USC Pacific Asia Museum

USC Pacific Asia Museum USC Pacific Asia Museum's mission is to further intercultural understanding through the arts and culture of Asia and the Pacific Islands. USC Pacific Asia Museum is one of only four institutions in the United States dedicated exclusively to the arts and culture of Asia and the Pacific Islands.
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The museum’s mission is to further cultural awareness and understanding through the arts.

Action@PAM - In a historic pick, Senator Kamala Harris is the first Black woman and first Asian American to become a vic...
08/17/2020

[email protected] - In a historic pick, Senator Kamala Harris is the first Black woman and first Asian American to become a vice presidential nominee.

Her mother, Shyamalan Goplan, was a breast cancer scientist who emigrated from India in 1960 to pursue a doctorate in endocrinology at UC Berekley. Her father, Donald Harris, is a Stanford University emeritus professor in Economics, who emigrated from Jamaica in 1961 for graduate study in Economics at UC Berkeley.

Born in Oakland, California, Harris is a graduate of Howard University and the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. She began her career in the Alameda County District Attorney's Office, before being recruited to the San Francisco District Attorney's Office and later the City Attorney of San Francisco's office. In 2003, she was elected district attorney of San Francisco. She was elected attorney general of California in 2010, and re-elected in 2014. She defeated Loretta Sanchez in the 2016 Senate election to become the second African-American woman and the first South Asian American to serve in the United States Senate. She is the presumptive Democratic vice presidential nominee in the 2020 election. @ USC Pacific Asia Museum

Community@PAM - Be the Buyer! Shop@PAM prides itself on working with businesses who value the principles of social respo...
08/16/2020

[email protected] - Be the Buyer! [email protected] prides itself on working with businesses who value the principles of social responsibility, provide safe working conditions, ensure the rights of children, respect cultural identities, and cultivate environmental stewardship. Now it’s your turn to help us decide which worthy company should join our Fair Trade collection. These companies represent a diverse sampling of countries and merchandise, and offer unique, high-quality products.
Every week members from Starfish Project visit brothels to invite women and girls to leave the sex industry for a new opportunity. Women are given basic education and healthcare and the tools to create the jewelry Starfish Project sells.
Stylish handbags, baskets, and home accessories are crafted from organic grasses by Baskets of Cambodia. The native, organic grasses are dependent on seasonal rains, not artificial irrigation, and all dyes are non-toxic. Baskets of Cambodia aims to maintain transparency in its treatment of its employees. All workers receive a wage higher than the national average, healthcare, company sponsored vacation, and no-interest loans are available for emergencies.
Sweet felted baby booties from all-natural yak wool come courtesy of Silk Road Bazaar. Based in Kyrgyzstan, Silk Road Bazaar connects with artisans in rural areas with limited market access to help develop designs, assist with quality control, and teach computer skills. What began as a Peace Corps project has grown into a successful business for traditional craftswomen.
Jungle Straws are 100% sustainable bamboo, biodegradable, and zero-waste. Responsibly grown in Vietnam, Jungle Straws is committed to donating proceeds to the preservation and restoration of natural resources in local communities. For your consideration: Jungle Straws set of 6 with cleaning brush.
Time to vote! In the spirit of valuing the efforts of each company, [email protected] is committed to purchasing from each company in the coming year. Your vote will decide who will be the first! Share your vote in the comments between August 15-August 24, 2020. We’ll reveal the winner August 29, 2020. @ USC Pacific Asia Museum

Kids@PAM - Ema: Japanese Wishing PlaqueIn Ancient Japan, Shinto and Buddhist worshippers used to dedicate horses to temp...
08/14/2020

[email protected] - Ema: Japanese Wishing Plaque
In Ancient Japan, Shinto and Buddhist worshippers used to dedicate horses to temples and shrines. However, since not everyone had horses, some people would make a substitute dedication by painting images of horses on wooden plaques. The Japanese character for ema is 絵馬, which means "picture horse". On the back of ema, people wrote their wishes or prayers and hung them at the shrine.

In modern times, ema are not limited to images of horses, but can show any animal or symbol. Some shrines will even offer limited edition ema with images pertaining to specific holidays!

