Marion County Museum of History and Archaeology

Marion County Museum of History and Archaeology Marion County Museum of History and Archaeology is the only place to find all the history of Marion County.
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In the Friday, October 25, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star, the Wacahoota society column mentioned that the brother...
04/21/2020

In the Friday, October 25, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star, the Wacahoota society column mentioned that the brother of Mr. Lute Howell had been summoned to Annapolis because the brother's son was suffering from pneumonia following the flu. (Image 1) In the next column over, the Ocala High School band announced it was not able to continue its weekly concerts because of sickness among the students.

In the Ocala Social Affairs column, it mentioned that the funeral of Alfred Brooks had been held out of doors at the Howard home because of the flu. (Image 2)

In the Ocala Occurrences column it was mentioned that Belleview had had a comparatively easy time with the flu. The same column mentioned that Duncan Elliott, who had previously been described as dying, was getting better. (Image 3)

The article listing women who either were nurses or wanted to be nurses to help with the epidemic was reprinted with some paragraphs with new names added. (Image 4)

The Thursday, October 24, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star carried articles saying it had been decided that the Mari...
04/20/2020

The Thursday, October 24, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star carried articles saying it had been decided that the Marion County Fair would go ahead and be held on November 19-22. It also said the schools would on November 4, a week later than predicted. (Images 1 & 2)

There were blurbs saying that the outbreak of influenza had not been bad in Ocala but that people should not relax their vigilance and that the flu would spread from east to west across the country. (Image 3)

To show how bad the flu had been in Jacksonville, there was a blurb saying that 70 of the children and 10 of the staff were sick at the Children's Home, an orphanage. (Image 4)

Under Ocala Social Affairs, it is stated that the entire family of Mr. E. T. Spencer of North Ocala has been sick and that there are still many cases of flu in North Ocala and that the people there hope the start of school will be delayed until the flu is completely gone. (Image 5)

The society column also said that there were no flu current cases at the Florida Industrial School for Girls. (Image 6) Additionally, it said the Don McIver's wife, daughter and father-in-law were sick with the flu and that Frances McIver, the sick daughter, has received a souvenir of the war from Lt. Hugo McIntosh. (Images 7 & 8)

The front page of the Wednesday, October 23, issue of the Ocala Evening Star, among all the news about the Great War, ca...
04/19/2020

The front page of the Wednesday, October 23, issue of the Ocala Evening Star, among all the news about the Great War, carried a long article of a list of women who either were nurses or wanted to be nurses in Marion County. The list was compiled as an aid during the influenza epidemic. (Images 1-4)

In the same issue a blurb mentioned that the ' "spif" ' was subsiding and that Ocala would probably resume its normal life the next week; "spif" must have been a 'cute' nickname for the Spanish influenza. Another blurb said the schools might reopen the next Monday, which would have been October 28. The Temple Theater was also expected to open the same day. A 4th mentioned that the wearing of face masks had helped saved lives and would have saved more had the practice have been started earlier. (Image 5)

Another blurb said that the County Fair was probably going to be cancelled because of the flu epidemic. (Images 6 & 7)

In the Ocala Social Affairs column it mentioned the Mrs. Dozier and most of the influenza cases along Ocklawaha Ave. (Silver Springs Blvd.) are recovering and that there would soon be no new cases to be reported in the newspapers. At the time Ocklawaha was a residential street once you went east past Osceola. Also mentioned illness in the Max Wilson household. (Image 8)

The same column mentioned that Mr. & Mrs. William Knoblock of Martin had to take their sick child to the hospital. Mrs. Otto Potter is recovering but Mrs. Moorhead is still sick. (Image 9) It also mentioned that Miss Sidney Perry has returned to work at the Book Shop after nursing her mother and sister. (Image 10) If what the mother and sister had was contagious, wasn't she then carrying the germs herself?

In a column headed Ocala Occurrences a man from Tampa removed his face mask as soon as he gets to Ocala! The same column says that Carl Wenzel, the helper at the Star offices, had returned to work. (Image 11)

When I read the names of the people who were sick in the society columns it makes me think of the sick people whose names would not have been listed in that type of column. It things were so bad that they were basically begging for nurses there had to have been more that the few cases that made it into the papers.

