Oakfield Historical Society

Oakfield Historical Society Oakfield Historical Society is dedicated to preserving and sharing the history of Oakfield's rich past. Founded in 1998. Museum open hours: 1-3pm on Sundays, excluding holiday weekends. In April we are open the 14th and 28th. Come see us!

Oakfield Historical Society is dedicated to educating the public through our research center exhibits, lecture series, numerous publications, and other events.

Do you want to impress your family tomorrow? Read below from The History Channel. Maybe buy mom a white carnation ☺️...
05/11/2019

Do you want to impress your family tomorrow? Read below from The History Channel. Maybe buy mom a white carnation ☺️

Mother’s Day is a holiday honoring motherhood that is observed in different forms throughout the world. In the United States, Mother’s Day 2019 occurs on Sunday, May 12. The American incarnation of Mother’s Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. Jarvis would later denounce the holiday’s commercialization and spent the latter part of her life trying to remove it from the calendar. While dates and celebrations vary, Mother’s Day traditionally involves presenting moms with flowers, cards and other gifts.

Celebrations of mothers and motherhood can be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who held festivals in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele, but the clearest modern precedent for Mother’s Day is the early Christian festival known as “Mothering Sunday.”
Once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, this celebration fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent and was originally seen as a time when the faithful would return to their “mother church”—the main church in the vicinity of their home—for a special service.

Over time the Mothering Sunday tradition shifted into a more secular holiday, and children would present their mothers with flowers and other tokens of appreciation. This custom eventually faded in popularity before merging with the American Mother’s Day in the 1930s and 1940s.

The origins of Mother’s Day as celebrated in the United States date back to the 19th century. In the years before the Civil War, Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia helped start “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach local women how to properly care for their children.
These clubs later became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868 Jarvis organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” at which mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.
Another precursor to Mother’s Day came from the abolitionist and suffragette Julia Ward Howe. In 1870 Howe wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. In 1873 Howe campaigned for a “Mother’s Peace Day” to be celebrated every June 2.

Other early Mother’s Day pioneers include Juliet Calhoun Blakely, a temperance activist who inspired a local Mother’s Day in Albion, Michigan, in the 1870s. The duo of Mary Towles Sasseen and Frank Hering, meanwhile, both worked to organize a Mothers’ Day in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Some have even called Hering “the father of Mothers’ Day.”

The official Mother’s Day holiday arose in the 1900s as a result of the efforts of Anna Jarvis, daughter of Ann Reeves Jarvis. Following her mother’s 1905 death, Anna Jarvis conceived of Mother’s Day as a way of honoring the sacrifices mothers made for their children.
After gaining financial backing from a Philadelphia department store owner named John Wanamaker, in May 1908 she organized the first official Mother’s Day celebration at a Methodist church in Grafton, West Virginia. That same day also saw thousands of people attend a Mother’s Day event at one of Wanamaker’s retail stores in Philadelphia.
Following the success of her first Mother’s Day, Jarvis—who remained unmarried and childless her whole life—resolved to see her holiday added to the national calendar. Arguing that American holidays were biased toward male achievements, she started a massive letter writing campaign to newspapers and prominent politicians urging the adoption of a special day honoring motherhood.

By 1912 many states, towns and churches had adopted Mother’s Day as an annual holiday, and Jarvis had established the Mother’s Day International Association to help promote her cause. Her persistence paid off in 1914 when President Woodrow Wilson signed a measure officially establishing the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.

Anna Jarvis had originally conceived of Mother’s Day as a day of personal celebration between mothers and families. Her version of the day involved wearing a white carnation as a badge and visiting one’s mother or attending church services. But once Mother’s Day became a national holiday, it was not long before florists, card companies and other merchants capitalized on its popularity.

While Jarvis had initially worked with the floral industry to help raise Mother’s Day’s profile, by 1920 she had become disgusted with how the holiday had been commercialized. She outwardly denounced the transformation and urged people to stop buying Mother’s Day flowers, cards and candies.
Jarvis eventually resorted to an open campaign against Mother’s Day profiteers, speaking out against confectioners, florists and even charities. She also launched countless lawsuits against groups that had used the name “Mother’s Day,” eventually spending most of her personal wealth in legal fees. By the time of her death in 1948 Jarvis had disowned the holiday altogether, and even actively lobbied the government to see it removed from the American calendar.

