Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Official page of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. The Gugg ❤️ You. Immerse yourself in video, film, and performance in our spiraling rotunda this summer.

Safety measures: https://www.guggenheim.org/plan-your-visit/coronavirus-information Frank Lloyd Wright's architectural masterpiece home to a world-renowned collection of modern and contemporary art.

Operating as usual

#GuesstheArtist answer: Arshile Gorky! Arshile Gorky spent the greater part of 1944 at Crooked Run Farm in Hamilton, Vir...
08/25/2021

#GuesstheArtist answer: Arshile Gorky!

Arshile Gorky spent the greater part of 1944 at Crooked Run Farm in Hamilton, Virginia. His enthusiastic response to the natural surroundings of the state infused his work with expressive freedom.

Landscape references appear throughout “Untitled” (1944). though the white ground is uniform, it is empty at the very top of the canvas, suggesting a slice of sky, while the “earth” below is replete with vegetal shapes and floral colors. A clear gravitational sense is produced by the dripping of paint thinned with turpentine, a technique suggested by Matta.

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“Untitled” (1944), © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

#GuesstheArtist answer: Arshile Gorky!

Arshile Gorky spent the greater part of 1944 at Crooked Run Farm in Hamilton, Virginia. His enthusiastic response to the natural surroundings of the state infused his work with expressive freedom.

Landscape references appear throughout “Untitled” (1944). though the white ground is uniform, it is empty at the very top of the canvas, suggesting a slice of sky, while the “earth” below is replete with vegetal shapes and floral colors. A clear gravitational sense is produced by the dripping of paint thinned with turpentine, a technique suggested by Matta.

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“Untitled” (1944), © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

#GuesstheArtist: The techniques and content of Surrealism influenced the development of this artist’s language of free, ...
08/25/2021

#GuesstheArtist: The techniques and content of Surrealism influenced the development of this artist’s language of free, organic, and layered forms. 🖌

Comment your best guess below, and keep an eye out for the answer later today!

#GuesstheArtist: The techniques and content of Surrealism influenced the development of this artist’s language of free, organic, and layered forms. 🖌

Comment your best guess below, and keep an eye out for the answer later today!

08/24/2021
Wu Tsang on "Anthem" (2021)

“Filmmaking, for me, is about that collaborative process. It’s about trying to tune into the people I’m working with and think about what I could do, or how my skills could be used to create a platform for what they do.” —Wu Tsang

Wu Tsang’s new commission “Anthem” was conceived with the legendary singer, composer, and transgender activist Beverly Glenn-Copeland, and revolves around an immense, 84-foot curtain sculpture. Projected onto this luminous textile is a “film-portrait” Tsang created of Glenn-Copeland improvising and singing passages of his music.

Experience the magic of “Anthem” through September 6—click here to plan your visit: https://gu.gg/2IAc2za

#WorkoftheWeek: Subverting the recognizable and allowing the familiar to become strange through odd juxtapositions, deta...
08/23/2021

#WorkoftheWeek: Subverting the recognizable and allowing the familiar to become strange through odd juxtapositions, details, and illogical compositions, David Salle’s artworks leave the viewer to develop meaning out of layered images and surrealistic disjunctions.

The left half of the diptych “Comedy” (pictured) is executed in grisaille, a technique that has been historically used to render figures. In the right panel, a domestic scene derived from a 1950s advertisement for a bedroom set is turned on its side, and layered with additional painted imagery: a fashion photograph in which the female figure is, disconcertingly, a headless mannequin, a garland of butterflies, and a ruffled harlequin collar of translucent cloth.

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“Comedy” (1995), © David Salle/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

#WorkoftheWeek: Subverting the recognizable and allowing the familiar to become strange through odd juxtapositions, details, and illogical compositions, David Salle’s artworks leave the viewer to develop meaning out of layered images and surrealistic disjunctions.

The left half of the diptych “Comedy” (pictured) is executed in grisaille, a technique that has been historically used to render figures. In the right panel, a domestic scene derived from a 1950s advertisement for a bedroom set is turned on its side, and layered with additional painted imagery: a fashion photograph in which the female figure is, disconcertingly, a headless mannequin, a garland of butterflies, and a ruffled harlequin collar of translucent cloth.

