North Andover Historical Society

North Andover Historical Society The North Andover Historical Society is a non-profit educational institution, which serves as a center for local community interest and is dedicated to preserving, documenting, exhibiting, and interpreting N Andover history; mainly through its collection
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The North Andover Historical Society was founded in 1913 and is dedicated to preserving our local heritage and bringing it to life through children’s programs, guided tours, lectures, workshops, exhibits, craft demonstrations, architectural walking tours and publications. Our historic properties include Johnson Cottage (1789), the Parson Barnard House (1715) and the Hay Scales Building (1833). We also operate the S. Forbes Rockwell Library and Archive at the Society Headquarters which contains thousands of documents, books, photographs, and paper objects that tell the story of the town and it’s people. We offer memberships and other ways to donate to support us, so check out how you can contribute to the preservation of our community!

Operating as usual

In the 1950s, Western Electric built a multi-million dollar industrial plant called the Merrimack Valley Works in North ...
04/21/2021

In the 1950s, Western Electric built a multi-million dollar industrial plant called the Merrimack Valley Works in North Andover on Route 125 close to the Haverhill border. At its height, this research and manufacturing facility employed 12,000 people, more than the entire 1950 population of the town.

One such item that was manufactured locally was this man-made quartz transmitter crystal. It was feared that there would be a shortage of natural crystals, used for communication systems, in addition to a desire to keep costs low which resulted in pilot programs, such as North Andover’s, to grow them in the lab. If you look closely, you can see a metal bracket on the left edge of the crystal. This is the plate, a thin piece of quartz, used to start the crystal’s growth!
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NAHS Identifier: 2015.025
#westernelectric #communicationsystems #quartzcrystal

In the 1950s, Western Electric built a multi-million dollar industrial plant called the Merrimack Valley Works in North Andover on Route 125 close to the Haverhill border. At its height, this research and manufacturing facility employed 12,000 people, more than the entire 1950 population of the town.

One such item that was manufactured locally was this man-made quartz transmitter crystal. It was feared that there would be a shortage of natural crystals, used for communication systems, in addition to a desire to keep costs low which resulted in pilot programs, such as North Andover’s, to grow them in the lab. If you look closely, you can see a metal bracket on the left edge of the crystal. This is the plate, a thin piece of quartz, used to start the crystal’s growth!
..
NAHS Identifier: 2015.025
#westernelectric #communicationsystems #quartzcrystal

#patriotsday
04/19/2021

#patriotsday

STEVENS CENTER PROGRESS--Another productive day at 800 Mass Ave is wrapping up!  Volunteers have been nose to the grinds...
04/17/2021

STEVENS CENTER PROGRESS--Another productive day at 800 Mass Ave is wrapping up! Volunteers have been nose to the grindstone in the Worden Theater and Huster Room in anticipation of new flooring next week. We've mocked up a cafe in the main lobby, while preparations are going in the upstairs Heritage Room to receive artifacts. Our sincere thanks to every one of our volunteers who are making this happen. :D 👊

For up-to-date information on all of the Society's activities, check out our next Zoom update this coming Wednesday at 7PM. You can register here:

https://www.northandoverhistoricalsociety.org/upcoming-events/spring-update

We featured Salem Poor in a post for Black History Month back in February. If you are itching to learn more or haven't h...
04/17/2021
Salem Poor, an American Hero

We featured Salem Poor in a post for Black History Month back in February. If you are itching to learn more or haven't heard of our local hero before, check out this video created by North Andover High student Eamon O'Cearuil. Thank you for letting us share your wonderful work Eamon!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wL3q-hE0gM

A special thank you to Mr. Brian Sheehy and Mr. Ed Bell for their amazing support on this project!

Did you know today is National Gardening Day? To celebrate, we highlight North Andover’s very own North Andover Garden C...
04/14/2021

Did you know today is National Gardening Day? To celebrate, we highlight North Andover’s very own North Andover Garden Club! Founded in 1885 and incorporated in 1893 under the leadership of Mr. J. D. W. French, this organization is still serving its mission “to encourage an interest and active participation in civic beautification, horticulture, flower arranging, and conservation” to this day. Their work in the community includes caring for the garden beds at NAHS’ Parson Barnard House. Interested in learning more? Check out their page or website, northandovergardenclub.com
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Images: North Andover Garden Club Entries from 1933 Flower Shows. NAHS Identifier: 2011.14.19 (7)
(1) Miss Ely’s Exhibit in the Massachusetts Horticultural Society Spring Flower Show - A Vegetable Stand | Second Prize
(2) “A French Market” in the Flower Show of the North Andover Garden Club hosted at the Old Berry Barn in North Andover Center

On this day in 1855, Andover legally split in two along the parish lines. Known since 1709 as the North (or First) and S...
04/07/2021

On this day in 1855, Andover legally split in two along the parish lines. Known since 1709 as the North (or First) and South parishes of Andover, the South parish paid $500 for the right to retain the name of Andover. The North Parish, despite being the area of original settlement, was then re-incorporated as North Andover. The meeting for the Act of Separation was held at the North Parish Church.
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Image: A recent donation of a flag that commemorated the centennial of North Andover’s re-incorporation. Thanks go to Mark Svendsen for adding this item to our collections. NAHS Identifier: 2020.017.

