Wyck Historic House, Garden, and Farm

Wyck Historic House, Garden, and Farm National Historic Landmark house, garden, and farm. The Oldest Rose Garden in United States.
(49)

Next up on the ABCs of Wyck: X is for … XeroxBefore the technology of Xerox machines and photocopying, copies had to be ...
12/29/2023

Next up on the ABCs of Wyck: X is for … Xerox
Before the technology of Xerox machines and photocopying, copies had to be made by hand on a copy press.

The first copy press was created and patented in 1780 by James Watt (better known as the inventor of the steam engine) as he found hand copying his countless letters, designs, and documents to be too time-consuming.

This copy press in Wyck’s collection features Watt’s patented rolling press design, which consists of two metallic rolls that are put in motion by a wooden lever the user would attach to the roller. The letter or document one wanted copied was then placed on a board, covered by a thin piece of dampened copying paper and then finally by a felt-like cloth. The board was passed through the rollers slowly one way and then rolled back through once more, allowing the ink from the original to be pressed onto the copy paper.

Wyck’s copy press (made of mahogany and brass) was owned by Reuben Haines III and dates to the early 19th century. The original user’s manual (Image 3) was kept with the object and lists the contents of the box, including pasteboard, copying paper, a dampening brush, a wetting book (seen in Image 5), and ink powders, all of which were important aspects of the copying process.

Reuben clearly made several copies with this press as examples of his copies were stored with it, including a page from his 1818 account book (Image 6) and a letter (Image 7) written in 1827 in the hall of the Academy of Natural Sciences, where he served as the Corresponding Secretary.

An impressive amount of Reuben’s accounts and correspondence exists today (now housed at ) and this copy press may be a large reason why several of these copies survived!

  in 1836 (187 years ago), former Wyck resident Robert Bowne Haines was 9 years old and was excited to tell his older br...
12/26/2023

in 1836 (187 years ago), former Wyck resident Robert Bowne Haines was 9 years old and was excited to tell his older brother what he received for Christmas🎁

He outlined an impressive haul of gifts, including a candy dog, a microscope, and a box of chemical apparatuses to perform experiments with, including a bottle of phosphorus and an iron horse shoe “to magnetize.” ➡️Swipe to read the entire letter and see what else Robert received!

❄️All of us at Wyck hope you had a happy and wonderful holiday season!❄️

W is for … Wyck! This might seem like an obvious choice to highlight, but visitors often ask how Wyck got its name, espe...
12/14/2023

W is for … Wyck! This might seem like an obvious choice to highlight, but visitors often ask how Wyck got its name, especially when no one with the last name “Wyck” ever lived here. Prior to the 19th century, Wyck was known as the “Haines House,” so how did it become known as Wyck?

You can find the answer displayed in the Conservatory where you can view this early 18th-century engraving of a large estate entitled, “Wyck, the Seat of Richard Haines.” The story goes that sixth-generation resident Reuben Haines III was perusing a book published by Johannes Kips in 1719 that depicted several country estates in England and had the very long title: “Britannia Illustrata or Views of Several of the Queens Palaces also of the Principal Seats of the Nobility and Gentry of Great Britain.” Among the illustrations of grand English country houses, he found an estate named Wyck that was the ancestral home of Richard Haines and located in South Gloucestershire.

With the same surname and knowledge that some of his ancestors emigrated from England, Reuben believed this estate was his ancestral home in England, and by 1807 Haines began naming his estate in Germantown “Wyck” after the English estate. Reuben would later discover that he was not descended from the same family who owned the English Wyck, but by then everyone knew his residence as Wyck, so the name stuck!

The original estate still exists today, although it is now known as Wick Court and is no longer owned by the Haines family.