While versions of Mother’s Day are celebrated worldwide, traditions vary depending on the country. In Thailand, for example, Mother’s Day is always celebrated in August on the birthday of the current queen, Sirikit.
Another alternate observance of Mother’s Day can be found in Ethiopia, where families gather each fall to sing songs and eat a large feast as part of Antrosht, a multi-day celebration honoring motherhood.
In the United States, Mother’s Day continues to be celebrated by presenting mothers and other women with gifts and flowers, and it has become one of the biggest holidays for consumer spending. Families also celebrate by giving mothers a day off from activities like cooking or other household chores.
At times, Mother’s Day has also been a date for launching political or feminist causes. In 1968 Coretta Scott King, wife of Martin Luther King Jr., used Mother’s Day to host a march in support of underprivileged women and children. In the 1970s women’s groups also used the holiday as a time to highlight the need for equal rights and access to childcare.

Happy May Day!For those unfamiliar with this holiday, it is an ancient Northern Hemisphere spring festival and a traditi...
05/01/2019

Happy May Day!
For those unfamiliar with this holiday, it is an ancient Northern Hemisphere spring festival and a traditional spring holiday in many cultures. Dances, singing, and cake are usually part of the festivities.
The best known modern May Day traditions, observed both in Europe and North America, include dancing around the maypole and crowning the Queen of May. Fading in popularity since the late 20th century is the tradition of giving of "May baskets," small baskets of sweets or flowers, usually left anonymously on neighbours' doorsteps. 🌸

The museum is nice and warm during open hours Sunday 1-3. Come see our newly dedicated US Gypsum room, including this ma...
04/27/2019

The museum is nice and warm during open hours Sunday 1-3. Come see our newly dedicated US Gypsum room, including this map of mine locations.

04/25/2019

Museum reopens this Sunday, 1-3pm. Come see us at 7 Maple Avenue and take in the brand new displays.

Who remembers this? 🤛
04/20/2019

Who remembers this? 🤛

Ilio...

Look what one of our members found in a box of old papers
04/17/2019

Look what one of our members found in a box of old papers

A trip down memory lane
04/14/2019

A trip down memory lane

Thanks to The Batavian for this article.
04/14/2019
The Batavian

Thanks to The Batavian for this article.

Oakfield museum open for the season on Sundays, new this year is a permanent U.S. Gypsum Co. display

04/09/2019

Can anyone tell us about an Oakfield Clown Band?pictures??

04/07/2019

Museum open hours: 1-3pm on Sundays, excluding holiday weekends.
In April we are open the 14th and 28th. Come see us!

Ribbon cutting today for our permanent USG display. Special thanks to Duane VanDuuren, Plant Manager, and everyone else ...
04/06/2019

Ribbon cutting today for our permanent USG display. Special thanks to Duane VanDuuren, Plant Manager, and everyone else who joined us to make this a special celebration.

We are only 13 away from 1000 ‘likes’ for our page! Please help us reach that milestone before our grand opening by ...
03/24/2019

We are only 13 away from 1000 ‘likes’ for our page! Please help us reach that milestone before our grand opening by sharing our page and inviting your friends. We rely on and are so grateful for the public’s support 👍🏻

03/16/2019

Friends we are looking for a picture of the circle in Triangle Park that was the big fountain BEFORE the Gazebo was built

Good news everyone! We are still accepting membership applications. Annual membership is $5 per person. You may download...
03/10/2019
Oakfield Historical Society – Preserving Local History!

Good news everyone! We are still accepting membership applications. Annual membership is $5 per person. You may download the "Membership Application Form" to print from our website. If you'd like it emailed or mailed to you, just let us know through a message, comment here, or the numbers on our website.
http://oakfieldhistory.org/

Welcome Welcome to the Oakfield Historical Society Museum. We are so excited to finally have found a home! Our museum has 5 rooms that are open to the public. We change our displays every year during our “down time”. We are reopening for the season on Saturday, April 21st at 11:00. This years di...

03/03/2019

Have you ever heard of Mary Jemison?

