Allen Memorial Art Museum

Allen Memorial Art Museum Founded in 1917, the Allen Memorial Art Museum (AMAM) is recognized today as one of the five best college and university art museums in the United States. Since its beginning, the museum has always been free for everyone.
(57)

Admission to the AMAM is always free and open to the public. The AMAM has an outstanding collection of nearly 14,000 works of art – including paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, prints, drawings and photographs – that provide a comprehensive overview of the history of art from a variety of cultures. The collection is particularly strong in European and American paintings and sculpture from the 15th century to today, and has important holdings of Asian paintings, scrolls, sculpture and decorative art, including a large group of ukiyo-e prints. The museum also houses the Eva Hesse archives, which includes the artist’s notebooks, diaries, photographs and letters, and is proud to oversee, along with the Art Department, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Weltzheimer/Johnson House. The collection is housed in an impressive Italian Renaissance-style building designed by Cass Gilbert and named after Dr. Dudley Peter Allen, a distinguished 1875 graduate of Oberlin College. In 1977, a gallery for Modern and Contemporary art was added to the Cass Gilbert building. Designed by the architectural firm of Robert Venturi, Rauch, and Scott Brown, the gallery was funded by Ruth Coates Roush (OC 1934) and dedicated to professor of art Ellen Johnson (OC 1933).

This Friday, May 29, is the 50th anniversary of artist Eva Hesse's passing in 1970. A formidable sculptor, painter, and ...
05/28/2020

This Friday, May 29, is the 50th anniversary of artist Eva Hesse's passing in 1970. A formidable sculptor, painter, and draftswoman, Hesse was a visiting artist at Oberlin in 1968, and the AMAM became the first museum to acquire a sculpture by Hesse the same year that she died, at the age of 34, from a brain tumor. Despite her too-short career, she is one of the most revered and influential artists of the last century. The AMAM is home not only to her groundbreaking sculpture "Laocoon," but also to the Eva Hesse Archive and more than 300 of her drawings, a selection of which will be on view at the museum in 2021.

In commemoration of Hesse's passing and her incredible legacy, the AMAM is pleased to announce two virtual events:

** On Friday, May 29, "Eva Hesse" documentary director Marcie Begleiter and AMAM curator Andrea Gyorody will be in conversation on Instagram Live, discussing Hesse's life and work. Join us on Instagram, on the account @evahessedoc, at 1PM Eastern (10AM Pacific - 18:00 London - 19:00 Berlin). Want to be part of the conversation? Submit questions below or on our IG accounts before or during the event.

** The Hesse documentary will be streaming FREE for 72 hours, hosted by the gallery Hauser & Wirth. The stream will be available from 12:01AM EST on Friday, May 29 until 23:59 EST on Sunday, May 31. Visit https://www.hauserwirth.com/stories/28680-screening-eva-hesse-documentary to watch. If you've never seen the film, don't miss it!

[Image: Photograph of Eva Hesse, c. 1969. Gelatin silver print. Eva Hesse Archive, Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College. Gift of Helen Hesse Charash, 1977.52.72.9.]

The Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Weltzheimer/Johnson House, owned by Oberlin College and managed by the AMAM, was complet...
05/28/2020

The Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Weltzheimer/Johnson House, owned by Oberlin College and managed by the AMAM, was completed in 1949. In an effort to provide a mini-FLW fix while the house is closed to the public, we present for this week’s #DeepDive a few thoughts from Walker Shadle ’19, curatorial assistant:
-
“To me, while the lovely house here in Oberlin stands in pretty clear contrast with earlier Wright structures commissioned by wealthier clients, a couple of its most unusual details—both involving circles—link it to that same visionary architect.
-
First, we have the curvilinear shapes of the clerestory windows in the Oberlin house, which are unique among Usonian homes and somewhat unusual in Wright’s overall oeuvre. It is not unlikely that the windows’ final design was in fact conceived by Ted Bower, the Wright apprentice who supervised the house’s construction. Second, let’s look at the wooden spheres that line the house’s overhang, which, while similar to fascia decoration in other Usonian homes, stand alone in their perfect roundness.
-
When I see these two elements, I can’t help but think of circular forms in earlier buildings by Wright, some featured more prominently than others. The Winslow House (1894) in River Forest, IL, shows off a strikingly symmetrical façade, emphasized by rectangular doors and windows. Its porte cochère, however, is a perfect semi-circle, and the heavy wideness of its front entrance is marked by two bowl-like planters, each 360 degrees round.
-
The Arthur B. Heurtley House (1902), in Oak Park, IL, a relatively grand residence, prefigures the horizontality of the Oberlin house and other Usonians. But for me, the dramatic arch above its front door is its most interesting feature. Like the balls along the fascia on the Weltzheimer/Johnson House, it disrupts long lines of brick and mortar, ultimately drawing forms together geometrically.
-
As with the Weltzheimer/Johnson House, The Nathan G. Moore House (1894, redesigned and rebuilt by Wright in 1923), also in Oak Park, includes multiple, almost playful series of perfect spheres (photos 8-9) which complicate an exterior dominated by straight lines.”

The Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Weltzheimer/Johnson House, owned by Oberlin College and managed by the AMAM, was complet...
05/28/2020

The Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Weltzheimer/Johnson House, owned by Oberlin College and managed by the AMAM, was completed in 1949. In an effort to provide a mini-FLW fix while the house is closed to the public, we present for this week’s #DeepDive a few thoughts from Walker Shadle ’19, curatorial assistant:
-
“To me, while the lovely house here in Oberlin stands in pretty clear contrast with earlier Wright structures commissioned by wealthier clients, a couple of its most unusual details—both involving circles—link it to that same visionary architect.
-
First, we have the curvilinear shapes of the clerestory windows in the Oberlin house, which are unique among Usonian homes and somewhat unusual in Wright’s overall oeuvre. It is not unlikely that the windows’ final design was in fact conceived by Ted Bower, the Wright apprentice who supervised the house’s construction. Second, let’s look at the wooden spheres that line the house’s overhang, which, while similar to fascia decoration in other Usonian homes, stand alone in their perfect roundness.
-
When I see these two elements, I can’t help but think of circular forms in earlier buildings by Wright, some featured more prominently than others. The Winslow House (1894) in River Forest, IL, shows off a strikingly symmetrical façade, emphasized by rectangular doors and windows. Its porte cochère, however, is a perfect semi-circle, and the heavy wideness of its front entrance is marked by two bowl-like planters, each 360 degrees round.
-
The Arthur B. Heurtley House (1902), in Oak Park, IL, a relatively grand residence, prefigures the horizontality of the Oberlin house and other Usonians. But for me, the dramatic arch above its front door is its most interesting feature. Like the balls along the fascia on the Weltzheimer/Johnson House, it disrupts long lines of brick and mortar, ultimately drawing forms together geometrically.
-
As with the Weltzheimer/Johnson House, The Nathan G. Moore House (1894, redesigned and rebuilt by Wright in 1923), also in Oak Park, includes multiple, almost playful series of perfect spheres (photo #) which complicate an exterior dominated by straight lines.”

Congratulations to all of Oberlin College’s graduating seniors on Commencement Day! We wish you well as you jump to ligh...
05/25/2020

Congratulations to all of Oberlin College’s graduating seniors on Commencement Day! We wish you well as you jump to lightspeed and begin new adventures vanquishing evil and changing the universe for good.
-
Image: Michelle Grabner (American, b. 1962), Untitled, 2014, silverpoint drawing on paper. Gift of Kathleen O'Hara and Malcolm Walsh in honor of the graduation of their daughter Isabel O'Hara Walsh (OC 2014), 2014.46.
-
#allenartmuseum #oberlin #oberlincollege #oberlinohio #museumfromhome #michellegrabner #frontinternational

For Senior Week, we saved Lucy and Liz for today in order to make a big announcement—both will be joining the AMAM team ...
05/22/2020

For Senior Week, we saved Lucy and Liz for today in order to make a big announcement—both will be joining the AMAM team this July as post-baccalaureate assistants at the museum. Congratulations and we look forward to continuing to work with you both!

Art history major Lucy Haskell has done a little bit of everything for the AMAM. As a docent, she led countless tours for visitors (kindergartners, middle schoolers, high school students, and adults) and also worked as a summer curatorial assistant in the Education Department in 2018. During this past year, she was part of the Office of Academic Programs team, doing everything from pulling art and keeping stats to helping students engage with challenging concepts through her teaching. Hannah Kinney, her supervisor, had this to say about Lucy, ”In brainstorming meetings about new programs and projects, she always has a good question to push our thinking forward. We’re thrilled to announce that this summer Lucy will be joining the full-time staff as curatorial assistant in Academic Programs.” Congrats, Lucy!