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“Comedy” (1995), © David Salle/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Weekend reading—The New York Times took a deep dive into Guggenheim Collection artist Catherine Opie’s body of photograp...
08/22/2021
Finding a Lavender Thread Even in Catherine Opie’s Landscapes

Weekend reading—The New York Times took a deep dive into Guggenheim Collection artist Catherine Opie’s body of photographs, exploring how her “q***r outlook suffuses the photographer’s wide-ranging works.” Read more: https://gu.gg/3mgjfat

A q***r outlook suffuses the photographer’s wide-ranging works, from streetscapes and still lifes to Elizabeth Taylor’s closet.

“I recognized that for so many artists, the document is a symbol of history. It becomes this space where so many kinds o...
08/20/2021

“I recognized that for so many artists, the document is a symbol of history. It becomes this space where so many kinds of critiques can happen, because you’re not only speaking to this individual material—you’re speaking to the histories they represent.” —Ashley James, curator, “Off the Record”

🎙 In honor of #NationalRadioDay, explore the audio guide for our current exhibition, “Off the Record” and hear from a selection of the show’s artists, including Tomashi Jackson, Hank Willis Thomas, Leslie Hewitt, and Sadie Barnette: https://gu.gg/3kbjm4j

“Off the Record” is on view through September 27. Experience the show in real life—click here to plan your visit: https://gu.gg/2IAc2za

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Photo: David Heald

“I recognized that for so many artists, the document is a symbol of history. It becomes this space where so many kinds of critiques can happen, because you’re not only speaking to this individual material—you’re speaking to the histories they represent.” —Ashley James, curator, “Off the Record”

🎙 In honor of #NationalRadioDay, explore the audio guide for our current exhibition, “Off the Record” and hear from a selection of the show’s artists, including Tomashi Jackson, Hank Willis Thomas, Leslie Hewitt, and Sadie Barnette: https://gu.gg/3kbjm4j

“Off the Record” is on view through September 27. Experience the show in real life—click here to plan your visit: https://gu.gg/2IAc2za

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Photo: David Heald

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Kevin Chiu—“The Guggenheim is one of my favorite buildings in New Yo...
08/20/2021

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Kevin Chiu—“The Guggenheim is one of my favorite buildings in New York. I was attracted to the unique appearance and style, so I decided to explore all its details through drawing.”

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Kevin Chiu—“The Guggenheim is one of my favorite buildings in New York. I was attracted to the unique appearance and style, so I decided to explore all its details through drawing.”

📸 Say cheese! 🧀 Did you know that the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building is one of the most-photographed ...
08/19/2021

📸 Say cheese! 🧀 Did you know that the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building is one of the most-photographed attractions in the world?

This #WorldPhotographyDay, we’re looking back at some of the many thousands of images captured by our Chief Photographer David Heald over the past forty-one years. Enjoy this selection of snaps of the museum—and be sure to tag us in your own photos!

08/18/2021
#RotundaReflections: Vincent van Gogh

Take a silent stroll through our Thannhauser Gallery for a look at the detailed brushstrokes of Vincent van Gogh’s “Mountains at Saint-Rémy” (1889).

Experience “Mountains at Saint-Rémy” (and other Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, and modern French masterpieces) in real life—click here to plan your visit: https://gu.gg/2IAc2za

#WorkoftheWeek: The razor blades in Tayeba Begum Lipi’s “Love Bed” (2012) represent not just the violence implied by the...
08/16/2021

#WorkoftheWeek: The razor blades in Tayeba Begum Lipi’s “Love Bed” (2012) represent not just the violence implied by their sharp edges, but their function as a basic tool to aid in childbirth in the absence of other medical support—a circumstance the artist recalls from childhood.

Lipi associates the strength of steel with the tenacity of the women who surrounded her as she grew up, individuals who defied the odds to keep their families and communities together. Yet her work resists interpretation according to simple binary opposition along historical, religious, social, or gendered lines. As much as the skeins of razors draped across the bed frame warn against our approach, they also, paradoxically, join together into a productive space for connection and dialogue.