Oakfield friends-Last call for information on your family member or friend who served in WWII. Information will be share...
02/23/2019

Oakfield friends-Last call for information on your family member or friend who served in WWII. Information will be shared in the War Room of the Oakfield Historical Society museum. We'd like to honor the brave men of our hometown. Message us here for details. George and Woodrow Derck pictured below. Note the three stars on the banner in the window. Three stars for three sons serving. Before the end of the war, four Derck boys would be serving.

Flash sale! We are making room for new exhibits. First come, first served. Message us or comment below.Wood desk 32” l...
02/09/2019

Flash sale! We are making room for new exhibits. First come, first served. Message us or comment below.

Wood desk 32” long, 52” tall, 22” wide - $10

Glass desk 4’ long x40” high x2 wide - $50

02/06/2019

Follow us on Instagram Oakfield NY Historical Society.

Have you sent in your membership form yet? It’s only $5 per person and you can even have our newsletters emailed to yo...
02/05/2019

Have you sent in your membership form yet? It’s only $5 per person and you can even have our newsletters emailed to you! Download the form or browse books for sale at oakfieldhistory.org.

This photo shows the fence between the Arnold House and Peterson's. This photo was taken in 1963.
02/02/2019

This photo shows the fence between the Arnold House and Peterson's. This photo was taken in 1963.

Those who forget the lessons of history are doomed to repeat it.
01/28/2019
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Those who forget the lessons of history are doomed to repeat it.

“I’m writing this letter to you even though I know you will never read it. The spring of 1944 was the last time we saw each other. When we arrived in Auschwitz, within minutes we were separated never to see each other again. I remember the chaos that enveloped us as soon as we stepped down from the train.”

In May 1944, Marty Weiss and his family were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Marty was selected for forced labor with his brother and father, but the rest of his family was sent to the gas chambers. It was the last time he ever saw his brother. While participating in the Echoes of Memory project, Marty wrote to his brother, recounting feelings and thoughts he was never able to share. Read the letter here:

Thank you all for supporting the Oakfield Historical Society and other organizations. Each museum visit, book purchase, ...
01/22/2019
Oakfield Historical Society – Preserving Local History!

Thank you all for supporting the Oakfield Historical Society and other organizations. Each museum visit, book purchase, and membership fee helps keep our local history alive!
Memberships will now run January through December each year and are $5 each. Please visit oakfieldhistory.org and click on “Membership Application Form” on our home page.

Welcome Welcome to the Oakfield Historical Society Museum. We are so excited to finally have found a home! Our museum has 5 rooms that are open to the public. We change our displays every year during our “down time”. We are reopening for the season on Saturday, April 21st at 11:00. This years di...

Does anyone recognize this quaint scene?
01/19/2019

Does anyone recognize this quaint scene?

01/12/2019

Have you visited Oakfield Historical Society’s museum in person?

Today we met to plan exciting updates to our home for 2019. There is a lot to do before opening day and we will be busy as bees until then.

See you in April!

Happy 2019! Reflect upon the past, but live in and enjoy the present.
01/01/2019

Happy 2019! Reflect upon the past, but live in and enjoy the present.

On #ThisDayinHistory 1890, in the final chapter of America’s long Indian wars, the U.S. Cavalry kills 146 Sioux at Wou...
12/30/2018
Remembering the Wounded Knee Massacre

On #ThisDayinHistory 1890, in the final chapter of America’s long Indian wars, the U.S. Cavalry kills 146 Sioux at Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota.

https://www.history.com/news/remembering-the-wounded-knee-massacre?cmpid=FACEBOOK_FBPAGE__20181229&linkId=61695420

On the anniversary of the Wounded Knee Massacre, look back at the last major confrontation in the long war between the United States and Native American tribes from the Great Plains.

Without your steadfast and ongoing support, we could find ourselves in the same boat. Thank you all for supporting your ...
12/28/2018
Town of Newfane Historical Society

Without your steadfast and ongoing support, we could find ourselves in the same boat. Thank you all for supporting your local Oakfield Historical Society through donations and buying our books.

If you are moved to donate to Rochester Historical Society, there is a link in the article below.

Sad state of affairs for Rochester Historical Society.

Wishing you all a joyous day!
12/25/2018

Wishing you all a joyous day!