Swipe left to take a look at the images of the ema in USC PAM’s collection and consider the following questions: Are all ema shaped the same? How do people choose to personalize their ema? What kind of wishes do you think people write down on their ema?

Questions to inspire your artwork: What are your current hopes and dreams? What animal do you have a positive association with? What do you like about that animal?

Materials Needed: Cardboard, Scissors, Coloring materials (such as paint, markers, pastels, or crayons), string, pencils

Step 1: Cut out a 4” x 6" piece of cardboard. If you prefer, you can cut the cardboard into a different shape, such as an animal, star, or heart.
Tip: If you want to make a shape that is not a rectangle, try using a cookie cutter as a stencil!
Step 2: Punch a hole on the top center part of your cardboard shape.
Step 3: Next, sketch the animal or symbol you want on the front of your ema with a pencil. After completing your sketch, you can start painting or coloring in your design!
Step 4: Allow the front of your ema to completely dry. When it's dry, flip the board over and write your wish down. You can also decorate the back of your ema.
Step 5: After both sides of your ema are dry, tie a string into a loop and thread it through the hole you punched on the top of the cardboard. Now you can hang your ema in a special place in your home so your wishes may come true!
@ USC Pacific Asia Museum

Throwback@PAM - In 2018, USC PAM invited four panelists to share their definitions of cultural appropriation, and its hi...
08/14/2020

[email protected] - In 2018, USC PAM invited four panelists to share their definitions of cultural appropriation, and its historical context — colonialism and genocide.

The panelists included: USC Professor Viet Thanh Nguyen, MacArthur Genius Grant awardee and Pulitzer-winning author of The Sympathizer (Grove Press, 2015); Josh Kun, Professor and Chair in Cross-Cultural Communication and American studies and a MacArthur Genius Grant awardee, as well; Melissa Chan, a Ph.D. candidate in East Asian Languages and Cultures at USC Dornsife; and Aditi Mayer, a photographer and journalist who explores ties between, fashion and social activism.

Moderated by USC PAM Curator, Dr. Rebecca Hall, the speakers offered the following ideas about cultural appropriation:

“Who owns culture? Who has the power? Ownership is a term that gets thrown around. People say we own this or that as a culture,” said Viet Thanh Nguyen. “And the decolonization we’ve been undergoing is a response to the commodification of people, bodies, labor, but also art, food and all these other types of commodities.”

Josh Kun, noted that one other framework also determines appropriation: capitalism. “Those encounters and those dominant marginal encounters and the removal or theft or extraction happen because those things become marketed or commodified in our culture. It has financial gain attached to it. It’s what we might call racial capitalism.”

Aditi Mayer said that social media has elevated cultural appropriation as an issue, both in positive and negative ways. “We can call people out when they are behind the keyboard,” Mayer said, noting that social media users were quick to criticize Gucci for the use of Sikh turbans at the 2018 Milan Fashion Week runway show.

Melissa Chan, raised the issue of a White teen wearing a qipao to prom, said that some people may ignorantly appropriate another culture’s art or fashion, but they should be responsible for doing the research. Otherwise, the display is insensitive and offensive.

Check out our stories to see excerpts of the evening from an @aditimayer post! @ USC Pacific Asia Museum

08/13/2020

Nourish your mind and spirit with today's Mindful Music performance by the talented Elizabeth Wei, @elizabethweii. Elizabeth is a rising sophomore from Dallas, Texas, studying Classical Violin Performance at USC Thornton School of Music.
We hope you enjoy Elizabeth's rendition of the Taiwanese Folk Song titled 思暮的人 (Thinking of you).

08/12/2020

Take a closer look with USC PAM curatorial intern, Tiv Hay-Rubin, who will look at the reimagined broken ceramic pieces by Yeesookyung.