We’re continuing to highlight treasures from Wyck’s collection for the   and this week: V is for…VelocipedeWyck’s collec...
11/30/2023

We’re continuing to highlight treasures from Wyck’s collection for the and this week: V is for…Velocipede

Wyck’s collection is full of children’s toys, but this object is the one that our youngest visitors want to play with the most! This three-wheeled toy horse dates to the early or mid 19th century and is classified as a velocipede, which is any human-powered land vehicle that features one or more wheels. This object was referred to as a velocipede as the term “tricycle” wasn’t popularly used until the 20th century.

Three-wheeled toy vehicles were a popular children’s toy in the 19th century and Wyck’s velocipede has a small front wheel and two large rear wheels. While the front wheel has pegs on either side, the rear wheels are attached to wooden handles, allowing the user to steer with their feet and move forward with their hands – the opposite technology of a bicycle!

While the toy is still operable and its paint remains intact, the horse is missing its ears and mane, which were most likely made of a more fragile material that was unable to sustain years of use and wear. This condition also suggests that the toy was used often and was a favorite of the 7 children who grew up at Wyck during the 19th century as well as the countless friends and relatives who visited and played at Wyck throughout its history.

Happy  ! This year, we are seeking your generous support to raise $3,150 in order to repair and preserve Wyck’s two tall...
11/28/2023

Happy ! This year, we are seeking your generous support to raise $3,150 in order to repair and preserve Wyck’s two tall case clocks.

The chime of the Duffield clock filled Wyck every hour for over 200 years; with your help, it can chime again!🎶

➡️View the images to learn more about the project and the clocks’ history! You can donate & support this project here: https://www.paypal.com/donate?campaign_id=TMQNGM8ZTAWM4

Thanks to generous donors and supporters like you, we’re able to continue sharing Wyck’s history with future generations of visitors!

Wyck's fall colors are too pretty not to share!  🍁🍂         🍁🍂
10/27/2023

Wyck's fall colors are too pretty not to share! 🍁🍂

🍁🍂

Here’s a fun mini edition of the ABCs of Wyck: U is for … Utensils!As Wyck was home to 9 generations of the same family,...
10/20/2023

Here’s a fun mini edition of the ABCs of Wyck: U is for … Utensils!

As Wyck was home to 9 generations of the same family, our collection contains nearly every type of object, including miniature versions!

This maple utensil holder dates to the early 19th century and would have been used to house larger kitchen utensils. Displayed in the same room is a small miniature cabinet filled with miniature kitchen and dining supplies made from metal, including a miniature utensil holder (Image 2).

And within this miniature utensil holder, you’ll find…10 miniature utensils; 4 knives and 6 two-pronged forks! (Images 3-4)

Wyck has several miniatures in its collection, and while most were created to be children’s toys or purchased to be purely decorative collectibles, this object and the rest of the miniatures contained in this cabinet appear to be homemade and perhaps created as a hobby project. Either way, our collection allows us to compare these miniatures to their full-sized counterparts!

Last week we celebrated the 35th Wyck-Strickland Award Honoring José Almiñana of Andropogon Associates. It was a heartwa...
10/11/2023

Last week we celebrated the 35th Wyck-Strickland Award Honoring José Almiñana of Andropogon Associates. It was a heartwarming and happy celebration on a beautiful fall evening. Congratulations, José on this well deserved honor!
📸: Kelly giarrocco

We have a whimsical installment of the ABCs of Wyck: S is for … SchnappshundThese interesting looking “whimsies” are “sc...
09/28/2023

We have a whimsical installment of the ABCs of Wyck: S is for … Schnappshund

These interesting looking “whimsies” are “schnappshunds,” dog-shaped drinking vessels that were popular among 18th-century German glass blowers. It’s believed that these objects were made by glass blowers with leftover materials, but they were likely sold as novelty items as well.

The schnappshunds in Wyck’s collection are attributed to Wistarburg Glassworks, which operated in Alloway, New Jersey from 1739 to the 1780s. It was the first successful glass company in America and was founded by former Wyck resident, Caspar Wistar (1696 - 1752). These pieces were most likely created by the company’s master glassblowers as Caspar himself was trained in button-making, not glassblowing.

