Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Official page of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. The Gugg ❤️ You. Immerse yourself in video, film, and performance in our spiraling rotunda this spring.

Safety measures: https://www.guggenheim.org/plan-your-visit/coronavirus-information Frank Lloyd Wright's architectural masterpiece home to a world-renowned collection of modern and contemporary art.

Operating as usual

#WorkoftheWeek: The white screen that reappears in Hiroshi Sugimoto’s “Theaters” series is a result of shooting the proj...
06/21/2021

#WorkoftheWeek: The white screen that reappears in Hiroshi Sugimoto’s “Theaters” series is a result of shooting the projection of a feature film.

Photographing drive-ins, golden-age cinema palaces, and modern movie houses, he uses an exposure determined by the length of the screening. As each frame of the film flickers by, it’s recorded as a bright, blank screen, appearing empty of imagery while actually overflowing. Sugimoto calls this “time exposed”—the collecting, in one still image, of moments passed.

__
“South Bay Drive-In, San Diego” (1993), © Hiroshi Sugimoto

#WorkoftheWeek: The white screen that reappears in Hiroshi Sugimoto’s “Theaters” series is a result of shooting the projection of a feature film.

Photographing drive-ins, golden-age cinema palaces, and modern movie houses, he uses an exposure determined by the length of the screening. As each frame of the film flickers by, it’s recorded as a bright, blank screen, appearing empty of imagery while actually overflowing. Sugimoto calls this “time exposed”—the collecting, in one still image, of moments passed.

__
“South Bay Drive-In, San Diego” (1993), © Hiroshi Sugimoto

We're ringing in the #SummerSolstice with Rudolf Bauer’s cosmic work, “Space” (1932). 🌞🌙⠀__“Space” (1932), © 2020 Artist...
06/20/2021

We're ringing in the #SummerSolstice with Rudolf Bauer’s cosmic work, “Space” (1932). 🌞🌙

__
“Space” (1932), © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

We're ringing in the #SummerSolstice with Rudolf Bauer’s cosmic work, “Space” (1932). 🌞🌙

__
“Space” (1932), © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Weekend reading—Guggenheim collection artist Jenny Holzer tells Dazed about “Like Beauty in Flames,” an app created with...
06/20/2021
Jenny Holzer on NFTs, her new AR app, and finding poetry in the political

Weekend reading—Guggenheim collection artist Jenny Holzer tells Dazed about “Like Beauty in Flames,” an app created with Museo Guggenheim Bilbao that enables you to project her provocative statements onto any environment.

The legendary artist tells Dazed about Like Beauty in Flames – the app that enables you to project her provocative statements onto any environment

06/19/2021
Sketch with Jeff - Episode 83

In this episode of #SketchWithJeff, Guggenheim Teaching artist Jeff Hopkins draws inspiration from summer 😎

✏️ This summer, join Jeff for a week of art classes featuring special guest appearances from Pencil and other beloved characters from the series! Learn more: https://gu.gg/3gBahjw

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Martina Gandulfo—“The creativity of the Guggenheim’s organic archite...
06/18/2021

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Martina Gandulfo—“The creativity of the Guggenheim’s organic architecture and undulating circles captured me. I haven’t had the opportunity to go, but I hope to some time soon!”

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Martina Gandulfo—“The creativity of the Guggenheim’s organic architecture and undulating circles captured me. I haven’t had the opportunity to go, but I hope to some time soon!”

06/17/2021
#RotundaReflections: Christian Nyampeta

Enjoy this silent, meditative look at drawings from Christian Nyampeta’s solo project “Sometimes It was Beautiful,” closing Monday, June 21. Don’t miss it!

🎨 The artist’s large drawings in this gallery reference illustrations from a variety of sources, including the African Writers Series (a publication of original African literature established in 1962), government-issued school books for French learning previously used in primary and secondary schools in Rwanda, and basic Kiswahili learning books.

Plan your visit: https://gu.gg/3zxMB8j

__
© Christian Nyampeta

Go behind-the-scenes for a look at life in a Works & Process bubble residency. These quarantined residencies, located in...
06/16/2021

Go behind-the-scenes for a look at life in a Works & Process bubble residency. These quarantined residencies, located in the Hudson Valley, sequence directly into one-night-only performances in the Guggenheim’s rotunda: https://gu.gg/35rMCNf

Photos: Alik Tamar Barsoumian, Christopher Ash

“I first encountered Maurizio Cattelan’s site-specific sculpture ‘Daddy, Daddy’ in 2015, as part of the Guggenheim’s ‘St...
06/15/2021

“I first encountered Maurizio Cattelan’s site-specific sculpture ‘Daddy, Daddy’ in 2015, as part of the Guggenheim’s ‘Storylines’ exhibition. Having been brought up on Disney films, I was immediately drawn to the image of Pinocchio, floating face down in the museum’s fountain, as if he had jumped from the ramps above.

