Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust

Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust The Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust is New York’s contribution to the global responsibility to never forget. The mission of the Museum is to educate people of all ages and backgrounds about the broad tapestry of Jewish life in the 20th and 21st centuries—before, during, and after the Holocaust.
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Multiple perspectives on modern Jewish history, life, and culture are presented in the Museum’s unique Core Exhibition and award-winning special exhibitions. Acclaimed public programs, including discussions, films, plays, and concerts, highlight the richness of Jewish culture and ideas. The Museum is also home to National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene.

Operating as usual

As classes start up again, we wish you and your family a safe, healthy, and engaging school year. Featured here is a fir...
09/14/2020

As classes start up again, we wish you and your family a safe, healthy, and engaging school year. Featured here is a first grade school book belonging to Silvia Lande, with a portrait of King Michael of Romania on the cover and multiplication tables on the back cover.

Gift of Dr. Silvia Lande

We wish you and your family a happy and healthy #GrandparentsDay! Featured here is a studio photo taken before WWI of Na...
09/13/2020

We wish you and your family a happy and healthy #GrandparentsDay! Featured here is a studio photo taken before WWI of Nachman and Rivka Leah Potashnikoff, the paternal grandparents to the donor of this photograph.

Gift of Isabelle Bengis

An excerpt from the September/October 2002 issue of American Alliance of Museums.
09/11/2020

An excerpt from the September/October 2002 issue of American Alliance of Museums.

When the Museum opened to the public on September 11th, 1997, it sat in the shadows of the Twin Towers. To commemorate 1...
09/11/2020

When the Museum opened to the public on September 11th, 1997, it sat in the shadows of the Twin Towers. To commemorate 19 years since September 11th, 2001, we spoke with our building engineer Frank Camporeale, who has been with the Museum since 1996 and began that particular workday like any other: ensuring the building was safe. And then at 8:46 AM, the lights flickered.

Read Frank’s account of this day on our blog:
https://mjhnyc.org/remembering-a-day-like-no-other/

#Honor911 #NeverForget

"By the time I returned to the apartment, my mother had already been mourning my death, because nobody came back from th...
09/11/2020
I Survived the Holocaust. But I Have Nightmares About Cats.

"By the time I returned to the apartment, my mother had already been mourning my death, because nobody came back from those trucks."

Hear more from Celia Kener, a member of the Museum's Speakers Bureau, in The New York Times:

‘The incident in the steeple always stayed with me as the moment I realized I had to be afraid.’

This miniature basket was made in the Magdeburg Labor Camp in Germany, dated 1945. The creator, Genia Blumberg, obtained...
09/10/2020

This miniature basket was made in the Magdeburg Labor Camp in Germany, dated 1945. The creator, Genia Blumberg, obtained wire in a factory and worked on the basket at night. She had begun making wire objects while in the Kaiserwald Concentration Camp, often trading them for extra rations. Following liberation, she married in Belgium and immigrated to the United States in 1956.

Gift of Genia Blumberg Goldberg

"Those Who Were There" is a podcast that comprises the oral histories of over 4,000 Holocaust survivors and witnesses. J...
09/10/2020

"Those Who Were There" is a podcast that comprises the oral histories of over 4,000 Holocaust survivors and witnesses.

Join us today at 2PM for an advanced preview of Season 2 and a behind-the-scenes look at the production process.

Register here:
http://mjhnyc.info/ThoseWhoWereThere

It’s official: the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust has reopened! Thanks to our Members wh...
09/09/2020

It’s official: the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust has reopened! Thanks to our Members who made our first day back a huge success.

You can purchase tickets here:
https://mjhnyc.org/purchase-tickets/

Tomorrow, exactly 180 days after we closed in March to combat COVID-19, the Museum will be open to visitors.Read our ful...
09/08/2020
A Reopening Welcome | Museum of Jewish Heritage

Tomorrow, exactly 180 days after we closed in March to combat COVID-19, the Museum will be open to visitors.

Read our full reopening welcome here:

Tomorrow, exactly 180 days after the Museum closed in March to combat COVID-19, we are reopening the building to visitors.

