Cavin-Morris Spotlight

Cavin-Morris Spotlight

Cavin-Morris Gallery
02/25/2020

Cavin-Morris Gallery

Installation shots of Izabella Ortiz and Kevin Sampson at Cavin-Morris Gallery!!!!!!

Cavin-Morris Spotlight
01/19/2020

Cavin-Morris Spotlight

Painting the Japanese Blues: Introducing Issei Nishimura(January 9 - February 15, 2020)Issei Nishimura has a number of o...
01/09/2020

Painting the Japanese Blues: Introducing Issei Nishimura
(January 9 - February 15, 2020)

Issei Nishimura has a number of obsessions but these three are the most important: the blues, his cats, and making drawings and paintings. Obsession might be too mild a word for the passion and time this prolific artist puts into artmaking. There is a beautiful chaos in his work that is held together by the consistencies in his wild style including off kilter, sometimes cartoon like, sometimes purely beautiful pictorial associations, and the wild colors that blend in such a way as to create new juxtapositions of tonalities much the way a blues note flattens and bends and extends the possibilities of meaning and emotion in the original note.

Edward Madrid Gómez said in Hyperallergic in (12/09) 2017: “For Nishimura, who was a guitar player before turning to drawing and painting, makes art inspired by and steeped in the blues. If ever that music- so redolent of yearning, loss, soulfulness, and psychic pain- were to find visual expression, here in Nishimura’s art, perhaps most unexpectedly, it has.”

He goes on to say “Nishimura was born in 1978 in Nagoya, Japan. In Nagoya, I also met the artist’s father, Usao, who recalled that, as a child, Issei enjoyed making drawings. Years later, after moving to Tokyo to study music, he began having a hard time fitting into society and started to withdraw. Soon his artmaking assumed a central urgent place in his life, and, before long, he committed his energy full time to producing drawings and paintings. He moved back home to Nagoya, where he resides today, reclusively, in a close-knit family setting. Issei loves and still plays his music, and he enjoys the companionship of his cats, but he rarely ventures out. To date, he has not seen any of the group or solo exhibitions in which his works have been publicly displayed.”

We are proud to present the first American solo exhibition of Issei Nishimura that will include a rich combination of his paintings, drawings and notebooks. We will also feature his work at the 2020 Outsider Art Fair.

For additional information please contact [email protected] or call us at 212-226-3768.

Issei Nishimura, Gothic Lolita, 2013, Acrylic on fabric on plywood,
31.75 x 24 inches, 80.6 x 61 cm, Nis 71

Issei Nishimura, No title (Three-Headed Pterosaur), 2012, Ink on paper,
14 x 15.75 inches, 35.6 x 40 cm, Nis 51

Issei Nishimura, Crow, 2013, Acrylic on fabric on plywood,
31.75 x 39.5 inches, 80.6 x 100.3 cm, Nis 79

The first art Shari and I collected after Haitian was the field of Mexican masks.  We could find it and it was affordabl...
09/02/2019

The first art Shari and I collected after Haitian was the field of Mexican masks. We could find it and it was affordable and it fulfilled so many of our interests in art, ethnography, and art history.; it was shamanic, it had precolumbian and African roots, it often departed from its own canon, the latter of which later informed how we went on with our lives. To this day the masks never stop offering mysteries and surprises.

The masks we liked were either one of a kind or had deep Native-American or African-American nuances. We devoured everything we could read and saw everything we could on Pre-Columbian and Native American Art. We built a huge library of indigenous art of ALL cultures. We loved Spanish Colonial art though by the time we had any means to purchase it the prices were way beyond us. But we studied the Santeros and the religious furniture nevertheless. We spent our summers in Santa Fe when it was a mecca for primal arts. Unfortunately at that time Mexican masks were so overrun with tourist copies that it slowed down the appetites of tribal art collectors. This was actually fine by us as we were on a learning curve. Because we read so much and looked at so much Central American and South American art we knew the aesthetic languages of these masks and as we gathered experience in studying, handling and visiting other tribal arts we always felt that the copies in Mexico were very easy to discern. We also visited museums in Mexico to see their collections right up to this day.

