Norton MA Historical Society

Norton MA Historical Society The Norton Historical Society preserves the town's history, offers an ever growing museum, and focus The Norton Historical Society is more than just a place that you drive by on Main Street.

It opens a door to the past through the fascinating objects in the museum and the many rooms to explore; the vast array of documents to explore and perhaps conduct family research or maybe just learn more about your neighborhood. There are monthly meetings and programs and offers a chance to get to know your neighbors. If you haven't visited, you don't know what you are missing out on!

Operating as usual

Another local historic house is for sale. This is the house in the background of this picture from the early 1900's. It'...
05/07/2021

Another local historic house is for sale. This is the house in the background of this picture from the early 1900's. It's the house on the hill in Chartley by the pond.: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/339-Old-Colony-Rd_Norton_MA_02766_M42352-09996

Another local historic house is for sale. This is the house in the background of this picture from the early 1900's. It's the house on the hill in Chartley by the pond.: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/339-Old-Colony-Rd_Norton_MA_02766_M42352-09996

Mark your calendars! If you have never been here, it's local and very interesting!
04/29/2021

Mark your calendars! If you have never been here, it's local and very interesting!

Fisher-Richardson House to open in June.

The Mansfield Historical Society announced that the Fisher-Richardson House will be opened to the public every Sunday from Jun 13th through September 12th from 10 AM to 2 PM. Tours will be conducted by costumed docents. COVID protocols will be in place. Masks are required.

The Fisher-Richardson House is owned by the Town of Mansfield with tours conducted by Mansfield Historical Society volunteers.
The house takes its name from the family of Mary Fisher the daughter of Mansfield's first minister and Captain Ira Richardson. Martha Richardson was the last person to live in the Fisher-Richardson House.

In February 1930, the Town of Mansfield purchased the house from Martha Richardson's heirs. On September 1930, the house opened to the public for the first time.
Visitors to the house can view early gunstock posts, feather-edged paneling and decorated ceilings, among other architectural details and well as many artifacts owned by the Mansfield Historical Society.

More information, including 3-D virtual tour, is available on the historical society’s website www.mhsma.org.

I was so sad to hear of Ruth's passing. She was such a vibrant part of the Norton Historical Society and will be greatly...
04/02/2021

I was so sad to hear of Ruth's passing. She was such a vibrant part of the Norton Historical Society and will be greatly missed by everyone who knew her.

I was so sad to hear of Ruth's passing. She was such a vibrant part of the Norton Historical Society and will be greatly missed by everyone who knew her.

The Society was sent this information in the hopes that perhaps the family of Salley Wilbur of Norton might see this and...
02/14/2021

The Society was sent this information in the hopes that perhaps the family of Salley Wilbur of Norton might see this and be interested. This portrait is from 1838 and is by Thomas Hewes Hinckely and is up for auction here: https://www.eldreds.com/auction-lot/thomas-hewes-hinckley-massachusetts-california-18_07D4A438C0

The Society was sent this information in the hopes that perhaps the family of Salley Wilbur of Norton might see this and be interested. This portrait is from 1838 and is by Thomas Hewes Hinckely and is up for auction here: https://www.eldreds.com/auction-lot/thomas-hewes-hinckley-massachusetts-california-18_07D4A438C0

This is in Taunton, but a great picture. Love that the building is still there!
01/21/2021

This is in Taunton, but a great picture. Love that the building is still there!

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo
12/01/2020

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo

Cool photos! In Taunton.
10/29/2020

Cool photos! In Taunton.

#ThrowbackThursday
Robert Crossman House

Hundreds, maybe thousands, of people pass by the old Robert Crossman house every day without realizing its historical significance. Located at 78-80 Cohannet Street, across the street from the YMCA, it was built in about 1700 by Robert Crossman, Jr. In its day it was considered an architectural masterpiece—a gem—though most of its best features are gone now.

