Barnes Foundation

Barnes Foundation We offer fresh new ways to through a renowned collection, exhibitions + programs.
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The Barnes was founded in 1922 by Philadelphia art collector Dr. Albert C. Barnes, with the belief that learning with and through art is a powerful agent for personal growth and social progress. In the Barnes collection, artists such as Renoir and Picasso share space with remarkable African masks and Native American jewelry in ensembles that invite the viewer to draw their own connections across a

rtistic traditions and time for a singularly immersive experience. Since relocating to Center City in 2012, the Barnes has continued this visionary legacy. From thought-provoking exhibitions that champion artists across diasporas, identities, periods, and disciplines, to robust social and educational programs that bring together communities and learners of all ages, the Barnes sparks exploration of our world through art.

And just like that...only four weeks remain to see Alexey Brodovitch:   before it closes on May 19 🔜  is perhaps known b...
04/18/2024

And just like that...only four weeks remain to see Alexey Brodovitch: before it closes on May 19 🔜

is perhaps known best for being the art director of the US fashion magazine Harper’s Bazaar for nearly a quarter century (1934–58). There, he ushered in a bold new aesthetic, drawing on European modernism and making photography the cornerstone of the magazine’s identity. Through his work at Bazaar and his legendary design classes in Philadelphia and New York, Brodovitch influenced a generation of American and emigré photographers, including Richard , , , and . Though distinct in style, they are unified by their embrace of Brodovitch’s dictum: “Astonish me.” 📸😲

This exhibition—the first of its kind—follows the trajectory of Brodovitch’s career and influence through personal stories and case studies. Featuring original and collaborative works by Brodovitch and his protégés, it illuminates the breadth of his impact on print culture today and shows that his legacy is all around us 💫

“All designers, all photographers, all art directors, whether they know it or not, are students of Alexey Brodovitch.” —Irving Penn

Designers, creatives, stylists, fashionistas, photography enthusiasts and pop culture fanatics—this exhibition is for you. Don't miss it!

Get tickets today 🔗https://bit.ly/3xll6SS

The Barnes is excited to partner with The Wilma Theater for a full day of family fun—including an *exclusive* preview of...
04/17/2024

The Barnes is excited to partner with The Wilma Theater for a full day of family fun—including an *exclusive* preview of the new opera, Hilma—during PECO Free First Sunday Family Day on May 5 from 10am – 5pm 🎭

From the Wilma Theater's website:

"The early 20th century q***r mystic and artist Hilma af Klint channeled hundreds of paintings through messages from otherworldly forces, hoping to communicate the mysteries of the universe. Only recently rediscovered and hailed as one of the first-ever abstract artists, she worked in obscurity during a time that was not yet ready to receive her message. This contemporary opera—a score that mixes genres including opera, rock, pop, and musical theater—wrestles with the hubris and humility that fueled one woman’s spiritual quest" 💫

Performances of Hilma begin at the Wilma Theater on June 4th—but you can catch an early preview for FREE at the Barnes on May 5. Plus, there will be art activities, a scavenger hunt, and storytime sessions inspired by Hilma’s journey 🎨📚

*This is a free event, but capacity is limited, and registration is required*

Registration opens Thursday, May 2, at 10am 🔗 https://bit.ly/3THonn8

This May, we’re exploring the rich heritage of Japanese American artists and their significant impact on visual art, des...
04/16/2024

This May, we’re exploring the rich heritage of Japanese American artists and their significant impact on visual art, design, and education.

In the *online* The Japanese American Century: Noguchi, Nakashima, and Asawa, taking place Fridays, May 3 – May 24, 1 – 3pm ET, we'll delve into artworks by both prominent and lesser-known figures and engage in vibrant weekly discussions about the diverse ways these individuals shaped the art world of the 20th century—from their innovative creations to their courageous political activism.

Each session is centered around dialogue, idea exchange, and challenging conventional narratives. Join us for an enriching conversation about a pivotal era and the remarkable community of artists that defined it.

