Japan Society

Japan Society Founded in 1907, Japan Society in New York City presents sophisticated, topical and accessible experiences of Japanese art and culture, and facilitates the exchange of ideas, knowledge and innovation between the U.S.
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and Japan. Japan Society is an American nonprofit organization supported by individuals, foundations and corporations that brings the people of Japan and the United States closer together through mutual understanding, appreciation and cooperation. More than a hundred years after the Society's founding, its goal remains the same—the cultivation of a constructive, resonant and dynamic relationship between the people of the U.S.

and Japan. Japan Society is an American nonprofit organization supported by individuals, foundations and corporations that brings the people of Japan and the United States closer together through mutual understanding, appreciation and cooperation. More than a hundred years after the Society's founding, its goal remains the same—the cultivation of a constructive, resonant and dynamic relationship between the people of the U.S.

Operating as usual

The upcoming Summer Games are the first gender-balanced Games in history, with women accounting for almost 49 percent of...
07/20/2021

The upcoming Summer Games are the first gender-balanced Games in history, with women accounting for almost 49 percent of participating athletes, according to the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

Tonight at 7:30PM EDT, Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike, the host city's first woman governor, will sit down with Japan Society President & CEO Joshua W. Walker to discuss her "unity in diversity" vision and why she wants Tokyo to become a role model for Japanese society.

Stream the online conversation at the Museum of the City of New York's Facebook or YouTube page. No advance registration required.

More details here: http://ow.ly/NKtk50FzP33

[Photo: New National Stadium, 2018 © Takashi Homma]

The upcoming Summer Games are the first gender-balanced Games in history, with women accounting for almost 49 percent of participating athletes, according to the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

Tonight at 7:30PM EDT, Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike, the host city's first woman governor, will sit down with Japan Society President & CEO Joshua W. Walker to discuss her "unity in diversity" vision and why she wants Tokyo to become a role model for Japanese society.

Stream the online conversation at the Museum of the City of New York's Facebook or YouTube page. No advance registration required.

More details here: http://ow.ly/NKtk50FzP33

[Photo: New National Stadium, 2018 © Takashi Homma]

Tomorrow at 7:30PM EDT! Tune into the Museum of the City of New York's Facebook or YouTube page for a conversation betwe...
07/19/2021

Tomorrow at 7:30PM EDT! Tune into the Museum of the City of New York's Facebook or YouTube page for a conversation between Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike and Joshua W. Walker, president and CEO of Japan Society. No advance registration required.

JUST ANNOUNCED: Join us on Tuesday (7/20) for a special webinar in collaboration with the Japan Society: A discussion with Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike, the city's first female Governor speaking with Dr. Joshua W. Walker, President and CEO, Japan Society. The conversation will be centered around sustainable recovery, green finance, women’s empowerment, and the upcoming Summer Games.
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This is the first program in Leading Cities Today, the Museum of the City of New York's new series of conversations exploring how urban leaders locally, nationally, and globally are facing the major challenges and opportunities of our moment.
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No pre-registration required. The program will be livestreamed on the Museum of the City of New York's Facebook and Youtube pages.

07/19/2021

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga highlighted the strength and resilience of the Japan-U.S. alliance during his opening speech at Japan Society’s 2021 Annual Dinner:

“New York is known for being the center of business, but also as the stage for U.N. diplomacy, as well as arts and culture. And in this city, Japan-U.S. cooperation and Japan’s presence have been expanding broadly, thanks to the efforts of everyone watching this message.”

Japan Society is honored to have the support and recognition of Prime Minister Suga, whose commitment to peace and international exchange resonates deeply with our own mission of “kizuna” — our forward-facing energy and deeply interwoven connections, between New York and Japan, and beyond.

This month, we’re sharing key moments from our 2021 Annual Dinner: Connecting Across Space and Time — a star-studded evening at the intersection of science, art, culture, business, and the U.S.-Japan alliance. Watch the full program here: http://ow.ly/4C4E50Fu2vB

A special chance to learn about kabuki from one of Japan's rising stars, Kazutaro Nakamura. On July 23, join our friends...
07/17/2021

A special chance to learn about kabuki from one of Japan's rising stars, Kazutaro Nakamura. On July 23, join our friends at Japan Society of Northern California for a free online program exploring traditional Japanese theater and its possibilities today.

