the accompanying scan. We're not 100% sure, but we believe that none are still living today.

Do you recognize anyone on the charter or in the picture? An ancestor? Someone you knew?

The Plaistow Lions are still going strong today, now in the midst of collecting for the St. Luke Food Pantry .

Thanks to all current members for all they do for those less fortunate and for our town!

01/05/2021

Diary for this day in 1837:

"January 5th- Very cold morning. Sleighing good. Alfred Webster called. Joab cut his finger."

01/04/2021

1837 diary:

"January 4th- Fair weather. Went to a sing in the evening at Col. N. Clarks. John Kelley Esqr. Our Chorister was absent being very sick with lung fever Mrs Worthen (formerly Harriet Kimball) with her child came here. Cold night."

01/03/2021

Many thanks to Dick and Lee Hawkins (Richard-Lee Hawkins ) for their recent donation of three boxes of historic documents and items mostly from Lee’s mother Mina and father J. Russell Colcord, some even from her grandfather Arthur Colcord.

We are currently going through them, many of them unique items and will post some scans in the future.

If anyone has old Plaistow documents, pictures or artifacts in their basement or attic, please consider donating them to us. Just email us at [email protected]. That way we can safeguard them and share them with everyone.

Who remembers the Custeau's Supermarket? it was located in the Hoyt City Plaza about where Papa Gino's is today. Their G...
01/03/2021

Who remembers the Custeau's Supermarket?

it was located in the Hoyt City Plaza about where Papa Gino's is today.

Their Grand Opening was on May 21st of 1969. We believe it operated here until 1984, maybe longer.

Here's some pics and ads with names of employees you might have known. You may have to zoom in to see who's there.

01/03/2021

Diary for this day in 1837:

"January 3rd- A confounded cold south wind. Snow may be perhaps six inches deep. Mrs Stevens died on Sunday last with a shock of the palsy aged 65 years."

01/02/2021

1837 diary:

"January 2nd- Some appearance of rain. Thawy. Began to snow towards night. Wind S.East."

On this day in 1899, it was a bit chilly here!
01/02/2021

On this day in 1899, it was a bit chilly here!

01/01/2021

Bonus diary entry for this day in 1840, the first day that the railroad cars ran through Plaistow:

"January 1st- Severely cold. The passenger cars commenced running on the railroad from Bradford toward Exeter as far as East Kingston. This road is acceptably reported as being the best in the United States. The snow in open places bears a horse."

01/01/2021

Isaac Merrill's diary for New Year's Day in 1837:

"January 1st- And still another year has been introduced. During the past no death has occurred in this neighborhood and may the present glide away as peaceful and quiet. The snow fell about three inches deep last night. Continued to snow all the forenoon and then had the appearance of rain. Mr Peckham preached. Sarah Haseltine (Steph. Hs Daughter) was married this evening to Elvin Taylor of Boston. Snowy evening."

12/31/2020

Isaac's diary for the last day of 1836:

"December 31st- Moderates considerable. Hazen Clement spent the evening here. Cloudy in the evening. Wind southeast. Upon the whole December has been quite a pleasant month. 1836 farewell."

Congratulations to Virginia Eastman who is our 2020 Volunteer of the Year. She was awarded a plaque this afternoon at he...
12/31/2020

Congratulations to Virginia Eastman who is our 2020 Volunteer of the Year. She was awarded a plaque this afternoon at her house with family in attendance.

Ginnie spent many hours transcribing three unique historical items:

1. The memories of Charlie Crockett

2. The diary of William Hills from 1883.

3. The meeting minutes for 1927 through 1932 of the Village Improvement Society.

Now that we have these digital documents, we can easily search them for the unique historical information they contain. And, we can begin to share them here on our page.

Charles Meriden Crockett (1899-1989) lived at what is now 2 Center Circle in an old farmhouse on the north corner of Center circle and Main Street. He was born in Plaistow and lived here 90 years. In 1928, he married Vivian Landman and they lived there until 1958 when they sold the 8 acre farm to J. Russell Colcord who then built Center Circle.

