Palm Springs Art Museum

Palm Springs Art Museum Please visit our website for more info: http://www.psmuseum.org Follow us on Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, Pheed, and Instagram @psartmuseum
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It’s the final day to view the Día de Muertos altars @sunnylands; open until 4PM. We are proud to have partnered with th...
11/01/2020

It’s the final day to view the Día de Muertos altars @sunnylands; open until 4PM. We are proud to have partnered with the many organizations and individuals that have created this beautiful experience.

PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM // AT HOME ACTIVITY:  Get Inspired by Día de los Muertos Activity 2, Paper MarigoldsMake your ow...
10/31/2020

PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM // AT HOME ACTIVITY: Get Inspired by Día de los Muertos Activity 2, Paper Marigolds

Make your own Flor del Muerto (Flower of the Dead) and learn about its importance to the celebration of Día de los Muertos.

About the History:

Marigolds are one of the most important components of Día de los Muertos celebrations. The flowers are used in the altars, laid out in cemeteries, and displayed for celebrations. Marigolds’ bright colors and strong smell are thought to reach the dead in the underworld and guide them back to the living so that they can be reunited with their families and feast on the offerings laid out on their altars or headstones. Marigold petals are also strewn on the ground to provide a pathway between worlds. In Mesoamerica, the marigold flower was used for medicinal and spiritual purposes.
Instructions

Supplies:
Tissue paper in orange, red or yellow. (If tissue paper is not available, try colored paper or coffee filters.
Scissors
One pipe cleaner per flower cut in half, preferably green. (Tip: Trash bag ties or a staple in the middle of the flower will also work.)

STEP ONE //
Cut four or more squares of tissue paper. The more squares, the bigger the flower. You can also use more than one color and alternate between colors.

STEP TWO //
Stack your tissue paper squares on top of each other and then fanfold them horizontally.

STEP THREE //
Tie a pipe cleaner around the middle fold and then twist it so that the paper is secure. Make sure the end is pointed down from the thin part of the fold to create a stem.
On both sides of the paper, carefully peel back each layer. Once all the layers are pulled back, fluff the paper to fill out the flower.
Optional: Cut the ends into a “V” shape or round them at the ends before you unfold the layers to create more realistic petals.

STEP FOUR //
You could also use purple or white tissue paper to create other traditional flowers. White flowers represent the sky, while purple is the traditional color for mourning.

PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM AT HOME // SPECIAL DAY OF THE DEAD ACTIVITIES ACTIVITY CALAVERAS  Color and decorate your own Ca...
10/31/2020

PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM AT HOME // SPECIAL DAY OF THE DEAD ACTIVITIES ACTIVITY CALAVERAS

Color and decorate your own Calavera. Calaveras are skulls and are an important part of Día de los Muertos.

Skulls are a reminder that death is just as sacred as life and provide a way to honor deceased loved ones. They also represent a willingness to laugh at death itself.

Calaveras are often made into candied skulls molded from sugar or chocolate. They are usually decorated with icing in bright colors and sometimes include the names of loved ones and placed on their altars.

Calaveras also have ties to political satire. Lithographer José Guadalupe Posada first printed La Calavera Catrina as a satire about aristocratic Mexicans who were becoming too European. The original image of La Catrina was popularized after artist Diego Rivera adapted Posada’s image in a mural titled, Sueño de una Tarde Dominical en la Alameda Central (Dream of a Sunday Afternoon Along Central Alameda), completed in 1947. La Catrina has played an important part in the history of Día de los Muertos and has become an iconic symbol for the holiday.

SUPPLIES:
Printed calaveras (If you don’t have a printer, you can draw your own images.)
Coloring supplies

STEP 1:
Print out one or both of the calavera images.

Download Calavera Image #1
https://www.psmuseum.org/storage/app/media/Images/At%20Home/Sugar%20Skull.png?mc_cid=cac9e76c97&mc_eid=8525f11569

Download Calavera Image #2
https://www.psmuseum.org/storage/app/media/Images/At%20Home/Sugar%20Skull%20Blank.png?mc_cid=cac9e76c97&mc_eid=8525f11569

STEP 2:
If you pick the blank calavera, sketch your own design. Calaveras are often ornamented with flowers and designs around the eyes, forehead, nose, and mouth.

If you choose the decorated calavera, think about what colors you would like to use in the design.

STEP 3: Add color!

STEP 4:
Consider writing the name of a deceased loved one to celebrate their life.

Writing the name of a living loved one or a person who is important to you is also a way to celebrate them and save them a place in the afterlife.