Learn more and register 🔗 https://bit.ly/4axP4l1

Scholarships available 🎓
📸 Isamu Noguchi Working (detail), 1940. © Underwood Archives / UIG / Bridgeman Images

Storytelling has always been a central function of art. Before there was the written word, people used artwork to teach ...
04/15/2024

Storytelling has always been a central function of art. Before there was the written word, people used artwork to teach lessons and convey stories. In a painting, these narratives may be apparent in the arrangement of figures or the representation of actions. Stories can also be suggested through mood, atmosphere, or the use of formal art elements 🖼️

Join us for our May Spotlight Tour: When Paintings Tell Stories—El Greco to Pippin to Van Gogh, taking place Thursdays–Mondays at 1pm, to look closely at works by , , , and others that use a variety of techniques to create meaningful narratives 🖌️

*Includes access to the collection before and after the tour*

Did you know? Each month, the Barnes offers Spotlight Tours that focus on a different artist or theme, allowing for a deeper dive into specific areas of the collection 🔎

Learn more and get tickets 🔗 https://bit.ly/43K9tAR

🎨 Vincent van Gogh. The Brothel, 1888. BF104. Public Domain.

Have you ever spent 90 minutes looking at a single work of art? It is remarkable what things you start to notice—little ...
04/14/2024

Have you ever spent 90 minutes looking at a single work of art? It is remarkable what things you start to notice—little details, individual brushstrokes, overall harmonies—when you give yourself the time and space to look carefully 🔎

In our new *online* Close-Looking Immersion series, we use the (an object-focused approach to art appreciation) to help you gain a deeper visual understanding of one iconic work in our collection. On Wednesday, May 8, from 12 – 1:30pm, we’ll unpack Matisse’s masterful Red Madras Headdress. These immersions are a great choice for both experienced art enthusiasts and newcomers wanting to slow down and spend time looking, thinking, and discussing.

Learn more and register 🔗 https://bit.ly/4auXCZJ

🎨Henri Matisse. Red Madras Headdress, 1907. BF448. © 2024 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Perhaps more than any other medium, works on paper can convey a sense of immediacy and spontaneity, as they often reveal...
04/13/2024

Perhaps more than any other medium, works on paper can convey a sense of immediacy and spontaneity, as they often reveal marks from the artist’s hand. The Barnes collection contains a rich array of works on paper, including images in ink, graphite, watercolor, tempera, pastel, and gouache. These pieces are easy to overlook in Dr. Barnes’s ensembles due to their relatively small size.

In the upcoming Works on Paper in the Barnes Collection, taking place Wednesdays, May 1 – May 22, from 1 – 3pm, and taught directly in the collection galleries (just like Dr. Barnes used to back in the day), we’ll explore the processes artists use to create works on paper and look at how the chosen media affects the expressive qualities of a finished piece. We’ll also examine the unique conservation techniques required to care for these works.

On-site classes have a very limited capacity. Enroll today 🔗 https://bit.ly/4a4tVid
🖼 Paul Klee. Sicilian Landscape, 1924. BF1005. © 2023 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

04/12/2024

Young Professionals Night is May 10! 🥳

The first of 2024 celebrates the final days of our current special exhibition, Alexey Brodovitch: Astonish Me, and you’re invited to join us for an incredible night of fashion, music, dancing, cocktails, and more 🍸💃🕺🎶

This evening is all about celebrating the many ways that Philly’s young professional and creative networks power our city’s vibrant cultural and civic life. Now it’s time to raise a glass in recognition of our collective success 🥂

Rock your favorite runway-ready looks, put on your bold prints, bright colors, and vintage finds, and connect with fellow Philly creatives and young professionals at the Barnes. The night’s beats are courtesy of DJ Wassup Gina and DJ Jamz. We’ll set the scene with art, style, light bites, and sips—all we need is you 💞

In the spirit of giving back and helping others to dress for success, we’re inviting YP guests to bring a new or gently used item of clothing or accessory to donate to The Wardrobe, whose goal is to eliminate clothing insecurity by outfitting people for life or work 🆒

