Arizona Rangers Museum and Archives

Arizona Rangers Museum and Archives The museum has on display some unique items of Arizona Ranger history relating to both the Territorial Arizona Rangers, as well as the modern day Rangers.
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Thank you to the Arizona Rangers, Peoria Company for this Ranger history:
11/04/2018

Thank you to the Arizona Rangers, Peoria Company for this Ranger history:

RECOMMENDED READING:
"Billy Old, Arizona Ranger " by Geff Moyer

Following the death of his good friend and fellow Ranger, Jeff Kidder, and the disbandment of the Arizona Rangers legend has it that Billy Old ventured into Old Mexico seeking vengeance for the men who gunned his friend down. This novel of historical fiction tells the tale of Billy Old's two year adventure, and the colorful and often dangerous characters he encounters along the way.

https://www.amazon.com/Billy-Old-Arizona-Ranger-Historical/dp/1632931397

Arizona Rangers: Agua Fria Company, No. 22
09/29/2018

Arizona Rangers: Agua Fria Company, No. 22

The badges, patches, and challenge coins of the Arizona Rangers. 1957-present

True West Magazine
09/20/2018
True West Magazine

True West Magazine

Kidder often worked along the Mexican border, accompanied only by his beloved dog, Jip, stalking cattle rustlers and smugglers.

True West Magazine
09/17/2018
True West Magazine

True West Magazine

Arizona has had three different Arizona Ranger law enforcement groups. The first Ranger group was created in 1860, the second in 1882 and the third in...

09/01/2018
Arizona Rangers: Agua Fria Company, No. 22

Arizona Rangers: Agua Fria Company, No. 22

Did you know there was a TV show based on the 1901-09’ Arizona Rangers......they even had a theme song “26 Men” have a listen.

AZ CONSTABLE HISTORYBisbee Daily Review, August 7, 1903Douglas, AZ - Constable Date Graham and two Arizona Rangers arres...
08/20/2018

AZ CONSTABLE HISTORY
Bisbee Daily Review, August 7, 1903

Douglas, AZ - Constable Date Graham and two Arizona Rangers arrest drunken Cochise County Deputy Sheriff Thomas Wilson, who was shooting up the Waldorf Saloon at 10:30 in the morning.

History Uk
07/29/2018

History Uk

On this day 28th July 1858 Fingerprints were first used as a means of identification by William Herschel, who later established a fingerprint register.

Herschel is credited with being the first European to note the value of fingerprints for identification. He recognized that fingerprints were unique and permanent. Herschel documented his own fingerprints over his lifetime to prove permanence. He was also credited with being the first person to use fingerprints in a practical manner. As early as the 1850s, working as a British officer for the Indian Civil Service in the Bengal region of India, he started putting fingerprints on contracts.

Here's a couple good articles about William Herschel:

http://www.sloughhistoryonline.org.uk/ixbin/hixclient.exe?a=query&p=slough&f=generic_theme.htm&_IXFIRST_=1&_IXMAXHITS_=1&%3Dtheme_record_id=sl-sl-williamjamesherschel

http://www.onin.com/fp/fphistory.html

On this day 1902:
07/10/2018

On this day 1902:

On this daye in 1908:
05/06/2018

On this daye in 1908:

Digital Arizona Library - DAZL
05/05/2018
Digital Arizona Library - DAZL

Digital Arizona Library - DAZL

On this day in 1876, Arizona rancher turned lawman, Burton Mossman was born.
This image is courtesy of the Arizona State Archives' historic photograph collection.

Sad day for Arizona Rangers History. On this day 1909 the Arizona Rangers were no more:
04/30/2018

Sad day for Arizona Rangers History. On this day 1909 the Arizona Rangers were no more:

On this day 1902:
04/11/2018

On this day 1902:

Dear Arizona,FEW have had your back so long.BUT we are here and we are one.PROUD that we shall never fall.THEN we rise i...
02/05/2018

Dear Arizona,

FEW have had your back so long.
BUT we are here and we are one.
PROUD that we shall never fall.
THEN we rise in support of law.
AND as we protected you in the past.
NOW we continue to stand steadfast.

Join us today by volunteering.

01/23/2018
Arizona Rangers Verde Valley Company
01/22/2018

Arizona Rangers Verde Valley Company

Courthouse Prescott, Arizona January 2018, home of the Arizona Rangers Lonesome Valley Company.

Thank you for your time Rangers!
01/06/2018

Thank you for your time Rangers!

Rangers Daniel and Rodrigo Ramos with Madera Company Commander Maj George Ophoff performing duty at Ranger Museum in Nogales Arizona....