Image credit:
Yeesookyung, Translated Vase, Korea, 2015
Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf
overall: 4 in x 4 1/8 in x 3 1/4 in; 10.16 cm x 10.4775 cm x 8.255 cm
Gift of the Artist
Accession Number
2015.2.1

08/11/2020

“My work reveals hidden narratives and patterns embedded in identity, gender expectations, community, family, and culture. My process lies somewhere between science and art. Like a scientist, I methodically conduct experiments, gather data, and synthesize findings. But where scientists deal with facts, my data points capture human memories, emotions, and experience. I piece together the larger truth that these data points reveal, creating videos, new media, and textiles.” – Ahree Lee

Join exhibited artist Ahree Lee in an online art workshop inspired by the Bojagi, a traditional Korean quilt-like textile. Lee invites you to use photos of family and friends to create a Bojagi-inspired photo collage. [email protected] - Bojagi‪, September 10th at 4:30pm. Rsvp link in bio!‬

Acrion@PAM - In a new campus-wide initiative, USC PAM has partnered with organizations across USC’s campus in a common c...
08/10/2020

[email protected] - In a new campus-wide initiative, USC PAM has partnered with organizations across USC’s campus in a common cause to struggle against systemic racism and hatred, both on and beyond the campus community. Together we will strive to build alliances across difference, counter hatred and, foster a culture of antiracism. Learn more at our link in bio!

Community@PAM - Introducing contemporary vases and home accessories from Art Floral, pieces evocative of clear seas, gra...
08/09/2020

[email protected] - Introducing contemporary vases and home accessories from Art Floral, pieces evocative of clear seas, gray clouds, dune grasses and wide sandy beaches. Even though Art Floral is new to [email protected], they have a long history of hand crafting ceramics in Thailand. The Art Floral company began in the northern province of Thailand in 1955. Originally producing ceramic noodle bowls, the second generation began creating vases and home accessories. Art Floral is now famous for its high quality ceramics and exquisite nature-inspired designs. Skilled artisans hand craft porcelain (white vitrified translucent ceramic) into home goods resembling sea shells, corals, palms, succulents and other natural elements.
[email protected] prides itself on working with businesses who value the principles of social responsibility and environmental stewardship. Art Floral artisans proudly support the activities of the Thai Elephant Conservation Center, a local school for the blind and scholarships for underprivileged students.
During the first few months of the pandemic, workers hours had to be reduced but they are back to full time production. Fortunately, there have been no local cases of COVID-19 in Thailand since July.
[email protected] is pleased to welcome Art Floral to its curated collection of fine goods. Look for Art Floral vases on [email protected]’s new website, coming soon! Email [email protected] to purchase today.
#artfloraltrading
#shopfair
#artisanmade
#fairtradela
#moderndesign
#handmade
#natureart

08/08/2020

Join our Teaching Artist, Idelle, as she takes you step by step in creating an origami frog!

08/07/2020

DREAMS OF A SLEEPING WORLD🌛🌏✨
"Dreams of a Sleeping World," featured an immersive mural and landscape paintings by New York-based artist Oscar Oiwa. The expansive site-specific mural, “Dreams of a Sleeping World,” commissioned by the Museum, is described by the artist as a 360° dreamscape. Created over two weeks, the mural was hand-drawn by Oiwa, his assistant, and four USC Roski School of Fine Art students using approximately 120 Sharpie permanent markers.

#usc #uscpam #artmuseum #museum #pasadena #losangeles #southerncalifornia #socal #tourism #love #photooftheday #fall #beautiful #oscaroiwa #dreamofasleepingworld #upcoming #exhibition #sharpie #dreamscape #newyork

08/06/2020

[email protected] - Meditative Drawing
Watch artist, and educator @norishirasu as he guides you through a meditative drawing exercise inspired by PAM's koi and water lily pond. Click link in bio for full video to follow along as he draws!

#mindfullness #MuseumMomentsofZen #mindfuldrawing

Learning@PAM - Children’s Clothing from the Collection In Qing dynasty China, children’s clothes were filled with embroi...
08/05/2020

[email protected] - Children’s Clothing from the Collection
In Qing dynasty China, children’s clothes were filled with embroidered symbols, such as flowers, fruit, animals, and insects, for warding off evil and bringing prosperity and future success to the wearer. Parents wanted to do everything possible to keep their children alive in the early years of their lives. Fierce animals, including tigers, lions, and dogs, were particularly popular for their protective qualities. Animals and symbols were chosen for embroidery on children’s clothing based on their talismanic properties and potential for protection. For example, cats’ ability to see in the dark meant they could see evil lurking; other animals include the alert phoenix, the loyal and fearsome dragon, the intelligent pig, or the astute and lucky rabbit. In addition to animals, Chinese characters, such as shou, were also embroidered on children’s clothing to bring long life to the wearer.