Highlights:
✔️Complimentary champagne toast at 7pm
✔️Music and spinning by DJ Wassup Gina and DJ JAMZ
✔️Aura photography by Inner Light Aura
✔️Custom fashion illustrations by Denise Fike
✔️Personalized magazine covers by Keyonna Butler, founder of I Am Creator Creation Project and Black Hippie Art.
✔️Cash bar featuring beer, wine, cocktails, and light fare
✔️ A treat to finish the night

Get tickets today 🔗🎟️ https://bit.ly/4auiS2c

Young Professionals Night is hosted by the Contemporaries. A vital part of the Barnes’s future, the Contemporaries are an active and committed group of young patrons and art enthusiasts who enjoy distinct programs and social events. The Contemporaries’ generous annual membership contributions provide critical, unrestricted support for our mission and programs. Learn more about joining Contemporaries on our website.

We’re excited to participate in   2024, a global event with a simple mission: to help more people discover the joy of lo...
04/11/2024

We’re excited to participate in 2024, a global event with a simple mission: to help more people discover the joy of looking at and loving art 😍 🖼️

Our approach to art education—the — is grounded in careful, prolonged looking and critical thinking, a mission that aligns with Slow Art Day’s focus on the art of seeing 👀

*Buy tickets for 11am on Saturday, April 13, to participate in Slow Art Day*
🎟️🔗https://bit.ly/4akM6k0

Here's what to expect:

11am – noon
Slow Looking in the Galleries
When you arrive at the Barnes, you’ll receive a list of five paintings for your self-guided experience. You'll spend time in the galleries looking carefully at these works before joining us on the Lower Level for a discussion about the experience 🔎

Noon – 12:30pm
Discussion in the Herbert and Joyce Kean Family Classroom
Barnes senior instructor Michael Williamson will lead a talk about the slow-looking experience 👨‍🏫

From Hans Memling’s 15th-century Portrait of a Man to Vincent van Gogh’s Postman, the portraits in the Barnes collection...
04/09/2024

From Hans Memling’s 15th-century Portrait of a Man to Vincent van Gogh’s Postman, the portraits in the Barnes collection illustrate an array of artistic approaches 🎨

In the *online* Portraiture at the Barnes: From the 15th Century to Modernism, taking place Thursdays, May 2 – May 23, 6 – 8pm ET, we will examine the relationship between artist and sitter in works by Matisse, Van Gogh, and Modigliani; historical precedents set forth by artists like Titian, Frans Hals, and Jean Fouquet; the practice of self-portraiture by modern artists; and the ability of portraits to indicate social practices 🖌️

In the end, we will uncover multiple layers of meaning in portraiture and explore the range of expression offered by portraits in the Barnes galleries 🔎

For more information and to register🔗 https://bit.ly/4cu32WL

Scholarships are available 🎓
🎨 Amedeo Modigliani. Portrait of the Red-Headed Woman (Portrait de la femme rousse), 1918. BF206.
🎨 Hans Memling. Portrait of a Man, Last quarter of the 15th century. BF440.
🎨 Frans Hals. Portrait of a Man Holding a Watch, 1643. BF262.
🎨 Unidentified artist, Titian (Tiziano Vecellio). Portrait of a Gentleman and Son, Mid-16th century. BF854.
🎨 Jean Fouquet. Portrait of Charles VII, Probably 15th century. BF420.
🎨 Vincent van Gogh. The Postman, 1889. BF37.

What are your plans for the  ? -We'll just be over here with these monkeys and a parrot, *not* looking directly at the s...
04/08/2024

What are your plans for the ?
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We'll just be over here with these monkeys and a parrot, *not* looking directly at the sun 😎
🖼 Henri Rousseau. Monkeys and Parrot in the Virgin Forest (Singes et perroquet dans la forêt vierge), c. 1905–1906. BF397.

Many of the world’s most recognizable images were shot for fashion magazines. 📸During the 20th century, illustrious phot...
04/07/2024

Many of the world’s most recognizable images were shot for fashion magazines. 📸

During the 20th century, illustrious photographers lent their eyes to glossies, including Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and Vanity Fair, challenging conventional taste with their avant-garde visions. Thanks to image-makers such as , Richard , Louise , and —the subject of our current special exhibition, Alexey Brodovitch: —the line between fine art and commercial photography blurred, forever changing print media.