The building stands just a stone’s throw uphill from the Mill River, where the earliest settlers of Taunton built their grist and fulling mills. The Crossmans owned and operated those mills for generations. In their early years as millwrights, they were constantly battling angry townspeople who claimed that the waterwheels obstructed the passage of the thousands of alewives (herring) that were also essential to Taunton in the early days.

Over the years, the building has been used as an inn, a tavern where Taunton militiamen gathered, including during the American Revolution, and a boarding house. For two generations after the Second World War, it was a service station and office operated by the Bloom family. Today, it’s reportedly used as an auto towing and repair business.

We often say that if buildings could talk. . . . If that were the case, no building in Taunton would have more stories to tell than the old Crossman house.

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo
10/22/2020

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo

This gorgeous home, "The Lane House" c. 1775 is for sale again! Used to be part of Glenmere Camp.  Additional pics in co...
09/15/2020
78 Dean St, Norton, MA 02766 - realtor.com®

This gorgeous home, "The Lane House" c. 1775 is for sale again! Used to be part of Glenmere Camp. Additional pics in comments!
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/78-Dean-St_Norton_MA_02766_M41018-57597#photo0

Own a piece of history with this Norton landmark home. Originally The ''Lane House'' (c1775), this stunning and exceptionally maintained 3 bedroom/2 bath antique cape style home sits proudly on a 1 acre corner lot beside a classic two story barn. This unique and impressive property offers all the ch...

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo
09/12/2020

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo

Noooooo!!!!!!!  https://www.thesunchronicle.com/foxboro_reporter/news/local_news/landmark-lafayette-house-slated-for-dem...
09/03/2020
Landmark Lafayette House slated for demolition

Noooooo!!!!!!!

https://www.thesunchronicle.com/foxboro_reporter/news/local_news/landmark-lafayette-house-slated-for-demolition/article_dca04fa5-c22c-5f81-84c3-81c500bd2bf5.html?fbclid=IwAR0y4clYbi-p0jZnWBio-Xz7bTUL_qZWvCf6xRsYXSnQQ3pRoX4X0mQLTo4#tncms-source=block-contextual-fallback

One of Foxboro’s oldest and most familiar Colonial-era landmarks may be slated for the wrecker’s ball — a victim of changing tastes and, more recently, the coronavirus pandemic.

08/17/2020
Susan

Susan

I am an independent researcher interested in places associated with people who were enslaved in Massachusetts during the colonial and early republic days.

Where was "Quock's Orchard" that is referred to in "A History of the Town of Norton, Bristol County, Massachusetts, from 1669-1859?" According to the book, "Many years ago, there lived about half a mile from, and directly in front of, the present residence of George Lane, an Indian by the name of Quock … An orchard near where his wigwam stood is to this day known as ‘Quock’s Orchard.’ This Indian is supposed to have been slave the latter part of his life, first of Major George Leonard, and then of his son Ephraim." https://archive.org/details/historyoftownofn00clar/page/56/mode/2up?q=quock%27s+orchard

Any information will be greatly appreciated. Even just a small piece of the puzzle that might help solve this mystery will be greatly appreciated.

I remember when they had cows next door.
07/23/2020

I remember when they had cows next door.

#throwbackthursday to the 80s.
Est. 1978 Norton, Mass
@produce_barn_norton_ma
ProduceBarnOnline.com

Thank you for shopping at the Produce Barn!

#mansfieldma #attleboroma #nortonma #wheatoncollege #tauntonma #boston #eastonma #plainvillema #xfinitycenter #foxboroma #rochebros #brockton #northattleboroma #norton #providenceRI #seekonkma #rehobethma #pawtucketri #brocktonma #sharonma #marketbasket

The time when Bob Hope came to neighboring Taunton....
07/16/2020

The time when Bob Hope came to neighboring Taunton....

