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Today's verdict in Minnesota is a reminder of the emotional pain of the last year, which has helped to reshape our colle...
04/20/2021

Today's verdict in Minnesota is a reminder of the emotional pain of the last year, which has helped to reshape our collective understanding of systemic racism in America. We can no longer ignore that Black Americans continue to be denied their full human right to live in a just and equal society. There is still work to be done. We must continue to say George Floyd's name and the names of all of the victims of police violence, and never forget the importance of this moment in the fight for dignity and civil rights.

#BlackLivesMatter #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd

Today's verdict in Minnesota is a reminder of the emotional pain of the last year, which has helped to reshape our collective understanding of systemic racism in America. We can no longer ignore that Black Americans continue to be denied their full human right to live in a just and equal society. There is still work to be done. We must continue to say George Floyd's name and the names of all of the victims of police violence, and never forget the importance of this moment in the fight for dignity and civil rights.

#BlackLivesMatter #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd

The Warsaw ghetto uprising began on this date, April 19, 1943, when German troops and police entered the ghetto to depor...
04/19/2021

The Warsaw ghetto uprising began on this date, April 19, 1943, when German troops and police entered the ghetto to deport its surviving inhabitants. Though this was the largest civilian resistance led by Jews during World War II, by May 16, 1943, the Germans had stopped the uprising, leaving the ghetto in ruins. Survivors were deported to concentration camps or killing centers.

Before World War II, Warsaw was home to more than 350,000 Jews. The city's Jewish population was second in size only to New York City. In January 1945, only about 11,500 Jewish survivors remained.

🎨: Michael David, “Warsaw,” 1980, Jewish Museum Collection

The Warsaw ghetto uprising began on this date, April 19, 1943, when German troops and police entered the ghetto to deport its surviving inhabitants. Though this was the largest civilian resistance led by Jews during World War II, by May 16, 1943, the Germans had stopped the uprising, leaving the ghetto in ruins. Survivors were deported to concentration camps or killing centers.

Before World War II, Warsaw was home to more than 350,000 Jews. The city's Jewish population was second in size only to New York City. In January 1945, only about 11,500 Jewish survivors remained.

🎨: Michael David, “Warsaw,” 1980, Jewish Museum Collection

Happy birthday to Joan Snyder, born on this day in 1940. Snyder gained early recognition with her “stroke paintings” whi...
04/16/2021

Happy birthday to Joan Snyder, born on this day in 1940.

Snyder gained early recognition with her “stroke paintings” which she made between 1969 and 1973. These works relied on the repeated gesture of a paint-laden brush applied over a grid penciled on the canvas. Snyder has said that the strokes are about paint itself—paint moving across the canvas; paint as medium for feelings, sensations, or sounds; paint suggesting a storyline.

She painted this work, “Hard Sweetness,” in 1971, the same year she launched the women's exhibition series at Douglass College, Rutgers University. Like many other abstract artists, Snyder later used text and mixed media in painting to create works with more overt feminist subjects. A retrospective of her paintings was shown at The Jewish Museum in 2005.

🎨: Joan Snyder, “Hard Sweetness,” 1971, Jewish Museum Collection

Happy birthday to Joan Snyder, born on this day in 1940.

Snyder gained early recognition with her “stroke paintings” which she made between 1969 and 1973. These works relied on the repeated gesture of a paint-laden brush applied over a grid penciled on the canvas. Snyder has said that the strokes are about paint itself—paint moving across the canvas; paint as medium for feelings, sensations, or sounds; paint suggesting a storyline.

She painted this work, “Hard Sweetness,” in 1971, the same year she launched the women's exhibition series at Douglass College, Rutgers University. Like many other abstract artists, Snyder later used text and mixed media in painting to create works with more overt feminist subjects. A retrospective of her paintings was shown at The Jewish Museum in 2005.

🎨: Joan Snyder, “Hard Sweetness,” 1971, Jewish Museum Collection

Can’t seem to get dressed this morning? That’s ok - it’s National Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day! Ease into Friday with t...
04/16/2021

Can’t seem to get dressed this morning? That’s ok - it’s National Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day! Ease into Friday with this work by Maira Kalman from the Jewish Museum Collection.

#NationalWearYourPajamastoWorkDay

🎨: Maira Kalman, “Israel Bed,” 2008

Can’t seem to get dressed this morning? That’s ok - it’s National Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day! Ease into Friday with this work by Maira Kalman from the Jewish Museum Collection.

