Historic Newton

Historic Newton Historic Newton tells the story of Newton's people & places, from the 17th century to the current Garden City, inspiring discovery and engagement by illuminating our community’s stories within the context of American history.
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The Jackson Homestead and Museum is located at 527 Washington Street Newton, MA 02458 617-796-1450 Open Wednesday-Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Open Saturday-Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Durant-Kenrick House and Grounds is located at 286 Waverley Avenue Newton, MA 02458 617-641-9142 Open Wednesday-Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Open Saturday-Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

06/03/2020
June 3rd Virtual Storytime: Transportation

Virtual Storytime is geared towards 0-3 year-olds and is an online version of Historic Newton’s Storytime at the Museums program. Each program will include a reading from a children’s book and a demonstration of an activity that can be completed at home.

Today we will be talking about Transportation! Our book will be Truck Stuck by Sallie Wolf. Thank you to the Auburndale Community Library for providing us with this week's book!

And we’ll be making Egg Carton Cars for our craft today.

We have provided a materials list and set of step-by-step instructions for the craft below. But please remember that these are just guidelines and you can use whatever you have on hand.

Egg Carton Cars
What You’ll Need:
Egg Carton (Cut into Individual Units)
Paint/Markers
Black, Yellow, and White Construction Paper
Black Marker
Glue
Scissors

Make-ahead instructions for parents/caregivers:
Cut your egg carton into individual units. Each unit can become its own car so a 12-egg carton can make 12 cars!
You can also cut out the wheels, headlights, and windshield for your cars. Each car will need four circles cut out of black construction paper, two small circles cut out of yellow construction paper and one square cut out of white construction paper.
And of course, if you are planning on using paint to decorate your cars you’ll want your little one to do this ahead of time so that the paint can dry.

Step-by-step instructions:
Cut your egg carton into individual units.
Decorate your car using paint or makers. If you are using paint make sure you let your cars dry completely before continuing.
To make the wheels: cut out four circles from the black construction paper. Do this for each car.
To make the headlights: cut out two small circles from the yellow construction paper. Do this for each car.
To make the windshield: cut out one square from the white construction paper. Do this for each car.
Now you can decorate your car. Glue the windshield onto the front side of one egg carton. You should make sure it is glued to the top half of this side. Below this you will glue the two headlights.
Glue two wheels to both the left and right side of the egg carton.
Use the black maker to draw on a door. Draw a square or rectangle with a small circle on the inside.

At Historic Newton we are following closely the events touched off by the death of George Floyd, only the recent example...
06/01/2020

At Historic Newton we are following closely the events touched off by the death of George Floyd, only the recent example in a long line of violence against black citizens that has caused pain and reflection among Americans over months, years, centuries. We have stories from Newton’s history about these issues that we will share with you over the coming days. For now, Historic Newton affirms that #BlackLivesMatter. [Photo from a rally at Newton City Hall].

June is Pride Month! Watch the rainbow flag-raising at Newton City Hall June 2 and hang a flag in your window all month....
06/01/2020

June is Pride Month! Watch the rainbow flag-raising at Newton City Hall June 2 and hang a flag in your window all month. The rainbow flag has symbolized LGBTQ pride since San Francisco artist Gilbert Baker created it in 1978. The ceremony streams at 6 p.m. on http://www.newtonma.gov/2020pride

How have you been spending your time during the shutdown? Send in a photo taken in Newton that documents your experience...
05/31/2020

How have you been spending your time during the shutdown? Send in a photo taken in Newton that documents your experiences during COVID-19. Our photo contest, a collaboration between Historic Newton, Newton, MA Cultural Development and Newton Community Pride, runs from June 1-30. http://ow.ly/cyyL50zUV2d

#TBT A Dunkin' Donuts shop is still located at Adams and Watertown streets in Nonantum, but the corner has changed quite...
05/28/2020

#TBT A Dunkin' Donuts shop is still located at Adams and Watertown streets in Nonantum, but the corner has changed quite a bit since the 1970s, when this photo was taken. So has the Dunkin' branding! The company's first store opened in Quincy, Massachusetts in 1950.

We're grateful to be the recipients of this grant, which we'll use to host a series of films and discussions touching on...
05/28/2020

We're grateful to be the recipients of this grant, which we'll use to host a series of films and discussions touching on abolition, civil rights, and voting rights. We expect to launch these programs in early 2021.

