Science History Institute

Science History Institute Chemistry • Engineering • Life Sciences
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The Science History Institute collects and shares the stories of the innovators and scientific discoveries that shape our lives.

➡️ NEW PODCAST EPISODE ⬅️ The Forgotten Mother of Penicillin How “Moldy Mary” helped produce the lifesaving drug and tur...
10/11/2023

➡️ NEW PODCAST EPISODE ⬅️ The Forgotten Mother of Penicillin
How “Moldy Mary” helped produce the lifesaving drug and turned an insult into a triumph.

Most people know the story of penicillin. Or they think they do. It involves microbiologist Alexander Fleming and his accidental discovery of one of the most important drugs in history. However, that’s not the whole story. In order to create penicillin, Fleming needed mold. And that’s where Mary Hunt, a scientist with an eye for interesting molds, comes in.

Listen to the latest episode of The Disappearing Spoon podcast with Sam Kean here: https://ow.ly/35tf50PVEWx

How “Moldy Mary” helped produce the lifesaving drug and turned an insult into a triumph.

How much do you really know about the Nobel Prize?With the Nobel Prize announcements taking place next week, October is ...
09/29/2023

How much do you really know about the Nobel Prize?

With the Nobel Prize announcements taking place next week, October is one of the rare times the news media focuses on fundamental scientific research. The Science History Institute has teamed up with the online learning platform Roundtable to offer you compelling courses from the history of science.

On Wednesday, October 4, join museum curator Roger Turner as he shows us how the Nobel Prize can be an entry point for more inclusive stories about the diversity of people who work in science. Turner, who is
the Institute’s curator of instruments and artifacts, will explain why we chose to talk about cruise missiles, emotional labor, and backyard volleyball games in our exhibit on biochemical instruments. After the presentation, participants will have a chance to chat with Turner about the “behind the scenes” work of museums to create contemporary exhibitions.

This is a live, virtual course hosted by Roundtable, which includes interactive opportunities and post-course recordings available for all course participants. Click here to register for this course: https://ow.ly/SfKB50PRgSm

In this five-part course, Roger Turner follows some of science’s most colorful characters and the role their instruments have played in changing the world.

We are just days away from the opening celebration for our latest exhibition, BOLD: Color from Test Tube to Textile! Dra...
09/18/2023

We are just days away from the opening celebration for our latest exhibition, BOLD: Color from Test Tube to Textile! Drawing on rich collections of dye sample books, vivid clothing, and unique scientific instruments, BOLD explores more than 150 years of synthetic dye-making, from the laboratory and the factory, to the runway and the home, from mauve to shocking pink and every tint in between!

The evening will feature
🗣️ a curator’s talk,
👗 fun fashion,
✋ hands-on crafts,
🎨 pop-up displays, and more!

Wear your most vibrant looks 👚🩳👕, and you can participate in our colorful costume contest . . . you may even take home a BOLD prize! 🏆

Curator Elisabeth Berry Drago will answer your questions and share behind-the-scenes stories from the making of BOLD. Be the first to tour the exhibition, then snap a pic at our virtual photo booth, try your hand at fashion sketching and collage, and enjoy light refreshments.

Check our stories for a sneak peak 👀

Immerse yourself in the DAZZLING world of BOLD this Friday, September 22, at 5 pm.

Click here to register: ow.ly/hMsL50PMOnR

09/12/2023
09/12/2023

Dive into the world of nixtamalization, and find out how you’re eating a small piece of ancient chemistry each time you bite into a taco.

Vibrant, Dazzling, BOLD! Come visit the Science History Institute’s latest exhibition and explore more than 150 years of...
08/29/2023

Vibrant, Dazzling, BOLD! Come visit the Science History Institute’s latest exhibition and explore more than 150 years of efforts to expand our access to color. The exhibition offers a journey through the history of science with stops at coal mines, factory floors, and fashion runways. Join us for our Opening Celebration on Friday, September 22, 2023 from 5 pm-8 pm.