#ThrowbackThursday: Bob Hope on Taunton Green

Thirty-five years ago, in June 1985, the cities and towns of southeastern Massachusetts were celebrating the 300th anniversary of the founding of Bristol County. Several events were held throughout that spring, and Taunton’s most memorable took place on June 2, when legendary entertainer Bob Hope briefly appeared at a program held on the lawn of the Superior Courthouse.

Temperatures that Sunday afternoon were in the mid-80s as thousands of people crowded the Green or watched from open windows of nearby buildings. State and local dignitaries sat in reserved seats and the program was emceed by a television anchorwoman. The crowd was there to see Hope, but as they waited their attention was briefly drawn to a long black stretch limo with tinted windows that made its way slowly up the driveway. While everyone had a guess as to who might be inside the car, loud applause began when the door opened and boxer Marvin Hagler, the reigning middleweight champion of the world, stepped out. A Brockton native, Hagler had many fans in the area and the cheers and applause continued as he moved to his reserved seat.

With Hagler in place, it was time for Hope to appear, and he surprised the crowd by walking out the front door of the courthouse. Accompanied by a Massachusetts state police trooper, he made his way to the microphone, where he was joined by Hagler. They joked a bit and then the program continued. After receiving a couple of gifts, both made locally at Reed & Barton, Hope bantered a little with Taunton mayor Richard Johnson and then addressed the crowd. He thanked his audience for the warm welcome and complimented city officials on maintaining such a beautiful New England setting.

Bob Hope was one of the most renowned entertainers of the last century. Throughout a career that began in the 1920s, he had mastered vaudeville, motion pictures and television. His face was recognized worldwide and over six decades he had shared the stage with most of the famous and a few of the infamous. Beginning in World War II, his star-studded traveling shows had entertained millions of American GIs in every part of the globe.

Hope’s humor was often self-deprecating. He had just turned 82-years old when he visited Taunton, and he told the crowd that last year he had celebrated the 42nd anniversary of his 39th birthday. After a few more jokes, he again told the audience how pleased he was to be here, and asked to be excused because he had another appearance at another Bristol County event later in the day. Bidding farewell to Hagler, he was escorted to a waiting car.

One of the recurrent themes of Hope’s humor was his advancing age, and indeed many wondered how long he would continue to make public appearances. In fact, Hope remained in the public eye until 1997. He died six years later, at age 100.

Happy 4th of July! Going to the Brockton Fair was a tradition for many, so enjoy these old pictures! https://www.enterpr...
07/04/2020
Photos: Step right up -- for Brockton Fair photos from 1930s-80s

Happy 4th of July! Going to the Brockton Fair was a tradition for many, so enjoy these old pictures!

https://www.enterprisenews.com/photogallery/WL/20190628/NEWS/628009995/PH/1?fbclid=IwAR0VztoUY5tARnxC-pFWe_kHWQMZ_0nlvuaGrtXFi1Zrnyqh-YdZkOEbOL0

With the Brockton Fair opening on Friday evening, The Enterprise is taking you back in time with photos of the annual event dating all the way back to the 1930s. The fair has been running since 1874.

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo
07/04/2020

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo

The former Tweave Building....
05/13/2020

The former Tweave Building....

An old textile mill building on Barrows Street in the Barrowsville section of Norton went up in flames Wednesday. The 5-alarm fire in the former Tweave Building was called in shortly after 5 p.m. (Mark Stockwell/Sun Chronicle Staff)

Something to read from the Mansfield Historical Society. Wonder how what we are going through now will be recalled in Hi...
03/28/2020

Something to read from the Mansfield Historical Society. Wonder how what we are going through now will be recalled in History books.

Spanish Influenza (1918)
Last year we wrote an article on the Spanish Influenza of 1918-19. We have resisted posting it again. We were not sure if readers would want to revisit that pandemic at this time. However, when profiling the “Our Daily Bread” food pantry on Channel 4 last night, WBZ’s Paula Ebben mentioned that the Congregational Church was used as a field hospital during the Spanish Flu, an example of how ordinary people pulled together then as they are now. How true. Our forebears pulled through that freighting outbreak together, and we will do the same now. So here is our article once again. Be well everyone!