Nakamura Kazutaro: ART of KABUKI - From Classical Kabuki to Art Kabuki, Moving Forward — 07/23 (PDT) | 07/24 (JPN) 🎭 - https://mailchi.mp/usajapan/art-kabuki

Part of the Museum of the City of New York's "Leading Cities Today" series, Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike will be in conve...
07/16/2021
Leading Tokyo Today: A Conversation with Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike

Part of the Museum of the City of New York's "Leading Cities Today" series, Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike will be in conversation with Joshua W. Walker, Japan Society's president and CEO, to discuss green finance, women's empowerment, and the upcoming Summer Games.

Join us for the free online event on Tuesday, July 20 at 7:30PM EDT. No advance registration required. Details here: http://ow.ly/EPNK50FxyAi

Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike and Joshua W. Walker, Ph.D., discuss sustainable recovery, green finance, women’s empowerment, and the upcoming Summer Games in thi

Following the opening of Yokohama Port in 1859, Utagawa Yoshikazu captured Japan’s fascination with the Western world in...
07/14/2021

Following the opening of Yokohama Port in 1859, Utagawa Yoshikazu captured Japan’s fascination with the Western world in a series of colorful ukiyo-e (woodblock) prints.

In celebration of Bastille Day, enjoy these Edo-era depictions of French merchants and their families 🎨

07/13/2021

"The greatest piece of diplomacy ever."

Enjoy this sneak peek from Diamond Diplomacy — director Yuriko Gamo Romer's upcoming film about U.S.-Japan relations through a shared love of baseball 📽

Happening tomorrow at 8PM EDT: "Let's Play Two: Baseball in Japan & the U.S." with Romer, Warren Cromartie, Matt Murton, Leon Lee and Robert Whiting's Japan. Register for the free online event here: http://ow.ly/lFVA50FsYXo

07/12/2021

"Although I was very interested in space, I didn't think of becoming an astronaut as a career."

Former JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) astronaut Naoko Yamazaki, the second Japanese woman to fly in space, discusses the importance of role models and "Sorajo" (Women in Aerospace), a program of the Japanese Rocket Society.

This month, we’ll be sharing key moments from our 2021 Annual Dinner: Connecting Across Space and Time — a star-studded evening at the intersection of science, art, culture, business, and the U.S.-Japan alliance. Stay tuned for more inspiring conversations and highlights.

Watch the full program here👇
http://ow.ly/OxmR50FsOjQ

“If baseball was the national religion of Japan and the Giants the leading practitioners of the faith, then Korakuen Sta...
07/10/2021

“If baseball was the national religion of Japan and the Giants the leading practitioners of the faith, then Korakuen Stadium was its cathedral.”

In his new book “Tokyo Junkie,” Robert Whiting reflects on life in Japan in the 1960s. Completed in 1937, Korakuen Stadium was home to the Yomiuri Giants for nearly 50 years before its demolition in 1988. With a capacity of 50,000 people, the ballpark also hosted concerts for the likes of Madonna and Michael Jackson.

On Wednesday, July 14 at 8PM EDT, director Yuriko Gamo Romer will lead a discussion on the past, present and future of the national pastime in “Let’s Play Two: Baseball in Japan & the U.S.” — featuring speakers Robert Whiting, Warren Cromartie, Matt Murton and Leon Lee.

Register for the free online event here: http://ow.ly/EM5a50ForAM

“If baseball was the national religion of Japan and the Giants the leading practitioners of the faith, then Korakuen Stadium was its cathedral.”

In his new book “Tokyo Junkie,” Robert Whiting reflects on life in Japan in the 1960s. Completed in 1937, Korakuen Stadium was home to the Yomiuri Giants for nearly 50 years before its demolition in 1988. With a capacity of 50,000 people, the ballpark also hosted concerts for the likes of Madonna and Michael Jackson.

On Wednesday, July 14 at 8PM EDT, director Yuriko Gamo Romer will lead a discussion on the past, present and future of the national pastime in “Let’s Play Two: Baseball in Japan & the U.S.” — featuring speakers Robert Whiting, Warren Cromartie, Matt Murton and Leon Lee.

Register for the free online event here: http://ow.ly/EM5a50ForAM

“I am not making anti-war films. I just do not like war." — Japanese filmmaker Nobuhiko Obayashi (1938-2020)Now streamin...
07/09/2021

“I am not making anti-war films. I just do not like war." — Japanese filmmaker Nobuhiko Obayashi (1938-2020)

Now streaming nationwide until August 7, "Tragedies of Youth: Nobuhiko Obayashi's War Trilogy" highlights a late-career trio of deeply personal films that confront Japan's wartime past.