Drawing on dye sample books, vivid clothing, and unique instruments, BOLD: Color from Test Tube to Textile documents the scientific and cultural trajectory of color from the earliest dyes through the mass-marketed color revolutions of the 20th century, and into the more environmentally minded present.

Opening September 22, 2023 through August 2024.
Visit sciencehistory.org/bold for more information.

This exhibition explores the history of textile dyes with a journey to coal mines, factory floors, and fashion runways.

In our latest Distillations article, Sam Kean recounts the most infamous crime Darwin never committed—accessory to the m...
08/22/2023

In our latest Distillations article, Sam Kean recounts the most infamous crime Darwin never committed—accessory to the murder of an elderly Parisian woman in 1878.

But that fact didn’t stop many in the French press from trying the naturalist in the court of public opinion. Were Catholic conservatives right to hold Darwin responsible for the crime, an accomplice whose ideas had poisoned the mind of a killer determined to illustrate “Darwinism” in real-time? Or was this sensational murder the perfect bludgeon for beating back the spread of secular ideas?

Read “The Case Against Darwin” now by clicking the link below.
https://www.sciencehistory.org/stories/magazine/the-case-against-charles-darwin/

For a deeper dive into the social and political phenomena of the Barré-Lebiez Murders, check out this interview with Dr. Liz Grjebine, author of “A Darwinian Murder: The Role of the Barré-Lebiez Affair in the Diffusion of Darwinism in Nineteenth-Century France.”
https://hssonline.org/news/news.asp?id=630041

How the investigation into a grisly murder shocked 19th-century France and framed the scientist as an accomplice.

We’re back with part 2 of our joint blog Theodore Roosevelt Center! In this post, Outreach Coordinator Dr. William Hansa...
08/21/2023

We’re back with part 2 of our joint blog Theodore Roosevelt Center! In this post, Outreach Coordinator Dr. William Hansard and Rachel Lane of the Science History Institute (and former TR Center intern!), examine the importance of the American Chemical Society, their then-president Charles H. Herty, and chemistry's role in the Preparedness Movement.

Click the link below to read now!
https://ow.ly/O7hc50PBCVi

Want to learn more about wartime medical history? Register for ‘The Transformation of American Medicine through War’. Presented by Roundtable by 92NY and the Science History Institute, this three-part online course features David Caruso, director of the Institute’s Center for Oral History, who will discuss military medicine during the Spanish-American War and World War I. Visit https://www.sciencehistory.org/visit/events/ for more information.

We are excited to share this two-part joint blog post with the Theodore Roosevelt Center Outreach Coordinator Dr. Willia...
08/14/2023

We are excited to share this two-part joint blog post with the Theodore Roosevelt Center Outreach Coordinator Dr. William Hansard and Rachel Lane of the Science History Institute (and former TR Center intern!), as we explore the importance of chemistry in society in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.

Click the link below to read now:
https://ow.ly/oqBw50PyFkr

Stay tuned for Part 2 next Monday, 08/21.

You can also learn more about Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley and his unceasing advocacy of national pure food and drug legislation by reading his scientific biography available on our website https://ow.ly/vFhX50PyBtU

Images 1 and 2: Newspaper cartoon, Chemist Roosevelt at work. Library of Congress Manuscript Division. Theodore Roosevelt Digital Library. Dickinson State University.

Image 3: The seven ages of dope. March 28, 1906. Prints and Photographs division. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Theodore Roosevelt Digital Library. Dickinson State University.

Image 4: Portrait of Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, c. 1900. DC Public Library Commons, Flickr.