The Tuesday, October 22, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star carries only a few direct references to influenza and a fe...
04/18/2020

The Tuesday, October 22, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star carries only a few direct references to influenza and a few mentions where influenza might be inferred.

A report of the Marion County Women's Liberty Loan Committee mentions that there is illness in the families of most of the active workers of the county. (Image 1)

E. A. Snowden, owner of the Magnolia barber shop, had a relapse on returning to work after an illness. (Image 2)

Arthur Brooks of Old Town is described as being very ill. (Image 3)

Both Miss Frances McIver and Mrs. D. E. McIver are sick. Mrs. McIver's illness has been previously posted. I am guessing that the two McIvers were connected somehow. (Images 4 & 5) Image 4 also says that Mabel Adkins can returned to her work at the Star offices.

Paul Brinson, of Ocala, is mentioned as having recovered from the flu and being able to return to duty at Hampton Roads. (Image 6)

Duncan Elliott, of Ocala, is described as dying at Southern College in Sutherland. Southern College is now Florida Southern in Lakeland. (Image 7)

The Monday, October 21, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star had some references to the influenza outbreak outside of Ma...
04/17/2020

The Monday, October 21, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star had some references to the influenza outbreak outside of Marion County that I thought were significant. There was mention that the schools in Boston were reopening after 3 weeks and that there had been 4,000 deaths in Boston in the current outbreak. It was also stated that Tampa was "full of influenza" but that there was only one serious case still at the University of Florida. There was also mention made that there had been more deaths in Jacksonville from the influenza than there had been from the yellow fever outbreak in the 1880s. (The Sunday, October 20 issue is not available.)

A doctor in Ocala, who was not named, was described as having treated 9 fellow doctors and 1doctor's wife who had influenza. It also said in the same article that "so many" people in "this section" had influenza. (Image 1)

As of the date of this issue, it is stated that Ocala has not suffered greatly from the flu. It is also stated that there have only been 7 deaths in the entire county so far. (Image 2)

The superintendent of the Florida Industrial School for Girls has let the principal know that the sick son that she had gone to be with has no hope of recovery. The son of Mr. & Mrs. J. A. Marshall has been removed from quarantine in New York. Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Crosby of Citra have returned home after being with their son who had been critically ill. (Image 3)

Mrs. McIver is described as still being very sick. Walter and John Troxler are better but Mrs. Troxler is still very sick. Mrs. H. W. Tucker, Miss Rachel Veal, Mrs. J. R. Moorhead, and Mrs. J. H. Sistrunk are described as better. (Image 4)

Mr. Joseph Blalock, Ed Bennett, and Mr. Clyde Balkcom are also described as better. (Image 5)

There is a Saturday, October 19, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star which destroys my theory that the Star did not pub...
04/16/2020

There is a Saturday, October 19, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star which destroys my theory that the Star did not publish on Saturdays. For some reason the October 12 issue must not have made it into the archives.

The October 19th issue mentioned that some of the people that had previously been post as sick were getting better. Some of the churches were mentioned as having open-air services.

There was a blurb from the Associated Press that mention that on October 19th, there were 218 cases of influenza with 14 deaths reported in Atlanta by the health department. On October 18th there were 154 cases with 5 deaths reported in the same place as seen in image 1. Was the health department in Marion County collecting similar statistics?

Mrs. E. G. Lindner is reported as having returned from PA and to be suffering from influenza. Mrs. M. C. Elliott is reported as having to go to her son, Duncan, at Southern College. The reports of someone in college being so sick their parents have to go to them make me suspect influenza but it could easily have been something else. (Image 2)

Rev. H. C. Hardin, the brother of Rev. Smith Hardin of Ocala, is reported as being ill with influenza at Camp Taylor in KY. In the blurb below this one is the report of one C. A. Tremere who has apparently returned from a visit to Jacksonville, where things are so bad be said the people of Ocala do not know how lucky they are. Could this be a reference to the flu? (Image 3)

There was also a mention in the paper of a small boy dying of whooping cough. There were so many diseases that have been basically conquered today that were still common in 1918.