Congratulations to Historic Newton in #NewtonMA for their grant for “Making Change: Abolition, Activism, and Social Justice from the 19th Century to Today”! We’re excited to watch and learn more about the social justice movements over the past two centuries. Mass Cultural Council Senator Edward J. Markey U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren Cynthia Stone Creem for State Senate State Representative John Lawn

05/27/2020
May 27th Virtual Storytime: Kindness

Virtual Storytime is geared towards 0-3 year-olds and is an online version of Historic Newton’s Storytime at the Museums program. Each program will include a reading from a children’s book and a demonstration of an activity that can be completed at home.

Today we will be talking about Kindness! Our book will be The Paper Crane by Molly Bang. And we’ll be making Cupcake Liner Cranes for our craft today.

We have provided a materials list and set of step-by-step instructions for the craft below. But please remember that these are just guidelines and you can use whatever you have on hand.

Cupcake Liner Crane
What You’ll Need:
White Cupcake Liners
Black, White, and Orange Construction Paper
Paper for Background (Any Color)
Colored Pencils/Crayons/Markers
Googly Eyes
Glue
Scissors
Any Additional Decorations (Feathers, Stickers, etc.)

Make-ahead instructions for parents/caregivers:
As always, you can cut out the wing, neck, beak, and legs so that all your little one needs to do is glue everything together. If you do this ahead of time you can have your little one help identify the different shapes that will be used to make their crane!

Step-by-step instructions:
Flatten two white cupcake liners. Set under a heavy object and set aside.
Cut an oval or diamond shape out of black construction paper. This will be the crane’s wing.
Cut out a thin rectangle from the white construction paper. This will be the crane’s neck.
Cut out a long and thin triangle from the orange construction paper. This will be the crane’s beak.
Cut out two rectangles from the orange construction paper. Cut one in half and leave the other whole. These will make the crane’s legs.
Start making your crane! Glue one cupcake liner to the middle of the page. Next, glue on the neck at an angle. Then, glue the head onto the neck.
Add your legs. Glue the longer triangle and one of the short triangles to the bottom of the crane’s body. (These should be vertical.) Glue the second short rectangle to the bottom of the other short rectangle. (This should be horizontal.)
Glue the wing, diagonally onto the crane’s body.
Glue the beak to your crane’s head. Add a googly eye to finish the crane’s face.
Add any decorations to your crane and the background. Maybe add some extra color or a feather to your crane’s head. Or decide where your crane is going to live.

05/27/2020

#FromTheCollection This "field desk" belonged to Gen. William Hull, who fought in the American Revolution, served as Gov. of Michigan Territory, and became a general in the War of 1812, surrendering Fort Detroit to the British - an act for which he was court-marshaled and sentenced to be shot. (He was pardoned by President Madison.) Gen. Hull settled in Newton with his wife, Sarah Fuller. Their estate included the land where Newton North High School stands today. This desk would have held important documents as well as writing materials (paper, pens, ink, blotter, and sealing wax).

Hey Storytime Friends! Join us tomorrow at 10:30 for Molly Bang's Paper Crane! Here's a sneak peak of the craft for this...
05/26/2020

Hey Storytime Friends! Join us tomorrow at 10:30 for Molly Bang's Paper Crane! Here's a sneak peak of the craft for this week.

05/26/2020

Newton North honors its 2020 graduates in a creative way this year. Since it's unsafe to host a traditional ceremony, names of each graduate are posted in alphabetical order along Commonwealth Avenue from City Hall to Temple Street. These signs will one day help tell the story of life in Newton during the pandemic.

Newton's annual Memorial Day parade is cancelled this year due to COVID-19 but here's a look back at the 1988 event. The...
05/24/2020

Newton's annual Memorial Day parade is cancelled this year due to COVID-19 but here's a look back at the 1988 event. The Sons of the American Legion - Post 440 is still observing the holiday today (May 24) with a dedication and wreath-laying at many local sites honoring those who made the ultimate sacrifice. http://ow.ly/Mjqm50zNGjf

Citizens have been beautifying Newton Centre with plantings since the Newton Centre Tree Association and the Newton Cent...
05/22/2020

Citizens have been beautifying Newton Centre with plantings since the Newton Centre Tree Association and the Newton Centre Improvement Association began in the 19th century.

05/22/2020

Hello, visitors! A family of robins has made its nest above the front door at the Jackson Homestead, taking advantage of quiet that came from the shutdown.