Did you get your tickets yet??? THIS Thursday, August 10, the Science History Institute invites you to experience a live...
08/08/2023

Did you get your tickets yet??? THIS Thursday, August 10, the Science History Institute invites you to experience a live concert event exploring the strange and otherworldly side of science! Created and performed by goth-folk duo Charming Disaster, this musical epic spans everything from witchcraft 🔮, monsters 👹, and the underworld to bats🦇, plants🌿, poisons☠️, and parasites🪱

After the show, join us for refreshments and a special reception with the artists. Super Natural History is both an album and an alchemical musical experiment! Magic and science may seem contradictory, but for they are opposite sides of the same coin: alternate ways to see the world and consider its mysteries.

There is still time to register, but space is limited. Click the 🔗 below to register now. You won't want to miss out!

The Science History Institute invites you to experience a live concert event exploring the strange and otherworldly side of science!

Today is National Milk Chocolate Day 🍫 Enjoy your favorite milk chocolate ice cream or milkshake to cool off in this hea...
07/28/2023

Today is National Milk Chocolate Day 🍫 Enjoy your favorite milk chocolate ice cream or milkshake to cool off in this heat!

Pictured here: Circa 1919. An illustration of bottles of various chocolate-flavored drugs and supplements for oral consumption. Includes: coco-quinine, coco-emulsion of cod liver oil, coco-santal compound, calomel, and phenolphthalein. The chocolate flavor was used in liquid solutions to disguise the flavor of the compound as well as add color and help in suspending the compound.

Click here to see more images from our digital collections: https://ow.ly/IsHu50PnEeo

More than 200 Philadelphia students gathered at the Science History Institute on July 21 to attend the third annual Xtre...
07/26/2023

More than 200 Philadelphia students gathered at the Science History Institute on July 21 to attend the third annual Xtreme5 Teen Tech Summit. An innovative program powered by and presented by Grace3 Technologies LLC echnologies and the The National Black Empowerment Council - NBEC X5 is designed to empower the next generation of leaders by delivering hands-on, real-world tools and emerging technologies.
Click here to learn more ⬇️

Drones, robotics, and Google’s Be Internet Awesome online safety program top list of tools and technologies experienced by more than 200 Philadelphia students at STEM event.

Why Do We Obsess Over Charles Darwin’s Health?Is it serious historical work? Respectable gossip? Blatantly prying into p...
07/06/2023

Why Do We Obsess Over Charles Darwin’s Health?

Is it serious historical work? Respectable gossip? Blatantly prying into people’s lives? Retro-diagnosing historical celebrities is all of the above and more.

Learn more about the value of retrodiagnoses in the latest episode of The Disappearing Spoon with Sam Kean .

It’s been 200 years since the pioneer of germ theory and modern vaccines was born, and still, his reputation endures. In...
12/07/2022

It’s been 200 years since the pioneer of germ theory and modern vaccines was born, and still, his reputation endures. In this day and age, why do we still talk about Louis Pasteur?
Find out why in our article: http://ow.ly/1KSu50LXPan

Or will the scientist’s 200th birthday be his last soirée?

It's the holiday season and Dasher decided to take a break inside our copy of the Historie of Foure-footed beastes (1658...
12/07/2022

It's the holiday season and Dasher decided to take a break inside our copy of the Historie of Foure-footed beastes (1658). Even Santa's reindeer need time to themselves!

Are you baking a ton of cookies but need to keep them fresh until your holiday party? Use saran wrap! This is a color pr...
12/06/2022

Are you baking a ton of cookies but need to keep them fresh until your holiday party? Use saran wrap!
This is a color print advertisement for Saran Wrap, a product of the Dow Chemical Company. Click here for a closer look: https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/9g65kvx

We're back with another  ! This illustration is of a knobbed Wild Mint, found in "Theatrum botanicum: The theater of pla...
12/06/2022

We're back with another ! This illustration is of a knobbed Wild Mint, found in "Theatrum botanicum: The theater of plants, or An herball of a large extent..." (1640). Click the link in our bio for more information!

O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree,How lovely are your...icicles? 🥶This 1964 view from the Dow Chemical Company of two c...
12/02/2022

O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree,
How lovely are your...icicles? 🥶

This 1964 view from the Dow Chemical Company of two children seated in front of a Christmas tree advertises one of the many uses of saran plastic. This tree happens to be decorated with "icicles" made from saran plastic!