While the smaller one (Image 2) appears to be purely decorative, the larger one could have functioned as a drinking vessel as it is hollow and one could place a cork in the “tail” of the dog (Image 3).

Any item owned or used by Caspar was considered to be an important heirloom for the Wistar-Haines family, especially the larger schnappshund as it was thought that Caspar’s breath was contained within it. The object was displayed on a sideboard in Wyck’s parlor (Image 4) and the story was passed down that this item “contained the breath of their ancestral glass-blower.” Rather than this referring to him blowing the glass object himself, it appears this referred to his literal breath being blown and stored inside the schnappshund.

Writing about Wyck’s collections, a distant descendant of Caspar said “the most interesting piece [at Wyck] is a glass pig because it contains some of the old gentleman [Caspar Wistar’s] breath. I, a descendant, do not wish to inhale it after all these years. It is the first case I have found where an article has value because it contains breath 200 years old. I like good fresh air. The pig with or without breath is worth having.”

This object once had a cork where the dog’s tail is, but as you can see the cork has been removed, so someone in the later generations of the family must have released Caspar’s breath!

This week on the ABCs of Wyck: R is for…Roses🌹The roses in Wyck’s Rose Garden, known as the oldest rose garden in Americ...
09/22/2023

This week on the ABCs of Wyck: R is for…Roses🌹

The roses in Wyck’s Rose Garden, known as the oldest rose garden in America in its original plan, are in full bloom in late May and early June. While spring is the best time to see the roses in bloom, fall is the best time to view the other aspects of each rose, including its thorns and rose hips. Check out some rose details in today’s post.

1️⃣&2️⃣Prickly thorns on ‘Frau Karl Druschki’ & ‘Harrison’s Yellow’

3️⃣Red details and outlined leaves on ‘White Pearl in Red Dragon’s Mouth’

4️⃣-7️⃣ A lightning bug near the Scotch Rose’s hips. Rose hips contain the plant’s seeds and are often used in medicinal and culinary recipes as they are rich in Vitamin C and antioxidants. Images 6 & 7 show examples of rose hip recipes in Wyck’s collection of historic recipes created and collected by former residents.

8️⃣&9️⃣Several of Wyck’s roses are multi-bloomers, including ‘Champney’s Pink Cluster’ and ‘Blush Noisette.’ You can see them in bloom right now as well as other roses throughout the fall!

Join us for our October Workshop: Weeds & What They Tell on October 14 from 11am - 12:30pm! 🌿🌱 This is a free workshop, ...
09/20/2023

Join us for our October Workshop: Weeds & What They Tell on October 14 from 11am - 12:30pm! 🌿🌱 This is a free workshop, but space is limited. Register here: wyckevents.ticketleap.com/w**ds-and-what-they-tell-us/
——
Weeds can tell us a lot about our gardens and our soils. In this workshop, Allison Houghton will share some strategies, resources, and observations to "read the w**ds" in a garden, farm or backyard. We'll discuss a few common w**d profiles, including a look at some tasty edibles as well as invasive w**ds. We'll explore the grounds at Wyck for a short w**d ID walk, and discuss what potential insights w**ds give us to what is happening under our feet in our land and soil.

Check out Part 2 of your guide to the 2023 Honey Fest at Wyck!🍯——Join us this Saturday, September 16 from 10am-4pm to ce...
09/13/2023

Check out Part 2 of your guide to the 2023 Honey Fest at Wyck!🍯
——
Join us this Saturday, September 16 from 10am-4pm to celebrate the honey bee.🐝 This post features local food and drink vendors as well as various community tables and activities. Honey Fest will also be buzzing with a vendor marketplace, bee-centered programs, and more!
——
🔗Check the link in our bio for the latest buzz on the event vendors and schedule!

Next in the ABCs of Wyck:P is for…PhrenologyPhrenology is the infamous pseudoscience that suggests each section of the b...
09/12/2023

Next in the ABCs of Wyck:
P is for…Phrenology

Phrenology is the infamous pseudoscience that suggests each section of the brain has a specific function and measuring the shape and size of one’s head predicts an individual’s mental traits and personality. Today, we know that no scientific data supports phrenology, but this theory took America by storm in the early and mid-nineteenth century, eventually creating and perpetuating damaging stereotypes.