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“Love Bed” (2012), © Tayeba Begum Lipi

#WorkoftheWeek: The razor blades in Tayeba Begum Lipi’s “Love Bed” (2012) represent not just the violence implied by their sharp edges, but their function as a basic tool to aid in childbirth in the absence of other medical support—a circumstance the artist recalls from childhood.

Lipi associates the strength of steel with the tenacity of the women who surrounded her as she grew up, individuals who defied the odds to keep their families and communities together. Yet her work resists interpretation according to simple binary opposition along historical, religious, social, or gendered lines. As much as the skeins of razors draped across the bed frame warn against our approach, they also, paradoxically, join together into a productive space for connection and dialogue.

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“Love Bed” (2012), © Tayeba Begum Lipi

Weekend reading—thanks to Hyperallergic for including Wu Tsang’s “breathtaking” installation “Anthem” on its roundup of ...
08/15/2021
Your Concise New York Art Guide for August 2021

Weekend reading—thanks to Hyperallergic for including Wu Tsang’s “breathtaking” installation “Anthem” on its roundup of must-see New York City shows this summer. "Anthem" is on view at the Guggenheim through September 6th: https://gu.gg/3xHP1yZ

Your list of must-see, fun, insightful, and very New York art events this month.

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays image is by Gabriel Zenone—“The Guggenheim always adds a bit of grace to everything aro...
08/13/2021

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays image is by Gabriel Zenone—“The Guggenheim always adds a bit of grace to everything around it. People, flashing sirens, cars, sunrises…even pigeons.”

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays image is by Gabriel Zenone—“The Guggenheim always adds a bit of grace to everything around it. People, flashing sirens, cars, sunrises…even pigeons.”

#WorkoftheWeek: Since 1969, Barbara Kruger has juxtaposed photographs culled from mass media with pithy slogans in a sub...
08/12/2021

#WorkoftheWeek: Since 1969, Barbara Kruger has juxtaposed photographs culled from mass media with pithy slogans in a subversive attack on the ways in which self-identity, desire, and public opinion are manipulated and perpetuated.

“Untitled (Not Perfect)” (1980) depicts a pair of soiled male hands resting in a washbasin. It is best understood when examined in concert with another work from 1980, “Untitled (Perfect),” in which the word “perfect” is written across an image of a woman’s discreetly sweatered torso. In “Not Perfect,” the word “stain,” albeit crossed out, points to the questionable source of the hands’ discoloration. Is it spilled coffee or dirt or blood? Although intentionally indecipherable, the image suggests the sense of recklessness, adventure, and destruction stereotypically associated with the male in our culture.

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“Untitled (Not Perfect)” (1980), © Barbara Kruger

#WorkoftheWeek: Since 1969, Barbara Kruger has juxtaposed photographs culled from mass media with pithy slogans in a subversive attack on the ways in which self-identity, desire, and public opinion are manipulated and perpetuated.

“Untitled (Not Perfect)” (1980) depicts a pair of soiled male hands resting in a washbasin. It is best understood when examined in concert with another work from 1980, “Untitled (Perfect),” in which the word “perfect” is written across an image of a woman’s discreetly sweatered torso. In “Not Perfect,” the word “stain,” albeit crossed out, points to the questionable source of the hands’ discoloration. Is it spilled coffee or dirt or blood? Although intentionally indecipherable, the image suggests the sense of recklessness, adventure, and destruction stereotypically associated with the male in our culture.

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“Untitled (Not Perfect)” (1980), © Barbara Kruger

Tap through our Instagram story to learn more about “Wu Tsang: Anthem,” the fourth and final presentation of our current...
08/11/2021

Tap through our Instagram story to learn more about “Wu Tsang: Anthem,” the fourth and final presentation of our current exhibition "Re/Projections: Video, Film, and Performance for the Rotunda": https://gu.gg/3CB0qVf

A new commission conceived by artist Wu Tsang in collaboration with the legendary singer, composer, and transgender activist Beverly Glenn-Copeland, “Anthem” harnesses the Guggenheim’s cathedral-like acoustics to construct what Tsang calls a “sonic sculptural space.” This site-specific installation revolves around an immense, eighty-four-foot curtain sculpture suspended from the oculus.