Although most think of Christmas as a holiday with its roots in Christianity, Puritans in the 17th century thought other...
12/23/2018

Although most think of Christmas as a holiday with its roots in Christianity, Puritans in the 17th century thought otherwise and banned it in several places. Apparently the celebration was associated with drunkenness and general misbehavior. Eventually it was restored as a legal holiday, but Christmas stayed disreputable for a time.

In the early 19th century, a movement began to revive Christmas as a mainly Christian festival, including special worship services with music and support of charities for the poor. Author Charles Dickens was instrumental in changing the celebration of Christmas from a season of revelry to a religious family period of gift giving and social consciousness.

The symbolism has changed over time too. Table top Christmas trees were used in the early 19th century, popularized by Godey’s Lady’s Book. A portion of Thomas Nast’s civil war era scene is below with small lighted tree. By the 1870s, many Christmas trees had made it to the floor.

As you spend time with friends and family the next few days, remember there are many roots to the holiday. If you overdo the revelry a bit, at least you can claim you’re paying homage to celebrations several centuries ago🎄 🎁

Friends we are looking for pictures from the VFW Drum Corp can anyone help?
12/20/2018

Friends we are looking for pictures from the VFW Drum Corp can anyone help?

Christmas is coming! Our newest book “Our Carefree Years” is $20.00 and can ship for $6.70.  Available for purchase ...
12/17/2018

Christmas is coming! Our newest book “Our Carefree Years” is $20.00 and can ship for $6.70. Available for purchase at the pharmacy, the library, or by mailing a check to Oakfield Historical Society, PO Box 74, Oakfield, NY 14125.

This book is about the Oakfield businesses during the 50’s, 60’s & 70’s with wonderful stories by the families. Find out how Al Hilchey got the hardware store. You will find out who was a former cowboy and could do some soft shoe. 65 different stories that you will love.

As you do your holiday or any other shopping online, please consider using Amazon Smile. It costs you nothing, but Oakfi...
12/10/2018
Amazon.com Help: About AmazonSmile

As you do your holiday or any other shopping online, please consider using Amazon Smile. It costs you nothing, but Oakfield Historical Society gets a donation from Amazon for each order you place. (Make sure you select the N.Y. Historical society!)
The signup process is quick and easy. For more information, here is a link. Thanks for your support! https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201365340

AmazonSmile is a website operated by Amazon with the same products, prices, and shopping features as Amazon.com. The difference is that when you shop on AmazonSmile, the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price of eligible products to the charitable organization of your choice.

85 years ago the “Noble Experiment” ended.
12/05/2018

85 years ago the “Noble Experiment” ended.

Such talent from our kids. You are all amazing!
12/01/2018

Such talent from our kids. You are all amazing!

OACS Elementary winners 1,2,3
12/01/2018

OACS Elementary winners 1,2,3

OACS High School 1,2, &3 winners
12/01/2018

OACS High School 1,2, &3 winners

Oakfield Historical Society
11/29/2018

Oakfield Historical Society

Enjoy and be thankful. 🍂 🦃 🥧
11/22/2018

Enjoy and be thankful. 🍂 🦃 🥧

Getting ready for our OACS  Art Show on December 1st from 11-3
11/17/2018

Getting ready for our OACS Art Show on December 1st from 11-3

Have you seen our 2018 historic displays? Have you purchased our latest book or one you’ve had your eye on for a while...
11/17/2018

Have you seen our 2018 historic displays? Have you purchased our latest book or one you’ve had your eye on for a while? November 18 is the LAST Sunday museum is open this year. Don’t miss your chance to explore local history and get a jump on Christmas shopping 1-3pm at 7 Maple Avenue.

How many have heard of the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps? Don’t forget to thank them too 🇺🇸
11/11/2018

How many have heard of the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps? Don’t forget to thank them too 🇺🇸

It was an honor to attend the 75th Anniversary Celebration this afternoon of the US Cadet Nurse Corps during a ceremony at Waterford Country School, recognizing the service to our country of ladies from our local area who served as members of the US Cadet Nurse Corps between 1943 and 1948.

Address

7 Maple Ave / PO Box 74
Oakfield, NY
14125

Opening Hours

Sunday 13:00 - 15:00

Telephone

(585) 259-4145

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