Made in the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of March 2011 and informed by the late filmmaker’s firsthand experience as a child born on the eve of World War II in Hiroshima Prefecture, these films consider the loss of innocence for an entire generation of Japanese youth.

🎞 SEVEN WEEKS (2014)
An emotionally profound exploration of a patriarch’s hidden wartime past.

🎞 HANAGATAMI (2017)
Obayashi’s 40-year passion project and penultimate film, made after he was diagnosed with stage four cancer and given months to live.

🎞 CASTING BLOSSOMS TO THE SKY (2012)
An uplifting tribute to Nagaoka’s wartime struggles and the resilience of human nature amid catastrophe.

View and rent the films here: bit.ly/ObayashiTrilogy

Final Weekend! 🪚🔨Only a few days left to see "When Practice Becomes Form: Carpentry Tools from Japan," closing this Sund...
07/09/2021

Final Weekend! 🪚🔨

Only a few days left to see "When Practice Becomes Form: Carpentry Tools from Japan," closing this Sunday! Through woodworking tools, architectural patterns, and models, the exhibition celebrates the resilient spirit of Japanese architecture and craftsmanship. We loved seeing the exhibition through your eyes—enjoy these highlights from our visitors: http://ow.ly/526h50FnzuN

Anti-Asian hate crimes rose by nearly 150 percent in America's largest cities last year, according to the Center for the...
07/08/2021

Anti-Asian hate crimes rose by nearly 150 percent in America's largest cities last year, according to the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism. The Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community cannot and should not have to combat this violence alone — and it hasn’t been.

On Monday, July 19 at 7PM EDT, join us for a free online panel discussion with leaders who are leveraging cross-racial partnerships in meaningful ways. Moderated by Dr. Mya Fisher, founder of Global Equity Forward, “The Power of Cross-Racial Solidarity in Advancing Racial Justice” aims to answer the following question:

How can marginalized communities come together to advance racial justice?

Register here: http://ow.ly/OV0Q50Fr58Y

Anti-Asian hate crimes rose by nearly 150 percent in America's largest cities last year, according to the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism. The Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community cannot and should not have to combat this violence alone — and it hasn’t been.

On Monday, July 19 at 7PM EDT, join us for a free online panel discussion with leaders who are leveraging cross-racial partnerships in meaningful ways. Moderated by Dr. Mya Fisher, founder of Global Equity Forward, “The Power of Cross-Racial Solidarity in Advancing Racial Justice” aims to answer the following question:

How can marginalized communities come together to advance racial justice?

Register here: http://ow.ly/OV0Q50Fr58Y

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Car...
07/08/2021

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Carpentry Tools from Japan," closing this Sunday, we asked our community to respond to this question to connect the past, present, and future of craftsmanship with artists, architects, and designers from around the world. http://ow.ly/526h50FnzuN

"Craftsmanship is a way of life. All of the knowledge imbued in the biographies of various materials is used to enhance their capacity, and the precise skill necessary to handle them comes from an appreciation of the materials and a sense of gratitude to work in harmony with nature. Craftsmanship is a respectful intervention of the human hand in the natural world to introduce beauty and utility to our daily lives."—architect Toshiko Mori

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Carpentry Tools from Japan," closing this Sunday, we asked our community to respond to this question to connect the past, present, and future of craftsmanship with artists, architects, and designers from around the world. http://ow.ly/526h50FnzuN

"Craftsmanship is a way of life. All of the knowledge imbued in the biographies of various materials is used to enhance their capacity, and the precise skill necessary to handle them comes from an appreciation of the materials and a sense of gratitude to work in harmony with nature. Craftsmanship is a respectful intervention of the human hand in the natural world to introduce beauty and utility to our daily lives."—architect Toshiko Mori

Happy Tanabata (七夕) 🌟🎋 Part of LACMA Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Yashima Gakutei collection, this 19th-century wo...
07/07/2021

Happy Tanabata (七夕) 🌟🎋 Part of LACMA Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Yashima Gakutei collection, this 19th-century woodblock print is affectionately titled “Making a Wish to Meet a Good Mate during the Tanabata Festival.”

Based on an ancient tale of star-crossed lovers, Tanabata celebrates the meeting of deities Orihime and Hikoboshi, represented by the stars Vega and Altair — which become clearly visible in the summer sky.