As the Wistar-Haines family was very involved with 19th-century Philadelphia’s leading scientists, physicians, and anatomists, they were typically up-to-date on the latest scientific theories and methods. Certain family members’ interest in the theory and practice of phrenology is apparent in Wyck’s collections.

This plaster phrenology model dates to c. 1838 and features labeled sections of the head or the “phrenological organs” (Images 1-4). It is stamped with “Approved by Geo. Combe,” one of the leading phrenologists who popularized the theory in England and America. Wyck’s pamphlet collection contains one of Combe’s popular publications, “Outlines of Phrenology,” which features illustrations of the phrenological organs and how to determine the size and shape of each (Image 5).

Reuben Haines III even had his own head measured by local doctor, John Godman, in 1828. The results, titled “Craniological Indications, exhibited by R. H.,” list each “organ” of the brain and Reuben’s result. We can see from this assessment that Reuben’s “Benevolence” and “Conscientiousness” measured as full, but his “Self Esteem” and “Hope” measured as small (Images 6-7).

Interestingly, Reuben is not the only family member who was interested in phrenology as his cousin, Ann Haines, collected a large poster printed in 1845 that illustrates each mental facility and its location (Image 8 ). This poster was also stored with a certificate from “Fowler & Wells Phrenological Cabinet” that qualifies the recipient as a “practical phrenologist” (Image 9).

Here’s Part 1 of your Guide to the 2023 Honey Festival at Wyck! 🍯Join us this Saturday, September 16 from 10am - 4pm for...
09/11/2023

Here’s Part 1 of your Guide to the 2023 Honey Festival at Wyck! 🍯Join us this Saturday, September 16 from 10am - 4pm for local vendors🛍️bee-themed activities🐝, food & drink, & more!
——
This post features the vendor line-up and Part 2 (being posted on Wednesday) will feature our food & drink vendors as well as community tables/activities, so stay tuned!
——
🔗Find the latest buzz on vendor and schedule updates here: https://wyck.org/philadelphia-honey-festival/

There are seats available in tomorrow's workshop on the Art & Science of Tree Identification! Register here:
09/08/2023

There are seats available in tomorrow's workshop on the Art & Science of Tree Identification! Register here:

Learn about Philadelphia's tree species, learn how to identify them, and create a leaf print of one of your favorite tress!

Did you know that a flock of geese used to live at Wyck? On this installment of the ABCs of Wyck:O is for … Ornithology ...
09/07/2023

Did you know that a flock of geese used to live at Wyck? On this installment of the ABCs of Wyck:
O is for … Ornithology 🦆

As former Wyck resident Reuben Haines III was the Corresponding Secretary of the Academy of Natural Sciences for 17 years, his professional and inner circle consisted of the most prominent naturalists of the 19th-century, including Thomas Say, Charles Lucien Bonaparte, Charles Alexandre Lesueur, William Cooper, and Titian Peale. Reuben himself studied botany, zoology, and geology, but he was most immersed in the scientific study of birds, known as ornithology.

This interest in birds began early in Reuben’s life as the nature journal and sketchbook he owned when he was just 12 years old contains colorful sketches of various birds, one being a brant goose (Image 1 & 2). At the age of 32, Reuben would go on to conduct intensive research on domesticating and breeding wild Canadian Geese.

After some failed trials, Reuben even constructed a pond on Wyck’s property in response to his peers’ advice that geese would not breed unless they had water to swim in. Reuben’s scientific study on breeding geese lasted 10 years from 1818 - 1828 and he wrote all of his trials, observations, and other findings in his research journal, which has been fully transcribed by Matthew R. Halley and available in the article linked in our bio.