Ranger Jefferson Kiddler involved in a shooting at Douglas, Arizona
01/02/2018

Ranger Jefferson Kiddler involved in a shooting at Douglas, Arizona

True West Magazine
12/28/2017
True West Magazine

True West Magazine

Arizona Ranger Lieutenant Harry Wheeler took part in one on the West’s most unusual gunfights when a shootout turned into a contest of mano a mano. It all happened in the railroad town of Benson, Arizona on February 28, 1907 when a lover’s triangle turned violent. J. A.Tracy, agent for the Helvetia Copper Company, was …

Arizona Rangers: Peoria Company
12/19/2017

Arizona Rangers: Peoria Company

The history of the Arizona Rangers can be found all over the state, including these photos of one of our most notable Rangers. Sgt. Jeff Kidder was believed to be the fastest draw and the best shot in the history of the original Territorial Rangers. These photos were taken by a member of our Peoria Company this past weekend during a trip to the historical town of Tombstone.

Samuel K. Dolan - Author
12/04/2017

Samuel K. Dolan - Author

Best known for having served as Captain of the Arizona Rangers, Thomas H. Rynning was serving as the superintendent of the Arizona State Penitentiary at Florence in 1922 when two convicts, both connected to the murder of the Pearsons in Ruby in 1921, escaped while being transported to the prison. Rynning once again entered the field at the head of one of the posses that set out to apprehend them.

Pima County Board of Supervisors recently proclaimed Wednesday, November 22 as Arizona Rangers Day in Pima County, with ...
11/22/2017

Pima County Board of Supervisors recently proclaimed Wednesday, November 22 as Arizona Rangers Day in Pima County, with Supervisor Steve Christy presenting the proclamation to members of Madera Company at a ceremony outside the Green Valley government center.

Front row, left to right: Sgt. Jeff Radamacher, Sgt. George Grove, PIMA County District Supervisor Steve Christy, Lt. Robert Downer, Lt. Richard Boyer and MSgt. Irl Henderson
Back row left to right: Lt. Roger Latimer, Ranger Robert McCarthy, Sgt. Mike Schultz and Sgt. Tom Sutler

While the Arizona Rangers has an extensive history we enjoy sharing, we'd also like to begin honoring the men and women ...
11/15/2017

While the Arizona Rangers has an extensive history we enjoy sharing, we'd also like to begin honoring the men and women who continue to serve Arizonans proud.

Today we're highlighting Lieutenant Dohrendorf who was assisted by Lieutenant Seevers, Master Sergeant Hurst along with the men and women of the Arizona Rangers Casa Grande Company for spearheading a donation drive to assist those Texas Rangers, Law Enforcement, First Responders and their families that were impacted by Hurricane Harvey.

The Texas Rangers in Austin, who report to the Texas Department of Public Safety were informed of the desire to help first responder families in need all over the Texas Gulf Coast, including: Police, Fire Dighters, Paramedics, Search and Rescue personnel, etc.. In fact, in Houston alone, over 200 police families had lost everything they owned.

The Arizona Rangers Casa Grande Company facilitated all of the physical and monetary donations to include setting up a GoFundMe page and reaching out to local businesses. The donations were loaded up and two Rangers made the long drive to Houston delivering everything to the Texas Rangers in-person.

Thank you Casa Grande Company for your selfless act in keeping our tradition of service before self shining bright!

Approximately three years ago, the Arizona Rangers Verde Valley Company was approached in reference having a Ranger Hist...
11/15/2017

Approximately three years ago, the Arizona Rangers Verde Valley Company was approached in reference having a Ranger History Plaque placed on the "Walk of Fame" in uptown Sedona, Arizona. Below is the finished product and we couldnt be prouder to continue sharing our hertiage with visitors.

Graham County Sheriff Jim Parks supervises the execution of Arizona outlaw Augustine Chacon in November of 1902. Capture...
11/01/2017

Graham County Sheriff Jim Parks supervises the execution of Arizona outlaw Augustine Chacon in November of 1902. Captured by Arizona Ranger Captain Burt Mossman, Chacon was sentenced to hang for a series of robberies and murders along the border. His final words on the scaffold were allegedly "this is the greatest day of my life!"

The 1962 Winchester Firearms Catalog ran this photo on the front, erroneously referring to the group as Texas Rangers. A...
09/20/2017

The 1962 Winchester Firearms Catalog ran this photo on the front, erroneously referring to the group as Texas Rangers. Arizona historians politely informed the company of the mistake and the president of Winchester Arms came to Arizona apologizing for the oversight. Interestingly enough forty-six Arizona Rangers hailed from Texas, and a quarter of them were former Texas Rangers.

