Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall

Timeline Photos
06/15/2015

Timeline Photos

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall
06/01/2015

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall

SNEAK PEAK: OPENING RECEPTION TONIGHT @7PM IN 870 SOUTH RAYMOND.
06/01/2015

SNEAK PEAK: OPENING RECEPTION TONIGHT @7PM IN 870 SOUTH RAYMOND.

Joelle Dietrick's installation is complete! Come see the finished work at the opening reception tonight 7pm-8am in 870 S...
06/01/2015

Joelle Dietrick's installation is complete! Come see the finished work at the opening reception tonight 7pm-8am in 870 South Raymond.

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall's cover photo
05/26/2015

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall's cover photo

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall
05/22/2015

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall

Art Center College of Design
And the Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall Present

Joelle Dietrick: Cargomobilities

Opening reception: Monday, June 1, 7-9pm

Joelle Dietrick’s paintings, drawings and animations explore contemporary nesting instincts and their manipulation by global economic systems. Her recent artworks and research consider housing trends that complicate relationships to place. Her work has been shown at Transitio_MX in Mexico City, TINA B Festival in Prague and Venice, Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) Chicago, MCA San Diego, Long March Space Beijing, ARC Gallery Chicago, Soho20 New York and MPG Contemporary Boston. She has attended residencies at the Künstlerhaus Salzburg, Anderson Ranch, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Banff Centre for the Arts and the School of the Visual Arts and received fellowships from the University of California, Florida State University and the Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst (DAAD).

Art Center College of Design And the Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall PresentJoelle Dietrick: CargomobilitiesOpening rece...
05/21/2015

Art Center College of Design
And the Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall Present

Joelle Dietrick: Cargomobilities

Opening reception: Monday, June 1, 7-9pm

Joelle Dietrick’s paintings, drawings and animations explore contemporary nesting instincts and their manipulation by global economic systems. Her recent artworks and research consider housing trends that complicate relationships to place. Her work has been shown at Transitio_MX in Mexico City, TINA B Festival in Prague and Venice, Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) Chicago, MCA San Diego, Long March Space Beijing, ARC Gallery Chicago, Soho20 New York and MPG Contemporary Boston. She has attended residencies at the Künstlerhaus Salzburg, Anderson Ranch, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Banff Centre for the Arts and the School of the Visual Arts and received fellowships from the University of California, Florida State University and the Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst (DAAD).

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall
04/03/2015

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall

Timeline Photos
04/02/2015

Timeline Photos

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall
03/20/2015

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall

Timeline Photos
03/19/2015

Timeline Photos

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall
03/10/2015

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall

Timeline Photos
03/09/2015

Timeline Photos

02/23/2015

ATTENTION: The Jennifer Pastor talk Dead Landscapes was cancelled for tonight due to scheduling conflicts. Please help spread the word. Thank you!

Don't forget, TONIGHT! Bring a friend!
01/26/2015

Don't forget, TONIGHT! Bring a friend!

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall
01/14/2015

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall's cover photo
01/14/2015

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall's cover photo

Being published as I write this!
01/13/2015

Being published as I write this!

Brody Albert installing the upcoming show, "Carol Johnson:  Drawing Fire"
01/13/2015

Brody Albert installing the upcoming show, "Carol Johnson: Drawing Fire"

01/13/2015

The Opening Reception for the second 870 Building exhibition, Carol Johnson: Drawing Fire, opens this Thursday evening, January 15, at 7 pm at the 870 Building Gallery. It is curated by alumni Brody Albert (ILL11), and is a great mix of multiple points of inquiry from both Fine Art and Illustration departments.

It is a wonderful opportunity to see original WWII war correspondence drawings; both a touching tribute to one of our recent grad's generational lineage (Brody's grandfather was a very successful New York Illustrator, and one of the main reasons he ended up enrolling at Art Center), as well as journalistic documents of real historical interest.

Please join us for the opening reception, this Thursday night, January 15th, at 7:00pm in the Hutto-Patterson Gallery, in the lobby of the 870 Building (and yes, there will be snacks).

Share, bring friends!
01/07/2015

Share, bring friends!

Welcome Back! Here's whats up next:
01/07/2015

Welcome Back! Here's whats up next:

Tonight!
11/17/2014

Tonight!

11/10/2014

Necessary and required event coming up:

Juli Carson, an art historian, critic and curator, offers a performative lecture. Carson is a Professor of Critical and Curatorial Studies at UCIrvine, where she is also the Director of UCI’s University Art Gallery and Room Gallery. 7 pm, room 150 at 870 S. Raymond.

Below, an interview with Carson:

Chop Shop: A Conversation between Stephanie Taylor and Juli Carson

JC: Your project, Chop Shop, is an interdisciplinary, “site-specific” installation of sculpture, photography, and song. In this installation, as in past work, you begin with a pun based upon the look or sound of a word you’ve associated with the exhibition site, and you metonymically proceed from there. Can you describe the associative method of your working process?