#NationalWearYourPajamastoWorkDay

🎨: Maira Kalman, “Israel Bed,” 2008

Join Columbia University Visual Arts MFA candidates and recent alumni for “In Response: We Fight to Build a Free World,”...
04/15/2021
Performance - In Response: We Fight to Build a Free World

Join Columbia University Visual Arts MFA candidates and recent alumni for “In Response: We Fight to Build a Free World,” a live virtual program this Sunday 4/18 at 4PM (EDT) with new video, sound, and performance work presented in response to “We Fight to Build a Free World: An Exhibition by Jonathan Horowitz.” RSVP for the Zoom info: https://thejm.net/3diPJvB

Participating artists: Aika Akhmetova, Lindsey Brittain Collins, Baris Gokturk, Juan Hernández Díaz, Yifan Jiang, Joseph Liatela, Kate Liebman, Paula Lycan, Cara Lynch, Farah Mohammad, Yi Sa-Ra.

Co-presented with Columbia University School of the Arts and part of the Carnegie Hall 'Voices of Hope Festival’

Columbia University Visual Arts MFA candidates and recent alumni present new video, sound, and performance work during this live program, in response to We Fight to Build a Free World: An Exhibition by Jonathan Horowitz.

In the twelfth century fanciful pitchers in animal and human form came into use for hand washing rituals in European chu...
04/14/2021

In the twelfth century fanciful pitchers in animal and human form came into use for hand washing rituals in European churches and synagogues, and for home use. This vessel in the form of a lion bears a Hebrew inscription, probably added several centuries later: “This is a donation of the honored Berekhiah Segal." With these simple words, the ewer takes its place among those rare Jewish ceremonial works that have survived from the Middle Ages. The name Segal is an abbreviation for “Levitical assistant,” identifying the donor as a descendant of the family of Levi, responsible for aiding priests. The vessel likely was used during the synagogue service, when Levites washed the hands of the descendants of ancient priests before they recited the priestly blessing.

🎨: Aquamanile (Handwashing Vessel), Northern Germany, late 12th century with later inscription, copper alloy: cast and engraved, Jewish Museum Collection

In the twelfth century fanciful pitchers in animal and human form came into use for hand washing rituals in European churches and synagogues, and for home use. This vessel in the form of a lion bears a Hebrew inscription, probably added several centuries later: “This is a donation of the honored Berekhiah Segal." With these simple words, the ewer takes its place among those rare Jewish ceremonial works that have survived from the Middle Ages. The name Segal is an abbreviation for “Levitical assistant,” identifying the donor as a descendant of the family of Levi, responsible for aiding priests. The vessel likely was used during the synagogue service, when Levites washed the hands of the descendants of ancient priests before they recited the priestly blessing.

🎨: Aquamanile (Handwashing Vessel), Northern Germany, late 12th century with later inscription, copper alloy: cast and engraved, Jewish Museum Collection

Saul Leiter was an American artist and early pioneer of color photography. He began shooting color film in 1948 but it w...
04/13/2021

Saul Leiter was an American artist and early pioneer of color photography. He began shooting color film in 1948 but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that his work gained visibility when his color fashion photography was published in “Harper’s Bazaar.”

This photo, currently on view in “Modern Look: Photography and the American Magazine,” was published in the February 1959 issue of Harper's Bazaar. Learn more about the exhibition: https://thejm.net/3sgQXvL

🎨: Saul Leiter, Untitled, 1959, printed 2007. Published in “Harper’s Bazaar,” February 1959. Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery

Saul Leiter was an American artist and early pioneer of color photography. He began shooting color film in 1948 but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that his work gained visibility when his color fashion photography was published in “Harper’s Bazaar.”

This photo, currently on view in “Modern Look: Photography and the American Magazine,” was published in the February 1959 issue of Harper's Bazaar. Learn more about the exhibition: https://thejm.net/3sgQXvL

🎨: Saul Leiter, Untitled, 1959, printed 2007. Published in “Harper’s Bazaar,” February 1959. Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery

Happy #NationalPetDay! We're celebrating with this portrait of visionary American art dealer Edith Halpert and her belov...
04/11/2021

Happy #NationalPetDay! We're celebrating with this portrait of visionary American art dealer Edith Halpert and her beloved pet dog Adam.

