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Tomorrow night at sundown, the Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot begins. The week is filled with celebration and observa...
09/19/2021

Tomorrow night at sundown, the Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot begins. The week is filled with celebration and observance, usually taking place within a sukkah—a small temporary outdoor structure.

Allan Wexler thoughtfully reinvents a sukkah in this piece from 1991. With its table and chairs sitting in live grass, “Indoor Sukkah” brings the outdoors inside and underscores ancient Judaism’s agricultural origins.

🎨: Allan Wexler, “Indoor Sukkah,” 1991. Mixed media installation. #JewishMuseumCollection

Tomorrow night at sundown, the Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot begins. The week is filled with celebration and observance, usually taking place within a sukkah—a small temporary outdoor structure.

Allan Wexler thoughtfully reinvents a sukkah in this piece from 1991. With its table and chairs sitting in live grass, “Indoor Sukkah” brings the outdoors inside and underscores ancient Judaism’s agricultural origins.

🎨: Allan Wexler, “Indoor Sukkah,” 1991. Mixed media installation. #JewishMuseumCollection

This painting by Marc Chagall, which depicts figures exchanging food and sweets in celebration of Purim, is a study for ...
09/17/2021

This painting by Marc Chagall, which depicts figures exchanging food and sweets in celebration of Purim, is a study for an unrealized mural commissioned from the artist by the Jewish Society for the Promotion of the Arts in St. Petersburg, Russia. The work’s folkloric imagery and vivid colors draw from Chagall’s memories of his childhood in a Jewish enclave in the Russian Empire — a theme that informs much of his work.

The painting was acquired by the Museum Folkwang in Germany in 1928. In 1937 it was confiscated by the N***s as part of a purge of German public museums to remove so-called “degenerate” art — modern or experimental art or art made by Jews. It was then sold by a N**i dealer authorized to trade in “degenerate” art on the international market, a stratagem of the Germans to raise funds for their war effort. It entered the collection of Kurt Feldhäusser, a Berlin collector and N**i Party member. After Feldhäusser was killed in an Allied bombing raid in 1945, the work traveled with his mother to Brooklyn and was later sold.

See it in “Afterlives: Recovering the Lost Stories of Looted Art,” on view through January 9, 2022. Learn more: https://thejm.net/3nDGzzz

🎨: Marc Chagall, “Purim,” 1916 or 1917. Oil on canvas Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Louis E. Stern Collection, 1963. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

This painting by Marc Chagall, which depicts figures exchanging food and sweets in celebration of Purim, is a study for an unrealized mural commissioned from the artist by the Jewish Society for the Promotion of the Arts in St. Petersburg, Russia. The work’s folkloric imagery and vivid colors draw from Chagall’s memories of his childhood in a Jewish enclave in the Russian Empire — a theme that informs much of his work.

The painting was acquired by the Museum Folkwang in Germany in 1928. In 1937 it was confiscated by the N***s as part of a purge of German public museums to remove so-called “degenerate” art — modern or experimental art or art made by Jews. It was then sold by a N**i dealer authorized to trade in “degenerate” art on the international market, a stratagem of the Germans to raise funds for their war effort. It entered the collection of Kurt Feldhäusser, a Berlin collector and N**i Party member. After Feldhäusser was killed in an Allied bombing raid in 1945, the work traveled with his mother to Brooklyn and was later sold.

See it in “Afterlives: Recovering the Lost Stories of Looted Art,” on view through January 9, 2022. Learn more: https://thejm.net/3nDGzzz

🎨: Marc Chagall, “Purim,” 1916 or 1917. Oil on canvas Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Louis E. Stern Collection, 1963. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, begins at sundown on Wednesday, September 15. The holiest day of the year in th...
09/14/2021

Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, begins at sundown on Wednesday, September 15. The holiest day of the year in the Jewish calendar, it marks the end of the Days of Awe, a ten-day cycle during the High Holidays that begins with Rosh Hashanah. The holiday is observed with a day of fasting and prayer as penance for past sins.

The Jewish Museum will be closed on Thursday, September 16, in observance of the holiday.