Wyck’s collection also contains displays of taxidermy birds that Reuben likely created as his journals contain a recipe for “Antiseptic Powder to be used in preserving,” or taxidermy, which calls for 1 ounce of arsenic (Image 6).

Next up on ABCs of Wyck: N is for…Needlework🪡🧶The Wistar-Haines family was full of talented needlework artists who used ...
08/25/2023

Next up on ABCs of Wyck: N is for…Needlework🪡🧶

The Wistar-Haines family was full of talented needlework artists who used their skills to create countless examples of functional and decorative textiles for their home. The general definition of needlework is handwork that uses a needle and thread or yarn to create an object.

Our collection is full of several forms of needlework, including embroidery and crochet, and spans a variety of objects, such as samplers, table coverings, doll accessories, and more!

Here are some needlework highlights (all made by Wyck’s former residents):
1️⃣&2️⃣Sconce: linen; silk; one of a pair; made by Margaret Wistar in 1738 when she was 9 years old

3️⃣&4️⃣Queen Ann chair seat cushions: walnut; wool. The walnut chair was made c. 1740, but the wool seat cushion was made by a family member 200 years later in the 1940s

5️⃣Sampler: linen; created in 1824 by Sarah Haines at boarding school when she was 11 years old

6️⃣&7️⃣Table covering: cotton with crocheted trim; made in the late 19th century

8️⃣&9️⃣Embroidered Genealogy of Wyck: linen; wool; researched and stitched between 1972-1982 by family descendant Laura Haines Belman

Join us for a casual craft night hosted by the Young Friends of Wyck where participants will learn about native bees, be...
08/24/2023

Join us for a casual craft night hosted by the Young Friends of Wyck where participants will learn about native bees, bee boxes, and their impact on the environment! 🐝

Using all-natural, recyclable materials, we'll create bee boxes to support the native bee populations that frequent Wyck. The bee boxes will be kept at Wyck, but participants are welcome to bring their own materials (empty tissue boxes, paper towel tubes, or small shipping boxes) to create their own bee boxes to take home!

This is a free workshop with a suggestion donation of $5 to support the Young Friends of Wyck or bring a snack to share! Space is limited, so please register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/craft-night-bee-boxes-tickets-705559757227?aff=oddtdtcreator

This week on the ABCs of Wyck, we’re diving into one of our collection’s children books. M is for… Mother 🪿Goose🪿A fasci...
08/18/2023

This week on the ABCs of Wyck, we’re diving into one of our collection’s children books. M is for… Mother 🪿Goose🪿

A fascinating title in the library collection is “Mother Goose in Hieroglyphics,” written by E.F. Bleiler and published in 1855. This book contains several nursery rhymes that replace certain words with pictures (a type of puzzle known as a rebus). It features over 400 detailed woodcuts, many of which the Haines children colored in on their own, and a key that reveals the word each picture stands for (Image 7).

In the book’s introduction, Bleiler writes that children want “a pretty book, written with pictures, as they wrote in Egypt a long while ago…My word for it, there is nothing like books with pictures to keep children quiet; and this is the best that was ever written, as everybody knows.”

Try to decode the stories featured in this post!

Save the Date for Honey Fest! The 2023 Philadelphia Honey Festival at Wyck is on Saturday, September 16 from 10am - 4pm....
08/16/2023

Save the Date for Honey Fest! The 2023 Philadelphia Honey Festival at Wyck is on Saturday, September 16 from 10am - 4pm.🐝 🍯

Food trucks, beer & mead, vendors, and bee/honey related activities will be offered all day! Keep checking our website (https://wyck.org/philadelphia-honey-festival/) for the latest buzz on schedule & vendor updates.

Join us for a tree-tastic workshop on September 9 at 11am!🌳Arborist and urban forester Jehane Samaha will lead participa...
08/15/2023

Join us for a tree-tastic workshop on September 9 at 11am!🌳

Arborist and urban forester Jehane Samaha will lead participants as we discuss common tree species in Philadelphia, practice using dichotomous keys to figure out mystery trees, and learn patterns across tree families. Each participant will have the opportunity to make a beautiful leaf print of one favorite tree. If desired, bring photos, leaves, and twigs of woody plants for the group to identify together.