In the Friday, October 18, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star there continued to be direct and indirect references to ...
04/15/2020

In the Friday, October 18, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star there continued to be direct and indirect references to the influenza epidemic. Most of the direct references continued to be in the so-called society columns of the day. Obviously, there had to have been flu victims who did not make the society pages. In each issue there were more civic and fraternal groups announcing they were cancelling their meetings.

The concert by the Ocala High School Band, whose day the Star originally got wrong, was cancelled because members of the band either had or were recovering from the flu. (Image 1)

Even though it does not refer to Marion County, there was a mention of the flu in the paper that shows how bad things were outside of the society columns. There is mention that the son of the editor of the Tampa Tribune, who was in the Stetson University training corps, is very sick and that the editor has had 5 relatives die recently. (Image 2)

D. L. Skipper, whose in-laws Mr. & Mrs. Robert Marsh were from Ocala, had died on October 13 from pneumonia following an attack of the Spanish flu. Skipper had become sick on October 5 with what was described as a cold and had become progressively worse. Skipper's son, David Lee Skipper, Jr., would be born the following January and would grow up to be a fixture in Marion County for decades after he and his mother & older brother moved to Ocala . He owned an office supply store for many years and was one of two men responsible for bringing the Greenville Aviation Academy to Marion County during WW II. (Images 3 & 4)

The Anthony society column mentioned that Mrs. Florence Gordon had returned from the hospital in Ocala. It also mentioned that Lizzie Lamb had been ill for a few days and that the Misses Guinn were improving from the influenza. (Images 5 & 6)

The Ocala Society page mentions that Serg. Pete Giles, brother of Mrs. J. S. McAteer of Ocala, had died in France of pneumonia six weeks earlier. The column also mentioned that Foster Floyd, whose illness was posted about earlier, is improving, and that Ed Carmichael was getting better in Jacksonville and his mother had returned to Ocala. (Image 7 & 8)

Finally, there was an article that had nothing to do with the flu but carried a brief mention of a forgotten part of Marion County history. There had been an collision between a train and an oil company truck in Summerfield. After the accident, the train backed up, the two victims were put aboard, and were carried on the train to Ocala. The article describes the African-American victim as being taken to the 'Afro-American' hospital. This probably referred to the Mercy Hospital, which opened in 1903 and was housed in the Davis/Goldman building at the SW corner of Ft. King and Magnolia where Brother's Keepers thrift store is currently housed. (Images 9 & 10)

The Thursday, October 17, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star did not carry much information directly dealing with how ...
04/14/2020

The Thursday, October 17, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star did not carry much information directly dealing with how the influenza epidemic was affecting Marion County.

The telephone company was still running an ad asking people not to use the telephone unless it was absolutely necessary.

The Belleview society column mentioned that Mrs. H. L. Hopkins, who was in CT, is very ill. It also mentioned that Mrs, Fouchter is recovering after having had to be taken to the hospital in Ocala the week before. (Image 1).

The staff of the Star announced that their linotype operator, R. L. Dosh, had returned to work but still wasn't feeling as well as he could. Mr. Dosh would go on to be the editor of the Star and the Star-Banner for decades and eventually have 4 sons and 1 daughter. One of his sons, who was around 3 at the time of the epidemic, was Louis N. Dosh, who died as a captain in the Philippines in WW II. The museum has artifacts from Captain Dosh and his wife Betty. (Image 2)

The Weirsdale society column mentioned that Mrs. & Mrs. Errol Reed and their son Herbert are all sick. Mrs. A. M. Reed, relationship to the other Reeds unknown, had just returned from Hawthorne. (Image 3)

The Wednesday, October 16, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star carried a notice in a column heading Ocala Occurrences t...
04/13/2020

The Wednesday, October 16, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star carried a notice in a column heading Ocala Occurrences that Ocala High School band would give a concert the next day. The piece did not say so but the concert probably would have been given at the band stand on the square. I don't think the 4-year-old Ocala High School building on 8th St. had any sort of facilities where a concert could be given. Again, it seems like there was an idea in Marion County that the flu could only be spread indoors.