Liz Yearsley started her journey with the Allen in the January 2017 Winter Term Practicum in Museum Education and has been an active and engaged docent ever since. “Liz is exceptionally skilled at relating to her audience on her tours,” says Jill Greenwood, curator of education, “and it’s a pleasure to watch students make personal connections with the Allen’s collection through Liz’s careful guidance.” A comparative literature major and Hispanic studies minor, Liz is a sensitive teacher who believes, “learning is always reciprocal—a process of sharing rather than giving or taking.” This summer, Liz will join the museum staff as a curatorial assistant in the Education Department. Welcome aboard, Liz, and congratulations!

Images: L: Lucy Haskell; R: Liz Yearsley. Lucy helping with a Community Day printing project and giving a tour for Oberlin College Students. Liz giving tours on the theme of art as propaganda and issues related to portraiture.

#allenartmuseum #oberlin #oberlincollege #oberlinohio #oberlinvirtualvisit

A Senior Week congratulations to our graduating docents! We appreciate your generous contributions of time, insights, an...
05/21/2020

A Senior Week congratulations to our graduating docents! We appreciate your generous contributions of time, insights, and positive energy to further the educational mission of the museum. Your dedication has directly impacted the lives of local pre-K to 12 students. Many thanks!

Jenn Lin was particularly helpful last spring as we organized the artist-in-residence and Community Day events with Oberlin alum Aimee Lee (‘99). As a student attendant during FRONT International, Jenn always brought a smile to the faces of everyone around her. Congratulations on your graduation, Jenn!

Megan Maguire has been a phenomenal addition to our docent corps following the 2020 Practicum in Museum Education. We’re so excited to see where her passion for teaching will take her. Best wishes, Megan!

Momo Suzuki, a docent since her second year, has shone as a gifted teacher in numerous K-12 tours and events. She hosted an art + music presentation at the AMAM in February for Prospect Elementary School third-graders and it was clear the kids adore her. Momo, your dedication to education and children is commendable and we thank you for your commitment to the museum!

Images: Momo Suzuki helps at a Community Day event centered around Asian theater. Megan Maguire giving a tour to Oberlin College students (photo credit: Yevhen Gulenko). Jenn Linn giving a tour to 5th graders on Pre-Columbian art.

#allenartmuseum #oberlin #oberlincollege #oberlinohio #oberlinvirtualvisit

Please note: this post discusses racial violence and police brutality.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Today’s #DeepDive is a throwback to an in...
05/21/2020

Please note: this post discusses racial violence and police brutality.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Today’s #DeepDive is a throwback to an installation by New York-based artist Alexandra Bell, co-organized by the Allen and the Oberlin College Libraries. The project was curated by Andrea Gyorody, Ellen Johnson ’33 Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, who writes:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
“A few hours ago, Alexandra Bell posted a photograph of Michael Brown on Instagram, and wished him a happy birthday, which she does on this day every year. She used the same photograph—of Brown in his cap and gown—that she reproduces in her work ‘A Teenager With Promise,’ which we installed at larger-than-life scale on the facade of Mudd Center in the fall of 2018. The first panel of the diptych shows the story of Brown’s murder as it was printed in The New York Times. Bell has heavily redacted the text to eliminate prejudicial and racially biased details that render Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson sympathetic, and make Brown out to be a credible threat. The second panel is Bell’s imagined alternative: a full-page memorial to Brown, who had graduated from high school just eight days before Wilson shot him.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The experience of having Bell’s work on campus that fall was deeply moving, all the more so because I and many others would find ourselves walking past it on our way across campus, catching a glimpse of Brown’s serious expression or the glint of his red regalia when we didn’t expect it. The panels interrupted the stark Brutalist exterior of the library, demanding to be read, to be engaged. They were prompts to think about just how firmly entrenched white supremacy is in American institutions, even ones as seemingly liberal as The Times. I also saw the work as a call to action—to hold authorities accountable, to name racism for what it is, to demand better. Today, as public space is changing in response to the pandemic, keeping us from being able to gather together, we are going to have to do that work of protest and advocacy differently. I don’t know what that will look like, but I do know it’s more urgent than ever.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Happy Birthday, Michael Brown.