Initially developed for the U.S. Army to wrap arms and equipment for transport during World War II, saran plastic was also developed and marketed as Saran Wrap for household use. Click here for a closer look: https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/h702q741k
What's your favorite unconventional holiday decoration?🎄

It's December, so it's time for Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, and snow! We'll be busy putting up some decorations around...
12/01/2022

It's December, so it's time for Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, and snow! We'll be busy putting up some decorations around the library and hoping for snow.

John Calhoun’s colony was a 🐁 utopia—a giant pen with everything a mouse could ever desire: plenty of food and water, a ...
11/30/2022

John Calhoun’s colony was a 🐁 utopia—a giant pen with everything a mouse could ever desire: plenty of food and water, a perfect climate, and reams of paper to make cozy nests. But the thing is, this wasn’t the first rodent heaven that Calhoun built. And by this point, he knew not to expect a happy ending. Because he also knew just how quickly mouse heaven can deteriorate into mouse hell.

In this episode of , Sam Kean explores scientist John Calhoun’s mouse utopia and what it can tell us about the ways we impose lessons for society onto lab experiments. Click the link in our bio to listen now!

This November, as we observe Native American Heritage Month, we’d like to honor the legacy of the late chemist Nancy B. ...
11/23/2022

This November, as we observe Native American Heritage Month, we’d like to honor the legacy of the late chemist Nancy B. Jackson.

Nancy B. Jackson (1956-2022) was a revered figure in the field of chemistry and also the first Native American woman to become president of the American Chemical Society (ACS). She was born in Wisconsin but spent most of her adolescence in St. Louis, Missouri, with her parents, who were ministers for the United Church of Christ. Nancy’s grandfather was Native American (Seneca) and grew up on the Cattaraugus reservation in New York. Although she was initially interested in politics and even worked on Capitol Hill while attending George Washington University, she decided to shift her focus to chemistry. Her mentor, Theodore P. Perros (1921-2014) convinced her that a chemistry degree would be more impactful in environmental and Native American causes.

Throughout her career, Nancy was very active in the American Chemical Society (ACS), serving on and chairing many committees and participating in ACS governance. In 2009, she was notified that she had won the election and would begin serving as President-elect in 2010. She was especially excited because her Presidential year would be the International Year of Chemistry, 2011. During her Presidency, she worked to expand the influence and reach of ACS internationally and make the resources more universally available. Relying on stories and relationships—a characteristic of her Native American heritage—Jackson wanted to improve communications with the public.

Nancy is survived by her husband, James Miller, a professor of Practice, School of Sustainability, College of Global Futures at Arizona State University, and her two sons, Christopher Miller and Jackson Miller.

You can listen to her full oral history interview on our website: https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/58o0m67

11/22/2022
It's the most wonderful time of the year! ⭐️That's right, we're back next month for our last First Friday event of the y...
11/22/2022

It's the most wonderful time of the year! ⭐️

That's right, we're back next month for our last First Friday event of the year!
On Friday, December 2, we'll be exploring all things merry and bright . . . with the science of light! 💡

Come and see the magical effects and real science behind things like combustion, gaslight, lightbulbs, and more—from candles and lanterns to modern electricity. Get illuminated with seasonal hands-on activities and see highlights from our rare book collections.

First Fridays are always FREE and open to the public. Attendees will receive a 10% discount to the National Mechanics restaurant! See you there!

Ever heard of a little green drink called..the green fairy? Perhaps you're familiar with its more common name, absinthe....
11/21/2022

Ever heard of a little green drink called..the green fairy? Perhaps you're familiar with its more common name, absinthe. Read more about the deadly origins of this former medicinal tonic on the Tasting Table website below. Thanks for featuring our article MSN!
http://ow.ly/TMEM50LJT1E

The swirling speculation and mystery surrounding absinthe came to a dark head when in the small village of Commugny, Switzerland.