We never saw these danced masks as contemporary folk art. They helped us to form our vision of showing and collecting art that sang the deep songs of human myth and memory. We saw them as gatekeepers of culture. The key was in the use. The use invested them with their cultural power. The danced masks and masks made for their original purposes were more than folk craft because they had spiritual investment in their performances. There was an intentionality of vision and ritual that still renders them timeless.

MASCARAS: The Other Faces of Mexico Opens september 5th at Cavin-Morris Gallery

Cavin-Morris Gallery
03/14/2019

Cavin-Morris Gallery

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE!!!

BODY LINES
(March 21 - April 20, 2019)



Guest curators Caroline Casey and Sophie Friedman-Pappas have combined forces to create an exhibition formed from the Cavin-Morris Gallery roster of artists:

Body Lines is a group exhibition featuring an international selection of artists, each with a transformative vision of the human body and spirit. The long history of drawing the figure has created an inextricable link between line and the body, a practice which continues to reflect our ever evolving relationship with the human form and consciousness. The drawings in the exhibition use line to push beyond representational depictions of physicality into the realm of abstract notions of presence and spirit.

The exhibition will include the work of Dwight Mackintosh from Creative Growth, whose loose, repetitive lines result in x-ray like visions, as if to show the interior structures of the human form. Also from Creative Growth, the prolific artist Donald Mitchell uses obsessive crosshatching to reveal faces and figures within the surface of the page. Caroline Demangel also works in the practice of uncovering the intangible with her dynamic and energetic lines. She once described her work as “the hatching of something buried I am still exploring.”

The intricate and anatomical work of Luboš Plný speaks to the relationship between the internal and the external, his annotations ask us to think about the micro worlds churning inside all of us. Plný was diagnosed with schizophrenia simplex, a non-hallucinatory manifestation of the disease, and processes his condition by creating complex and layered images of the body.

Working to explore the depths of the spirit is Japanese artist M’onma who is guided by an ‘entity’ to create elaborate drawings that result in a woven, tapestry-like vision. He outlines intersecting swatches of space and color to form a tooth, fingernail or an eye, and ultimately carves out a world on paper. Belgian artist Solange Knopf also taps into the psyche to transmute archetypes and transmit dreamscapes of the soul. Additionally, Indonesian artist Angkasapura’s ferocious marks create an esoteric gravity within his heavy figures and their habitats. It is the varying density he gives each appendage and the intense detail that gives the viewer a clue into the force that moves him.

The exhibition will also include pieces by Miguel Ramon Morales Diaz and Ilya Natarevich who transform the ostensibly mundane to communicate a rich interior vision. The work of self-taught masters Bill Traylor and Martin Ramirez will be included in the exhibition. Both artists use seemingly simplistic, flattened representations of the human form with recurring motifs to explore a vivid yet complex world.

Each artist harnesses the quality of line to convey the ever evolving vision of the body in relation to the external world. The selection for the exhibition explores the continuous dialogue between inward and outward selfhood.

For additional information please contact [email protected] or call us at 212-226-3768.

PRIMORDIAL HEART: NEW WORKS BY CHRISTINE SEFOLOSHAFebruary 14 - March 16, 2019 Christine Sefolosha is an oneiric or drea...
02/12/2019

PRIMORDIAL HEART: NEW WORKS BY CHRISTINE SEFOLOSHA
February 14 - March 16, 2019

Christine Sefolosha is an oneiric or dream traveler. There are some artists whose work drifts like a dark voluptuous flower over the unseeing ant-like hordes of the art mainstream. It ravels and unravels histories. It moves even as it seems to be stationary on board, canvas, or paper. This art in a way, is about travel. We look to the distant horizon or up higher in the skies and see shivering roiling concentrations of energies: birds, clouds of dust, storms, insects, demons, angels, all indistinct in the chiaroscuro seconds before attaining form and disappearing in darkness. The unknown appears as a swarm of ectoplasm with an inner intelligence all its own. It is the open and aware traveler who sees it - not the tourist - the traveler.