In the online Fashion Photography: The Magazine as Canvas, taking place Wednesdays, April 24 – May 15, 6:30 – 8pm ET, we’ll survey the key photographers—and the editors who dared to hire them—who elevated the field of fashion photography to an art. With an emphasis on the 1930s through 1980s, this course will chart how artistic movements like surrealism influenced fashion and editorial creative direction at large. An examination of the work of today’s preeminent photographers will further illuminate the profound legacies of their predecessors.

This class will be taught by Stephanie Sporn, an award-winning arts journalist, fashion historian, and author based in New York.

Learn more and enroll today 🔗 https://bit.ly/3PE22Wb

Scholarships are available 🎓
📸 Lillian Bassman. Across the Restaurant, 1949, printed 1994. International Center of Photography, New York. Gift of William A. von Mueffling in honor of Willis E. Hartshorn’s 25th Anniversary at ICP

  painted this picture of a sickly-looking pr******te during a trip to Paris in the fall of 1901. It is typical of his B...
04/06/2024

painted this picture of a sickly-looking pr******te during a trip to Paris in the fall of 1901. It is typical of his Blue Period, when he often depicted subjects from the margins of society. One clue to this woman's social status is the cigarette; in Paris of 1901, proper French women were not seen smoking in public. Picasso emphasizes his subject's weariness with subtle dabs of red beneath her eyes.

Did you know? 💡 This was one of the first paintings in Dr. Barnes's collection. See all 46 works by Picasso in the Barnes collection here: https://bit.ly/3xdxIeJ

What's your favorite painting or object in the ? Let us know in the comments and then keep an eye on our page—we'll pick one to share soon! ⬇
🎨 Pablo Picasso. Young Woman Holding a Cigarette (Jeune femme tenant une cigarette) (detail), 1901. BF318. © 2024 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Did you know? 💡 We regularly partner with the University of Pennsylvania's history of art graduate program to offer In F...
04/05/2024

Did you know? 💡 We regularly partner with the University of Pennsylvania's history of art graduate program to offer In Focus Gallery Talks, 30-minute discussions held in our galleries that provide new interpretative approaches and intensive focus on individual works in the collection. For this month’s talk, taking place Monday, April 8, from 3 – 3:30pm, doctoral candidate Elliot Mackin will lead an in-depth discussion about a medieval painting in Room 4.

*In Focus talks are free with admission* 🔗 https://bit.ly/49lkTfP

🎨 Unidentified artist, probably French. Circumcision (detail), 15th century. BF869. Public Domain.

In August 1940, Dr. Albert C. Barnes traveled to Lake Tahoe to meet the British philosopher Bertrand Russell at his cabi...
04/04/2024

In August 1940, Dr. Albert C. Barnes traveled to Lake Tahoe to meet the British philosopher Bertrand Russell at his cabin in the woods. For decades prior to this meeting, Barnes had admired Russell for his philosophical thought, conviction to his theories, and fortitude in the face of controversy. After their encounter, Russell seemed similarly impressed with Barnes, writing on August 17, “It was a great pleasure getting to know you, and thanks to you I look forward to much more of the same pleasure in the future.” 👬

Russell’s letter arrived in Merion, Pennsylvania, just as Dr. Barnes was finalizing the details of a contract that would bring Russell to work at the Barnes Foundation. The move brought the pair into close association, a goal Barnes had pursued for years, in an effort to surround himself with leading thinkers of the day, such as his friend and collaborator, thought leader John Dewey.