STEP 5: Submit your work!
https://store-psmuseum.org/submission-21/?mc_cid=cac9e76c97&mc_eid=8525f11569

PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM AT HOME:THE FIRST OF THREE SPECIAL DAY OF THE DEAD ACTIVITIESACTIVITY 1: CREATE AN OFRENDA Creat...
10/30/2020

PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM AT HOME:
THE FIRST OF THREE SPECIAL DAY OF THE DEAD ACTIVITIES

ACTIVITY 1: CREATE AN OFRENDA
Create an ofrenda or altar at home to remember your loved ones.

Elements of an Ofrenda:

Fire: Candles and torches are symbols of love for deceased relatives and are guiding lights for the spirits.

Papel picados: usually made out of tissue paper. Typically in yellow and purple, their intricate designs represent the union between life and death and how fragile that union is.

Flowers: not only a beautiful visual addition to the altar, but each type has specific meaning. Marigolds or cempasúchil are guides for the spirits into the mortal world because of their bright color and strong scent. (Scroll down to find out how to make paper marigolds.) White flowers represent the sky or heaven. Purple flowers are the color of mourning in Mexican culture.

Incense or copal (an aromatic tree resin used in indigenous ceremonies): placed on the altar. It is a way to purify the souls of the dead and to ward off evil spirits.

Water: placed on the altar to quench the thirst of the souls who have traveled a long way. It also strengthens them for their journey back.

Salt: usually placed on a plate and stops the souls of the departed from becoming corrupt by earthly temptations.
Banquet: an offering to loved ones providing their favorite food and drinks. Traditional Day of the Dead food offerings are Pan de Muerto (bread of the dead), rice, mole, pumpkin, jicama, oranges, sugar cane, and fruits of the season.

White cross: A cross is drawn on the ground under the altar to represent the four elements, earth, air, fire, and water. It is traditionally made with slaked lime (a white calcium powder).
Calaveras or skulls represent deceased relatives. A popular kind of calavera is a candied skull made of sugar or chocolate decorated with designs and often including the name of the deceased.

Calaveras are often eaten by children after the celebrations. (Calavera coloring pages in next activity.)

STEP ONE //
Select the person or persons you will create an ofrenda for. This might be a loved one who is no longer living or a favorite person in history. Use a photo, draw a picture, or collect an item to represent who you are making your altar for.

Gather your ofrenda items. Use the Elements of an ofrenda (above) to guide your selection. You do not have to include all items, but you might select a few.

STEP 2 //
Decide where you would like to display your ofrenda. It might be on a table, bookshelf, or night stand.

STEP 3 //
Cover your display area with fabric or a table cloth and start assembling your altar!

Some altars place elements on different levels instead of just on a flat surface. Ofrendas can be as high as seven levels. Two levels represent heaven and earth; three levels show heaven, purgatory, and earth; and seven levels represent the steps the soul has to take to get to heaven.

You could create different levels of your ofrenda with books or boxes, but no matter how high or low, big or small, remembering and celebrating is the most important part.

STEP 4 //
Arrange your items around the image of the person or people your altar is for. If you have a papel picado, hang it on the top of your ofrenda or along the table.

After you have finished arranging your items, take a moment to remember the person or persons your altar honors. Recall your favorite memories of them or family traditions you enjoyed together.

Learn how to make paper marigolds in the following activity and display them on your altar.

STEP 5:
Submit your art: https://store-psmuseum.org/submission-21/?mc_cid=cac9e76c97&mc_eid=8525f11569

JOIN THE PARTY! Palm Springs Art Museum's signature fundraising gala, Art Party, will be held virtually in your home on ...
10/29/2020

JOIN THE PARTY! Palm Springs Art Museum's signature fundraising gala, Art Party, will be held virtually in your home on Friday, December 4.

This online event will feature the WORLD PREMIERE of a new performance art piece by internationally acclaimed artist Jeffrey Gibson, as well as a behind-the-scenes studio tour showcasing highlights of his creative process. The evening will be capped off with a celebrity MC and performances by guest entertainers.

Visit the LINK BELOW for event details, tickets and sponsorship opportunities!

https://artparty.psmuseum.org/

Celebrating Día de los Muertos or Day of the Dead has been a tradition at Palm Springs Art Museum for many years. Throug...
10/27/2020

Celebrating Día de los Muertos or Day of the Dead has been a tradition at Palm Springs Art Museum for many years. Throughout the Coachella Valley, the holiday is a time to bring members of the community together and celebrate the tradition of remembrance. Typically, we invite the public to the Museum, however we are currently closed due to COVID-19.

This year, Palm Springs Art Museum has partnered with U.S. Representative for California Raul Ruiz M.D. to create a Community Altar to remember and honor those who have passed away from COVID-19.