THE SPANISH INFLUENZA

In the autumn of 1918, World War I was nearing an end. But few were prepared for the next crisis that was about kill more people globally than the war itself: the Spanish Influenza.
A horrific flu strain that was incorrectly associated with Spain, the “Spanish Influenza” killed over 20 million people worldwide in a six-month span, far more than the war did (11.9 million) over four years. In the United States 600,000 lives were lost, and in Massachusetts the death toll was 22,000.
And sadly, Mansfield was no exception. From the outbreak in late September 1918 through the following February, 44 Mansfield residents died of the flu. The town was in crisis mode from late September until the first week of November, when the worst of the epidemic subsided. Death by Spanish Flu was horrible, and there was great fear over such a virulent outbreak. Fortunately there was also considerable cooperation to see the crisis through.
The first death by Spanish Influenza in Mansfield occurred on September 24, when John Malloy of Chauncy Street, a 20-year old employee of the S.W. Card Manufacturing Company passed away. By then the town was beginning to mobilize against the flu. That same day the public schools were closed and would not reopen for an entire month. Local factories were decimated by a lack of workers. To prevent further spread of the disease the Board of Selectman soon banned all public meetings and ordered all funerals private.
And a string of sad stories began. Among them was Gussie Hanaford, also of Chauncy Street, whose husband and mother both succumbed to the flu within a span of two hours. There was Mrs. George Lameraux, a wife and mother of seven. Florence White, 34 years old, followed two days later by her husband Charles, 38. Several children and infants were lost, including a six-year old boy and twin 17-day old girls. Five Mansfield servicemen died by Spanish Flu while serving in the war.
Our local doctors made endless house calls. There were far too many cases for them to handle, so the town established a “Community Hospital” at the Congregational Church. Miss O’Rourke, a Red Cross nurse from Lowell, was appointed to run the hospital. Selectman William P. McDermott secured the services of two female doctors, a Dr. Bruce and Dr. Benedict of New York and New Jersey respectively. The hospital was opened for five weeks, treated 146 patients, and suffered 15 deaths. A “Community Kitchen” was also established at the Methodist Church for families that were sick and unable to cook.
The Community Hospital was considered such a success that a committee was appointed to consider a permanent hospital in Mansfield, but in the end no such action was taken. The influenza crisis subsided in the first week of November, and the next week great joy arrived in the form of the Armistice that ended World War I. Nine more influenza deaths hit Mansfield through February 1919 when the strain finally disappeared and the frightening episode faded into history.

Norton Alerts
03/23/2020

Norton Alerts

Stay Safe Norton and help slow the spread!!

Hope everyone is doing ok during this difficult time we are facing. While we all practice the social distancing protocol...
03/16/2020
Stuck at Home? These 12 Famous Museums Offer Virtual Tours You Can Take on Your Couch

Hope everyone is doing ok during this difficult time we are facing. While we all practice the social distancing protocols, here is a link so you can all tour some museums virtually. Stay healthy my friends!
https://www.travelandleisure.com/attractions/museums-galleries/museums-with-virtual-tours?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=social-share-article&utm_content=20200313&fbclid=IwAR3zUKobGxL7OM57EJCvEt3fEqU1CSn4Qh5jqKdEtfWx_OVi8Xii_AXmcmI

Going into a self-quarantine can have many complex issues and complications beyond having enough food and supplies for two weeks. In terms of entertainment, it…

Not in Norton, but in Canton. So sad.
03/03/2020

Not in Norton, but in Canton. So sad.

Today, Canton lost a part of its history and heritage with the demolition of the Canton Water Works Building on Pice Street. Take a moment and consider all we have lost, and help us protect what's left of our heritage. Join the Canton Historical Society and be a part of the preservation of Canton. Tell our town leaders that we care about our architecture, archeology and the artifacts that make Canton special.