ST: The concept of site specificity has traditionally been important for artists making a connection between an artwork and an exhibition space, but subsequently it’s become an overused term that means almost nothing. When something is emptied this way, it's an attractive starting point because there’s space for redefinition. So I begin by making a ridiculously simple sound association, say with the name of a gallery such as "Room." In this case "Room" leads to the sound "Vroom" and the project becomes about cars. This is site-specific in the ludicrously empty way that this term is used colloquially. In its absurdity it’s also a critique of language thrown around in art discourse.

JC: But distinct from more ubiquitous site-specific projects, you work critically with the concept of genre. How does genre come into play here?
ST: In my first exhibition, I used the sound of my name to develop the story. "Stephanie Taylor" sounds like "stay funny sailor," and so the story was about a sailor. The stories are developed in different ways each time I do an exhibition. But it’s never the case that I say "I'm interested in cars…I'm going to make a show all about them." And yet the association isn’t completely arbitrary. Cars are integral in Los Angeles, so they’re obvious things to make art about. In fact, in this instance, cars play centrally as a cover stories for my texts, which are written from pre-formed sound sequences, liberally edited, and made into song and objects derived from rhymes. The fact that so many artworks have been made about cars makes me indistinguishable among thieves, which of course is how thieves are happiest. The chosen genre is a self-imposed limitation. Each piece in the show must therefore have a sound-relation with its materials and also, in some more abstract way, tell the story of the car thieves. I try to work within the vernacular of a given genre, but I’m also always working within the vernacular of contemporary art.

JC: Speaking of art vernacular, Eva Hesse was a prolific list-maker, constructing endless word plays and titles. Rosalind Krauss, in her book The Optical Unconscious, cites Hesse’s intentions on the absurdity of word play, which I think relates to your project: “‘My idea,’ she had said in 1970, speaking about the aesthetics of composition, of form, ‘is to counteract everything I’ve ever learned or been taught about those things, to find something else…If something is absurd, it’s much more exaggerated, more absurd if it’s repeated.’” This describes Hesse’s tactic of repetition-as-absurdity. I bring this up because, while others have cited literary models for your work, they don’t usually discuss what I’d like to call the sculptural-semiotic model evoked by Hesse. Does this model resonate with you?

ST: I work in an additive process. Individual rhymes are based on the repetition of a sound. Sounds are limited in the number of things with which they rhyme. Each rhyme within a composition produces a portion of the narrative in that each work must be associated in some abstract way to car theft, even if this means I tell a story about someone who wears a rat's bed on her head and goggles. Things get ridiculous quickly when rhymes are compounded. The stranger the story, the more process is revealed.

JC: With all this repetition, contingency seems to be, pardon the pun, the driving force. But it’s not a force devoid of intellect or intention; in fact, your process is complexly semiotic.

ST: There’s always an element of surprise in what I am “able” to make within these self-imposed limitations. But sometimes it's the case that I decide I want to make something specific, and I simply find a material with a very elastic rhyme-relation to this thing. I allow myself all liberties when I need to change something to make it better. I sneak in phrases I find or write and have them pose as products of rhyme charts. The charts are more like a corrupt alibi than an art-making factory. Sometimes I have to stretch the boundaries of believability to make something work. For instance, in this exhibition, which is traveling to Galerie Nagel in Berlin, I introduced rhymes with mispronunciations. "Berlin" sonically breaks down as "ur/in," which becomes "cur" (car mispronounced) and "vin" (vehicle identification number). Normally "car" would require the syllable "ar" rather than "ur." The logic is that certainly somewhere there exists a place where "car" is pronounced "cur." This site, wherever it may be, is where the story takes place.

JC: It’s interesting how your brand of absurdity-as-paradox, which spins off visual/verbal puns, relates to the irrational act of lying out loud, another form of rational mimesis (or more corrupt alibi). It’s what Lacan meant when he said “a too formal logical thinking introduces absurdities, even an antinomy of reason in the statement I am lying, whereas everyone knows that there is no such thing….If you say I am lying, you are telling the truth, and therefore you are not lying, and so on.” So in a way, the surrealist-absurdist notion of “lying out loud” in order to hide relates to your work.

ST: I can think of another example: the Art & Language painting "Portrait of V.I. Lenin in the style of Jackson Pollock." When the painting traveled to the Soviet Union for exhibition, in order to pass the border censors the artists retitled it “Portrait of a Man in Disguise.” By announcing in the title that it was "disguised," it was able to pass through the censors because I think it was assumed that someone trying to disguise something wouldn't scream and yell about being in disguise.