The shofar used in the Auschwitz concentration camp allowed the High Holidays to be observed against all odds. It made a...
09/07/2020
Celebrate the Jewish High Holy Days, Pandemic-Style

The shofar used in the Auschwitz concentration camp allowed the High Holidays to be observed against all odds. It made another appearance as we prepped for a pandemic-style celebration.

Read more from The New York Times:

Here are ways Jewish congregations around the country are observing Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur this year, from pretaped shofar blasts to webinars on how to make your own altars.

Happy #LaborDay! Pictured here is a union membership dues and working card of Esther Pearlman, issued by the Ladies Wais...
09/07/2020

Happy #LaborDay! Pictured here is a union membership dues and working card of Esther Pearlman, issued by the Ladies Waist and Dressmakers Union.

Gift of Jerome Friedman

Reading has been proven to improve memory and concentration while reducing stress. To celebrate #ReadABookDay, here is R...
09/06/2020

Reading has been proven to improve memory and concentration while reducing stress. To celebrate #ReadABookDay, here is Ruth Fischer as a young girl enjoying a picture book. ⠀

Ruth sailed on the St. Louis with her mother and brother to join Ruth's father; the three were among the passengers returned to France. They left France for Cuba in December 1939, reunited with George Fischer and came to the U.S. in 1941.⠀

Gift of Ruth Bickhardt, Yaffa Eliach Collection donated by the Center for Holocaust Studies

You can now reserve timed tickets for our reopening. We can't wait to welcome you back next week!Read more about safety ...
09/04/2020

You can now reserve timed tickets for our reopening. We can't wait to welcome you back next week!

Read more about safety guidelines and purchase your tickets here:
https://mjhnyc.org/purchase-tickets/

08/28/2020
Yiddish, Anti-Racist Practice, and the Transformation of Jewish Communities

How does one discuss the Black Lives Matter movement in Yiddish, and why is that significant? Join us for a conversation with acclaimed Yiddish vocalist Anthony Russell and Jewish Communities Liaison to the NYC Commission on Human Rights Jonah Sampson Boyarin about their recent translation initiative and ongoing efforts to support racial justice within Jewish communities.

Co-sponsored by the NYC Commission On Human Rights, The Workers Circle, and Jews for Racial and Economic Justice [JFREJ]
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Relevant Links:
"Translating Black Lives Matter into Yiddish" by Anthony Russell (via Jewish Currents): https://jewishcurrents.org/translating-black-lives-matter-into-yiddish/
Episode of The Allusionist Podcast: https://www.theallusionist.org/allusionist/yiddishblm
Yiddish Terms: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1MWmD507ip5qHvwmVFhriO5GeRRdZj5PQkp1rI7ZggMs/edit?usp=sharing

The GI oral history collection consists of 423 interviews with Jewish veterans of World War II, conducted for the Museum...
08/27/2020
In Their Own Words: Jewish Veterans of World War II : Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust

The GI oral history collection consists of 423 interviews with Jewish veterans of World War II, conducted for the Museum’s first major temporary exhibition, the award-winning Ours To Fight For: American Jews and the Second World War. To honor their memories, we examine the role of Jewish servicemen and women who labored on and off the battlefield, through the triumph and the tragedy of World War II.

Learn more about the collection on our blog.

By Treva Walsh, Collections Project Manager “As a Jew, it was Hitler and me. That’s the way I pictured the war.” – Theodore Diamond, U.S. Army Air Force The Museum of Jewish Heritage’s oral history collections number over 3,800 interviews. While many of these recordings are the testimonies...

Dogs are not only “man’s best friend,” they often become members of our family. In celebration of #NationalDogDay, here ...
08/26/2020

Dogs are not only “man’s best friend,” they often become members of our family. In celebration of #NationalDogDay, here is Lajos Pless’s endearing depiction of his German shepherd — a watercolor sketch illustrated on the back of an X-ray. This dog makes another appearance in the following image of Pless’s anniversary gift to his wife, Sabine, who he was liberated with from the Terezin concentration camp.