On this day in 1855, Andover legally split in two along the parish lines. Known since 1709 as the North (or First) and South parishes of Andover, the South parish paid $500 for the right to retain the name of Andover. The North Parish, despite being the area of original settlement, was then re-incorporated as North Andover. The meeting for the Act of Separation was held at the North Parish Church.
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Image: A recent donation of a flag that commemorated the centennial of North Andover’s re-incorporation. Thanks go to Mark Svendsen for adding this item to our collections. NAHS Identifier: 2020.017.

For the last week of Women's History Month, we remember Caroline Stevens Rogers (1894-1985). Few people have given as mu...
03/31/2021

For the last week of Women's History Month, we remember Caroline Stevens Rogers (1894-1985). Few people have given as much to their community as Caroline. She was born in 1894, to Lucy Abbot Stevens and Samuel Dale Stevens, and thus inherited a strong family tradition of providing generous support to cultural and conservation town projects.

She was educated in Andover and Boston and attended Bryn Mawr. During WWI, she served as a volunteer nurses aide at a hospital in France. She returned to tour Europe in 1921 and flew from Paris to London in the open nose compartment of an early commercial plane. She married Dr. Horatio Rogers in 1923, and they raised four children together in Boston and later Newton. During WWII, she again served as a nurses aide, this time in Boston hospitals. In 1952, her husband retired and they settled in North Andover to find “a quiet life in the country.”

At this stage, Caroline became active in a number of organizations working to conserve and interpret the town’s history and natural resources. She poured her energies into reorganizing the collections of the North Andover Historical Society and strove to ensure the organization became a more vital entity. As President, in 1958, she initiated an extensive restoration of the Parson Barnard House. She next turned her attention to finding a home for her father’s extensive collection of textile related items, a passion she shared herself. What began as a concept for an exhibit in a barn grew into the foundation of a new museum, The Merrimack Valley Textile Museum. She was driven to tell ‘the story of one phase of the social and industrial growth of the country’. Caroline educated herself in all aspects of the project along the way, and prepared her staff by teaching spinning and weaving classes out of her home, the Gayton Osgood House, on Osgood Street.

In 1955, she spoke before the members of the Historical Society and reminded them that “we have here [in the Old Center], right in their original locations, the embodiment of our fore fathers, a precious possession to which we have paid little attention.” In order to rectify this oversight, she founded the Center Realty Trust to help achieve conservation goals through private means when public preservation movements failed.

Caroline's legacy lives on through the many organizations that she founded and participated in. We are proud and excited to continue work that Caroline cared so much about, including growing our campus by repurposing the Textile Museum as the Stevens Center, to preserve and share the history of North Andover and serve the wider community.

For the last week of Women's History Month, we remember Caroline Stevens Rogers (1894-1985). Few people have given as much to their community as Caroline. She was born in 1894, to Lucy Abbot Stevens and Samuel Dale Stevens, and thus inherited a strong family tradition of providing generous support to cultural and conservation town projects.

She was educated in Andover and Boston and attended Bryn Mawr. During WWI, she served as a volunteer nurses aide at a hospital in France. She returned to tour Europe in 1921 and flew from Paris to London in the open nose compartment of an early commercial plane. She married Dr. Horatio Rogers in 1923, and they raised four children together in Boston and later Newton. During WWII, she again served as a nurses aide, this time in Boston hospitals. In 1952, her husband retired and they settled in North Andover to find “a quiet life in the country.”

At this stage, Caroline became active in a number of organizations working to conserve and interpret the town’s history and natural resources. She poured her energies into reorganizing the collections of the North Andover Historical Society and strove to ensure the organization became a more vital entity. As President, in 1958, she initiated an extensive restoration of the Parson Barnard House. She next turned her attention to finding a home for her father’s extensive collection of textile related items, a passion she shared herself. What began as a concept for an exhibit in a barn grew into the foundation of a new museum, The Merrimack Valley Textile Museum. She was driven to tell ‘the story of one phase of the social and industrial growth of the country’. Caroline educated herself in all aspects of the project along the way, and prepared her staff by teaching spinning and weaving classes out of her home, the Gayton Osgood House, on Osgood Street.