JC: No, it’s counter-intuitive…

ST: I like making objects that are simple rhymes with material names. Viewers tend not to read visual art as a series of sounds. In this sense, the objects I make are made to be misread. The rhyme charts appear to be so systematic, and yet the stories that are produced are often so bizarre. But I don't see it as lying – often it’s the case that things are not what they seem. It is necessary to make a story in the absence of comprehension. And it is not uncommon at a later date to marvel at one's wildly inaccurate estimations. In relation to first impressions, everything is in disguise.

JC: On a local note, making car sculpture or work in L.A. always seems to be, in part, about Charlie Ray’s work. It’s interesting, though, that you openly “steal” from a source that has less to do with your work logically than, say, the Art & Language piece.

ST: The drawing in the anti- theft silkscreen sketch is reminiscent of Ray's Unpainted Sculpture. It's a diagram that I found on the internet which is labeled with all the devices that can be added to a car to make it “theft-proof.” What's funny is that the sketch has been sitting on my desk unresolved for some time now. I think it might be unusable in that it's not made of units which can be separated. So the anti-theft car is really what it is – a dead end for car thieves (like me). But Unpainted Sculpture, in a way, relates to my project only on the most superficial level since it's not a show that's been inspired by art about cars, and I have no particular interest in cars.

JC: What about this connection between car theft and art theft? What do you mean by mobilizing this cultural metaphor?

ST: Work that motivates me tends to have this divide between what is apparent and what is not immediately given. For instance, when one reads the absolutely dense descriptive scenes in a Roussel novel, it is unbelievable to imagine the stories are based on internal rhymes. This idea of taking something and making it unrecognizable is mirrored in the structure of the exhibition, in that all the texts are written with rhyme charts and all the objects are made with rhymes that are not visually present in the show. One sees objects that may seem to have something to do with cars. The source is hidden in the same way a car thief might paint a stolen part and disguise it in a new context hoping to sell it without going to jail. We are always and only working with parts, thus as artists we are criminals because we have to steal.

JC: Can you describe some of the work more specifically in these terms?

ST: For instance, the song playing on the car stereo installed in a carpeted box is a rewrite of the Woody Guthrie song "Take Me Riding in the Car." There’s no way anyone would ever know this since every single word has been dissected and re-rhymed. This is my sense of humor, to take a simple song about riding in a car and completely rework it, but to keep the story essentially the same. It's still a song about riding in a car, only it’s thieves who are riding. The melody of the rewritten song is composed of five notes which are based on the vowel sequence of the rewritten text. The music is a bit "hard" since it's for car thieves.

There’s also a photo of a mirror in the shape of a car door. If you emphasize the first syllable of mirror so that it sounds like "ear” and the last syllable so that it sounds like “oar,” together they rhyme with "rear" and "door." But this of course isn't what someone is going to think when they see it. And there’s wallpaper composed of silhouettes amidst an intricate pattern of leaves. They’re thieves in leaves, hiding and waiting to steal your car. There’s also a sexy chrome lady hanging on the wall like one you might see on a truck bumper. But it's rusty. The title of the piece is "Busty," so it both rhymes with its exterior description and fits within the loose narrative of automobile culture. Each work has a description packed with rhymes, but for the duration of the exhibition they are pawns of an auto-theft gang.

JC: Perhaps we should stop there, so we can leave some of the work ‘hiding in plain view.’

Timeline Photos
11/10/2014

Timeline Photos

10/27/2014

Update: We'll have refreshments tonight before Althea's presentation, from around 6:30 pm on.

Althea Thauberger at 870 S Raymond on the 27th October:  this invitation is part of a platform of events supporting the ...
10/22/2014

Althea Thauberger at 870 S Raymond on the 27th October: this invitation is part of a platform of events supporting the Ike E. Morgan exhibition. About Althea:

She recently staged Peter Weiss’s 1963 play Marat/Sade in the decommissioned waterworks and laundry facilities at the Bohnice Psychiatric Hospital in Prague, the largest clinic in the Czech Republic. Thauberger traveled to Kandahar, Afghanistan, as part of the Canadian War Artist program, met and created photographs with Canadian women in uniform who were working at Kandahar Airfield, and the Ma’sum Ghar Forward Operating Base. As writer Deborah Campbell observes in her spring 2010 cover story “War Artist,” Thauberger brings a unique working method, in which subjects are “co-creators rather than hired props,” to bear on military subjects with surprisingly humanist results. Projects range from a choral performance by home-front military wives at the height of the war in Iraq to a massive photo mural of a military explosives exercise installed at a UBC library.

Timeline Photos
09/04/2014

Timeline Photos

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall
09/03/2014

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall's cover photo
08/29/2014

Hutto-Patterson Exhibition Hall's cover photo

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Pasadena, CA
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