While q***r coding has historically been commonplace for Disney when designing their villains, I find a tale about a protagonist with daddy issues, who wants to become a’real boy,’ ripe for q***r reading. In the 1940 film, Pinocchio’s chirping conscience attempts to keep him on the straight and narrow, because ‘real boys’ assimilate to a strict (white, middle-class) moral code so that they may become upstanding, contributing members of capitalist society. Perhaps Cattelan’s Pinocchio would rather remain a flotsam than turn away from the delights of Pleasure Island. But there’s still hope—Pinocchio has an appendage that can grow—potentially to lift his face out of the shallow fountain and allow him to catch his breath. All he needs to do is misbehave.” —Alan Seise (@aseise), Manager, Public Programs
__

In honor of #Pride, LGBTQIA+ members of the Guggenheim staff are sharing their takes on works from the museum’s collection. Watch this space all month for more!
__
“Daddy, Daddy” (2008), © Maurizio Cattelan

“I first encountered Maurizio Cattelan’s site-specific sculpture ‘Daddy, Daddy’ in 2015, as part of the Guggenheim’s ‘Storylines’ exhibition. Having been brought up on Disney films, I was immediately drawn to the image of Pinocchio, floating face down in the museum’s fountain, as if he had jumped from the ramps above.

While q***r coding has historically been commonplace for Disney when designing their villains, I find a tale about a protagonist with daddy issues, who wants to become a’real boy,’ ripe for q***r reading. In the 1940 film, Pinocchio’s chirping conscience attempts to keep him on the straight and narrow, because ‘real boys’ assimilate to a strict (white, middle-class) moral code so that they may become upstanding, contributing members of capitalist society. Perhaps Cattelan’s Pinocchio would rather remain a flotsam than turn away from the delights of Pleasure Island. But there’s still hope—Pinocchio has an appendage that can grow—potentially to lift his face out of the shallow fountain and allow him to catch his breath. All he needs to do is misbehave.” —Alan Seise (@aseise), Manager, Public Programs
__

In honor of #Pride, LGBTQIA+ members of the Guggenheim staff are sharing their takes on works from the museum’s collection. Watch this space all month for more!
__
“Daddy, Daddy” (2008), © Maurizio Cattelan

#WorkoftheWeek: The agitated line and heavy impasto of Jean Dubuffet’s “Propitious Moment” (1962) indicate a spontaneity...
06/14/2021

#WorkoftheWeek: The agitated line and heavy impasto of Jean Dubuffet’s “Propitious Moment” (1962) indicate a spontaneity and directness in keeping with Art Brut—a term he christened that refers to the art of uncompromising immediacy and aggression.

“Propitious Moment” reflects Dubuffet’s tendency in the mature paintings of his “Paris Circus” series to ground his figures in ambiguous, abstract settings. Here, the flattened, vibrating bodies, defined solely through two layers of contour lines, merge with their shimmering background.

__
“Propitious Moment”, © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

#WorkoftheWeek: The agitated line and heavy impasto of Jean Dubuffet’s “Propitious Moment” (1962) indicate a spontaneity and directness in keeping with Art Brut—a term he christened that refers to the art of uncompromising immediacy and aggression.

“Propitious Moment” reflects Dubuffet’s tendency in the mature paintings of his “Paris Circus” series to ground his figures in ambiguous, abstract settings. Here, the flattened, vibrating bodies, defined solely through two layers of contour lines, merge with their shimmering background.

__
“Propitious Moment”, © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Weekend watching—get lost in Wu Tsang’s new film “Passage.” Tsang, a 2018 Hugo Boss Prize nominee, will transform the Gu...
06/13/2021
See a Hypnotic Wu Tsang Film Produced for Solange’s Creative Agency

Weekend watching—get lost in Wu Tsang’s new film “Passage.” Tsang, a 2018 Hugo Boss Prize nominee, will transform the Guggenheim’s rotunda into a sonic sculptural space this July, as part of “Re/Projections: Video, Film, and Performance for the Rotunda.”

“This felt like the perfect melding of everyone’s visions,” Tsang said.

06/12/2021
Mark Napier’s “net.flag” (2002)

Discover Mark Napier's online work 'net.flag' (2002), a piece that allows visitors to design their own “flag for the internet” by remixing and reconfiguring the shapes, colors, and insignia of existing national flags from around the world.

Over 22,000 flags have been created—in the lead up to #FlagDay, create your own: https://gu.gg/3vkz9RX
__
Pictured: a time-lapse of flags created by users on Napier’s “net.flag” (2002).

06/12/2021
Sketch with Jeff - Episode 82

In this episode of #SketchWithJeff, Guggenheim Teaching artist Jeff Hopkins draws inspiration from crayon rubbings! 🖍

✏️ Watch and create your own drawings with kids at home.