The four sections of the artwork represent different periods in their lives: their wedding, their married life, the deportation of civilians led by soldiers, and an image of ocean liner, symbolizing a hope of leaving the following year. The sections are joined by a symbol of Terezin, dated 08.10.1943 and signed: "To my beloved wife on occasion of our anniversary, Lajos."

Gift of Alfred Koevary

The Gerda III was built in 1926 as a lighthouse tender, but in October 1943, the boat was used to rescue Jews from Nazi-...
08/24/2020

The Gerda III was built in 1926 as a lighthouse tender, but in October 1943, the boat was used to rescue Jews from Nazi-occupied Denmark. After being brought to a warehouse along Copenhagen’s waterfront, the refugees were smuggled aboard the Gerda III and hidden in the cargo hold. The little vessel then set out on her official lighthouse supply duties but detoured to the coast of neutral Sweden and put her “cargo” ashore. The vessel was regularly boarded and checked by German soldiers, but the refugees were never discovered.

In 1989, an act of Danish Parliament donated the Gerda III to the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. Today, the boat is on long term loan to Mystic Seaport Museum, where it is prominently docked and cared for by Museum staff and longtime volunteer Howard Veisz. Veisz’s connection to the Gerda III is not accidental: his father was also forced to flee from the Nazis, escaping from Berlin to Bolivia before reaching the US and returning to Europe as part of the D-Day invasion forces.

Join us tomorrow at 2PM for a conversation with Veisz and screenwriter Damian Slattery, whose 1991 film “A Day in October” tells the story of the Danish rescue. The discussion will focus on the Gerda III and Henny Sinding Sundø, the 22-year-old Danish lighthouse worker who helped rescue more than 300 Danish Jews, and who is the subject of Veisz’s 2017 book “Henny and Her Boat: Righteousness and Resistance in Nazi Occupied Denmark.

Registration is included with a suggested donation of $10.
https://mjhnyc.info/GerdaIII

Gift of the Government of Denmark

Today is #WorldPhotographyDay. Photo documentation played a significant part in the tenuous and painful process of liber...
08/19/2020

Today is #WorldPhotographyDay. Photo documentation played a significant part in the tenuous and painful process of liberation experienced by concentration camp survivors and U.S. Army servicemen alike following World War II. Many soldiers felt compelled to visit former death camps -- thus becoming firsthand witnesses of Nazi atrocities -- after seeing the horrific photographs distributed by the U.S. Signal Corps. Now indelibly printed onto our collective consciousness, these images were first taken by U.S. Army photographers like J.A. Conboy, who used this camera to document the liberation of Nordhausen, also known as Mittelbau-Dora, a slave labor subcamp of Buchenwald.

At the same time as photographers like J.A. Conboy were creating now-infamous photographs of Nordhausen, U.S. soldier Martin Halye captured the same scenes in somber watercolor paintings like the ones pictured here. A member of the 104th Infantry Division, he carried art supplies among his personal effects.

See Halye's “Liberation of Nordhausen” series on view in “Rendering Witness: Holocaust-era Art as Testimony” ​when the Museum reopens to the public on September 13.

The Sara and Sam Schoffer Holocaust Resource Center at Stockton University is seeking Holocaust survivors and their fami...
08/19/2020
South Jersey college seeks stories from Holocaust survivors

The Sara and Sam Schoffer Holocaust Resource Center at Stockton University is seeking Holocaust survivors and their family members for a new initiative to compile and create a digital archive on the lives of Holocaust survivors who settled in South Jersey.

For more information, visit:

The Sara and Sam Schoffer Holocaust Resource Center at Stockton University compiling information for “South Jersey Holocaust Survivor Digital Archive and Exhibition.”

Esther Toporek Finder's experience in our exhibition “Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away." helped her bring the stori...
08/17/2020
My father hid from the Nazis in a coffee pot. True story.