#TBT If you're planning a picnic during Memorial Day weekend, the Newton Highlands couple in this 1908 photo by the Char...
05/21/2020

#TBT If you're planning a picnic during Memorial Day weekend, the Newton Highlands couple in this 1908 photo by the Charles River near Waltham might give you some inspiration.

05/20/2020
May 20th Virtual Storytime: Play

Virtual Storytime is geared towards 0-3 year-olds and is an online version of Historic Newton’s Storytime at the Museums program. Each program will include a reading from a children’s book and a demonstration of an activity that can be completed at home.

Today we will be talking about Play! Our book will be Sometimes I Like to Curl up in a Ball by Viki Churchill. We would like to give a special Thank You to the Auburndale Community Library for providing this week's book!

For our craft today, we’ll be making Wombat’s Garden.

We have provided a materials list and set of step-by-step instructions for the craft below. But please remember that these are just guidelines and you can use whatever you have on hand.

Wombat’s Garden (Paper Plate Garden)
What You’ll Need:
Paper Plate
Green, Orange, and Brown Construction Paper
Googly Eyes
Blue and Brown Paint/Crayons/Markers/Colored Pencils
Glue
Scissors
Crayons/Markers/Colored Pencils

Make-ahead instructions for parents/caregivers:
As always, if you and your little one are working with paint you’ll want to do that step ahead of time so that everything is dry.
If you’d like you can also cut out the pieces for the carrots and the wombat so that all your little one needs to do is glue everything together.


Step-by-step instructions:
Draw a line across the middle of your paper plate. Color/paint the top half blue and color/paint the bottom brown. This will be your sky and garden soil.
Cut carrots out of the orange construction paper. Cut the carrot tops out of the green construction paper. Glue your carrot tops to the back of your carrots.
Cut a circle and two small triangles out of the brown construction paper. Glue the triangles to the top of the circle.
Glue on your googly eyes. Add a nose and a mouth to finish your wombat’s face.
Glue your wombat onto the paper plate right where the sky meets the dirt.
Glue your carrots to your paper plate as if they had just been dug up from the garden.

#MondayMotivation "The establishment of cycling as a routine in the daily life of Americans, young and old, can become o...
05/18/2020

#MondayMotivation "The establishment of cycling as a routine in the daily life of Americans, young and old, can become one of the most vital steps in restoring health and vigor to us all," said Boston physician Dr. Paul Dudley White (1886-1973). A bike trail along the Charles River, including a section in Newton, is named after him.

#NewtonConnects Here's how one of our volunteers has kept busy during the shutdown: "It is a scary time. I first became ...
05/16/2020

#NewtonConnects Here's how one of our volunteers has kept busy during the shutdown: "It is a scary time. I first became nervous when we were in Florida. We made it home just before the shutdown and I am grateful to be able to stay safely at home. I think many people are trying to stay positive and remain healthy (and not infect others) during this crisis. My approach has been to use my skills at sewing to make masks and hopefully keep friends, family, and volunteers at the "front line" healthy. We are in a long-term situation and I hope we can continue to support and help each other as time goes on." What are you doing to occupy your days? Tell us in the comments below!

While our museums are closed, our educators have been hard at work offsite. Antoine Trombino-Aponte (pictured on the lef...
05/15/2020

While our museums are closed, our educators have been hard at work offsite. Antoine Trombino-Aponte (pictured on the left at our candlemaking booth at Hayfest) has been developing a history of the Boston accent formatted for online presentation, as well as conducting research for another upcoming presentation about Leif Eriksson's (alleged) history in Massachusetts. Hopefully we'll see you there when they go live! #behindthescenes

Our #TBT memory for #MuseumMomentsMW in #MuseumWeek2020 goes back to the 1960s when the Jackson Homestead hosted punch a...
05/14/2020

Our #TBT memory for #MuseumMomentsMW in #MuseumWeek2020 goes back to the 1960s when the Jackson Homestead hosted punch and cookie parties on the back porch. Our events have changed since then but we look forward to welcoming people again when it is safe to gather.

We were happy to provide historical perspective on the Newton portion of Commonwealth Avenue, designed by Frederick Law ...
05/14/2020
Boston, Newton, Weston consider bicycle improvements along Route 30 - The Boston Globe

We were happy to provide historical perspective on the Newton portion of Commonwealth Avenue, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and once called "Newton Boulevard."