Our Senior Week celebration of Obie grads includes the AMAM’s student assistants. Congratulations Janine, Emily, Gail, a...
05/19/2020

Our Senior Week celebration of Obie grads includes the AMAM’s student assistants. Congratulations Janine, Emily, Gail, and Mecky!
-
Janine Chouinard, graduating from Oberlin with a history major, has been employed by the AMAM for four years. She worked for her first three years as a Student Museum Attendant. As a fourth-year, she took on additional responsibilities as communications assistant, including proofreading publications, emails, and exhibition labels, as well as wrote press releases and articles for the "At the Allen" e-newsletter. Thanks for always putting a smile on our face, Janine!
-
Emily Harter's spring 2020 internship with the AMAM preparators included hinging and matting some of her own art, as well as a bit of construction in the museum's woodworking shop, when it was cut short by the campus closure. When things return to normal, Emily, who is graduating with a double major in art history and studio art, plans to move to Chicago to work in an art history-related job. Emily, we wish you the best!
-
Gail Johnson was only at the AMAM for one semester, but we wish we could have had her longer, since she did such a great job as a Student Museum Attendant. Gail is a clear and welcoming communicator, and was always willing to help. She made visitors feel right at home. Gail graduates with a neuroscience degree and is on the pre-medical track. Congrats, Gail!
-
Mecky (Mechteld) Kuijpers worked at the AMAM for three years as a Student Museum Attendant. She is confident and friendly, and that was a perfect combination for greeting the public, students, and for working with our staff. Mecky graduates with a neuroscience degree and is on the pre-medical track, but also knows her way around an art museum! Best wishes, Mecky!
-
TL: Janine Chouinard; TR: Emily Harter; BL: Gail Johnson; BR: Mecky (Mechteld) Kuijpers

Looking for a summer job in museum work? Oberlin students in the classes of ’20, ’21, and ’22 keep reading:AMAM 2020 Int...
05/18/2020

Looking for a summer job in museum work? Oberlin students in the classes of ’20, ’21, and ’22 keep reading:

AMAM 2020 Internship in Audience Engagement

The Office of Academic Programs at the Allen Memorial Art Museum is looking for 6 interns to work as a team to envision how the AMAM can support the Oberlin student community in the face of COVID-19. Working collaboratively, the interns will design a museum experience for their fellow Oberlin students that will take place during the 2020-2021 academic year. Through this work interns will develop essential skills for entry-level positions in museums, cultivate an understanding of an institution’s role in its community, and form a professional network.

The internship will take place June 15-July 31, 2020 and will consist of twice-weekly team Zoom meetings, one-on-ones with their supervisor, digital meet-ups with other college students interested in museum work at institutions across the country, and 5-7 hours per week of independent or small group work for the project. At the conclusion of the program, interns will receive an honorarium of $750, which is taxable. Interns will need to have access to a computer with Zoom and an internet connection for the duration of the internship. Please reach out if this requirement would be a barrier.

This program is open to Oberlin students in the classes of ’20, ’21, and ’22 with an interest in museum work and community engagement.

For more information about the internship, please contact Hannah Kinney, Assistant Curator of Academic Programs, [email protected] .

Apply here: tinyurl.com/ya6u7fdf

Deadline: Monday, June 1 at 11:59pm.

Image: Doug Michels (American, 1943-2003), "Oberlin 2133," 1983. Pen and ink, colored pencil, and blackline print on paper. Allen Memorial Art Museum, Friends of Art Endowment Fund, 1984.2

For Senior Week, we celebrate the many contributions to the museum made by graduating seniors. We kick off the week with...
05/18/2020

For Senior Week, we celebrate the many contributions to the museum made by graduating seniors. We kick off the week with our curatorial assistants.

Amy Baylis:
Andrea Gyorody, curator of modern and contemporary art, has this to say about Amy, "Amy has been an unbelievably fantastic and multi-talented assistant who has been crucial to so many projects over the last two years. She's helped catalogue dozens of old posters, added provenance information for hundreds of objects to our database, suggested artworks and written wall labels for exhibitions, and, not least, contributed her skills as an artist, drawing advertisements, miniatures for exhibition models, and, most recently, a super cool title that will actually go on the wall in a future show. I will deeply miss her when she graduates, and I can't wait to see what she does!"