This must have been embarrassing, take 2! | Epic of Bisbee
09/05/2017
This must have been embarrassing, take 2! | Epic of Bisbee

This must have been embarrassing, take 2! | Epic of Bisbee

This must have been embarrassing, take 2! Posted on May 7, 2015 by Gary DillardMay 7, 2015 Published a blurb the other day about the Bisbee newspaper having some fun at the expense of the Bisbee Fire Department, so now it’s time to give local law enforcement equal time. Seems that back in 1904, a co...

Before he rode with the Arizona Rangers, John Foster fought with the "Rough Riders" as a bugler in Troop B, 1st Voluntee...
08/31/2017

Before he rode with the Arizona Rangers, John Foster fought with the "Rough Riders" as a bugler in Troop B, 1st Volunteer Cavalry during the Spanish American War. Later he served as a deputy constable in Cochise County before enlisting in the Rangers, where Captain Tom Rynning would make him a Sergeant, and later the Lieutenant of the company. Ranger service was followed by terms as a Deputy United States Marshal, Deputy Sheriff and Special Agent with the Department of Justice (Bureau of Investigation), where he provided key insight for the Government's report on the 1919 "Bisbee Riot". Foster passed away in Santa Maria, California in 1958 at the age of 85.

Oath of Office dated August 30, 1901.
08/30/2017

Oath of Office dated August 30, 1901.

Article, 1902 - Albuquerque Daily Citizen
08/19/2017

Article, 1902 - Albuquerque Daily Citizen

Timeline Photos
08/05/2017

Timeline Photos

1908 article:
08/05/2017

1908 article:

Current day Arizona Rangers uniform patch.
07/22/2017

Current day Arizona Rangers uniform patch.

Article July 10, 1902
07/10/2017

Article July 10, 1902

Timeline Photos
07/06/2017

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
07/01/2017

Timeline Photos

In June 1903, the Governor of Arizona Territory at the behest of influential mine owners, ordered the Arizona Rangers to...
06/01/2017

In June 1903, the Governor of Arizona Territory at the behest of influential mine owners, ordered the Arizona Rangers to Morenci to quell an enployee strike. With the exception of the Jeff Kidder, the Morenci strike was the only time the force posed for group photos. The Rangers’ role as strikebreakers not only tarnished their image among the territory’s working class citizens, it proved unpopular with the Rangers who felt their mission was to pursue rustlers, killers and other felons.

In Rememberence:Before he rode with the Arizona Rangers, John Foster fought with the "Rough Riders" as a bugler in Troop...
05/28/2017

In Rememberence:

Before he rode with the Arizona Rangers, John Foster fought with the "Rough Riders" as a bugler in Troop B, 1st Volunteer Cavalry during the Spanish American War. Later he served as a deputy constable in Cochise County before enlisting in the Rangers, where Captain Tom Rynning would make him a Sergeant, and later the Lieutenant of the company. Ranger service was followed by terms as a Deputy United States Marshal, Deputy Sheriff and Special Agent with the Department of Justice (Bureau of Investigation), where he provided key insight for the Government's report on the 1919 "Bisbee Riot". Foster passed away in Santa Maria, California in 1958 at the age of 85.

Timeline Photos
05/02/2017

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
04/20/2017

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
04/11/2017

Timeline Photos

In Rememberence:Ranger Jefferson P. KidderNovember 15, 1875 - April 5, 1908 was a little-known police officer in the clo...
04/05/2017

In Rememberence:

Ranger Jefferson P. Kidder

November 15, 1875 - April 5, 1908 was a little-known police officer in the closing days of the American Old West. He is considered one of the twelve most underrated gunmen of the Old West.

Early life:

He was born Jefferson David Kidder in 1875 in Vermillion, South Dakota, the son of Silas W. Kidder from a prominent family. The boy's grandfather, for whom he was named, was Jefferson P. Kidder; he had served as the Lieutenant Governor of Vermont and later served on the South Dakota Supreme Court and in the U.S. House of Representatives. Silas had a brother Lyman S. Kidder, who became an officer in the 2nd Cavalry Regiment (United States), and served under George Custer. He and his detachment were killed by Native Americans in July 1867, in an event that became known as the Kidder Massacre. In 1868, Silas W. Kidder settled in Vermillion.

By an early age the boy Jeff had taken an interest in dime novels depicting the lives of gunfighters. Kidder began studying and practicing the art of the quick draw. He attended the University of South Dakota where he studied algebra, language and composition.