The projects are being considered as leaders across the region look for ways to promote greater cooperation among communities in building a bicycle and trail network across Greater Boston.

05/13/2020
May 13th Virtual Storytime: Earth

Virtual Storytime is geared towards 0-3 year-olds and is an online version of Historic Newton’s Storytime at the Museums program. Each program will include a reading from a children’s book and a demonstration of an activity that can be completed at home.

Today we will be talking about the Seasons! Our book will be Here We Are by Oliver Jeffers. And our activity for today is an Earth Mosaic.

We have provided a materials list and set of step-by-step instructions for the craft below. But please remember that these are just guidelines and you can use whatever you have on hand.

Earth Mosaic
What You’ll Need:
Construction Paper Mosaic Pieces (Green and Blue; you can add more detail by using brown and white or multiple shades of the green and blue)
Blue or Black Construction paper
White or Silver Crayon/Marker/Colored Pencil/Paint
White Paper
Glue
Scissors
Pencil

Make-ahead instructions for parents/caregivers:
You’ll need small pieces of paper to complete this Earth Mosaic. You can cut the construction paper into small squares or tear it into pieces. You can also let older kids practice their fine motor skills by helping you cut or tear the paper! At minimum you need green and blue to make your Earth. You can add more variety by also including brown and white or by using multiple shades of the green and blue.
You can have your little one pre-decorate their background. This is especially important if you are using paint to allow for everything to dry.

Step-by-step instructions:
Make mosaic pieces by cutting your green and blue construction paper into small squares or ripping it into small pieces.
Decorate your background by drawing/painting white or silver dots/stars onto a blue or black piece of paper. Allow to dry thoroughly if using paint.
Trace a large circle onto a piece of white paper.
Glue your mosaic pieces to the circle. This can be an artistic representation of the Earth of a more accurate representation.
Cut out your Earth and glue it to the background.

Storytime friends! Tomorrow we're reading about our lovely planet Earth. Join us at 10:30 for "Here We Are" by Oliver Je...
05/12/2020

Storytime friends! Tomorrow we're reading about our lovely planet Earth. Join us at 10:30 for "Here We Are" by Oliver Jeffers. Here's a sneak peak of our craft. Hope to see you tomorrow!

#MuseumWeek brings together museums from around the world to highlight the power of culture, art - and the ways they can...
05/11/2020

#MuseumWeek brings together museums from around the world to highlight the power of culture, art - and the ways they can help bring us together. Today the theme is honoring heroes. We appreciate front line health care workers in all eras, including Red Cross workers during World War II. This photo of Dorothy Bates from 1944 comes from our archives. #heroesMW

#OnThisDay in 1891, suffragists Julia Ward Howe and Lucy Stone spoke to women and men at a meeting of the Newton Woman's...
05/11/2020

#OnThisDay in 1891, suffragists Julia Ward Howe and Lucy Stone spoke to women and men at a meeting of the Newton Woman's Suffrage League in West Newton. Howe said, "Not alone to the chivalry of men would I appeal but also to the women, who should interest themselves in the condition of their sex and remember that though their money is controlled and their property is taxed they have no voice in the government of the country." She also called for women to be "represented in the government equally with the men." This year marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment that gave women the right to vote. #suffrage100newton Women's Suffrage Celebration Coalition of Massachusetts, Inc. [Portrait of Julia Ward Howe by John Elliott / public domain]

Happy Mother's Day! This photo of Sylvia Nickerson and her daughter, Leila, was taken circa 1855, long before the holida...
05/10/2020

Happy Mother's Day! This photo of Sylvia Nickerson and her daughter, Leila, was taken circa 1855, long before the holiday became an official part of the American calendar in 1914.

05/08/2020

The recent rains have reminded us of the past importance of hydropower. This dam once harnessed the Charles River for the factories in Upper Falls. Newton Upper Falls Area Council

#TBT Here's what Washington Street in Newton Lower Falls looked like in 1973. Who remembers shopping at these businesses...
05/07/2020

#TBT Here's what Washington Street in Newton Lower Falls looked like in 1973. Who remembers shopping at these businesses?

05/06/2020
May 6th Virtual Storytime: Seasons

Virtual Storytime is geared towards 0-3 year-olds and is an online version of Historic Newton’s Storytime at the Museums program. Each program will include a reading from a children’s book and a demonstration of an activity that can be completed at home.