Join us TOMORROW for Family Day: Clean Water at 11 am!You'll have the chance to:📚 Hear stories with Thembi Palmer🚰 Taste...
11/18/2022

Join us TOMORROW for Family Day: Clean Water at 11 am!
You'll have the chance to:
📚 Hear stories with Thembi Palmer
🚰 Taste Philly's finest tap with us at our water bar Philadelphia Water Department
🔍 Try a scavenger hunt to earn a water-themed prize
🎨 Make a take-home craft

Family Day is always FREE for all ages!
Visit http://ow.ly/JCk650LInoM for more info.

On this episode of The Disappearing Spoon, Sam Kean tells the story of Thomas Schall, a U.S. Congressman who dedicated h...
11/16/2022

On this episode of The Disappearing Spoon, Sam Kean tells the story of Thomas Schall, a U.S. Congressman who dedicated himself to one idea above all—reforming our messy, lopsided, archaic, and maddingly inconsistent monthly calendar.
Click here to listen to the full episode: http://ow.ly/5x1250LG9OT

Why does February have only 28 days? Why do days have 24 hours but hours have 60 minutes? And while octagons have eight sides and octopuses eight arms, why is October the tenth month? Most of us just shrug at such questions. But not Thomas Schall. He wouldn’t let things like that stand. He underst...

In the ancient world, sugar was used as a medicine, but over time it became a luxury indulgence. The desire for its swee...
11/15/2022

In the ancient world, sugar was used as a medicine, but over time it became a luxury indulgence. The desire for its sweetness shaped the modern world in some horrible ways, influencing both slavery and the Holocaust.

In this episode of The Disappearing Spoon, Sam Kean traces how such a sweet treat has caused so much harm—from slavery to the N**i death machine. Listen to this episode now on our website:
http://ow.ly/N2Yw50LEW2O

This episode of The Disappearing Spoon traces how such a sweet treat has caused so much harm—from slavery to the N**i death machine.

Today we observe World Diabetes Day, an international awareness day for those who suffer from this health condition dail...
11/14/2022

Today we observe World Diabetes Day, an international awareness day for those who suffer from this health condition daily. Diagnosing and treating diabetes has evolved dramatically over the past few centuries, but researchers are still working towards a viable cure. Take a look at these 1970s Clinitest Reagent Tablets used to test for urine sugar.

Alt-Text: Photos of Clinitest Reagent Tablets, directions for conducting the test, and the color chart used to analyze the result.

As we remember attorney Paul Morantz (1945-2022), we look back at a 3-part   series on opioid addiction in the U.S., inc...
11/11/2022

As we remember attorney Paul Morantz (1945-2022), we look back at a 3-part series on opioid addiction in the U.S., including Morantz's efforts to stop rehab cult Synanon. http://ow.ly/SSlq50LBgNK

Part 2: Synanon and the Tunnel Back to the Human Race.

This painting hung in Rolf Dessauer’s home when he was a child growing up in Germany. It was damaged 84 years ago today ...
11/10/2022

This painting hung in Rolf Dessauer’s home when he was a child growing up in Germany. It was damaged 84 years ago today on Kristallnacht, or the Night of Broken Glass, coordinated acts of violence against Jews in N**i Germany, Austria, and Czechoslovakia on November 9-10, 1938. The survival of this painting is a reminder of the violence Jews faced on Kristallnacht, the resilience of the Jewish community, and the contributions of Jewish scientists.