“Whereas the tourist generally hurries back home at the end of a few weeks or months, the traveler belonging no more to one place than to the next moves slowly over periods of years, from one part of the earth to another. Indeed, he would have found it difficult to tell, among the many places he had lived, precisely where it was he had felt most at home.” Paul Bowles, The Sheltering Sky.

Christine Sefolosha is just such a traveler. She raises new challenges constantly. She asks that we open ourselves to the intentional freedom of the observations of a consummate artist whose psyche is in constant flux, who is at home everywhere and nowhere in the world, in the art world, on the precarious contemporary world, who, in Kurt Vonnegut’s immaculate phrase, has become “unstuck in time” like Billy Pilgrim in the novel Slaughterhouse Five.

We see Sefolosha as an often out-of-body expatriate. A visual wanderer. She is not a shaman. She is an artist. She is an animist. Animism is the imbuing of life and internal forces to non-human objects and entities. Sefolosha and other visionary artists translate animistic tendencies and impulses into idiosyncratic visual languages.

Cavin-Morris Gallery is pleased and privileged to present an exhibition of works on paper by an artist we have watched and loved for almost twenty years. She is unique. She is powerful. And she is generous in allowing us, through these drawings, to dream and travel with her.

For additional information please contact [email protected] or call us at 212-226-3768

PRIMORDIAL HEART: NEW WORKS BY CHRISTINE SEFOLOSHA
February 14 - March 16, 2019

Christine Sefolosha is an oneiric or dream traveler. There are some artists whose work drifts like a dark voluptuous flower over the unseeing ant-like hordes of the art mainstream. It ravels and unravels histories. It moves even as it seems to be stationary on board, canvas, or paper. This art in a way, is about travel. We look to the distant horizon or up higher in the skies and see shivering roiling concentrations of energies: birds, clouds of dust, storms, insects, demons, angels, all indistinct in the chiaroscuro seconds before attaining form and disappearing in darkness. The unknown appears as a swarm of ectoplasm with an inner intelligence all its own. It is the open and aware traveler who sees it - not the tourist - the traveler.

“Whereas the tourist generally hurries back home at the end of a few weeks or months, the traveler belonging no more to one place than to the next moves slowly over periods of years, from one part of the earth to another. Indeed, he would have found it difficult to tell, among the many places he had lived, precisely where it was he had felt most at home.” Paul Bowles, The Sheltering Sky.

Christine Sefolosha is just such a traveler. She raises new challenges constantly. She asks that we open ourselves to the intentional freedom of the observations of a consummate artist whose psyche is in constant flux, who is at home everywhere and nowhere in the world, in the art world, on the precarious contemporary world, who, in Kurt Vonnegut’s immaculate phrase, has become “unstuck in time” like Billy Pilgrim in the novel Slaughterhouse Five.

We see Sefolosha as an often out-of-body expatriate. A visual wanderer. She is not a shaman. She is an artist. She is an animist. Animism is the imbuing of life and internal forces to non-human objects and entities. Sefolosha and other visionary artists translate animistic tendencies and impulses into idiosyncratic visual languages.

Cavin-Morris Gallery is pleased and privileged to present an exhibition of works on paper by an artist we have watched and loved for almost twenty years. She is unique. She is powerful. And she is generous in allowing us, through these drawings, to dream and travel with her.