Read how Adam proved unexpectedly useful to Halpert in her commercial dealings, and find out who Halpert said this to: “You see, even my dog can’t stand your bargaining.” https://thejm.net/3wNWDAH

🎨: Bernard Karfiol, “Edith Gregor Halpert and Adam," 1935. Jewish Museum Collection

Happy #NationalPetDay! We're celebrating with this portrait of visionary American art dealer Edith Halpert and her beloved pet dog Adam.

Read how Adam proved unexpectedly useful to Halpert in her commercial dealings, and find out who Halpert said this to: “You see, even my dog can’t stand your bargaining.” https://thejm.net/3wNWDAH

🎨: Bernard Karfiol, “Edith Gregor Halpert and Adam," 1935. Jewish Museum Collection

On April 9, 1940, the Germans invaded Denmark, marking an occupation that was met by Danish resistance, resilience, and ...
04/09/2021

On April 9, 1940, the Germans invaded Denmark, marking an occupation that was met by Danish resistance, resilience, and courage. Jens Møller, a Danish fisherman and rescuer depicted in this photograph by Judith Glickman Lauder, was one of many Danish citizens who banded together to help thousands of Jews escape by boat to the safety of nearby Sweden in 1943.

Learn more about individual and collective acts of bravery and resistance during the Holocaust in the Jewish Museum's virtual tours for schools. Elementary school students reading Lois Lowry’s book “Number the Stars,” which is set in occupied Denmark during WWII, focus on concepts of bravery and hope through an age-appropriate exploration of the themes addressed in the book. Students in middle and high school discuss, interpret, and establish connections between the events of World War II and works of art and artifacts related to the Holocaust. Learn more about our virtual tours for schools: https://thejm.net/39X8vqw

🎨: Judy Glickman Lauder, “Jens Møller, Fisherman, Rescuer,” 1992. Jewish Museum Collection

On April 9, 1940, the Germans invaded Denmark, marking an occupation that was met by Danish resistance, resilience, and courage. Jens Møller, a Danish fisherman and rescuer depicted in this photograph by Judith Glickman Lauder, was one of many Danish citizens who banded together to help thousands of Jews escape by boat to the safety of nearby Sweden in 1943.

Learn more about individual and collective acts of bravery and resistance during the Holocaust in the Jewish Museum's virtual tours for schools. Elementary school students reading Lois Lowry’s book “Number the Stars,” which is set in occupied Denmark during WWII, focus on concepts of bravery and hope through an age-appropriate exploration of the themes addressed in the book. Students in middle and high school discuss, interpret, and establish connections between the events of World War II and works of art and artifacts related to the Holocaust. Learn more about our virtual tours for schools: https://thejm.net/39X8vqw

🎨: Judy Glickman Lauder, “Jens Møller, Fisherman, Rescuer,” 1992. Jewish Museum Collection

Teachers, librarians, and school staff are invited to explore the work of renowned children’s book author and illustrato...
04/08/2021

Teachers, librarians, and school staff are invited to explore the work of renowned children’s book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak on April 13 at 5pm EST. Arthur Yorinks, award-winning author and director, will speak about his collaborations with Sendak, including "Presto and Zesto in Limboland," published after Sendak’s death. Yorinks will also discuss how Sendak inspired his own work. Following the presentation, a Jewish Museum educator will facilitate activities and a discussion of Sendak’s illustrations.The program fee is $10. Participants may receive 1.5 CTLE hours. Register by April 12. Book online: https://thejm.net/3wACDl8

Teachers, librarians, and school staff are invited to explore the work of renowned children’s book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak on April 13 at 5pm EST. Arthur Yorinks, award-winning author and director, will speak about his collaborations with Sendak, including "Presto and Zesto in Limboland," published after Sendak’s death. Yorinks will also discuss how Sendak inspired his own work. Following the presentation, a Jewish Museum educator will facilitate activities and a discussion of Sendak’s illustrations.The program fee is $10. Participants may receive 1.5 CTLE hours. Register by April 12. Book online: https://thejm.net/3wACDl8

Tonight at sundown begins Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. It commemorates the approximately six million Jews who...
04/07/2021

Tonight at sundown begins Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. It commemorates the approximately six million Jews who perished as a result of the actions carried out by N**i Germany and its collaborators.

This brass heart pendant was made by Manfred (Fredi) Ehrlich, a teenage prisoner at the camp ghetto of Theresienstadt, as a gift to his mother. The pendant is inscribed “Fredi” on one side and “Muttertag Terezín 9.V.1943” (Mother’s Day, May 9, 1943) on the other. Ehrlich was deported from Vienna to Theresienstadt on October 2, 1942, and on September 28, 1944, was sent to Auschwitz, where he was killed. He was 17 years old. His mother survived.