In 1955, she spoke before the members of the Historical Society and reminded them that “we have here [in the Old Center], right in their original locations, the embodiment of our fore fathers, a precious possession to which we have paid little attention.” In order to rectify this oversight, she founded the Center Realty Trust to help achieve conservation goals through private means when public preservation movements failed.

Caroline's legacy lives on through the many organizations that she founded and participated in. We are proud and excited to continue work that Caroline cared so much about, including growing our campus by repurposing the Textile Museum as the Stevens Center, to preserve and share the history of North Andover and serve the wider community.

The society pauses to recognize National Vietnam War Veterans Day, held annually on March 29.  In particular we remember...
03/29/2021

The society pauses to recognize National Vietnam War Veterans Day, held annually on March 29. In particular we remember those North Andover residents who lost their lives in Southeast Asia:

-Spc. 4 Michael J. Byron, USA, age 27
-LCpl. Gregory C. Davis, USMC, age 22
-Sgt. Michael R. Dunn, USA, age 24
-Spc. 4 James P. English, USA, age 19
-Lt.(j.g.) Richard F. Gorham, USN, age 25
-LCpl. James A. St. Cyr, USMC, age 19

The society pauses to recognize National Vietnam War Veterans Day, held annually on March 29. In particular we remember those North Andover residents who lost their lives in Southeast Asia:

-Spc. 4 Michael J. Byron, USA, age 27
-LCpl. Gregory C. Davis, USMC, age 22
-Sgt. Michael R. Dunn, USA, age 24
-Spc. 4 James P. English, USA, age 19
-Lt.(j.g.) Richard F. Gorham, USN, age 25
-LCpl. James A. St. Cyr, USMC, age 19

The Worden Theater is coming together thanks to our volunteer builders!  Decking went on this morning, which means the s...
03/27/2021

The Worden Theater is coming together thanks to our volunteer builders! Decking went on this morning, which means the seating and finished flooring can be termed our 'Coming Attractions'. Thanks to this dedicated work crew, the Stevens Center will be set to host lectures, presentations, videos, and performances on par with much larger historical societies and museums. Onward!

This week, we honor Sarah Loring Bailey who researched and wrote the quintessential town history Historical Sketches of ...
03/24/2021

This week, we honor Sarah Loring Bailey who researched and wrote the quintessential town history Historical Sketches of Andover/North Andover in 1880. Sarah was born and grew up in the Parson Barnard House, although in her time, the house was still believed to be the "Governor Bradstreet House". Without her research and dedication to rooting out documents in personal collections, much of the information from these private papers would have been lost from the record. Did you know you can access this book for free on the Internet Archive (https://archive.org/details/historicalsketch00bail)? There are also hard copies available in our bookstore!
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Image: Sarah Loring Bailey #womenshistorymonth

This week, we honor Sarah Loring Bailey who researched and wrote the quintessential town history Historical Sketches of Andover/North Andover in 1880. Sarah was born and grew up in the Parson Barnard House, although in her time, the house was still believed to be the "Governor Bradstreet House". Without her research and dedication to rooting out documents in personal collections, much of the information from these private papers would have been lost from the record. Did you know you can access this book for free on the Internet Archive (https://archive.org/details/historicalsketch00bail)? There are also hard copies available in our bookstore!
..
Image: Sarah Loring Bailey #womenshistorymonth

Flying the flag of Ireland on this sunny St. Patrick's Day afternoon!  ☘️
03/17/2021

Flying the flag of Ireland on this sunny St. Patrick's Day afternoon! ☘️

Flying the flag of Ireland on this sunny St. Patrick's Day afternoon! ☘️

Anne Bradstreet (1612 - 1672) was born in England to a Puritan family. Her father, Thomas Dudley, was a manager of the e...
03/17/2021

Anne Bradstreet (1612 - 1672) was born in England to a Puritan family. Her father, Thomas Dudley, was a manager of the estates of the Earl of Lincoln. Married at sixteen, two years later she and her husband Simon, along with her parents, joined Governor Winthrop’s party on the ship Arabella. They lived first at Charlestown, then moved to Cambridge, Ipswich and by the 1640s she and Simon settled in the North Parish of Andover.  Their homestead was located on Osgood Street where the present day Phillips Manse and Parson Barnard houses stand.
 
Anne was busy with eight children to care for, but she found time to write as well. It was a past-time she had begun in her youth.  Her early attempts at poetry were styled along the lines of noted poets, in particular DuBartas, but over time her work came to embody a more personal, lyrical expression based on her life experiences.  Anne’s best poems were written during her later years in Andover.  It was never her intent that they be published, she appears to have been content to circulate them amongst  friends in manuscript form. However, unbeknownst to her, some of her poems were published in England in 1650 under the title “The Tenth Muse Lately sprung up in America.” In the years following her death at age sixty, a Boston edition followed called “Several Poems…By a Gentlewoman in New England.”
 