🔗This is a free workshop, but space is limited. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/698411165597?aff=oddtdtcreator

This week on the ABCs of Wyck: L is for…Library 📚Wyck’s Library collection contains over 3,400 books covering almost eve...
08/09/2023

This week on the ABCs of Wyck:
L is for…Library 📚

Wyck’s Library collection contains over 3,400 books covering almost every topic imaginable. Family members collected books throughout the site’s history, reflecting their curiosity for various subjects, including botany, chemistry, fiction, mathematics, and more! Several family members would also write their names on the inside cover of the books they purchased or were gifted, allowing us to track which family members were interested in which topics (Image 3).

Check out some highlights from Wyck’s library collection!

Image4️⃣: The oldest book in the collection is a 1508 edition of Margarita Philosophica by Gregor Reisch, which was used as a general textbook throughout Western Europe and covers the subjects of grammar, astronomy, physics, and music.

Image5️⃣: Anatome Animalium, published in 1681, is known as the first comprehensive publication of animal anatomy. It includes detailed descriptions of over 110 species and features several detailed illustrations.

Image6️⃣: There are several first editions in the collection, including this copy of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, first published in 1886.

Image7️⃣: The book collection is also full of children’s stories, including this whimsical story of Bob the Squirrel and his “extraordinary adventures,” published in 1850.

Check back next week to see another one of our children’s books in-depth!

Join us at Wyck this Saturday for a day full of activities and excitement during The Jabali Jungle Plant Pop Up Experien...
08/07/2023

Join us at Wyck this Saturday for a day full of activities and excitement during The Jabali Jungle Plant Pop Up Experience by ! 🌿🌱

This event celebrates & highlights Black and POC owned plant shops, flower shops, floral design businesses, and urban farms across the U.S.!
🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿
Saturday, August 12, 2023 | 12 - 4pm at Wyck House, Garden & Farm | 6026 Germantown Ave.

Festivities at this FREE EVENT include:
Music • Gardenside Chat • Marketplace • Art • & MORE!

View the full schedule in the image or check out to learn more about the event!

This week’s ABCs of Wyck post is another horticultural highlight: K is for Kitchen Garden!Did you know that before the r...
08/03/2023

This week’s ABCs of Wyck post is another horticultural highlight:
K is for Kitchen Garden!

Did you know that before the rose garden was filled with roses of every shape and size, it was a kitchen garden in the 18th century that operated as the family’s pantry and medicinal cabinet? Due to this long history of planting and growing fruits, vegetables, and flowers, Wyck’s collection is full of historic seed catalogs, including the “Spring Catalogue and Amateur's Guide to the Flower and Kitchen” published in 1870 by B.K. Bliss & Sons. One can find beautiful, vivid illustrations of various crops, like this beet, that have grown on Wyck’s property for nearly 300 years.

The earliest documentation of the garden was in 1797 when Hannah Marshall Haines shared with her son, Reuben, that the cabbage had flourished, but their peas and “some of the beans are stuck.” Along with nourishing vegetables and fruit trees, the garden was also full of ornamental plants, including daisies and honeysuckle.

While the garden was transformed into a formal rose garden in 1821 by Jane Bowne Haines I, several plants from the original kitchen garden remain, including a bed in the garden that contains herbs and a pomegranate tree (Image 3). Of course, Wyck’s kitchen garden is most evident in our Home Farm, a half-acre plot of land that was used as the family’s kitchen garden after the roses were planted that continues to be full of fruits and vegetables today (Image 4). Just as the family used this land to create culinary and medicinal recipes, we use it today to grow and share produce with our local community.

If you’re interested in volunteering on the farm, join our Home Farm Club Program, which is free to join and runs every Tuesday from 4-6pm and every Friday from 9:30-11:30am. Volunteers get a share of free produce each session (which will include beets, peppers, tomatoes, and more this August!)