Esther Toporek Finder's experience in our exhibition “Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away." helped her bring the stories from her father's Holocaust experience to life. Read the full story on The Times of Israel:

The tale of how my dad survived by climbing into a pot wearing wooden clogs made much more sense when I finally saw the pot and the shoes

08/16/2020

Five months ago today, the Museum closed its doors as part of New York City's lockdown measures to fight COVID-19. As we grappled with how to reach our followers, we moved to virtual programs. One of the first online programs we shared was “Yiddish Humor During WWII with Professor Anna Shternshis,” and we invite you to rewatch it today, as it is #NationalTellAJokeDay. We hope laughter has helped you and your loved ones through this unprecedented time. You can watch the full program here:
https://mjhnyc.org/yiddish-humor-during-wwii/

Fran “Fay” Malkin was born in the spring of 1938 in Sokal, Poland (now Ukraine). After the Gestapo shot and killed 400 o...
08/13/2020
"No. 4 Street of Our Lady" Film Discussion | mjhnyc.org

Fran “Fay” Malkin was born in the spring of 1938 in Sokal, Poland (now Ukraine). After the Gestapo shot and killed 400 of Sokal’s Jewish men including Fran’s father, Fran’s remaining family fled to the home of a Polish Catholic woman named Francisca Halamajowa, who hid them in the hayloft above her pigsty for two years. Worried that Fran's inconsolable crying would reveal their hideout, the adults tried to silence her with poison. Miraculously, she survived.

In 1949, Fran moved with her family to the United States, where she went on to become a successful real estate broker. In 2007, she returned to Sokal with her cousin, filmmaker Judy Maltz, to film "No. 4 Street of Our Lady," a documentary about the rescue. By the end of the war, only 30 of Sokal’s 6,000 Jews had survived, half of them rescued by Francisca.

In today's online public program (2PM Eastern Time) we will be joined by Fran Malkin, her daughter Debbi Schonberger-Pierce, and Judy Maltz for a discussion of "No. 4 Street of Our Lady" 13 years later.

Watch the film here: https://vimeo.com/80085717
Register for the program at the link below:

"No. 4 Street of Our Lady" tells the remarkable story of Francisca Halamajowa, a Polish Catholic woman who rescued 15 of her Jewish neighbors."

Gerda III played a significant role in saving nearly 95% of Denmark’s Jewish population.On August 25, we'll be talking t...
08/12/2020
Where He Is Meant to Be: Profile of Gerda III Volunteer Howard Veisz

Gerda III played a significant role in saving nearly 95% of Denmark’s Jewish population.

On August 25, we'll be talking to Gerda III volunteer Howard Veisz whose connection to this ship is far from accidental. Joining him will be screenwriter Damian Slattery, whose 1991 film A Day in October tells the story of the Danish rescue.

On your way to sign up for this webinar, we hope you'll use the link to our blog below to read more about Veisz whose efforts help us bring histories to life.

You can register here:
https://mjhnyc.info/GerdaIII

The remarkable story of Howard Veisz, a Mystic Seaport volunteer who steadfastly ensures that the stories of Henny and Gerda III are remembered.

Whether you're curious about what you'll find at the Museum or if you are already anticipating seeing "Auschwitz. Not lo...
08/12/2020
Introduction to Auschwitz History. Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away.

Whether you're curious about what you'll find at the Museum or if you are already anticipating seeing "Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away." since our extension announcement, you can learn the history of this internationally-acclaimed exhibition here:

More than 1.1 million people were murdered between May 1940 and January 1945 behind the barbed-wire fences of Auschwitz, located in Nazi-occupied Poland.

"Typhus was the direct cause of thousands of deaths in the ghettos, various camps during the war, and directly after lib...
08/11/2020
Post-Liberation Battles: Surviving Typhus | Museum of Jewish Heritage

"Typhus was the direct cause of thousands of deaths in the ghettos, various camps during the war, and directly after liberation in displaced persons (DP) camps. These living conditions did not come about by happenstance; they were purposefully created and constructed as part of Nazi policy."

Learn more about typhus through translations of the Grunbaum family's documents:
https://mjhnyc.org/post-liberation-battles-surviving-typhus/

Typhus was the direct cause of thousands of deaths in the Nazi ghettos, various camps during the war, and directly after liberation in DP camps.