Charlie & Vivian then built the first house on Center Circle, #17, where they lived out their lives. In 1982, Charlie related his memories of Plaistow to Cliff Cook who wrote them in a notebook, much of it unique information on people & places in town.

Ginnie transcribed that interesting interview.

William Hills (1822-1909) was a lawyer and botanist who built & lived at the Linden Cottage on Elm Street. He kept a diary from 1883 through his death in 1909. Each diary was written in his "lawyeresque" handwriting in annual diaries, difficult to read.

Ginnie was able to transcribe 1883 with a lot of hard work.

The Village Improvement Society was a group of women in town who formed a club to support projects within the village center that beautified the town from 1893 through the 1940s. These women planted trees, installed sidewalks, bought a snow plow to plow them, beautified Pollard Park, and helped bring the Civil War Monument to the park in 1908, amongst many other projects.

Ginnie said she found the work demanding, but rewarding and she loved learning about the town's history.

Please join us in congratulating and thanking her.

By the way, the Historical Society could use your assistance on transcription and other projects. If you have a few hours, please contact us at [email protected] This would give you access to all these amazing old documents we have and allow us to share them more easily here and in other ways.

12/30/2020

1836 diary:

"December 30th- Very cold and windy. A pedlar called."

12/29/2020

Diary for today in 1836:

"December 29th- Moderates. Cloudy morning. Fair towards night. G. M. Kimball, J. Minor and John Emerson spent the evening."

12/28/2020

1836 diary:

"December 28th- Rather more moderate. Last night was the coldest we have had this season. Had a sing at the meetinghouse."

12/27/2020

Diary for this day in 1836:

"December 27th- Fair weather and cold. Half an inch of snow. J. Eaton hauled me load of wood."

12/26/2020

1836 diary:

"December 26th- About such a morning as yesterday. Began to rain in the forenoon and continued all day. Wind southeast. Johnson Noyes called. Began to snow in the evening at eight clock. Fair weather at ten."