Due to the excessive heat watch, Wyck will be CLOSED on July 27, 28, and 29. Farm Club on Friday, July 28 will run as sc...
07/26/2023

Due to the excessive heat watch, Wyck will be CLOSED on July 27, 28, and 29. Farm Club on Friday, July 28 will run as scheduled from 9-11am, with water and shade provided.

Thank you for your understanding!

We are thrilled to announce José Almiñana of  as our 2023 Wyck-Strickland awardee! We will celebrate José on October 3rd...
07/17/2023

We are thrilled to announce José Almiñana of as our 2023 Wyck-Strickland awardee!

We will celebrate José on October 3rd at the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania.

For information on sponsorship or tickets, contact us at [email protected] or give us a call!

Congratulations José!

Announcing our August Workshop - Food Preservation!In this class, local food preservation expert April McGreger will sho...
07/14/2023

Announcing our August Workshop - Food Preservation!

In this class, local food preservation expert April McGreger will show us how to use one of the world's oldest and simplest methods of preserving foods, lactic-acid fermentation, to turn our garden’s bounty into crunchy pickled vegetables and vibrant salads that will last for many months without canning. We will utilize a small batch method of fermenting by the pint or quart, which requires no special equipment and makes this the perfect preservation method for beginners. We’ll discuss the long history of fermented foods, how and why they‘ve risen to health food status in recent years, and why fermentation is a fantastic low-effort, high-reward technique to curb food waste.

Workshop is free, but spots are limited! Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/food-preservation-fermentation-tickets-674432775587?aff=oddtdtcreator

Thank you to the Philadelphia Inquirer for highlighting Wyck, and thank all of you for your support!
07/12/2023

Thank you to the Philadelphia Inquirer for highlighting Wyck, and thank all of you for your support!

The Tausendschon was planted in the 1910s. It was a crime scene of snipped stems and broken branches.

After an incident involving one of our historic roses, we’re dedicating the next entry of our ABCs of Wyck series to the...
07/10/2023

After an incident involving one of our historic roses, we’re dedicating the next entry of our ABCs of Wyck series to the women who designed, protected, and enhanced Wyck’s rose garden and important collection of heritage roses. J is for Jane, Jane, AND Jane!

The Rose Garden was designed in 1821 by Jane Bowne Haines I. She sketched out the garden’s design of its 5 main parterres (Image 2) and selected 20 types of roses to plant in her garden (the roots of several still grow in the garden today).

Jane Bowne I’s youngest daughter, Jane Reuben Haines (Image 3), was only 11 years old when her mother passed away. She lived at Wyck her entire life and took it upon herself to maintain her mother’s rose garden – even preventing the removal of the once-blooming heritage roses her mother planted when multi-blooming hybrid roses became popular in the mid to late 1800s. Due to this, Wyck’s wonderful collection of heritage roses remains intact today for visitors to enjoy.

Jane Bowne I’s granddaughter and Jane Reuben’s niece, Jane Bowne Haines II, left her own impact on Wyck’s garden history. As a talented horticulturist, she maintained Wyck’s garden throughout the early 20th century and planted the climbing roses visitors see as they view Wyck’s front facade, including the Tausendschon rose, in the 1910s (Image 4). These roses are now part of Wyck’s identity and are a highlight of many people’s visit to the garden. Jane Bowne II went on to found the First School of Horticulture for Women, which is now the Temple Ambler campus.

Wyck’s collections, both living and nonliving, reflect the family’s passion for horticulture and the natural world – these 3 Janes helped to make sharing Wyck’s history with the public possible!

Address

6026 Germantown Avenue
Philadelphia, PA
19144

Opening Hours

Thursday 12pm - 4pm
Friday 12pm - 4pm
Saturday 12pm - 4pm

Telephone

(215) 848-1690

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Wyck Historic House, Garden, and Farm posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Wyck Historic House, Garden, and Farm:

Videos

Share

Category


Other Museums in Philadelphia

Show All