As children grew older, the focus of the embellishments on their clothing changed from protection to the attraction of good fortune. Hats, in particular, were essential in their role as protective garments and in attracting good fortune. These hats in USC PAM’s collection are excellent examples of the type of hat that scares away evil spirits or fools them into thinking that the child is a fearsome animal. If the tiger hat was worn on birthdays or special occasions, it is supposed to bring luck and peace. Special animal hats were also worn for the Lunar New Year celebrations.

Sometimes a child would have not only a tiger hat but also tiger shoes, tiger toys, and tiger pillows. Children’s shoes were also made in animal forms to scare away evil spirits. On hats and shoes, an animal’s large eyes, large ears, and whiskers helped to see, hear, and feel evil if it was nearby. Often made with red cotton, the shoes might also have bells attached as an audible warning for spirits. As a child aged towards adulthood, embellishment on clothing increasingly focused on academic success, happiness, longevity, prosperity, and the birth of sons. @ USC Pacific Asia Museum

08/04/2020

“Memory can be unreliable and reflects a continuous process of retranslation. Remembering the self is not a case of restoring an original identity, but a continuous process of “remembering,” of putting together moment by moment, or provisional and partial reconstruction.” – Ann Le

Delve deeper into Ann Le’s practice by watching the USC PAM produced mini-documentary on her work and biography for the “We Are Here” special exhibition. @annsgood

#pamfromhome #identity #tracingmemories #asianart #contemporaryart #photography

Action@PAM - Healing Power of Positive ThinkingTake time for self-care during these uncertain times and attend a short s...
08/03/2020

[email protected] - Healing Power of Positive Thinking

Take time for self-care during these uncertain times and attend a short seminar teaching Mindful innovation, Meditation and Laughter yoga led by experts sponsored by the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work. Join from anywhere virtually! Link in bio!

#mindbodyspirit #selfcare #momentofzen #pamfromhome

Community@PAM - Handcrafted artful greeting cards carry more than your birthday wishes; these cards carry a message of h...
08/02/2020

[email protected] - Handcrafted artful greeting cards carry more than your birthday wishes; these cards carry a message of hope and respect. Quilling Card is a Fair Trade certified and woman-owned business that started in Vietnam in 2011. Owner and creator Huong Wolf wanted to revive the lost art of quilling while providing and a stable workplace for women from rural backgrounds. Quilling Card provides employment to over 500 artisans, 99% of whom are women. They receive a safe workplace, paid training, a living wage - that is higher than Vietnam’s minimum - and health care, which includes six months of paid maternity leave.
You can see and feel the creativity of the artisans on these enchanting cards. In 2020, encouraged by deaf members of the team expressing the importance of the sense of touch, Quilling Card launched the “Hand to Heart” project, an artistic Braille card collection in collaboration with the Perkins School for the Blind. These cards provide a tactile art experience as well as a heartwarming message.
The art of quilling dates back centuries and crosses continents. Quilling Card artisans use laser-cut, thin strips of Japanese kishu paper, rolled tightly to create a coil. The coil is shaped and glued to create intricate, decorative designs. For a detailed look into how these coils come to life visit: https://vimeo.com/384032094. To purchase cards and support the museum, email [email protected] The [email protected] will be expanding its selection of Quilling Cards in the coming months.
#shopfairtrade #quillingcard #artisanmade #artcards ba @ USC Pacific Asia Museum

08/01/2020

Listen to our Education Specialist, Valentina Quezada, as she reads the story of six-year-old Bilal who is excited to help his dad make his favorite food of all-time: daal! The slow-cooked lentil dish from South Asia requires lots of ingredients and a whole lot of waiting.