Happy Tanabata (七夕) 🌟🎋 Part of LACMA Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Yashima Gakutei collection, this 19th-century woodblock print is affectionately titled “Making a Wish to Meet a Good Mate during the Tanabata Festival.”

Based on an ancient tale of star-crossed lovers, Tanabata celebrates the meeting of deities Orihime and Hikoboshi, represented by the stars Vega and Altair — which become clearly visible in the summer sky.

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Car...
07/07/2021

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Carpentry Tools from Japan," closing this Sunday, we asked our community to respond to this question to connect the past, present, and future of craftsmanship with artists, architects, and designers from around the world. http://ow.ly/526h50FnzuN

For designers AOIRO: "Great craftsmen breathe life into their work. One can trace a deep nurturing path of materials into the final shape, including a space for growth with those who would eventually own and use these objects. With great craftsmanship, there is a kind of determination, grace, and spirit."

What do Reggie Smith and Japanese warriors have in common? Hint: It’s not baseball ⚾️American former professional baseba...
07/06/2021

What do Reggie Smith and Japanese warriors have in common? Hint: It’s not baseball ⚾️

American former professional baseball player Reggie Smith played two seasons (1983-1984) for Japan’s Yomiuri Giants. After finishing an impressive playing career, he served as the Dodgers’ hitting instructor back in the U.S., where he was known to wield a katana, or a samurai sword, during batting practice. Smith used the sword as an instructional tool to teach players the correct way to grip a bat, an idea he got from all-time Japanese home run hitter Sadaharu Oh (right photo), who is said to have trained with a 600-year-old katana.

In a lead-up to the 150th anniversary of baseball in Japan, we’re hosting a free online event on July 14 at 8PM EDT. “Let’s Play Two: Baseball in Japan & the U.S.” explores the past, present and future of the national pastime in both countries. Register here: http://ow.ly/Z79a50FoqWi

📸 Photos courtesy of Robert Whiting’s new book “Tokyo Junkie”

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Car...
07/06/2021

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Carpentry Tools from Japan," closing on July 11, we asked our community to respond to this question to connect the past, present, and future of craftsmanship with artists, architects, and designers from around the world. http://ow.ly/526h50FnzuN

For artist Takuro Kuwata: "Communicating with the material is a very important point for me. I let the material guide me as I emphasize its natural lines through the firing and glazing processes to showcase it in its most beautiful and unexpected form. The artistry lays in finding the right balance between imagination and craftsmanship."

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Carpentry Tools from Japan," closing on July 11, we asked our community to respond to this question to connect the past, present, and future of craftsmanship with artists, architects, and designers from around the world. http://ow.ly/526h50FnzuN

For artist Takuro Kuwata: "Communicating with the material is a very important point for me. I let the material guide me as I emphasize its natural lines through the firing and glazing processes to showcase it in its most beautiful and unexpected form. The artistry lays in finding the right balance between imagination and craftsmanship."

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Car...
07/05/2021

What does craftsmanship mean to you? In celebration of the final days of our exhibition "When Practice Becomes Form: Carpentry Tools from Japan," closing on July 11, we asked our community to respond to this question to connect the past, present, and future of craftsmanship with artists, architects, and designers from around the world. http://ow.ly/526h50FnzuN

For artist and musician Jaiko Suzuki: "Craftsmanship seems like a form of love to me. A cultivated passion and the ability to express one’s idea of beauty, translating your quiet fire within to the outside world."

Address

333 E 47th St
New York, NY
10017

SUBWAY: #6 to 51st Street or 42nd Street - Grand Central Station, or the E or V to Lexington Avenue and 53rd Street. BUS: M15 to 47th Street, M101 or M102 north on Third Avenue to 47th Street, or crosstown M27, M50 or M42.

General information

Built on land donated by Rockefeller, Japan Society's building was designed by architect Junzo Yoshimura and opened in 1971 as the first building by a leading Japanese architect in New York City. Located near the United Nations on 47th Street and First Avenue across the street from Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza park--just a short walk from Grand Central Station--activities at Japan Society are set against a stunning backdrop of indoor gardens, a reflecting pool and a waterfall. Furnished with a superb collection of tables, chairs and benches designed by master woodworker George Nakashima, the facilities include a 262-seat theater, art gallery, language center, library, conference facilities and over three floors of administrative space. The classic elegance and simplicity of Yoshimura's original vision has been preserved even as the building has been enhanced by a substantial renovation completed in 1998.

Telephone

(212) 832-1155

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