Rolf Dessauer explains in his oral history interview that the portrait was “torn to shreds” on Kristallnacht but was soon restored. It depicts scientist Paul Ehrlich, a German-Jewish physician and scientist who won the Nobel Prize in 1908 for his work in immunology. Rolf’s father, Adolf Dessauer, interned in the institute that was headed by Ehrlich in Frankfurt, Germany. Rolf would go on to study chemistry and make his own contributions to science. Learn more about the portrait of Paul Ehrlich in Rolf Dessauer’s oral history interview:
https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/m9ymvpo =18401

Other materials related to Ehrlich’s work in our collections include a letter from Ehrlich to scientist Georg Bredig, which you can view here: https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/nt69rwb

Rolf Dessauer’s oral history interview is part of the Oral Histories of Immigration and Innovation project, which is supported by a generous grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

The letter from Paul Ehrlich to Georg Bredig is from the Papers of Georg and Max Bredig. Digitization and cataloging of this collection was made possible through the generosity of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR).

Join us for Family Day: Clean Water  Saturday, 11/19 @ 11 am!You'll have the chance to:📚 Hear stories with Thembi Palmer...
11/09/2022

Join us for Family Day: Clean Water
Saturday, 11/19 @ 11 am!
You'll have the chance to:
📚 Hear stories with Thembi Palmer
🚰 Taste Philly's finest tap with the Philadelphia Water Department's Philly Water Bar
🔍 Try a scavenger hunt to earn a water-themed prize
🎨 Make a take-home craft

Family Day is always FREE for all ages! http://ow.ly/ZjoC50LyWkL

Dive into a day of family-friendly, water-related activities that includes storytime and exploration of our exhibitions.

Archaeologists have long understood the value of an aerial view for understanding past landscapes. The last decade has s...
11/08/2022

Archaeologists have long understood the value of an aerial view for understanding past landscapes. The last decade has seen an extraordinary change in technology as drones, lidar and high-res satellite imagery has allowed access to a variety of aerial data, and the emergence of increasingly complex research questions that can be answered remotely.

Join Science on Tap - Philadelphia for a talk with Dr. Austin "Chad" Hill, who will discuss his work with drones, remote sensing, and a variety of sensor technologies with examples from projects in Jordan, Israel, and the U.S.

This is a FREE event, but pre-registration is required.
Click here to register:
http://ow.ly/5Rse50LxBPi

The Hanford Nuclear site in Washington is not just a nuclear site; it’s also a tourist destination and part of the Natio...
11/03/2022

The Hanford Nuclear site in Washington is not just a nuclear site; it’s also a tourist destination and part of the National Park system. Welcome to nuclear tourism ☢️
Read more in our Distillation Magazine article: http://ow.ly/sTaR50Lt5AO

Why would anyone visit a radioactive ghost town or the remnants of a nuclear reactor? The reasons are surprisingly varied, and the impressions of...

Join us this Friday, 11/04, for the opening of our outdoor exhibition: Science and Survival.  Drawing from the collectio...
11/02/2022

Join us this Friday, 11/04, for the opening of our outdoor exhibition: Science and Survival. Drawing from the collection of correspondence from the father and son chemists of Jewish descent, Science and Survival reveals the Bredig family’s struggle to survive the horrors of the N**i regime. http://ow.ly/Yjbk50LrQ1s

Join us for the opening of our outdoor exhibition, Science and Survival, featuring a talk by curator Jocelyn McDaniel.

Calling all researchers 🗣️! The Science History Institute's Beckman Center is now accepting applications for the 2023-20...
11/01/2022

Calling all researchers 🗣️! The Science History Institute's Beckman Center is now accepting applications for the 2023-2024 Fellowships! Visit our website for a full list of requirements and our Guide for Applicants!
The deadline to apply is January 15, 2023. http://ow.ly/erbG50LqLkF

The Science History Institute offers a variety of fellowships, many of which require separate application processes. Here you will find information about applying for Beckman Center fellowships and Othmer Library travel grants.

In this episode of the Distillations Podcast, our hosts discuss the unlikely intersection of science and paranormal acti...
10/27/2022

In this episode of the Distillations Podcast, our hosts discuss the unlikely intersection of science and paranormal activity. More specifically, paranormal investigation... 👻
Listen here:
http://ow.ly/NRT350Lni7j

Though science and investigations of the paranormal might seem incompatible, they were intertwined for a long time.