#childrensstories #pockidsbooks #asianchildrensbooks #pamfromhome

Address

46 N Los Robles Ave
Pasadena, CA
91101

Metro Gold Line (Memorial Park Station)

Opening Hours

Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 20:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(626) 449-2742

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USC Pacific Asia Museum is one of only four institutions in the United States dedicated exclusively to the arts and culture of Asia and the Pacific Islands. Our mission is to further intercultural awareness and understanding through the arts. Each day, we strive to be a vibrant destination of the arts and culture of Asia and the Pacific Islands that ignites intellectual curiosities and cultivates creative collaborations. Come explore the engaging and interactive opportunities we offer, including exhibitions, festivals, and workshops for visitors of all ages!

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Hi everyone, I just want to share a very creative presentation by Federation of World Peace and Love (FOWPAL) featuring Asian puppets Wind Warrior and Water Warrior, who introduce useful COVID-19 prevention tips. Stay healthy and safe! http://www.icday.org/EP/SP/ep.html #InternationalConscienceDay #ChangetheWorldwithConscience #fowpal #icday #covid19 #puppets #bjddoll https://youtu.be/RaqVi5z7N0o
Relaxing and beautiful place to enjoy alone or in good company.
This is amazing: this room has not changed in over 50 years. I did art projects there in the early 60s! It looks unchanged!!
Thank you guys again! Here's the full video from the event. https://www.facebook.com/ZawStudios/videos/1967942676572604/
Thank you USC Pacific Asia Museum for hosting Myanmar Cultural Day.
This is a story of an American woman, who protested the enactment of the 1924 Asian Exclusion Act and, in despair, left her homeland for good. Her name was Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore (pronounced "Sid-more," October 1856-November 1928). She was a close friend of Dr. Nitobe Inazo, the author of "Bushido," who died in Vancouver. National Cherry Blossom Festival for 2018 is coming around the corner. Today, it is almost forgotten that the spectacular view of cherry blossoms in the area around the Potomac Tidal Basin and elsewhere in the country is owed to an inspiration of an American woman. While visiting Japan in the mid-1880s, Scidmore was captivated by the beauty of the cherry blossoms in Tokyo and conceived the idea to transplant Japanese flowering cherry trees to the U.S. capital. Back home, Scidmore became the initial proponent for transplanting Japanese flowering cherry trees to the area around the Potomac Tidal Basin. Her idea finally materialized in 1912, when 3,020 saplings of Japanese flowering cherry trees arrived safely in Washington, D.C., as a gift of friendship to the people of the United States from the people of Japan, by the City of Tokyo (current Tokyo prefecture). The cherry tree saplings were successfully transplanted to the area around the Potomac Tidal Basin and to the Capitol grounds, on March 27, 1912 and afterwards. Twenty-three years later, on March 27, 1935, the first national cherry blossom festival was held in commemoration of the landmark event. This is the origin of the National Cherry Blossom Festival that has been celebrated annually, to this day. However, the story of Scidmore does not end here. She was a pioneering American woman in many respects, and her life encompassed many remarkable achievements, as impressive and significant as her Japanese flowering cherry tree project. Her later life was even more dramatic than the earlier one. She protested the enactment of the 1924 Asian Exclusion Act and, in despair, she left her homeland for good. She moved to Geneva, Switzerland, closely worked with Dr. Nitobe Inazo, under secretary-general of the League of Nations, and died there. A new biography of Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore is available now at https://www.amazon.com/dp/1973413736. Enjoy!
To the new Director: Welcome! When possible, would you please research to find when the Pacificulture Foundation was first incorporated. My wife and I, plus a few of our friends incorporated the Foundation. Mrs. Palmer was a constant supporter and she was president when the foundation took over the Grace Nicholson building. My son, Dean Ito Taylor, runs the Asian Pacific Islander Legal Outreach offices in the S.F. Bay area. I would like to give him the details of the Pacificulture Foiundation. When we incorporated, I designed the name PacifiCulture. Thank you for your help. Sincerely, Guy C. Taylor Jr., [email protected] Home address: 94-804 Lelehu Pl. Waipahu, HI 96797
when are U re opening ?
When do you plan to reopen? Miss you🌸.