Just two years later, though, Barnes had soured on Russell. In December 1942, he wrote to Dewey: “My feeling is that Russell has taken unwarranted advantage of the situation. . . . I think I am justifiably mad and being made a sucker of.” In under 24 months, the relationship had fallen apart and, with it, Barnes’s grand plans for Russell and the Barnes Foundation’s foray into the humanities 😐

Our latest online archival exhibition spotlights Russell’s involvement with the Barnes Foundation, providing context for the factors and forces that brought Dr. Barnes and Russell together, and explores the details of Russell’s brief tenure as a Barnes instructor and the disagreements that ended it, culminating with the pair facing off in court ⚖

Learn more here 🔗 https://bit.ly/3IMizn8
📸Bertrand Russell, date unknown. Photograph by Underwood & Underwood. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division

Hey Philly! A *very* limited amount of screen-printed Alexey Brodovitch:   posters remain from our AIGA Philadelphia Lou...
04/03/2024

Hey Philly! A *very* limited amount of screen-printed Alexey Brodovitch: posters remain from our AIGA Philadelphia Lounge at March’s First Friday public exhibition preview party. One can be *yours* for FREE when you purchase an exhibition catalog 😲

Only 100 posters were produced by local screen-printer and graphic artist Pink Bike Ralph 🆒 Learn more about his process here 🔗 https://bit.ly/4991IWt

*Purchases must be made on-site at the Barnes Shop. Just mention the poster when you are buying the catalog, and it's yours (while supplies last)*

(Psst: You don’t need to purchase an admission ticket to go the Barnes Shop)

04/02/2024

First Friday is April 5 at the Barnes, and we’re excited to partner with University of the Arts to offer college students $5 admission to enjoy an evening of art, music, and community in celebration of our special exhibition, Alexey Brodovitch: Astonish Me 😲

Alexey Brodovitch was a graphic designer, instructor, illustrator, and photographer who spent formative periods of his career in Paris, Philadelphia, and New York. His artistic pursuits were surprising and diverse, in an era when creatives were free to experiment across media. Did you know? 💡 The pioneering art director taught design at UArts in the 1930s, then known as the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art.

First Friday admission includes access to both this special exhibition *and* the collection galleries.

We’ll also enjoy the sounds of Freedom Over Certainty, a new student jazz ensemble from UArts. Led by Professor Joshua Stamper, the octet is devoted to widening the possibilities of harmony, form, rhythm, and texture. The group's original music is a vehicle for artistic discovery—vocals, winds, brass, vibraphone, guitar, bass, and percussion combine to form a vibrant palette of musical colors. They’ll be sure to *astonish you* with their talent 🎶

*In honor of Alexey Brodovitch's connection to UArts, enjoy a special student price of $5 with code UARTS24.*

Get tickets here 🎫🔗 https://bit.ly/3VzmlI7
Image credits for video:
https://bit.ly/49wVl06

March at the Barnes, aka, "the Spring of Deception" 🤨-As we make our way to Actual Spring, let's take a moment to apprec...
04/01/2024

March at the Barnes, aka, "the Spring of Deception" 🤨
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As we make our way to Actual Spring, let's take a moment to appreciate these lovely visitor snaps 📸
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Keep tagging us in your pics 🤳 We love the way you 😍 🖼
📸
and.bunbaldi.art


walker.design
and.savor

Have you ever paused in front of this painting by Henri Rousseau in Room 11 and wondered, "why does that baby look so gr...
03/31/2024

Have you ever paused in front of this painting by Henri Rousseau in Room 11 and wondered, "why does that baby look so grumpy"⁉

So have we ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
🖼: Henri Rousseau. The Family (La Famille), between 1890 and 1900. BF581.

Vincent   appreciation post! 📢Born   in 1853, Vincent Willem van Gogh is widely recognized as one of the most celebrated...
03/30/2024

Vincent appreciation post! 📢

Born in 1853, Vincent Willem van Gogh is widely recognized as one of the most celebrated and influential post-impressionist painters of all time. Over a brief span of just over ten years, he produced an astonishing body of work. His repertoire encompassed a diverse range of subjects, including landscapes, still lifes, portraits, and introspective self-portraits 🎨

Van Gogh's art is distinguished by its bold and symbolic use of color, as well as its dynamic and emotionally charged brushwork, which played a pivotal role in shaping the trajectory of modern art.