We’re wrapping up #MuseumWeek 2021 with a good old-fashioned New Yorker-style caption contest. ✏️ Craft your wittiest ca...
06/11/2021

We’re wrapping up #MuseumWeek 2021 with a good old-fashioned New Yorker-style caption contest. ✏️ Craft your wittiest captions and comment them below—let’s see what you’ve got!

__
Cartoon by James Stevenson, 1976, © The New Yorker

We’re wrapping up #MuseumWeek 2021 with a good old-fashioned New Yorker-style caption contest. ✏️ Craft your wittiest captions and comment them below—let’s see what you’ve got!

__
Cartoon by James Stevenson, 1976, © The New Yorker

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Marie Le Révérend—“The architecture of the Guggenheim resembles a lo...
06/11/2021

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Marie Le Révérend—“The architecture of the Guggenheim resembles a long white ribbon that winds from the bottom up—it’s a true work of art. I wanted to translate this through my hand-painted illustration of this majestic museum.”

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Marie Le Révérend—“The architecture of the Guggenheim resembles a long white ribbon that winds from the bottom up—it’s a true work of art. I wanted to translate this through my hand-painted illustration of this majestic museum.”

“Set against a saturated blue patterned background, the unnamed sitter in Catherine Opie’s ‘Dyke’ (1993) majestically sh...
06/10/2021

“Set against a saturated blue patterned background, the unnamed sitter in Catherine Opie’s ‘Dyke’ (1993) majestically showcases the eponymous word tattooed on the back of their neck. Executed in distinct gothic script, the tattoo functions as a literal marker of identity, signifying both permanence and pride with the reclaimed slur.

While published writings on this work tend to refer to the sitter as female, their gender remains arguably ambiguous, the n**e freckled torso and shorn hair merely sparking cursory assumptions. I believe this to be an intentional gesture by the artist, exposing the common misconception that le***an identity is tied to a legible gender. To me, Opie’s work has always demonstrated that being a d**e is not a fixed identity, but allows just as much room for fluidity and gender play as the term ‘q***r’ is often thought to have pioneered.” —Ksenia Soboleva, Ma**ca and Jan Vilcek Curatorial Fellow

__

In honor of #Pride, LGBTQIA+ members of the Guggenheim staff are sharing their takes on works from the museum’s collection. Watch this space all month for more!

__
“Dyke” (1993), © Catherine Opie

“Set against a saturated blue patterned background, the unnamed sitter in Catherine Opie’s ‘Dyke’ (1993) majestically showcases the eponymous word tattooed on the back of their neck. Executed in distinct gothic script, the tattoo functions as a literal marker of identity, signifying both permanence and pride with the reclaimed slur.

While published writings on this work tend to refer to the sitter as female, their gender remains arguably ambiguous, the n**e freckled torso and shorn hair merely sparking cursory assumptions. I believe this to be an intentional gesture by the artist, exposing the common misconception that le***an identity is tied to a legible gender. To me, Opie’s work has always demonstrated that being a d**e is not a fixed identity, but allows just as much room for fluidity and gender play as the term ‘q***r’ is often thought to have pioneered.” —Ksenia Soboleva, Ma**ca and Jan Vilcek Curatorial Fellow

__

In honor of #Pride, LGBTQIA+ members of the Guggenheim staff are sharing their takes on works from the museum’s collection. Watch this space all month for more!

__
“Dyke” (1993), © Catherine Opie

#MuseumWeek 2021 continues today with the theme #ChildrensEyesMW—and what better way to experience the Guggenheim than t...
06/09/2021

#MuseumWeek 2021 continues today with the theme #ChildrensEyesMW—and what better way to experience the Guggenheim than through the inquisitive, thoughtful perspectives of our Learning Through Art students? 🎨

Learning Through Art (LTA), the Guggenheim’s pioneering arts education program, has served New York City public schools for 50 years. LTA caps off each year with “A Year With Children,” an exhibition showcasing student artwork created over the course of the year.

“A Year With Children” is on view through June 21. Plan a visit to the Gugg and experience the show IRL—click here to reserve your timed tickets: https://gu.gg/2IAc2za

__
Photos: David Heald

Happy birthday to Frank Lloyd Wright, who was born #OnThisDay in 1867!In 1943, Solomon Guggenheim and Hilla Rebay commis...
06/08/2021

Happy birthday to Frank Lloyd Wright, who was born #OnThisDay in 1867!

In 1943, Solomon Guggenheim and Hilla Rebay commissioned Wright to design a museum for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Collection—over 15 years, 700+ sketches, and six separate sets of working drawings later, the Guggenheim opened its doors in October 1959, and has captivated visitors ever since.

__
Photo: William H. Short

Happy birthday to Frank Lloyd Wright, who was born #OnThisDay in 1867!