For additional information please contact [email protected] or call us at 212-226-3768

Cavin-Morris Gallery
09/16/2018

Cavin-Morris Gallery

For Immediate Release

EAGLE CROSSED THE SUN: VISIONARY WORKS BY J.B. MURRAY

(September 13 - November 3, 2018)

J.B. (John Bunion) Murray was born in 1908 in Glascock County, Georgia. In the history of African American non-mainstream artists Murray falls into the second generation, born after the 19th century and before 1950.

His important graphic abstractions come from a unique place in the annals of this art. His generation dealt with a harsh variation of survival for black Americans in the South. Many of the problems of that time, like Jim Crow laws that were not struck from the books until 1965, continued into the present despite institutional and popular denial. It was an era of poverty and racism exacerbated by the disillusionment of black Americans who fought as victorious heroes in the World Wars only to return to the same ugly visage of the Jim Crow years as when they left.

The church attended by black Americans at that time was not the same as the white church. Black Pentecostalists were possessed by the Holy Spirit and moved in ways closer to the Old Religion than to the mainstream church. The banning of drums in the 19th century had moved rhythms into the body itself as manifested in the ring shouts, expressed by clapping, tambourines, cymbals, guitars and the rhythmic breaking up of language.

J.B. Murray was always spiritual. He was a church-going Pentecostalist who ultimately became more and more involved in a cosmic battle between good and evil. He believed some people were saved and some were not, and the battle to save those who were tormented by evil became the subject of his Spirit-inspired drawings.

His beliefs were too radical even for the local parishioners. He was asked to leave his community church. Soon after he was institutionalized because of his fervid praying and blessing, but was released within a short period of time having been diagnosed not insane. Now validated, he was allowed back in church again, even delivering a sermon or two. Illiterate, he handed out scraps of paper covered in his spirit writing given to him by an ecstatic experience that changed his life forever. In the late 1970’s he received this vision in his garden while hosing his plants, in a flood of buttery yellow and rainbow light refracted by the waters that coated the world around him and covered his skin in gold. He looked up and saw a visionary eagle cross the hot yellow sun. Clearly the intensity of these colors was an integral part of his vision and subsequent art making.

Events led to his being given access to better artistic materials than he could find previously. He developed a unique style in which, through color and line, he drew the intense language given to him by the Spirit, which he read by looking through a bottle of well water. On paper and board he fought the battle for the Soul of Man. He drew with both hands. His process was not only the mechanical act of drawing, he fought for the salvation of souls with each mark . The drawings are living records of this visionary struggle. The natural abstraction comes from Murray’s burning need to communicate a moral standing in his own cohesive language. Murray died in 1988.

Cavin-Morris Spotlight's cover photo
04/24/2018

Cavin-Morris Spotlight's cover photo

Cavin-Morris Spotlight
10/30/2017

Cavin-Morris Spotlight

http://randallmorris.blogspot.com/2017/10/martin-ramirez-lecture-presented-at.htmlGreetings!I offer this presentation as...
10/30/2017

http://randallmorris.blogspot.com/2017/10/martin-ramirez-lecture-presented-at.html

Greetings!
I offer this presentation as a libation to a great and important artist of the Western Hemisphere. I place words as a 'comida del alma' on his grave in respectful awe of what he was able to do and in appreciation of how our perception of his fate changed over time and place. '
On the Day of the Dead what we give is as much about being alive and surviving as it is about the pathways after life. In Martin Ramirez' work we have been given all kinds of paths to follow. I celebrate also the genius and courage of work like Ramirez’ in appreciative recognition of that fact that to get to our walls the work of an artist passes through a process unlike any we can imagine; that it stems from the compression of need and genius in consummate spasms of outrageous creativity and it expands the big culture itself. This art straddles many worlds. The art you see is the end result of extremely complex process. We suffer from not being there the day the art was pulled and shaped from the ethers but that magical engagement; that tremendous feat of health, strength and life was poured into the work by an artist for reasons rarely if ever consistent with the demands of the academy.

Continued at link below:

http://randallmorris.blogspot.com/2017/10/martin-ramirez-lecture-presented-at.html

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