🎨: Manfred Ehrlich, Pendant, 1943 (date of inscription), made in Theresienstadt (Terezín), Czechoslovakia (Czech Republic). Gift of the Family of M. Ehrlich, Jewish Museum Collection

Join Jewish Museum curator Claudia J. Nahson on April 8, Holocaust Remembrance Day, for a focused look at a bracelet tha...
04/06/2021

Join Jewish Museum curator Claudia J. Nahson on April 8, Holocaust Remembrance Day, for a focused look at a bracelet that was created during World War II by Greta Perlman (1904-1975) while she was a prisoner in Theresienstadt, a camp ghetto in what is now the Czech Republic. Over 140,000 Jews were deported there by the N**is, including many artists and writers who struggled to maintain a vibrant cultural life. Despite horrific conditions, Perlman was able to gather the 20 charms and badges assembled into her bracelet, each steeped in personal memories. Intimate creations such as the bracelet gave some meaning to the lives of inmates in the ghetto.

This program will be presented live in collaboration with 92nd Street Y on Thursday, April 8 from 10:30-11:45 am ET. Click here to purchase tickets: https://thejm.net/3dCl8IC

Join Jewish Museum curator Claudia J. Nahson on April 8, Holocaust Remembrance Day, for a focused look at a bracelet that was created during World War II by Greta Perlman (1904-1975) while she was a prisoner in Theresienstadt, a camp ghetto in what is now the Czech Republic. Over 140,000 Jews were deported there by the N**is, including many artists and writers who struggled to maintain a vibrant cultural life. Despite horrific conditions, Perlman was able to gather the 20 charms and badges assembled into her bracelet, each steeped in personal memories. Intimate creations such as the bracelet gave some meaning to the lives of inmates in the ghetto.

This program will be presented live in collaboration with 92nd Street Y on Thursday, April 8 from 10:30-11:45 am ET. Click here to purchase tickets: https://thejm.net/3dCl8IC

This Jewish calendar was created in 1943-44 by Arthur Berlinger, one of the many Jewish artists the N**is deported to th...
04/05/2021

This Jewish calendar was created in 1943-44 by Arthur Berlinger, one of the many Jewish artists the N**is deported to the Theresienstadt camp-ghetto. Despite horrific conditions, many prisoners tried to keep their faith in secret. Decorated with the #zodiac on its cover, the calendar also includes two full-page illustrations. One of them shows a man praying at a synagogue with walls that are decorated with stars—a depiction of the hidden prayer room at Theresienstadt, whose interior Berlinger painted.

This work is currently on view in the exhibition “Signs and Symbols: The Zodiac.” Click here to learn more: https://thejm.net/2Q1VZ1y

🎨: Arthur (Asher) Berlinger, Jewish Calendar for the Year 5704, made in Theresienstadt (Terezín), Czechoslovakia (Czech Republic), 1943-44, Jewish Museum collection.

Opening tomorrow, “Modern Look: Photography and the American Magazine” highlights a time when avant-garde techniques in ...
04/02/2021

Opening tomorrow, “Modern Look: Photography and the American Magazine” highlights a time when avant-garde techniques in photography and design reached the United States via European émigrés, including Bauhaus artists forced out of N**i Germany. Whether in the service of advertising or fashion, image-making began to blossom as the relationship between photography and text grew more nuanced. As the standard of photojournalism rose, so did the power of the photograph.

Plan a safe and enjoyable visit—reserve timed ticket: https://thejm.net/3cJhL3e

🎨: Erwin Blumenfeld. “Voilettes de Montezin,” 1938. Published in “Le Point de Vue de Vogue,” Vogue (Paris), 1938. Gelatin silver print. Private collection. Image provided by Christie's Images / Bridgeman Images; © Estate of Erwin Blumenfeld

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SUBWAY: Take the 4, 5, or 6 to 86th Street, or the 6 train to 96th St and Lexington Ave. BUS: Take the M1, M2, M3, or M4 to 92nd Street. Or take the M86 or M96 crosstown to 5th Ave.

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Monday 11:00 - 16:00
Thursday 11:00 - 20:00
Friday 11:00 - 16:00
Saturday 11:00 - 16:00
Sunday 11:00 - 16:00

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An art museum on New York City’s Museum Mile exploring Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds.

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