In 1943, Solomon Guggenheim and Hilla Rebay commissioned Wright to design a museum for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Collection—over 15 years, 700+ sketches, and six separate sets of working drawings later, the Guggenheim opened its doors in October 1959, and has captivated visitors ever since.

__
Photo: William H. Short

Happy #MuseumWeek! 🖼 The 2021 edition kicks off today with the theme of “beginning”—so we’re taking you back over 100 ye...
06/07/2021

Happy #MuseumWeek! 🖼 The 2021 edition kicks off today with the theme of “beginning”—so we’re taking you back over 100 years ago, to December 1913, when Vasily Kandinsky made his first truly abstract paintings and effectively freed painting from its need to be representational. Many of these works, including “Light Picture” (pictured), were part of the Guggenheim’s Founding Collection.

__
“Light Picture” (1913), © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Happy #MuseumWeek! 🖼 The 2021 edition kicks off today with the theme of “beginning”—so we’re taking you back over 100 years ago, to December 1913, when Vasily Kandinsky made his first truly abstract paintings and effectively freed painting from its need to be representational. Many of these works, including “Light Picture” (pictured), were part of the Guggenheim’s Founding Collection.

__
“Light Picture” (1913), © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

06/05/2021
Sketch with Jeff - Episode 81

In this episode of #SketchWithJeff, Guggenheim Teaching artist Jeff Hopkins teaches viewers how to make prints with the sun. ☀️

✏️ Watch and create your own drawings with kids at home.

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Venus Tong—“The Guggenheim is one of my favorite museums in the city...
06/04/2021

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Venus Tong—“The Guggenheim is one of my favorite museums in the city. While I love seeing the exhibits, a trip to the museum is not complete without spending time admiring one of the most beautiful buildings in the history of architecture, by the man himself.”

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Venus Tong—“The Guggenheim is one of my favorite museums in the city. While I love seeing the exhibits, a trip to the museum is not complete without spending time admiring one of the most beautiful buildings in the history of architecture, by the man himself.”

06/03/2021
See Christian Nyampeta's "Sometimes It Was Beautiful" at the Guggenheim

Get to know artist Christian Nyampeta 🔴

Nyampeta has transformed the Guggenheim’s rotunda into a venue for collective feeling and cooperative thinking, with an immersive presentation comprising his film “Sometimes It Was Beautiful” as well as audio, videos, and drawings.

Experience “Sometimes It Was Beautiful” through June 21—plan your visit: https://gu.gg/2IAc2za

“So many of these songs are actually made to charm and compliment women, but when you hear them all together you realize...
06/02/2021

“So many of these songs are actually made to charm and compliment women, but when you hear them all together you realize the structure of society.” —Ragnar Kjartansson, as told to the New York Times.

For four days only in July, the Guggenheim will present “Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy,” a work by Ragnar Kjartansson that will have women and non-binary singer-guitarists stationed throughout the rotunda, playing popular songs of love and romance by some of the world’s greatest songwriters, including Bruce Springsteen, Cat Stevens, and Lil Wayne.

At once a live mash-up celebrating pop music and a charged environment of critique, “Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy” creates a space where contradictions—between individual and group, oppression and liberation, rhythm and chaos—exist together within a community of collaboration and mutual support. Click here to book your tickets: https://gu.gg/2RYaV2q

__
Pictured: Laila Sapphira Williams. © Ragnar Kjartansson.
Photo: Ragnar Kjartansson. Courtesy the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8 Gallery, Reykjavík

“So many of these songs are actually made to charm and compliment women, but when you hear them all together you realize the structure of society.” —Ragnar Kjartansson, as told to the New York Times.

For four days only in July, the Guggenheim will present “Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy,” a work by Ragnar Kjartansson that will have women and non-binary singer-guitarists stationed throughout the rotunda, playing popular songs of love and romance by some of the world’s greatest songwriters, including Bruce Springsteen, Cat Stevens, and Lil Wayne.

At once a live mash-up celebrating pop music and a charged environment of critique, “Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy” creates a space where contradictions—between individual and group, oppression and liberation, rhythm and chaos—exist together within a community of collaboration and mutual support. Click here to book your tickets: https://gu.gg/2RYaV2q

__
Pictured: Laila Sapphira Williams. © Ragnar Kjartansson.
Photo: Ragnar Kjartansson. Courtesy the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8 Gallery, Reykjavík

Address

1071 5th Ave
New York, NY
10128

4, 5, 6, or Q train to 86th St; M1, M2, M3, M4 bus

Opening Hours

Monday 11:00 - 18:00
Thursday 11:00 - 18:00
Friday 11:00 - 18:00
Saturday 11:00 - 18:00
Sunday 11:00 - 18:00

Telephone

(212) 423-3500

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum:

Videos

Category


Other Art Museums in New York

Show All