Address

127 Main St
Plaistow, NH
03865

Opening Hours

Thursday 10:00 - 12:00

Telephone

+16039741090

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Good Morning. As a follow up to my post yesterday I have created a petition that I hope you will all sign and share with members of our community who would like to see our town begin to preserve its history. Please click the link below and sign and then share it with your friends and other members of the community who share the same feeling. I have never done a petition before so I don't know if it will work but at least it will give us a small voice. There is no reason to donate any type of money should the Change website ask for it. I plan to watch the meeting Thursday but I do not plan at this time to speak up. This is as far as my comfort level goes. I plan to submit the petition prior to the meeting so the more signatures we can get in the next three days the better. If there is someone out there who is passionate about this that would like to step up and speak that would be appreciated as well. The rest of the info is in the petition.
Helen Hart, Plaistow Town Clerk — Recollections Samuel D. Conti, Esq., Plaistow (NH) Board of Selectmen, 1978-1981 April 20, 2020 When I learned of the passing of Helen Hart, the long time Town Clerk of Plaistow, several thought and images careened through my mind. The most prominent image is of a stately blue-haired lady who was always beautiful and dignified. I can see her sitting at her desk in Town Hall or at Town Meeting diligently performing her duties My most vivid recollection is the first time I met Mrs. Hart. My plan was to go to Town Hall soon after we arrived in Town in late August 1973. Voter registration was to occur on the second floor of Town Hall. In those days, a visitor to the building entered and immediately stood before the door to the Selectmen’s Office, to the right was the entry to the Town Library, to the left before the hallway leading to restrooms and other offices was the tiny office of the Plaistow Police Department. Opening from that lobby was a wide staircase that crossed an intermediate landing to the large double-doored courtroom. The stairs groaned and creaked as the ascendant made the way as quietly as possible into the judicial space. Upon entering the courtroom one saw the simple raised bench bracketed by the flags of the United States of America and of the State of New Hampshire. Before the bench at one to the tables reserved for counsel sat Mrs. Hart. As always, she was impeccably dressed with a stern demeanor. She asked what I wanted and to my answer that I needed to register as a new voter in Town, newly transplanted to the community from New Jersey, she regarded me with an official mien and asked me to be seated across from her at counsel’s table. After a few perfunctory questions about age, new address in the community, and family, Mrs. Hart withdrew from a small stack of papers before her a laminated cards perhaps 8”x10”. I glanced at the card and waited. Mrs. Hart patiently asked, “can you read that.” I dutifully replied ”yes.” Having glimpsed the card quickly I realized that it contained the opening sentence of the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution. “Will you read it?” she asked. I flipped the card over and confidently repeated the words of the Amendment. “All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. She said “no, read it.” “But I know it word for word,” as I had just recited. “No,” somewhat impatiently she said, “you must read it.” My response delivered perhaps a little impertinently was “but I just said it.” Mrs. Hart responded, “you have to read it,” which I sheepishly did. Thus my introduction to a New England lady confident in her ability to wrest compliance from a newcomer to her Town and its ways. I completed some paperwork and extracted myself, humbly, from the courtroom. That was my first meeting with a woman I counted as a friend and admired deeply throughout our stay in our dear Plaistow. Helen Hart proved herself to be a person of great integrity, of great dedication to duty, of love for the community, and firm adherence to the guiding practices and procedures needed in a civic society. May she Rest in Peace. HelenHart04202020 -- RIP -- recollections sdc/me Tuesday, April 21, 2020 My dear bride, Shirley, joins me in sending condolences and prayers. Be well, each and all Stay safe Sam & Shirley Conti
Plaistow Car Barns
Hoyt City, Plaistow NH, Custeaus, Simons, Many Memories.
Plaistow Kings At Stateline Plaza.
We are having some work done on our house on Sweet Hill Road - a wall was opened up today and this was found inside! It's a spelling test dated May 28, 1945. The name at the top is Paul Loring, Grade 6 at Pollard School. I thought may someone in this group might know who Paul is or at least find it cool! We certainly thought it was a cool find!
That property was owned & operated as a farm by Henry Holmes father of Paul Holmes Connie Cullen & Harriet Ingalls. The brick home is still standing.
Hi there, I posted this on December 1st but I don't see it up. Hello, I am wondering if anyone can tell me if there are town directories in existence for Plaistow for the years 1912-1930. I am learning about a great-aunt we didn't know existed named Phoebe Stanley, and trying to figure out where she was between her birth in Plaistow May 28, 1912 until her first marriage in 1932. I can't locate her in any censuses. Her parents James Stanley and Sadie Downer Stanley lived at 7 1/2 Hale Road in 1912. Thanks for any help!
Hello, I am wondering if anyone can tell me if there are town directories in existence for Plaistow for the years 1912-1930. I am learning about a great-aunt we didn't know existed named Phoebe Stanley, and trying to figure out where she was between her birth in Plaistow May 28, 1912 until her first marriage in 1932. I can't locate her in any censuses. Her parents James Stanley and Sadie Downer Stanley lived at 7 1/2 Hale Road in 1912. Thanks for any help!
This had to be from the early 70’s when my mom was shopping for my grandparents. Imagine getting a token today for change in Food stamps? How times have changed. Found this in some of grandparents boxes we hadn’t opened in at least 30 years.
The Spencer house in winter #12 Wentworth ave , December 1990 ,was demolished in 2003, Haynes had previously owned , the property went from Wentworth ave to the haverhill boarder. Haynes boulevard followed the property along this line, John and Shirley Spencer Sold a back piece to the shopping center where a small movie theater was,and the IGA grocery store. Now shaws. 1963 we purchased the property from Haynes , Haynes Blvd was a dirt road that was already there.
I am curious to know when the house at what is now 58 Plaistow Road, where Staples and Home Depot are now, was torn down and the land sold. Our family lived there (my dad was Norman Roberts) from October 1946 to October 1956. I loved it there. The house was set on a rolling hill with woods on three sides and a grove of maples running down the left side of the hill. We had a big vegetable garden, with tulips and daffodils and wild grape vines in the back. It was a wonderful place to play with our friends and our dogs. I saw the place this summer, and I would say that our house sat where Bed, Bath and Beyond is now.