There is some direct mention in the paper about how bad the epidemic was becoming in Marion County. There are also things that imply how bad it was getting.

The Blalock Bros. Vulcanizing Plant placed an announcement in the paper that they were closing until further notice because of illnesses. The business was on the NW corner of what is now Silver Springs Blvd. and Osceola. (Image 1)

In a column entitled Ocala Social Affairs there are directions about how to make gauze masks to be used when nursing influenza patients. The Marion County Chapter of the American Red Cross had submitted the instructions. (Image 2)

The column also mentions Mrs. R. S. Hall and her son Robert are recovering from an attack of the flu but that her sister, Josephine Williams, who had joined them at the Harrington (Hall) Hotel to help nurse them, is now very sick with the flu. Little Harrington Hall, Mrs. Hall's grandson, is also very sick. When the Halls bought the Montezuma Hotel, R. S. Hall renamed it Harrington Hall, after his grandson. The hotel was sometimes referred to as Harrington Hall, Harrington Hall Hotel, and Harrington Hotel. It was located at the NE corner of Main (1st Ave.) and Ft. King and is shown in image 3 about how it would have looked in 1918. The section of the column that mentions the Harringtons is shown in image 4.

The column had mention of Albert Green, formerly of Ocala and stationed at Fortress Monroe, is improving from an attack of the flu. (Image 5) This piece also states that the sister of Dr. Pillans, Mrs. Durance, will not be able to get to Ocala because of her illness. Dr. Pillans' death was mentioned in a previous post.

The Fairfield society column says there are several cases of flu there but surprisingly for the time does not say who they are. (Image 6)

The Fellowship society column says that everyone there who has the flu seems to be recovering. (Image 7)

Finally, there is a two-column, multi-paragraph piece from the United States Public Health Service on the Spanish flu. The piece implies that the Spanish flu was caused by a bacteria and that it is "overcrowding" inside homes. (Images 8-11) (I put the two columns side by side in the same images to cut down on how many images it would take to post the article.)

Reading between the lines of the Tuesday, October 15, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star, it seems the flu epidemic in...
04/12/2020

Reading between the lines of the Tuesday, October 15, 1918 issue of the Ocala Evening Star, it seems the flu epidemic in Marion County was getting worse. One problem with the newspapers of the day is that there seems to have been no obituary section as we would think of one today. Deaths are mainly mentioned only in the society columns with some people getting mentioned in what amounts to a news article. Death notices also do not seem to include all the survivors. If a person was not prominent, not someone who would ordinarily mentioned in a society column, or someone not known to the people who wrote the society columns, would their deaths be mentioned in the paper at all?

Additionally, if some one does pass away, it takes some guesswork if the flu is not mentioned. A 15-year-old named Blance Reichards daughter of Mr. & Mrs. E. S. Rogers of Lynne. is mentioned having passed away after an illness of three weeks. This is probably not the flu.The Spanish flu usually killed people within hours or a few days after it struck.

A little editorial paragraph says that the flu will soon be passing. Another one says that people in an unnamed location have started wearing face masks, which the writer thinks is a good idea. The writers of the Star acknowledge that they barely covered the Liberty Bond rally the previous Saturday but say that under the circumstances they were lucky to get a paper out at all. As posted earlier, there was illness among the newspaper staff.

Plant Clayton, formerly of Ocala, died while in the service of the coast artillery in Key West. Clayton had earlier been a fireman and his brother John still lived in Ocala. There is no way of knowing if this is flu or not. (Image 1)

In the Ocala society column, Mrs. Hollindrake and Miss Annie Davis have been volunteering at the hospital to fill in for nurses who are sick. Miss Lillian Clarkson is mentioned as one of those nurses who has recovered from the flu and is taking a vacation at her parents house. (Image 2)

Also in the 2nd image, mention is made of W. P. Huckabee who has returned from the burial at Lake Butler of his sister-in-law and has now been called to the death-bed of his sister in GA.

A few paragraphs below as shown in the 3rd image, it mentions George Rentz, mentioned in posts earlier, has recovered some and returned to his business in Jacksonville. Below that is says that Frances Webber is very sick in Jacksonville and his mother has gone up to be with him.