“Dia de Los Muertos is a day to remember and honor those who have passed by celebrating their lives," says Representative Ruiz. "This year, it is especially important to have a place of reflection and meaning for the more than 1,200 Riverside County residents who have died from COVID-19. At Palm Springs Art Museum’s Dia de Los Muertos celebration, we will remember and honor our loved ones, friends and neighbors we have lost. I am honored to be a part of this day of remembrance.”

Palm Springs Art Museum invites you to write the name of a loved one or a note and to bring it with you to leave in the message box at the altar. While we cannot welcome guests to the museum at this time, the Community Altar also celebrates the life and work of a selection of artists in our collection of Latin heritage. These include Gunther Gerzso (Mexican, 1915-2000), Roberto Matta (Chilean, 1911-2002), Ana Mendieta (Cuban, 1948-1985), and David Alfaro Siquerios (Mexican, 1896-1974).

The altars at Sunnylands will be on view from October 28 to November 1. Times are Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Thursday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Palm Springs Art Museum is a proud member of the Coachella Valley Days of Los Muertos Collective, which partners with important area organizations: Children’s Discovery Museum of the Desert, Sunnylands Center & Gardens, Run with Los Muertos, Raices Cultura, Cabot’s Pueblo Museum, Palm Springs Cemetery District and Coachella Valley History Museum.

Dine amongst art at Persimmon Bistro at Palm Springs Art Museum! Although the museum is currently closed and preparing t...
10/25/2020

Dine amongst art at Persimmon Bistro at Palm Springs Art Museum! Although the museum is currently closed and preparing to reopen soon, you can enjoy Persimmon Bistro’s cuisine, wine and beer in the sculpture garden. Open Wednesday through Sunday, 11am-6pm; closed Monday & Tuesday.

ARTWORK OF THE WEEK // POLI MANAThe Hopi believe that Katsinam bring spiritual well-being into the physical world. There...
10/24/2020

ARTWORK OF THE WEEK // POLI MANA

The Hopi believe that Katsinam bring spiritual well-being into the physical world. There are over 300 different Katsinam, and their carved doll forms are used to educate children in the teachings and principles of Hopi culture, including the fundamental belief in living in harmony with nature and strong ethical principles regarding good behavior.

Poli, or butterfly dancers, are similar to Katsinam but are not true Katsina dolls. Like Katsinam, however, they are carved from cottonwood root and decorated with paint and accessories, and are then given to girls as a blessing. This Poli Mana, or butterfly maiden, represents a young female dancer. The butterfly dance is a popular social affair where young people of marriageable age meet. The butterfly, a motif used by many ancient cultures, often symbolized springtime, youth, fertility, and renewal. This figure wears a large decorative tableta, or headdress, a traditional black dress, a ceremonial yellow shawl with a blue border, and moccasins.

Hopi or Pueblo, Poli Mana (Butterfly Maiden), c. 1920, painted wood and feathers, 11 1/4 × 3 15/16 × 2 9/16 inches. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James G. Swinnerton, A23-1975.

#PSArtMuseumatHome

Palm Springs Art Museum's signature fundraising gala, Art Party, will be held virtually in your home on Friday, December...
10/23/2020

Palm Springs Art Museum's signature fundraising gala, Art Party, will be held virtually in your home on Friday, December 4. This online event will feature the world premiere of a new performance art piece by internationally acclaimed artist Jeffrey Gibson, as well as a behind-the-scenes studio tour showcasing highlights of his creative process. The evening will be capped off with a celebrity MC and performances by guest entertainers. Event details, tickets and sponsorship opportunities: https://artparty.psmuseum.org/

Arthur Secunda’s “Blue Protrusion” (1975) (left) and Ed Garman’s “Variations of a Structure No. 63-B” (1967) (right) in ...
10/22/2020

Arthur Secunda’s “Blue Protrusion” (1975) (left) and Ed Garman’s “Variations of a Structure No. 63-B” (1967) (right) in the Op Art installation at Palm Springs Art Museum.

ARTWORK OF THE WEEK // RICHARD MISRACHRichard Misrach focuses on the deserts of the American West and is recognized inte...
10/22/2020

ARTWORK OF THE WEEK // RICHARD MISRACH

Richard Misrach focuses on the deserts of the American West and is recognized internationally for the cultural, social, political, and environmental emphasis he brings to landscape photography. Night Desert Series, which he began in the mid-1970s, represents the artist’s first photographic exploration of desert plants, rocks, and terrain. With the aid of carefully set and timed spot-lighting, Misrach transformed his subject in Plate 33, Ocotillo #1, Arizona into an enchanting stage setting, with the sepia toning evoking a mysterious atmosphere. The toning varies from print to print, at times significantly, making each print in this series unique.