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo
02/08/2020

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo
12/13/2019

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo
11/24/2019

Norton MA Historical Society's cover photo

Eric Paulus is a Norton High School teacher who was born to baby boomer parents. Influenced by his parents' music at an ...
10/17/2019

Eric Paulus is a Norton High School teacher who was born to baby boomer parents. Influenced by his parents' music at an early age, he fell in love with Woodstock. He uses Woodstock to teach the history of the time to his classes and to show how music and history are intertwined. If you were there or heard about it from your parents or grandparents you will surely enjoy this program! The public is invited to this free program. Please Share!

Address

18 W Main St
Norton, MA
02766

Opening Hours

Wednesday 09:30 - 14:30

Telephone

(508) 285-7070

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My name is Chuck Wetherell. I contacted you about a year ago to tell you I was working on the "First Burial Ground" there on Bay Road. My wife and I returned this year to do some more work and to find out what it will cost to make the necessary repairs to the fence and the headstones. The 17 broken fence posts will cost $12,500 and the iron pipe will probably be around $5,000. Then I want to reset and repair the headstones but the cost of that is minimal. I would like to set a shed there to keep my tools so I don't have to move them around. Anyway, I am applying for a grant to help me with some of these costs. My daughter will help me write the grant but I was wondering if you have any experience with this type of situation and if so, do you have any advice for me. We will be in the area until Wednesday the 11th when we will return to Florida. My contact information is; Chuck Wetherell 1091 Hoover Circle Nokomis, FL 34275 941-232-8186
HORNBINE SCHOOL MUSEUM OPEN THIS SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 27, 2020 The Hornbine School Museum is a one room school house (1846 – 1937) LOCATED at 144 Hornbine Road in Rehoboth. Children are always facinated with our outhouse. Fall is here and this will be our last openhouse for the p***c until next year. Don't forget to use your masks. We will be open between 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. this Sunday. FOLLOW us on Facebook at "Hornbine School Museum". You and your family will have limited access to the building. We ask: 1. Please do not visit if you have symptoms of Covid 19. 2. Wear a mask and maintain a distance of 6 feet. 3. Groups of 4 or less will have restricted access to the Museum.
HORNBINE SCHOOL MUSEUM OPEN SEPTEMBER 27, 2020 The Hornbine School Museum is a one room school house (1846 – 1937) LOCATED at 144 Hornbine Road in Rehoboth. We will be open for the last time this season between 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. this Sunday. FOLLOW us on Facebook at "Hornbine School Museum". You and your family will have limited access to the building. We ask: 1. Please do not visit if you have symptoms of Covid 19. 2. Wear a mask and maintain a distance of 6 feet. 3. Groups of 4 or less will have restricted access to the Museum.
The Hornbine School Museum will be open to the public this Sunday, September 13, 2020 from 2 - 4 P.M. The Museum is located at 144 Hornbine Road in Rehoboth, MA (about a ten minute ride from Rte. 44 going south on Rte. 118.) We ask: Please do not visit if you have symptoms of Covid 19. Wear a mask and maintain a distance of 6 feet. Groups of 4 or less will have restricted access to the Museum. FOLLOW us on Facebook at "Hornbine School Museum"
Recent OPEN HOUSE at Hornbine School Museum in Rehoboth, MA
HORNBINE SCHOOL MUSEUM OPEN AUGUST 23rd The Hornbine School Museum is LOCATED at 144 Hornbine Road in Rehoboth. We are open between 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. Frances Megan, a past Hornbine School student, will be in attendance when possible. Visitors always find her to be very interesting and informative. Go to our page at “Hornbine School Museum” to FOLLOW us. You and your family will have limited access to the building. We ask: 1. Please do not visit if you have symptoms of Covid 19. 2. Wear a mask and maintain a distance of 6 feet. 3. Groups of 4 or less will have restricted access to the Museum.
Can someone tell me what this note is that was included with an ‘intention to marry‘ in 1777 Norton?