Tragically, van Gogh's ascent to fame was posthumous. At the age of 37, he succumbed to su***de after enduring years of poverty and grappling with mental illness. Yet, his legacy endures as a testament to the power of artistic expression and the depths of the human spirit.

Swipe through ➡ to see the van Gogh paintings in the Barnes collection, and learn more about them here: https://bit.ly/3UK0mOf

🎨 Vincent van Gogh. Houses and Figure, 1890. BF136.
🎨 Vincent van Gogh. The Brothel (Le Lupanar), 1888. BF104.
🎨 Vincent van Gogh. The Postman (Joseph-Étienne Roulin), 1889. BF37.
🎨 Vincent van Gogh. The Smoker (Le Fumeur), 1888. BF119.
🎨 Vincent van Gogh. Still Life (Nature morte), May 1888. BF928.
🎨 Vincent van Gogh. Reclining N**e (Femme nue étendue sur un lit), January–March 1887. BF720.
🎨Vincent van Gogh. The Factory, July–September 1887. BF303.

📢 We're excited to announce our fall special exhibition, Mickalene Thomas: All About Love 💕 This will be the first major...
03/29/2024

📢 We're excited to announce our fall special exhibition, Mickalene Thomas: All About Love 💕

This will be the first major international tour focused on the work of Mickalene Thomas, a pioneering artist whose influences range from 19th-century painting to popular culture. Co-organized by the Hayward Gallery at Southbank Centre, London, and The Broad, Los Angeles, and in partnership with the Barnes, All About Love will be shown as a series of independent presentations, with further venues to be confirmed.

In her art, Mickalene Thomas (American, b. 1971) articulates a complex and empowering vision of self while expanding on and subverting common definitions of beauty, sexuality, celebrity, and politics. The show will highlight how Thomas has redefined contemporary ideas of portraiture and subjects, introducing new ways of seeing the female body and dissecting the complexities of Black and female identity within the Western canon.

Through her work, Thomas subverts art history to claim notions of love, desire, and repose. She draws on representations of intergenerational female empowerment, autobiography, memory, and tenets of Black feminist theory in writing by authors and academics such as Kimberlé Crenshaw, Patricia Collins, and bell hooks, whose acclaimed 2000 essay collection All About Love is referenced in the exhibition’s title. This exhibition will explore the ways in which Thomas’s work draws on relationships and collaborations centered on love, self-expression, and joy.

Mark your calendar 📅 This special exhibition opens at the Barnes on October 20 🔗 https://bit.ly/49cPNXr

Exhibition Venues
The Broad, Los Angeles (May 25–September 29, 2024)
The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia (October 20, 2024–January 12, 2025)
Hayward Gallery, London (February 11–May 5, 2025)
🎨 Mickalene Thomas. Afro Goddess Looking Forward, 2015. Rhinestones, acrylic, and oil on wood panel. © 2024 Mickalene Thomas

“I could almost feel with my fingers the excitement of his layouts, the way he exploded corseted columns, liberating ima...
03/28/2024

“I could almost feel with my fingers the excitement of his layouts, the way he exploded corseted columns, liberating image and text, which often appeared at dynamic angles; the way he bled single pictures across double-page spreads, endowing them with an immersive appeal.”—4Columns

Read the full article here: https://bit.ly/3vus5It

: Astonish Me is now on view 📸

Get tickets 🎟 https://bit.ly/3wxEeNc

Pierre-Auguste Renoir loved painting the women in his life. His wife, lovers, and friends regularly found their way onto...
03/27/2024

Pierre-Auguste Renoir loved painting the women in his life. His wife, lovers, and friends regularly found their way onto his canvases. These models, muses, and partners provided the artist with a continual source of inspiration, and they became the center of the artistic worlds he constructed over his long career.

In our April Spotlight Tour, we'll explore the ways represented different ideals of femininity and consider how his paintings of women hold up today 🤔

Spotlight tours take place Thursday–Monday at 1pm, and include access to the collection before and after the tour, as well as Alexey Brodovitch: Astonish Me.