Born in Los Angeles, Misrach earned a B. A. in psychology from University of California at Berkeley, where he continues to live. He helped popularize large-format color photography in the 1970s and 80s, and in 1979 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship. Best known for his ongoing series, Desert Cantos, Misrach has worked as a landscape photographer for over 40 years. Beginning in 2004—and increasing since 2009—he has been photographing the US-Mexico borderlands and critically exposing the unseen realities in a series called Border Cantos.

Richard Misrach (American, born 1949), Plate 33, Ocotillo #1, Arizona (from Night Desert Series), 1975, split-toned gelatin silver print, 14 3/4 × 14 5/8 inches. Gift of L. J. Cella, 2015.6.

PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM AT HOME ACTIVITYGET INSPIRED BY // LOUISE NEVELSONRediscover old, used, or forgotten objects and...
10/17/2020

PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM AT HOME ACTIVITY
GET INSPIRED BY // LOUISE NEVELSON

Rediscover old, used, or forgotten objects and then arrange them together to create a puzzle-like assemblage. Paint the result in a single color in the same way that visual artist and sculptor Louise Nevelson does, often in either black or white.

Assemblage combines everyday materials to create an arrangement. It is similar to collage, but is typically three-dimensional.

SUPPLIES:
Box such as one used for shipping, shoes, notecards, or mints
Found objects
Heavy-duty glue
Optional: paint, paint brushes, and scissors

STEP 1:
Collect your objects! Find a box to use as your base. If you do not have a box, use a flat thick surface sturdy enough to support the glued-on objects. The larger the base, the more objects you will need to arrange to cover the surface.

Be on the lookout for objects that are forgotten, broken or no longer used, such as old game pieces or sewing supplies. You might also collect objects that can be recycled, like the cardboard from a paper towel roll.

STEP 2:
Arrange your items on your base. Experiment with different layouts until you find one that seems visually interesting to you.

STEP 3:
Glue your items with heavy-duty glue and let them dry.

Tip: Take a photo of your arrangement before you begin to glue the pieces so that you do not forget the layout when you apply glue.

STEP 4:
Keep your assemblage as is, or paint it one color, such as black or white.

STEP 5
Submit your artwork:
https://store-psmuseum.org/submission-20/?mc_cid=ea310d8968&mc_eid=8525f11569

ARTWORK OF THE WEEK //ACOMA WATER JARAcoma Pueblo is believed to be the oldest continuously occupied village in the Unit...
10/16/2020

ARTWORK OF THE WEEK //
ACOMA WATER JAR

Acoma Pueblo is believed to be the oldest continuously occupied village in the United States. There were 300 steep steps leading up to the Acoma Pueblo, and women balanced jars of this kind on their heads to bring water up the ancient trail. Acoma water jars are characterized by thin ceramic walls and wide, undefined necks. Geometric elements and cross-hatching are typical design features of Acoma pottery. These designs are painted onto a white slip, which is a thin layer of clay.

The art of pottery making in the Southwest can be traced back over 1,300 years to prehistoric Puebloan greyware pinched pots that later developed into pots with more decorative geometric, black-on-white designs. The pan-Pueblo peoples, including Hopi, Zuni, and residents of nineteen Pueblos in New Mexico, are considered the living descendants of ancient Puebloans. The linear style in Acoma Pueblo Water Jar exhibits a direct stylistic link to historic Pueblo designs, whereas the olla form of these jars with their bold abstract motifs are a more recent interpretation.

Shown: Acoma Pueblo Water Jar, c. 1900, black-on-white ceramic, 11 ¾ x 12 ½ inches. Collection of Palm Springs Art Museum, A57-1975.

Address

101 N Museum Dr
Palm Springs, CA
92262

MUSEUM ADMISSION: -Free to members, and youths 12 and under -$12.50 adults -$10.50 seniors 62 and over -$5.00 for students and active duty military personnel with I.D. -Free public admission every Thursday from 4 - 8 pm during downtown Villagefest. -Free admission to AAM, NARM, and WMA members with I.D. -Group tours available. CONTACT INFO: 760.322.4800 or email: [email protected] DIRECTIONS: Located in downtown Palm Springs on Museum Drive at Tahquitz Canyon Way, just west of N. Palm Canyon Drive 101 Museum Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262-5659 Social Media Disclaimer: Palm Springs Art Museum strives to maintain the currency and accuracy of information published on Facebook. However, all posted events and schedules are subject to change. Palm Springs Art Museum disclaims all responsibility for any loss or damage which may arise from the use of this information. Links to external websites and user accounts are provided as a convenience to users and such sites and associated content are not under the control of the Palm Springs Art Museum. The inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of that website, service, art or person by the Palm Springs Art Museum. The museum reserves the right to remove any posted material deemed inappropriate.

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 12:00 - 20:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(760) 322-4800

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