Join us on Friday, November 4, for the opening of our latest outdoor exhibition: Science and Survival.Some Holocaust sto...
10/25/2022

Join us on Friday, November 4, for the opening of our latest outdoor exhibition: Science and Survival.

Some Holocaust stories may never be known. Trauma and loss prevent many from ever being told. The Papers of Georg and Max Bredig, some of which will be displayed at the event, help give voice to these silent memories.

Drawn from the collection of correspondence from the father and son chemists of Jewish descent, Science and Survival reveals the Bredig family’s struggle to survive the horrors of the N**i regime.

At this month’s First Friday event, you’ll have a chance to write your own postcard using images from the Bredig collection, try a scavenger hunt on the theme of unknown figures in science, and explore unique objects and stories from our museum and library collections.
Click here for more information: http://ow.ly/1pOx50LkfJm

We teamed up with Friends of the Wissahickon or a guest blog post titled “Microplastics and the History of Water Protect...
10/24/2022

We teamed up with Friends of the Wissahickon or a guest blog post titled “Microplastics and the History of Water Protection.”

Written by our Director of Curatorial Affairs, Jesse Smith, the story offers insight into microplastics and how this teeny, tiny material has put the health of our environment at risk. He also uses our current Downstream exhibition as an example of the long and ongoing history of water protection, which began more than 200 years ago when the city of Philadelphia needed a clean water supply. Click here to learn more.

Jesse Smith shares his insights into microplastics and the history of water protection through our ‘Downstream’ exhibition.

It's  ! To celebrate this year's theme,  , we invite you to explore our Digital Exhibition: Second Skin. This virtual ex...
10/21/2022

It's ! To celebrate this year's theme, , we invite you to explore our Digital Exhibition: Second Skin. This virtual exhibit illustrates the materials and techniques used to create stretch and compression fabrics. http://ow.ly/j9Bv50LhGkN

This exhibition investigated the materials and techniques used to create stretch and compression fabrics.

Next Tuesday, catch our latest Lunchtime Lecture event, presented by our Beckman postdoctoral fellow Armel Cornu. This t...
10/20/2022

Next Tuesday, catch our latest Lunchtime Lecture event, presented by our Beckman postdoctoral fellow Armel Cornu.

This talk will open an unexplored chapter of early modern social and scientific history: a time during which sellers, regulators, patients, physicians, and chemists met, argued and collaborated over a shared interest in healing waters.
Click here for more info: http://ow.ly/pb2350LgWEH

Institute fellow Armel Cornu follows the journey of bottled water from medical remedy to grocery store staple.

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Though Louis Pasteur never visited the United States, his memory persists here. However, without denying his rage ingenuity or public health contributions, could commemorations of him become less common? Via Science History Institute.
Douglas Mawson made several dumb mistakes on his harrowing expedition across Antarctica. 🇦🇶 But the biggest blunder involved eating animal livers oversaturated with vitamins - a sure death sentence.

The full story: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-disappearing-spoon-a-science-history-podcast/id1506994358

Science History Institute
We touch on the importance of water and the Delaware watershed a lot here at FOW...but tomorrow on Clean Water Day, you can learn all about water in Philly with the Science History Institute!!

See details of this great family-friend event below!⤵️⤵️
Tomorrow, November 17, APS Member Frances Arnold will deliver the 2022 Ullyot Public Affairs Lecture at the Science History Institute titled "Innovation by Evolution: Bringing New Chemistry to Life" https://www.sciencehistory.org/event/frances-arnold-innovation-by-evolution-bringing-new-chemistry-to-life
Family Day: Clean Water at Science History Institute this Saturday at 11 am!

More info➡️ https://sciencehistory.org/event/family-day-111922

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Automobiles kill several million animals every single day. 🚨🦌🐸🦤😾🚗Scientists are still coming to grips with this apocalyptic carnage.