Get tickets here 🔗 https://bit.ly/3TLfaeO

🖼: Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Andrée in a Hat, Reading (detail), c. 1918. BF932. Public Domain.

Saint Edith Stein, a philosopher and Catholic nun of Jewish origin who was tragically murdered in Auschwitz, emphasized ...
03/26/2024

Saint Edith Stein, a philosopher and Catholic nun of Jewish origin who was tragically murdered in Auschwitz, emphasized the connection between our spiritual lives and our bodies. She acknowledged that sometimes this link feels restrictive, but she believed our bodies aren't meant to hinder our spirits; rather, they can serve as tools for spiritual expression.

Stein's significant contribution was blending phenomenology (the study of human experiences) with Christian theology, particularly drawing from the teachings of Saint Thomas Aquinas. This perspective sheds light on a selection of religious pictures found in Room 16 of the Barnes collection. These colorful manuscript miniatures from late medieval Germany, crafted by and for nuns, are displayed along the east wall. They were acquired by Dr. Albert Barnes in Munich in 1930.

Learn more about this unique story from Barnes research associate Amy Gillette, and see these miniatures in closer detail 🔗 https://bit.ly/3TGWFrM

Did you know that we are always trying to learn more about our art collection? 💡 The Barnes has a team of curators, scholars, conservators, and archivists who actively research the treasured works on view in our galleries. We work continually to link collection objects to their original histories, and almost every day we uncover something new—from small details like when a piece entered the collection, to larger discoveries like unknown sketches on the backs of two Cézannes! You can learn more about that discovery here 🔍 https://bit.ly/43qW3ty
📷: East wall, Room 16, Barnes Foundation.

Join us for First Friday on April 5, from 6 – 9pm, featuring Freedom Over Certainty, a new student jazz ensemble from Un...
03/25/2024

Join us for First Friday on April 5, from 6 – 9pm, featuring Freedom Over Certainty, a new student jazz ensemble from University of the Arts. Led by professor Joshua Stamper, the octet is devoted to widening the possibilities of harmony, form, rhythm, and texture. The group's original music is a vehicle for artistic discovery—vocals, winds, brass, vibraphone, guitar, bass, and percussion combine to form a vibrant palette of musical colors.

First Friday at the Barnes includes access to the collection galleries and Alexey Brodovitch: Astonish Me. Learn about the life and work of the pioneering art director, who taught design at UArts in the 1930s, then known as the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art.

*In honor of Brodovitch's connection to UArts, enjoy a special student price of $5 with code UARTS24* 🎉

Seating is limited. Cocktails and light fare are available for purchase.

Learn more and get tickets 🔗 https://bit.ly/3PcTllI

The first Sunday of every month is PECO Free First Sunday Family Day at the Barnes. Yes, that means NO-COST admission to...
03/24/2024

The first Sunday of every month is PECO Free First Sunday Family Day at the Barnes. Yes, that means NO-COST admission to the collection galleries as well as an array of family-friendly activities, including arts and crafts, musical performances, and interactive workshops.

April's theme, “Boundless Creativity,” is in celebration of our newest special exhibition Alexey Brodovitch: Astonish Me. Brodovitch was a graphic designer, instructor, illustrator, and photographer who is perhaps known best for being the art director of the US fashion magazine Harper’s Bazaar for nearly a quarter century (1934–58). Presented in the Roberts Gallery, follows the trajectory of Brodovitch’s career and his influence on a generation of American and emigré photographers, including Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, Lillian Bassman, and Eve Arnold. *Exhibition admission is also included at no-cost during PECO Free First Sunday Family Day*

On Sunday, April 7, enjoy fun family art activities and free access to the collection and special exhibition — plus, you'll be inspired by the sounds of emerging jazz masters from the Philadelphia Clef Club’s Jazz Ambassadors Youth Ensemble.

Registration opens Thursday, April 4, at 10am 🔗 https://bit.ly/4a0Ta50

What’s On:

10am – 4pm
Art Activities 🎨
Join us for art activities, a scavenger hunt, and play. Perfect for the whole family—ages 2 and up.