Mrs. Marsh and her son Walter are described as leaving for Zolfo where her son-in-law, D. L. Skipper, had passed away after an attack of pneumonia lasting a few hours. Skipper had been married to the former Leila Marsh. Below that, Paul Brinson, mentioned in an earlier post, wrote his parents that he was doing better. (Image 4)

There is something mentioned is passing in one of the blurbs that comes as something of a surprise. It seems to have been the practice to ring the court house bell and lower the flag to half-staff when someone in the military from Marion County died. I don't know if this was the flag staff that appeared to be on top of the band stand on the square or there was another flag staff that had been put up for the duration of the war. Photos of the square in the 1920s and 1930s show no flag pole on the square.

Address

307 SE 26th Terrace East Hall
Ocala, FL
34471

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Monday 10:00 - 15:00
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Thursday 10:00 - 15:00
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Who is the speaker and topic for this month's event. Thank you!
Y'all come see us at the Citra Orange-A-Fair Saturday, 10/26, 10-3. Located at the Citra Community Center on CR 318, 1 block east of the Citra 301 stoplight. This is a day-long fundraiser and event benefiting the Citra Museum restoration fund. Lots of activities. We'll have some surprises, too, for young and old alike.
Price, haven't been able to find the photograph with discussed Sunday........know it is someplace on my computer.
Marion County's 175th Anniversary of our charter is to be celebrated 03/30/2019. All interested historic groups, exhibitors, vendors, entertainers, speakers, need to fill out a participation form and return it to the county by 12/31/2018. there is a tab on the county's website to download the form. It may be either filled out online and returned to the county (where it will immediately get into the database), or mail the form to the county. They need this information to allot enough spaces for all interested parties. BIG plans are in the works, and lots of help is needed now, and on the date of the event. We will be needing volunteers in period attire, to help with the information booth, as well. BUT THEY NEED THE FORMS FOR ALL INTERESTED FOLKS!
Good morning, what do you charge for admission, and what days are you open, please?
CORRECTION to Marion County Museum of History and Archaeology program for Sunday, 09/16/2018. Due to unforeseen circumstances, we had a very short notice change of program for September. “What do you know about the McPherson School?” a program on the Alice McPherson Florida Industrial School for Girls will be presented by Annabelle Leitner (back by popular demand). The Star-Banner Events Calendar was not notified of the change of program in time before publication, and I apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.
Please help me get the word out. Due to unforeseen circumstances, the regularly scheduled September program at the MC Museum of History and Archaeology has been changed. Sunday 09/16/2018 at 2 pm, at the Green Clover Hall, Annabelle Leitner is back by popular demand. Her program is "What do you know about the McPherson School?" and coincides with the anniversary month for the museum's MC Historical Assn, Inc. Reception and tours of the museum will follow the program. $5 admission for nonmembers and no admission charge for museum members. Y'all come!
Equal Justice activist to address Bridges Project Saturday Sept. 1 Florida lynched more Black people per capita than any other state, according to the Bryan Stevenson's nationally known Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), with Orange County and Marion County topping the list of those murdered here between 1877 and 1950 when more than 4400 African American men, women, and children were hanged, burned alive, shot, drowned, and beaten to death by white mobs throughout the nation. Millions more fled the South as refugees from racial terrorism, profoundly impacting our entire nation to this day. Yolanda Russell, EJI activist, will discuss the new National Museum for Peace and Justice, informally known as the Lynching Monuments and Legacy Museum, recently opened in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as area efforts to memorialize victims in the search for social justice when the Bridges Project of Ocala/Marion County meets Saturday, September 1 at the Ocala Police Community Room, 402 South Pine Ave.