Molly Bryson:
As a curatorial assistant in the department of European and American art this spring, Molly has contributed to several research and exhibition projects related to works in the collection before 1900. A creative writing and art history double major, Molly composed excellent and thoughtful writing for exhibition labels and the AMAM's social media. She has also been a leader of the Art Students Committee and during this year served as co-editor-in-chief of The Grape, Oberlin’s Alternative Student Newspaper. Congratulations, Molly, and good luck!

Luoying Sheng:
Luoying began working at the AMAM as a docent, and was the 2019-20 curatorial assistant in Asian art education, a position sponsored by a grant from the Freeman Foundation. The position was created to help the museum to develop K-12 educational materials related to Asian art. Her native fluency in Chinese was a great benefit not only for research but also in making translations of painting inscriptions and other texts. One of her projects was conceiving of and starting to develop the upcoming exhibition of Japanese art titled “Interrogating Beauties” (2020-21). Luoying, a double major in art history and economics, is also a painter and photographer who hopes to pursue a career in museums or the arts. Best wishes!

Many thanks to Amy, Molly, and Luoying. We wish you well on your future endeavors!

[Images, from left to right, courtesy of: Amy Baylis, Molly Bryson, and Luoying Sheng.]

Address

87 N Main St
Oberlin, OH
44074

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 13:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(440) 775-8665

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Allen Memorial Art Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Category

Our Story

Admission to the AMAM is always free and open to the public. The AMAM has an outstanding collection of over 15,000 works of art – including paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, prints, drawings and photographs – that provide a comprehensive overview of the history of art from a variety of cultures. The collection is particularly strong in European and American paintings and sculpture from the 15th century to today, and has important holdings of Asian paintings, scrolls, sculpture and decorative art, including a large group of ukiyo-e prints. The museum also houses the Eva Hesse archives, which includes the artist’s notebooks, diaries, photographs and letters, and is proud to oversee, along with the Art Department, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Weltzheimer/Johnson House. The collection is housed in an impressive Italian Renaissance-style building designed by Cass Gilbert and named after Dr. Dudley Peter Allen, a distinguished 1875 graduate of Oberlin College, and whose wife, Elisabeth Severance Allen Prentiss, was a major benefactor to the museum. In 1977, a gallery for Modern and Contemporary art was added to the Cass Gilbert building. Designed by the architectural firm of Robert Venturi, Rauch, and Scott Brown, the gallery was funded by Ruth Coates Roush (OC 1934) and dedicated to professor of art Ellen Johnson (OC 1933).

Nearby museums


Other Art Museums in Oberlin

Show All

Comments

The temptation is always to run straight towards your goal. Sometimes that works, but often it leaves you wide of the mark, especially in art. This lesson hit me over the head when I was just starting out as a painter when I was a studio art major at Oberlin College. The school's Allen Memorial Art Museum has the most remarkable and troubling painting by the 17th century artist Rubens, The Finding of Erichthonius from 1632. Despite it having been mysteriously cut down in size years later it's still a powerhouse of a painting. At Oberlin I saw it almost daily and I was always a little creeped out by it. Its subject involves the finding of the snake-tailed baby by the three daughters of King Cecrops in a tale from Greek mythology. The story ends badly with the startled daughters driven to madness. I would have preferred to avoid such unpleasantness, but the painting had an odd power to pull me back look at it yet another time. The clashing of opposite qualities can be the engine that drives a painting's energy. Right next to the infant creature one of the unknowing daughters kneels down wearing the most spectacularly painted golden silk dress. Rubens chose a visually spellbinding outfit to lure his viewers in and to heighten the contrast when the baby's tail is revealed. Yet this works of several levels- within the fabric's sheen he created curved patterns of folded cloth that mimic the pose of the baby's tail- they are opposites but this formal link cements what will be a powerful encounter. Philip Koch, Obie '70
Hi AMAM- I have shared a little about some works you have at the Allen. These remarks can be found on the Oberlin Parents Group page. I am wondering if you might want to assist us in this fun and friendly exchange? < https://m.facebook.com/groups/301359100043788?view=permalink&id=1435604679952552&ref=m_notif¬if_t=feedback_reaction_generic>.
Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College was named a Most Astounding University Museum by EDsmart!
Hi, I'm looking for information on the ironic column of venturi ( the wooden one) for an analysis... is it possible to send us mesures of the column, or if you have any plans of it (?) I havn't been able to find anything online or elsewhere. Thank you
hightly recommended!