Hear the full story: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-disappearing-spoon-a-science-history-podcast/id1506994358

Science History Institute
Join us for Family Day: Clean Water at Science History Institute on Saturday, November 19th at 11 am!

You'll have the chance to:
📚 Hear stories with Thembi Palmer
🚰 Taste Philly's finest tap with us at our Philly Water Bar
🔍 Try a scavenger hunt to earn a water-themed prize
🎨 Make a take-home craft

More info➡️ https://www.sciencehistory.org/event/family-day-111922
Magnesium found many uses in the trenches of Europe during World War I. But a British blockade changed who manufactured the metal and what it was used for. In Science History Institute.
Those interested in history of chemistry, chemical engineering, and the life sciences, should consider applying for a fellowship offered by the Science History Institute, in Philadelphia.
All the details in the post below ⬇️
Hoping it can be of interest to this community:

INTENSITY AND THE GRADES OF NATURES: heat, Colour, and Sound in the Ordering of the Pre-Modern World 1200-1600.

11-14 July 2023 Pisa

Held in the stunning premises and terrace of the Domus Comeliana, this summer school will explore how heat, colour, and sound have been used, conceptualised and graded in the pre-modern cosmos shaping both disciplines of knowledge and everyday life.

Central to the various cosmologies that developed throughout the period 1200-1600 was the idea that phenomena are subject to a variation in intensity. Intensity determined why objects were of higher or lesser temperature, speed, brightness, porous or dense texture, pitch, and so forth. And yet, intensity also had wider metaphysical, theological, political and cultural implications: it was instrumental to justify the order of the cosmos, the necessity of evil, and the need for hierarchies in maintaining social peace, with shades of colour especially used to mark social status, both in garments and buildings.

Note that five Santorio fellowships are available to support this event.

Info and registration at: https://csmbr.fondazionecomel.org/events/the-intensity-of-nature/
🟠 in 1923… diabetes pioneers Frederick Banting and JJR Macleod won the Nobel Prize for the discovery of insulin.

By the end of the year insulin was being made on a mass scale, and the lives of millions of people with diabetes were saved

Read about the discovery on the Science History Institute…
👉 www.sciencehistory.org/historical-profile/frederick-banting-charles-best-james-collip-and-john-macleod
ICYMI: We had absolute pleasure of collaborating with the Science History Institute to talk about microplastics in the watershed.

Click the link below to learn more about the history of water protection in the Philadelphia and the risks microplastics brings to our health and environment.
🔗 https://www.sciencehistory.org/news/friends-of-the-wissahickon-guest-blog
On November 17, APS Member Frances Arnold will deliver the 2022 Ullyot Public Affairs Lecture at Science History Institute, "Innovation by Evolution: Bringing New Chemistry to Life." Registration is free and open to the public: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/innovation-by-evolution-bringing-new-chemistry-to-life-tickets-388860922487
Join our friends at the Science History Institute as they host an open house to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the signing of the Clean Water Act on October 19!!
🤪🧬🔭"[Science] should never be stuffy. It should be fun and silly and a little chaotic.” — Allison Krisch, co-producer of Science On Tap and the Assistant Director of Family and Camp Programs at

Philadelphia’s Science on Tap, a monthly event series for curious adults, sets itself apart by making one thing clear: Science is for everyone. It is organized by a consortium of six Philadelphia science museums:

The Academy of Natural Sciences, American Philosophical Society, Mütter Museum of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Penn Museum, Science History Institute, and the Wagner Free Institute of Science.

Read the full story by WHYY: https://bit.ly/3RNiHoq

Join in on the fun this coming Monday 10/10 at 6PM, returning to National Mechanics for the first in-person event since March 2020. Seats are first come, first served & no tickets required: https://bit.ly/3EldwZY
It looked more like a decadent hotel than a scientific institute. But that appearance was misleading: it was the Fort Knox of agriculture. Learn more about the Soviet Union’s Bureau of Applied Botany in Science History Institute.