( Rt. 441) from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. The event is free and open to the public. Ms. Russell also will address 1920 Ocoee Massacre of Blacks seeking to vote in that year's election. Those not killed disappeared from the area according to the EJI report entitled "Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror," in which the EJI documents violent, public acts of torture, sanctioned by public officials, designed to intimidate the Black community.The report found that many lynching victims were not accused of crimes but killed for minor social transgressions or for demanding basic rights and fair treatment. Almost since its inception in January 2015 the Bridges Project formed a working group , chaired successively by Michael Davis, Henry DeGeneste and now Col. Gorham L. Black III, to remember and attain justice for Marion County victims by seeking sacred spaces for truth-telling and reflection about racial terror still strong in the memory of many among us. In addition to continuing to speak history's truth, the group plans to travel to Montgomery to bring back one of the hanging slabs duplicated for each of the 805 counties in which lynchings occurred once a suitable public site has been approved. Many members of the Bridges Project also served on the Public Policy Institute's 2014 study entitled "The True Cost of Justice in Marion County" available online. Complementing the lynching monuments in Montgomery is The Legacy Museum which draws connections between enslavement and mass incarceration using interactive media, sculpture, videography and exhibits to immerse visitors in the sights and sounds of the domestic slave trade, racial terrorism, the Jim Crow South, and the world’s largest prison system. Compelling visuals and data-rich exhibits provide a one-of-a-kind opportunity to investigate America's history of racial injustice and its legacy — to draw dynamic connections across generations of Americans impacted by the tragic history of racial inequality.
COMING ATTRACTIONS MC Museum of History & Archaeology P.O. Box 4383 Ocala FL 34478 352-236-5245 307 SE 26th Ter, Ocala, FL 34471 All programs 3rd Sunday of odd months, at 2 p.m. in Green Clover Hall. Reception follows at East Hall. All programs admission free to members, $5 to nonmembers. Individual and family memberships available for sale at events. September 16, 2018 Historic Ocala Preservation Society presenting "The History of Ocala and of HOPS." November 18, 2018 Brian Stoothoff presents the History of "The Great Fire" and the City Fire and EMS services – 135th Anniversary.
Sunny Mehaffey, you won the Family membership to the Marion County Museum of History and Archaeology. Our tent was at the Marion County Government Day on Saturday, 03/24/18. Congratulations!
The Rebels of Florida Presented by Ms. Leah Oxendine, author & historical reenactor The next Marion County Museum of History and Archaeology program is on Sunday 11/19/17 at 2 p.m. at Green Clover Hall 319 SE 26th Ter, at the McPherson Governmental Complex property, 307 SE 26th Ter, Ocala, FL 34471. Following will be a reception with refreshments and touring the museum. Admission is free to museum members, and $5 per person for nonmembers. For information, please call the museum at (352) 236-5245. Leah Oxendine is a historical reenactor, musician and 21-year-old author from North Marion County. Her book The Rebels of Florida was published and released to the public through Amazon, Barnes and Noble online, and multiple other worldwide venues. The Rebels of Florida is one of the very few books written about Florida's involvement during the War Between the States, and the only historical novel that focuses entirely on the subject. Over ten years of research and work have been put into the book. You can read about the book at Amazon. She comes dressed in period 1860s clothing program and book signing, and speaks to visitors on 1860s Florida history.
Trappers & Traders Presented by Mr. Robert Wilson, living historian The next Marion County Museum of History and Archaeology program is on Sunday 09/17/17 at 2 p.m. at Green Clover Hall 319 SE 26th Ter, at the McPherson Governmental Complex property, 307 SE 26th Ter, Ocala, FL 34471. Following will be a reception with refreshments and touring the museum. Admission is free to museum members, and $5 per person for nonmembers. For information, please call the museum at (352) 236-5245. A traveling interpretative historian, Mr. Robert Wilson is the owner of Wizard's Gun shop, a gunsmith, expert on trapping, and instructor on the ways of trappers & traders in early Florida. Having participated in the Silver River Museum's Ocali Days and Knap In, and doing approximately 10-30 events a year for State Parks, Boy Scouts, churches, private groups starting in 1993, he became a regular at the State Park system in 2000, and has participated on a regular basis since. He has done these programs at approximately 12-15 state parks through the years. He also does workshops/programs on Women in the Outdoors, and for the Wild Turkey Federation. A passion of his, he claims he was born 200 years too late. During these events, he does primitive camping from two to ten days at a time. The art and lifestyle of trappers and traders is represented in exhibits and in action.