🎨: Edouard Brandon, “Silent Prayer, Synagogue of Amsterdam, "The Amidah,"” 1897. Oil on panel. Jewish Museum Collection

Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, begins at sundown on Wednesday, September 15. The holiest day of the year in the Jewish calendar, it marks the end of the Days of Awe, a ten-day cycle during the High Holidays that begins with Rosh Hashanah. The holiday is observed with a day of fasting and prayer as penance for past sins.

The Jewish Museum will be closed on Thursday, September 16, in observance of the holiday.

🎨: Edouard Brandon, “Silent Prayer, Synagogue of Amsterdam, "The Amidah,"” 1897. Oil on panel. Jewish Museum Collection

Today is your last day to see “Louise Bourgeois, Freud’s Daughter!” Hear curator Philip Larratt-Smith discuss select wor...
09/12/2021

Today is your last day to see “Louise Bourgeois, Freud’s Daughter!”

Hear curator Philip Larratt-Smith discuss select works in the exhibition: https://thejm.net/3lnzIro

🎨: Installation view of “Louise Bourgeois: Freud’s Daughter,” The Jewish Museum, NY, May 21-September 12, 2021. © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photo by Ron Amstutz.

Today is your last day to see “Louise Bourgeois, Freud’s Daughter!”

Hear curator Philip Larratt-Smith discuss select works in the exhibition: https://thejm.net/3lnzIro

🎨: Installation view of “Louise Bourgeois: Freud’s Daughter,” The Jewish Museum, NY, May 21-September 12, 2021. © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photo by Ron Amstutz.

In Jewish tradition, a memorial candle is lit on the anniversary of a person’s death to commemorate the loss of a loved ...
09/10/2021

In Jewish tradition, a memorial candle is lit on the anniversary of a person’s death to commemorate the loss of a loved one.

The anniversary of one’s death is called yahrtzeit in Yiddish, meaning “time of year.” Many Sephardic Jews use the Hebrew term nachala or “legacy,” while others use the Ladino word melado. Some Persian Jews use the term saal, simply meaning “year.”

Whatever your tradition, we mark this time to honor the lives lost on September 11, 2001. May their memory be for a blessing.

#NeverForget911

Pictured: Bert Frijns, Memorial Light, 1987. Glass.

In Jewish tradition, a memorial candle is lit on the anniversary of a person’s death to commemorate the loss of a loved one.

The anniversary of one’s death is called yahrtzeit in Yiddish, meaning “time of year.” Many Sephardic Jews use the Hebrew term nachala or “legacy,” while others use the Ladino word melado. Some Persian Jews use the term saal, simply meaning “year.”

Whatever your tradition, we mark this time to honor the lives lost on September 11, 2001. May their memory be for a blessing.

#NeverForget911

Pictured: Bert Frijns, Memorial Light, 1987. Glass.

“Louise Bourgeois, Freud’s Daughter” closes this Sunday, September 12. Perhaps more than any other artist of the twentie...
09/09/2021

“Louise Bourgeois, Freud’s Daughter” closes this Sunday, September 12.

Perhaps more than any other artist of the twentieth century, Louise Bourgeois produced a body of work that consistently and profoundly engaged with psychoanalytic theory and practice as established by Sigmund Freud. Bourgeois considered the act of artmaking a form of psychoanalysis, believing that through it she had direct access to the unconscious.

The exhibition features artworks from throughout Bourgeois’s career, including the pivotal installation “The Destruction of the Father” (1974) and “Passage Dangereux” (1997). The works are contextualized with a focused selection of Bourgeois’s original writings—many of them presented to the public for the first time—to illuminate her art in light of her complex and ambivalent relationship with Freudian psychoanalysis.

Reserve your timed ticket: https://thejm.net/3tsy3UN

🎨: Installation view of “Louise Bourgeois: Freud’s Daughter,” The Jewish Museum, NY, May 21-September 12, 2021. © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photo by Ron Amstutz. © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

“Louise Bourgeois, Freud’s Daughter” closes this Sunday, September 12.

Perhaps more than any other artist of the twentieth century, Louise Bourgeois produced a body of work that consistently and profoundly engaged with psychoanalytic theory and practice as established by Sigmund Freud. Bourgeois considered the act of artmaking a form of psychoanalysis, believing that through it she had direct access to the unconscious.