Today, Anne Bradstreet is hailed as the first printed poetess in America. Her work was praised by contemporaries as well, such as Cotton Mather and Harvard President John Rogers, who described her lines as “nectar”. Anne’s poems are still in publication in the present day, no doubt due in part to her wit and clever turn of phrase, as she noted of neighbors who grew jealous of her writing talent:
 
“I am obnoxious to each carping tongue,
Who says my hand a needle better fits.”
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Image: Signature of Anne Bradstreet
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If you are interested in learning more about Anne, join us for our virtual event, “Anne Bradstreet: She Walked the Same Land - A Poet’s Life in Verse and History,” on March 31st. You can register by visiting our website, northandoverhistoricalsociety.org.

Anne Bradstreet (1612 - 1672) was born in England to a Puritan family. Her father, Thomas Dudley, was a manager of the estates of the Earl of Lincoln. Married at sixteen, two years later she and her husband Simon, along with her parents, joined Governor Winthrop’s party on the ship Arabella. They lived first at Charlestown, then moved to Cambridge, Ipswich and by the 1640s she and Simon settled in the North Parish of Andover.  Their homestead was located on Osgood Street where the present day Phillips Manse and Parson Barnard houses stand.
 
Anne was busy with eight children to care for, but she found time to write as well. It was a past-time she had begun in her youth.  Her early attempts at poetry were styled along the lines of noted poets, in particular DuBartas, but over time her work came to embody a more personal, lyrical expression based on her life experiences.  Anne’s best poems were written during her later years in Andover.  It was never her intent that they be published, she appears to have been content to circulate them amongst  friends in manuscript form. However, unbeknownst to her, some of her poems were published in England in 1650 under the title “The Tenth Muse Lately sprung up in America.” In the years following her death at age sixty, a Boston edition followed called “Several Poems…By a Gentlewoman in New England.”
 
Today, Anne Bradstreet is hailed as the first printed poetess in America. Her work was praised by contemporaries as well, such as Cotton Mather and Harvard President John Rogers, who described her lines as “nectar”. Anne’s poems are still in publication in the present day, no doubt due in part to her wit and clever turn of phrase, as she noted of neighbors who grew jealous of her writing talent:
 
“I am obnoxious to each carping tongue,
Who says my hand a needle better fits.”
..
Image: Signature of Anne Bradstreet
..
If you are interested in learning more about Anne, join us for our virtual event, “Anne Bradstreet: She Walked the Same Land - A Poet’s Life in Verse and History,” on March 31st. You can register by visiting our website, northandoverhistoricalsociety.org.

Address

153 Academy Rd
North Andover, MA
01845

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 14:00

Telephone

(978) 686-4035

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Comments

Many of the people that started Andover which became North Andover and Andover at the split are listed on the Founders Monument in Newbury. One is John Osgood who landed in Newbury and was the third of ten men to sign the document that created the Andover. Another family that was in Andover is the Ordways. There are others on the monument as well.
Good Afternoon. A quick question. John Osgood the founder of Andover then Andover/ North Andover was my 7th great grandfather and my Osgood line ran right up to my grandmother. I was wondering if you have any Osgood artifacts or information at the Historical Society?
the item shown in the latest publication is used for darning socks
Attended this informative and thoughtful forum on Thursday-thank you Andover Center for History and Culture and Essex Heritage!
Congratulations Scarlet Knights! History made again!
Veteran's Day 2018 in North Andover. Truly a day for remembering all who have sacrificed for this country.
We are less than two weeks away from 26th Trot for Special Tots 5K that takes place in Andover on Sunday, October 14, 2018. The run/walk benefits the Professional Center for Child Development that benefits children across the Merrimack Valley. http://www.theprofessionalcenter.org/trot-for-tots.html. The mission is to provide educational and therapeutic services for children of all abilities and their families, working with each child to develop to his or her full potential. We strive to eliminate barriers to growth and development for children with disabilities and families coping with health issues and challenge. Interested in running or walking? Register today: http://www.lightboxreg.com/trot-for-special-tots_2018…
Looking forward to another Fall Festival-stop by and say hello!
Does the Historical Society have any information on Dorothy Moody? She is listed on the WWI monument, one of three women NOT listed as Auxilary Service. Thank you!
Tattered Torn Bibles and Historic Books CAN be Repaired Preserving all your underlining, highlighting and notes New covers; Leather, Naugahyde, Bookcloth, original cover http://www. bookman-jim. biz If you would like a poster, just send your street address to: [email protected] BookMan-Jim. Biz 920.265.5966
Please check out my article about the separation of North Andover from Andover (w. new illustrations). Thank you. - Carl McCarthy