08/10/2020

In this Yiddish lullaby “Ven ikh volt gehat (“If I had the Kaiser’s Treasures”), musician Vladimir Fridman croons:

“My child, my crown.
When I see you
It seems to me
That the whole world is mine.”

This song was performed by Yiddish theater actress Diana Blumenfeld and recorded by folklorist Ben Stonehill more than 70 years ago. In the summer of 1948, Stonehill recorded more than 1,000 songs from Holocaust refugees who were being housed temporarily at the Hotel Marseilles on New York’s Upper West Side. The recordings are now being disseminated on the web by Yiddish scholar Miriam Isaacs through a partnership with the Center for Traditional Music and Dance.

Watch last week’s program “Survivor Songs: The Amazing Stonehill Recordings” in full here: https://youtu.be/QpVwA39sWgI

The postponement of this year's Summer Olympics was a history-making moment. The 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin was anot...
08/07/2020
The Summer Olympics of 1936 | Museum of Jewish Heritage

The postponement of this year's Summer Olympics was a history-making moment. The 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin was another Olympics of historical note. As Germany instituted antisemitic and racist laws in 1935, other countries considered boycotting the 1936 Summer Games.

Learn more about the 1936 Berlin Olympics boycott efforts and the personal decisions placed on Jewish athletes around the world on our blog:
https://mjhnyc.org/the-summer-olympics-of-1936/

The 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin was almost boycotted by several nations who protested the antisemitic and racist practices occurring in the Third Reich.

Address

36 Battery Pl
New York, NY
10280

SUBWAY -4/5 to Bowling Green, walk west along Battery Place -W/R to Whitehall Street, walk west along Battery Place -1 to South Ferry, walk north along Battery Place/State Street, turn left and walk west on Battery Place. -J/M/Z to Broad Street, walk one block west along Broadway, and then south to the corner of Battery Place and Bowling Green. Walk west along Battery Place BUS M1, 6, 15 to Battery Park M9, 20 to Battery Park City (stops in front of the Museum) The Downtown Alliance operates a free shuttle bus that includes a stop in front of the Museum.

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Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

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(646) 437-4202

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The history of those resting at Mount Hebron Cemetery is not just a story of individuals, it is a story of people who persevered to help create our city and in turn, our country. We want these stories to come alive and that the legacy of these individuals and their cultural history will be available for generations to come. If you have a love one buried at Mount Hebron Cemetery, please visit our page and share their legacy with us. Thank you.
The history of those resting at Mount Hebron Cemetery is not just a story of individuals, it is a story of people who persevered to help create our city and in turn, our country. We want these stories to come alive and that the legacy of these individuals and their cultural history will be available for generations to come. If you have a love one buried at Mount Hebron Cemetery, please visit our page and share their legacy with us. Thank you.
Here's my Blog-Video Cultural Diversity Song in New York City (near MJH) https://drsue.com/dr-sue-sings-diversity-song-in-nyc-park-positive-entertainment/
Did any of your relatives flee Germany in 1938 on the "Imperial" bound for South America?
The isolation affecting most of us is familiar to me. I recall vividly living in hiding for two years in Belgium during the German occupation to avoid deportation as a Jewish child to a concentration camp. I was then 10 to 12 years old, not attending school, avoiding youths my age and rarely stepping out of our hidden refuge in the Belgian Ardennes. Through my life, the isolation and stress of those early years have ever been in my memory. I still remember the anxiety and fear of being apprehended. Today's restrictions resonate, even at 87 years old. Fred A. Kahn, Bethesda, MARYLAND Source; The Washington Post, April 16, 2020
On Yom Ha Shoah I had the privilege of using Zoom to introduce my grandson’s 4th grade class to stories of bravery and heroism during the Holocaust. I shared the story of the Shofar, now on display, at the Museum and the story about Irena Sender whose dramatic video was on exhibit at the Museum. Kudos to the Rebbe of the class for opening his classroom and to my daughter for facilitating the meeting. A follow up: the success precipitated a call from another Rebbe in another school. I scheduled another Zoom meeting for 6th grade youngsters! All in all a busy and meaningful day!