The exhibition features artworks from throughout Bourgeois’s career, including the pivotal installation “The Destruction of the Father” (1974) and “Passage Dangereux” (1997). The works are contextualized with a focused selection of Bourgeois’s original writings—many of them presented to the public for the first time—to illuminate her art in light of her complex and ambivalent relationship with Freudian psychoanalysis.

Reserve your timed ticket: https://thejm.net/3tsy3UN

🎨: Installation view of “Louise Bourgeois: Freud’s Daughter,” The Jewish Museum, NY, May 21-September 12, 2021. © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photo by Ron Amstutz. © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

From all of us at the Jewish Museum, we wish you a happy, healthy, and safe #RoshHashanah!
09/06/2021

From all of us at the Jewish Museum, we wish you a happy, healthy, and safe #RoshHashanah!

From all of us at the Jewish Museum, we wish you a happy, healthy, and safe #RoshHashanah!

The Torah calls Rosh Hashanah, which begins at sundown on September 6, “Yom Teruah,” which means “the day of sounding th...
09/05/2021

The Torah calls Rosh Hashanah, which begins at sundown on September 6, “Yom Teruah,” which means “the day of sounding the horn.” The horn, or shofar, is sounded on the Jewish New Year as a call to repentance. Shofarot (Hebrew plural for shofar) are made from the horn of rams or other kosher animals. The Jewish Museum has many shofarot in its collection. This example from around the 20th century is probably from India and is made of kudu horn.

“The shofar is not easy to sound. It takes a lot of practice,” says Rabbi Darcie Crystal. “I’ve been told that people who are trained to blow the trumpet are phenomenal at sounding the shofar.” Learn more and hear what a shofar sounds like: https://thejm.net/3BDYw4G

The Torah calls Rosh Hashanah, which begins at sundown on September 6, “Yom Teruah,” which means “the day of sounding the horn.” The horn, or shofar, is sounded on the Jewish New Year as a call to repentance. Shofarot (Hebrew plural for shofar) are made from the horn of rams or other kosher animals. The Jewish Museum has many shofarot in its collection. This example from around the 20th century is probably from India and is made of kudu horn.

“The shofar is not easy to sound. It takes a lot of practice,” says Rabbi Darcie Crystal. “I’ve been told that people who are trained to blow the trumpet are phenomenal at sounding the shofar.” Learn more and hear what a shofar sounds like: https://thejm.net/3BDYw4G

Shanah Tovah! Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, begins on Monday, September 6, at sundown. In this video, explore sele...
09/01/2021
Mixed Media Cards for Rosh Hashanah | Art-Making Video

Shanah Tovah! Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, begins on Monday, September 6, at sundown. In this video, explore selections of Rosh Hashanah greeting cards from the Jewish Museum's collection. You’ll also learn stamping techniques to create your own homemade New Year greeting card! It’s a perfect rainy day project for families and adults!

While many people today may send their loved ones best wishes for Rosh Hashanah via email or text message, not too long ago sending paper New Year greetings was very popular. The tradition in fact goes back centuries. The medieval Rabbi Jacob ben Moses Moellin, known as Maharil, encouraged the writing of special greetings to friends and family for Rosh Hashanah. With the rise of modern manufacturing in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, greeting cards were produced commercially.

https://thejm.net/3jAized

Explore selections from the Jewish Museum's collection and learn stamping techniques to create a homemade New Year greeting card for Rosh Hashanah.

“Landscape” by artist Max Pechstein belonged to the German Jewish banker Hugo Simon, an avid art collector and associate...
08/31/2021

“Landscape” by artist Max Pechstein belonged to the German Jewish banker Hugo Simon, an avid art collector and associate of Bertolt Brecht, Thomas Mann, and Albert Einstein. Simon fled to Paris when the N***s came to power in 1933. In 1938 this painting was shown in the anti-N**i art exhibition in London. As the German army entered France in 1940, Simon escaped to Brazil, leaving his belongings behind. The N***s looted his Paris home, seizing “Landscape.” After the war, the painting was presumed lost until it was discovered in the basement of a French museum in 1966. It entered the temporary custodianship of the Musées Nationaux Récupération, an inventory established by the French government to catalogue works that were stolen or had uncertain provenance. In 2021, eight decades after it was stolen, the painting was restituted to Hugo Simon’s heirs.