I am an independent researcher interested in places associated with people who were enslaved in Massachusetts during the colonial and early republic days. Where was "Quock's Orchard" that is referred to in "A History of the Town of Norton, Bristol County, Massachusetts, from 1669-1859?" According to the book, "Many years ago, there lived about half a mile from, and directly in front of, the present residence of George Lane, an Indian by the name of Quock … An orchard near where his wigwam stood is to this day known as ‘Quock’s Orchard.’ This Indian is supposed to have been slave the latter part of his life, first of Major George Leonard, and then of his son Ephraim." https://archive.org/details/historyoftownofn00clar/page/56/mode/2up?q=quock%27s+orchard Any information will be greatly appreciated. Even just a small piece of the puzzle that might help solve this mystery will be greatly appreciated.
HORNBINE SCHOOL MUSEUM IN REHOBOTH We plan to open the school for Sunday Open House, August 9th from 2 – 4 p.m. We are located at 144 Hornbine Road in Rehoboth, MA. Please wear masks. There will be limited access. Visitors will have a chance to use a slate pencil. It's a unique experience. SHARE this with your friends if you think they may have an interest in history. FOLLOW this if you want more postings. In the nineteenth century, school children in Rehoboth used slates to practice handwriting and arithmetic without wasting precious paper. The board was made from a piece of quarry slate set in a wooden frame. They were personal-sized blackboards. Often, students wiped away their work, using the cuff of their sleeve, after it was checked by the teacher. This process is the origin of the phrase 'to wipe the slate clean', which we still use to mean to make a new start, or to forget the things that have gone before. A slate pencil (not chalk) was used to form the letters. Slate pencils were made of soapstone or softer pieces of slate rock, sometimes wrapped in paper. Many Palmer River students remember the sound of the slate pencil, "...like nails on a chalkboard..." when they visited the Hornbine School for a day. Many 19th century children would sharpen their slate pencils on the school wall. These slate pencils are wrapped in paper decorated like the American flag and stored in a cardboard box with an American flag design. In the United States, slate pencils were manufactured at least as early as 1844 and at least as late as the 1910s. A Vermont company produced up to 100,000 pencils a day, which were shipped throughout the world in the mid19th century. By the end of the Civil War, slate pencil manufacturing began to wane as wood and graphite pencils took over the marketplace.
HORNBINE SCHOOL MUSEUM OPEN FOR AUGUST & SEPTEMBER The Hornbine School Museum is a one room school house LOCATED (30 min. ride) at 144 Hornbine Road in Rehoboth. (That’s in the south east corner of Rehoboth across from the Historic Hornbine Church.) We are very happy to announce that the Museum will be open between 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. on the 2nd and 4th Sundays of each month (August & September). Cathy Potter, Brenda Saben, Jan McMurry and Dave Downs unpacked the school materials this Friday (July 24, 2020) in preparation for Sunday Open Houses. Frances Megan, a past Hornbine School student, will be in attendance when possible. Visitors always find her to be very interesting and informative. We will follow Rehoboth Health Dept. guidelines. You and your family will have limited access to the building. We ask that visitors wear face masks. Please SHARE this post with any friends that you feel may have an interest. (If there is no SHARE button on this post, just go to our page and you can share it from there.) FOLLOW our page at “Hornbine School Museum.”
This is an Fernandes Supermarket advertisement in the Attleboro Sun from Wednesday February 16th, 1966
This is an Fernandes Supermarket advertisement in the Monday February 15th, 1965 and anyone remembers the TV game show Supermarket Sweep in which contestants picked up groceries in a short amount of time---This is Fernandes Supermarkets' version of it in which people submitted entries at the Fernandes' stores in Norton, Attleboro and Plainville and then the lucky winner was drawn over WARA Radio in Attleboro and then they would have seven minutes to fill a cart with groceries