10:30 –11 am & 11:15-11:45 am 📚
Join Thembi Palmer of Imagine More Story Adventures as she takes you on an action-packed journey through shapes, colors, and stories! Imagine More Story Adventures was created to encourage a time of exploration, connection, and promote a lifelong love for learning. Ages 2 and up.

1 – 1:45pm; 2:30 – 3:15pm 🎺🎶
Performances: Jazz Ambassadors Youth Ensemble

The mission of The Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz and Performing Arts is to celebrate and preserve the legacy of jazz through accessible education for the Greater Philadelphia region, and to support the evolving art form through talent development, programming, and public performance. The Jazz Ambassadors Youth Ensemble, a group that have been meticulously trained and mentored by world-class musicians at the Clef Club, are sure to inspire. Don't miss your chance to witness the incredible talent of these rising stars! 🌟✨🌟

At first glance, this   looks like it is made of mixed materials—fabric, wood, paper, and paint— but if you look closely...
03/23/2024

At first glance, this looks like it is made of mixed materials—fabric, wood, paper, and paint— but if you look closely it is entirely made up of thousands of variously colored threads, woven together by skillful artisans working from a collage created by Pablo 🔎 Who is the talented creator behind this stunning work? It's none other than Marie Cuttoli, a visionary entrepreneur who commissioned designs for fashion, interior design, and decorative art from artists during the 20th century.

Dr. Albert Barnes was an ardent patron of . In 1936, after purchasing three tapestries, he gave an impassioned radio address that highlighted her work fusing Modern art with the classical traditions of art. Today, you can see three Cuttoli tapestries on the second-floor balcony at the Barnes.

The Cuttoli tapestries are the subject of this month’s *FREE* member talk, taking place tomorrow, Saturday, 3/24, from 10:15-11am in the second-floor classroom in the collection galleries. Members, we hope you can join us! 🔗 https://bit.ly/4amO3w2

Not yet a ? Learn more about the significant privileges Barnes members receive all year long, including unlimited free admission, access to exhibition previews and private tours, exclusive morning access to the collection, discounts on classes and public programs, reciprocal benefits, and more 🔗 https://bit.ly/3vtQeij

Did you know? 💡 In 2020 the Barnes presented Marie Cuttoli: The Modern Thread from Miró to Man Ray in the Roberts Gallery. Learn more about that special exhibition here 🔗 https://bit.ly/4a0kLnd
🎨Pablo Picasso. Atelier Delarbre. Secrets (Confidences) or Inspiration, 1934, Cotton warp and wool weft with silk highlights. The Barnes Foundation, 01.27.02. © 2023 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
📸 Marie Cuttoli photographed by Thérèse Bonney at Myrbor, 1926. © The Regents of the University of California, The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. This work is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.
📸 Marie Cuttoli: The Modern Thread From Miró to Man Ray, 2020. The Barnes Foundation, installation view. © The Barnes Foundation.

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Our Story

We believe art is for everyone. Our founder, Dr. Albert C. Barnes, believed that art had the power to improve minds and transform lives. Our diverse educational programs are based on his teachings and one-of-a-kind collections—both his art holdings and the rare trees, flowers, and other plants at the Barnes Arboretum. Learn more about our history.

An art experience like no other.

The Barnes is home to one of the world’s greatest collections of impressionist, post-impressionist, and modern European paintings, with especially deep holdings in Renoir, Cézanne, Matisse, and Picasso. Assembled by Dr. Albert C. Barnes between 1912 and 1951, the collection also includes important examples of African art, Native American pottery and jewelry, Pennsylvania German furniture, American avant-garde painting, and wrought-iron metalwork.

The minute you step into the galleries of the Barnes collection, you know you’re in for an experience like no other. Masterpieces by Vincent Van Gogh, Henri Matisse, and Pablo Picasso hang next to ordinary household objects—a door hinge, a spatula, a yarn spinner. On another wall, you might see a French medieval sculpture displayed with a Navajo textile. These dense groupings, in which objects from different cultures, time periods, and media are all mixed together, are what Dr. Barnes called his “ensembles.”


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