Experience the magic of “Anthem” in real life—click here to plan your visit: https://gu.gg/2IAc2za

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Photos: David Heald

Calling all bookworms! 📚 Did you know that many of our exhibition catalogues available to read for free on the Internet ...
08/09/2021

Calling all bookworms! 📚 Did you know that many of our exhibition catalogues available to read for free on the Internet Archive? From Paul Klee to Jenny Holzer, there are over 200 titles to explore this #NationalBookLoversDay—click here to browse the entire selection: https://gu.gg/37s8j0I 📖 Happy reading!

Happy #InternationalCatDay! 🐈If you look closely at Natalia Goncharova’s “Cats (rayist percep.[tion] in rose, black, and...
08/08/2021

Happy #InternationalCatDay! 🐈

If you look closely at Natalia Goncharova’s “Cats (rayist percep.[tion] in rose, black, and yellow)” (1913), you’ll notice two black felines with a tabby in between. This work illustrates the Rayist view that objects may serve as points of departure for explorations on the canvas. Goncharova used darts of color to suggest the effects of light on the cats’ shiny coats and the way that adjacent surfaces reflect neighboring hues. The dynamic slashes of black and white evoke the energized, machine-inspired compositions of the Futurists.

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“Cats (rayist percep.[tion] in rose, black, and yellow)” (1913), © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Happy #InternationalCatDay! 🐈

If you look closely at Natalia Goncharova’s “Cats (rayist percep.[tion] in rose, black, and yellow)” (1913), you’ll notice two black felines with a tabby in between. This work illustrates the Rayist view that objects may serve as points of departure for explorations on the canvas. Goncharova used darts of color to suggest the effects of light on the cats’ shiny coats and the way that adjacent surfaces reflect neighboring hues. The dynamic slashes of black and white evoke the energized, machine-inspired compositions of the Futurists.

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“Cats (rayist percep.[tion] in rose, black, and yellow)” (1913), © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

📸 Time for a summer photo dump!⠀Here’s what’s been going on at the Gugg lately, through the eyes of you, our visitors. ⠀...
08/07/2021

📸 Time for a summer photo dump!

Here’s what’s been going on at the Gugg lately, through the eyes of you, our visitors.

Ready to plan your own visit? 🎟 Click here to reserve your timed tickets: https://gu.gg/2IAc2za

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Photos courtesy of: @carolekeit; @sarapalms; @margotnorton; @kerryannjames; @hannahykwon; @sssss.910

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Jennifer Ball—“Winding my way around the Guggenheim, listening to th...
08/06/2021

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Jennifer Ball—“Winding my way around the Guggenheim, listening to the audio guide of the museum’s architecture, I found myself full of awe, gratitude, and joy. Sharing the streaming sunlight with these fellow humans, I wondered where they were from and what they were feeling."

Today’s #FrankLloydWrightFridays illustration is by Jennifer Ball—“Winding my way around the Guggenheim, listening to the audio guide of the museum’s architecture, I found myself full of awe, gratitude, and joy. Sharing the streaming sunlight with these fellow humans, I wondered where they were from and what they were feeling."

#GuessTheArtist answer: Joan Miró! Pictured is “Prades, the Village,” completed in the summer of 1917. The painting is a...
08/05/2021

#GuessTheArtist answer: Joan Miró!

Pictured is “Prades, the Village,” completed in the summer of 1917. The painting is an earlier work of Miró’s, representing quasi-realistic, Fauvist-colored rural views (characterized by the work’s juxtapositions of intense color patches and brushwork accentuated by broad strokes).

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“Prades, the Village” (1917), © 2021 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

#GuessTheArtist answer: Joan Miró!

Pictured is “Prades, the Village,” completed in the summer of 1917. The painting is an earlier work of Miró’s, representing quasi-realistic, Fauvist-colored rural views (characterized by the work’s juxtapositions of intense color patches and brushwork accentuated by broad strokes).

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“Prades, the Village” (1917), © 2021 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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