Life in the West:

In 1901, Kidder's family moved to California, but he stayed in Vermillion. That same year, the Arizona Rangers were formed, and Kidder ventured southwest to join them. He was not hired until 1903, and he took many odd jobs in between, including working as a cowboy, a miner, and as a lawman in Nogales, Arizona. Kidder quickly became known within the Rangers as the second best marksman, second only to Captain Harry C. Wheeler.

Two months later, Kidder and other Rangers went to Morenci to quell the mine strikes and riots. Kidder had a reputation as being quiet, having little to say, unless he was drinking. When drunk, he was known to be loud mouthed and quarrelsome. Tom Rynning, an Arizona Ranger Captain, would later claim that he never saw any man faster with a gun on a quick draw than Jeff Kidder.

Kidder began working to control cattle rustling along the United States/Mexico border near Nogales, often working alone, but sometimes joined by Rangers Fred Rankin, Billy Old, and Bill Sparks. In early 1904, Kidder and Rankin intercepted gunrunners near the border, which resulted in a gunbattle. Kidder shot and killed one of the outlaws, with Rankin shooting the horse out from under another. The two Rangers confiscated several weapons and 10,000 rounds of ammunition. Kidder had numerous other clashes with gunrunners on the border, leading to intelligence reports that he was to be targeted by the Mexican Border Police, who were involved in the gunrunning business with the outlaws.

Kidder, Rankin, Sparks and Old had all received commissions from Mexican General Luis E. Torres, commander of the northern district of Sonora, authorizing them to enter into Mexico if need be in pursuit of outlaws. In the fall of 1907, Kidder and a Benson, Arizona Constable fought and captured one bandit and dispersed several others who were smuggling arms and gunpowder. By this time, Kidder had a sizable reputation on the border and in Mexico. He was promoted to sergeant in early 1908.

Gunfight and Death:

In late March 1908, Kidder pursued gunrunners into Mexico. He entered Naco, Sonora on April 3, 1908, and in a small cantina he located his suspects. A gunfight erupted between Kidder and Delores Quias and Tomas Amador, both of whom were Mexican policemen, resulting in both suspects being wounded, and their wounding Kidder. Two Mexican police, in business with the outlaws, burst into the cantina and fired at Kidder, hitting him in the gut. Kidder, alone and outnumbered, continued the fight, returning fire on the two officers, killing them both. Kidder was badly wounded, the bullet having ripped through his intestines and exiting his back, leaving him lying on the floor.

Kidder, realizing he was in trouble, staggered to his feet and walked into the night and began attempting to reach the US border several hundred yards away. Several Mexican policemen and civilians stood between him and the border by this point and they began firing at Kidder. Ranger Kidder then attempted to return fire, but his gun was empty, so he veered to his right heading for the boundary. Taking cover, he reloaded and shot one of the civilians who came within his range, killing the man. Kidder continued to return fire until his ammunition was expended, at which point he surrendered.

Naco Police Chief Victoriano Amador and several of his policemen immediately jumped on Kidder, beating him senseless. Chief Amador had been wounded by Kidder. The police beat Kidder as they dragged him about fifty yards toward the local jail, and he was hit on the head with a pistol, which cracked his skull. Kidder was held in jail that night without medical attention.

The following day, American officials led by Ranger Captain Wheeler pressured Mexican officials to release Kidder into a private residence for medical care, and pressed for Mexico to allow a Bisbee, Arizona doctor, Dr. F.E. Shine, to attend him. Mexican officials complied. However by that point there was little hope that Kidder could survive. He was, however, able to speak and to relay the events as they happened in his own version.

Deputy US Marshal John Foster, a friend to Kidder, entered into Naco and visited Kidder during this time, along with several others having authority to do so. Kidder died on April 5, 1908, at 6:30 am. At first, local Mexican authorities refused to allow Kidder's body to be removed to American soil. After intense arguments, General Torres intervened and ordered Kidder's body returned to the Americans. His body was sent to his mother in Los Angeles, California, where he was buried.

No charges were ever filed against the Mexicans. The Arizona Rangers and many citizens of Arizona were enraged. When the Rangers were disbanded in 1909, Ranger Billy Old, Kidder's closest friend, disappeared into Mexico, where he remained for two years. Years later, former Ranger Captain Tom Rynning revealed that in Mexico, Old had had hunted down and killed all the men who attacked Kidder.

Source: www.azrangers.us

Address

21 E Court St
Nogales, AZ
85621

Opening Hours

Saturday 10:00 - 15:00

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