This painting is currently on view in the exhibition “Afterlives: Recovering the Lost Stories of Looted Art.” Learn more: https://thejm.net/3t1jcAw

🎨: Max Pechstein, “Landscape,” 1912. Estate of Hugo Simon. © Pechstein Hamburg / Tökendorf / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; image provided by CNAC/MNAM, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, New York. Photo by Philippe Migeat

“Landscape” by artist Max Pechstein belonged to the German Jewish banker Hugo Simon, an avid art collector and associate of Bertolt Brecht, Thomas Mann, and Albert Einstein. Simon fled to Paris when the N***s came to power in 1933. In 1938 this painting was shown in the anti-N**i art exhibition in London. As the German army entered France in 1940, Simon escaped to Brazil, leaving his belongings behind. The N***s looted his Paris home, seizing “Landscape.” After the war, the painting was presumed lost until it was discovered in the basement of a French museum in 1966. It entered the temporary custodianship of the Musées Nationaux Récupération, an inventory established by the French government to catalogue works that were stolen or had uncertain provenance. In 2021, eight decades after it was stolen, the painting was restituted to Hugo Simon’s heirs.

This painting is currently on view in the exhibition “Afterlives: Recovering the Lost Stories of Looted Art.” Learn more: https://thejm.net/3t1jcAw

🎨: Max Pechstein, “Landscape,” 1912. Estate of Hugo Simon. © Pechstein Hamburg / Tökendorf / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; image provided by CNAC/MNAM, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, New York. Photo by Philippe Migeat

Premiering now on YouTube, psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster explores an assortment of Louise Bourgeois’s journal entries, ...
08/26/2021

Premiering now on YouTube, psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster explores an assortment of Louise Bourgeois’s journal entries, dreams, and artistic works to elaborate the texture of the artist’s engagement with psychoanalysis, whose themes move from the body, anxiety, and depression, to feminine sexuality, murderous wishes, and the primal scene. Along the way, we will meet some illustrious characters, not just Freud, but the French Princess, Marie Bonaparte, and her rival, Jacques Lacan. Watch: https://thejm.net/3jkgGCb

📸: Installation view of “Louise Bourgeois: Freud’s Daughter,” The Jewish Museum, NY, May 21-September 12, 2021. © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photo by Ron Amstutz.

Premiering now on YouTube, psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster explores an assortment of Louise Bourgeois’s journal entries, dreams, and artistic works to elaborate the texture of the artist’s engagement with psychoanalysis, whose themes move from the body, anxiety, and depression, to feminine sexuality, murderous wishes, and the primal scene. Along the way, we will meet some illustrious characters, not just Freud, but the French Princess, Marie Bonaparte, and her rival, Jacques Lacan. Watch: https://thejm.net/3jkgGCb

📸: Installation view of “Louise Bourgeois: Freud’s Daughter,” The Jewish Museum, NY, May 21-September 12, 2021. © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photo by Ron Amstutz.

Happy birthday to artist Mel Bochner! One of the most popular paintings in the Jewish Museum’s collection is Bochner’s “...
08/23/2021

Happy birthday to artist Mel Bochner!

One of the most popular paintings in the Jewish Museum’s collection is Bochner’s “The Joys of Yiddish.” The use of words as sources for painting stems from Bochner’s interest in philosophy on the one hand and humor and popular culture on the other.The source for this painting is Leo Rosten’s classic 1968 book of the same name. Visit our website to learn what the words mean: https://thejm.net/3zd6t03!

Which word is your favorite?

🎨: #MelBochner, “The Joys of Yiddish, 2012. #JewishMuseumCollection

Happy birthday to artist Mel Bochner!

One of the most popular paintings in the Jewish Museum’s collection is Bochner’s “The Joys of Yiddish.” The use of words as sources for painting stems from Bochner’s interest in philosophy on the one hand and humor and popular culture on the other.The source for this painting is Leo Rosten’s classic 1968 book of the same name. Visit our website to learn what the words mean: https://thejm.net/3zd6t03!

Which word is your favorite?

🎨: #MelBochner, “The Joys of Yiddish, 2012. #JewishMuseumCollection

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