Thank you to the Auburndale Community Library for helping supply us with Storytime books, including today's selection!

Today we will be talking about the Seasons! Our book will be Run Jump Whiz Splash by Vera Rosenberry. And our activity for today is a Paper Bag Butterfly.

We have provided a materials list and set of step-by-step instructions for the craft below. But please remember that these are just guidelines and you can use whatever you have on hand.

Paper Bag Butterfly
What You’ll Need:
Paper Lunch Bag
Construction Paper (or another fun paper like material such as doilies, scrapbook paper, etc.)
Markers, Crayons, Colored Pencils, or Paint
Googly Eyes
Scissors
Glue
Additional Decorative Materials (Pom Poms, Sequins, Pipe Cleaners, etc.)

Make-ahead instructions for parents/caregivers:
You’ll want to make the butterfly’s wings ahead of time. To do this take a sheet of construction paper (or other paper product) and cut out a heart shape. Then cut the bottom quarter of the heart off, creating a straight edge. Repeat with a second piece of paper for the second wing.
If your little one is going to paint the paper bag or wings this step should be done early so that everything is dry by the time you start the rest of the craft.

Step-by-step instructions:
If painting the paper bag: Paint bag and leave until completely dry.
Make two wings out of construction paper (or another paper product) by cutting out two large hearts.
If the paper bag and wings are not already decorated, use markers, crayons, or colored pencils to add color to your butterfly.
Glue your wings into the side pockets of the paper bag. Make sure the rounded side of the wing is facing outwards.
Make your butterfly’s face. You will need eyes, a mouth, and two antennae. Any materials can be used for this step.
Add any additional decoration (pom poms, sequins, etc.)

Address

527 Washington St
Newton, MA
02458

Opening Hours

Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 17:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(617) 796-1450

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Our Story

Historic Newton inspires discovery and engagement by illuminating our community’s stories within the context of American history. Visit our two museums or join us for a walking tour, lecture, concert, family activity, education program, or another special event.

The Jackson Homestead and Museum is located at 527 Washington Street Newton, MA 02458 617-796-1450 The Durant-Kenrick House and Grounds is located at 286 Waverley Avenue Newton, MA 02458 617-641-9142

Both museums are open Wednesday-Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Nearby museums


Other Community Museums in Newton

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Comments

Hi! I am looking for any pictures or public data on Harry Quint Florist 1189 Centre St. This was owned by my godfather and I would love to see if anyone has something that the family may not have seen.
Hi there. I just found this site. I was doing research on a great-grand-Uncle of mine on Ancestry.com and saw that he had been put in the Newton Working Boy's Home. I found his name on a 1900 census and he was 15 years old at the time. Is this still around? Better he was there than with that awful woman he had has a mother.
This is a fun map! It shows how Newton looked 100 years ago.
Walk in the ancestors' footsteps with a family tree and personal travel itinerary. facebook.com/familyfootstepsthroughtime
Does anyone have any links to the story of the creation of the fig Newton In Newton???? Thanks
We've got 2 AWESOME family events happening for New Year's Eve. Check them both out: https://dnb.ticketbud.com/woburnnye1 https://dnb.ticketbud.com/woburnnye2
DEMOLISHED HOME on WASHINGTON & WAVERLY ? On the corner of Washington & Waverly there are two home lots. One is #3 - still standing. The other is empty. Was this lot always empty ? It seems to have enough room for a house.
Sorry, I meant "I Hung Out in Newton Centre, MA" is the name of the page where the discussion was held.
I had a hard time finding you! I wonder if you might want to put on the Jackson Homestead page (a very inactive page, I see) a redirect to Historic Newton. Many of us grew up knowing of the Jackson Homestead, and are not as aware of the title "Historic Newton." Just a suggestion. Visiting the Jackson Homestead was a pivotal experience in my third grade life in the 1950s. Then, and perhaps now, all of us in third grade toured the City of Newton. I spent my career working in museums (including one year at the Jackson Homestead in the 80s). I'm sure you know that there is an active page called "You Know You're From Newton..." that brings up a lot of memories about Newton and interesting experiences...there was recent discussion about creating a "Newton Memories" opportunity that could capture these digital recollections. I wonder if Historic Newton does such a thing or would want to be involved in such a thing.
Newton, MA Lets Make a Deal on these Discounted Homes ! #NewtonMATopDiscountedHomesEricKnows