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American Folk Art Museum

Since 1961, the American Folk Art Museum has been the leading institution shaping the understanding of art by the self-taught through its exhibitions, publications, and educational programs.

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One of the most technically challenging –  and visually exciting – star quilts are those that feature a single large sta...
01/30/2023

One of the most technically challenging – and visually exciting – star quilts are those that feature a single large star blazing across the expanse of the textile. Precision in cutting and assembling multiple diamond patches is typically essential to the success of this type of quilt, which goes by many names depending on differences in color, fabric, composition, and size. The Star of Bethlehem Quilt is constructed in the same fashion as a Lone Star Quilt, but the quilt top might feature several stars rather than just one, and they may be of varying sizes.

Star of Bethlehem with Star Border Quilt, Artist unidentified, United States c. 1840–1860. Cotton. Frame Dimension: 90 3/4 × 90 1/2". Gift of Cyril Irwin Nelson in honor of Robert Bishop, American Folk Art Museum director (1977-1991), 1990.17.3. Photo by Gavin Ashworth.

“Parliamentary Buildings,” was the last painting that Morris Hirshfield produced before his death in 1946. This beautifu...
01/28/2023

“Parliamentary Buildings,” was the last painting that Morris Hirshfield produced before his death in 1946. This beautifully detailed work was inspired by a postcard of the iconic Parisian church, Sacre Coeur, sent to him by art collector Sidney Janis. The exhibition “Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered” includes an excerpt from a tribute that Janis later wrote for Hirshfield in View magazine, in which he describes the piece to be “touchingly prophetic.”

“No longer a view of a church in a strict sense, the painting is nevertheless infused with a high degree of spirituality and philosophic over-tone. As Hirshfield’s final work, it symbolizes life after death, and virtually becomes the painter’s own monument,” he added.

Tomorrow is the last day to see this exhibition and explore the most comprehensive gathering of Hirshfield’s work ever assembled. The Museum is open from 11:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and admission is always free.

Morris Hirshfield (1872, Russian Poland–1946, Brooklyn, NY), "Parliamentary Buildings," c. 1946. Oil on canvas. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection, 1969. 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.

Looking for fun weekend plans?! We’ve got you covered. This weekend marks the last chance to see our critically-acclaime...
01/27/2023

Looking for fun weekend plans?! We’ve got you covered.

This weekend marks the last chance to see our critically-acclaimed exhibition, Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered! As the first retrospective of Hirshfield’s work in nearly 80 years, the exhibition explores the full range of the artist’s intricate brushwork, visual dazzle, and radical departures from realism – and you won’t want to miss it.

Reserve a ticket online or drop-in before the show closes on Sunday, January 29th. Admission is always free.

Morris Hirshfield, (1872, Russian Poland–1946, Brooklyn, NY), "Cat and Two Kittens," c. 1945. Oil on canvas, Collection of KAWS. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.

We’re thrilled to share that our next two exhibitions, "What That Quilt Knows About Me," and "Material Witness: Folk and...
01/26/2023

We’re thrilled to share that our next two exhibitions, "What That Quilt Knows About Me," and "Material Witness: Folk and Self-Taught Artists at Work" will open on March 17, 2023!

Ahead of these openings, the Museum galleries will be temporarily closed starting on January 30th for design renovations and installation work. Visit our website to read a letter from Director & CEO Jason T. Busch for more information about these exciting plans.

https://folkartmuseum.org/news/a-message-from-the-jason-t-busch/

“What That Quilt Knows About Me” features approximately 40 quilts and related works of art from the 19th to 21st centuries. Crafted from both traditional and unorthodox materials, the quilts are presented as deeply emotional objects that give us insight into a range of personal and cultural histories. Meanwhile, “Material Witness: Folk and Self-Taught Artists at Work” is the first in a series of thematic shows generously supported by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation. This exhibition will be on view in the Museum’s Daniel Cowin Gallery, and explores how artists learn with and through material engagement – often in ways that exceed conventional frameworks for artistic training.

Images: Carl Klewicke (1835–1913), Original Design Quilt, Corning, New York c. 1907. Pieced silk, faille, taffeta, and satin, 60 x 72 1/2 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, Museum purchase, 2012.1.1. (On view in “What That Quilt Knows About Me”).

Consuelo “Chelo” González Amézcua (1903-1975) Scrutinare Del Rio, Val Verde Couny, Texas Work is dated December 14, 1970 (TMS record says c. 1970s) Pencil and ballpoint pen on paper 27 3/16 x 21 1/8 in. Frame: 29 9/16 x 23 3/8 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Jacqueline Loewe Fowler, 2018.19.1 (On view in “Material Witness: Folk and Self-Taught Artists at Work.”)

To create these gorgeous slippers that Morris Hirshfield originally designed over a century ago, contemporary artist Liz...
01/25/2023

To create these gorgeous slippers that Morris Hirshfield originally designed over a century ago, contemporary artist Liz Blahd researched historically accurate colors and lightly stained fabrics with tea or coffee so they would resemble the appearance of vintage textiles.

Long before he became a celebrated self-taught painter, Hirshfield and his wife launched a wholesale foot-care business cleverly titled “E-Z Walk Manufacturing Company,” which featured arch support and ankle straighteners, as well as a line of bo***ir slippers. Bo***ir slippers were decorative shoes intended for home use, particularly in the bedroom, dressing room, or private sitting room. For our current exhibition, "Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered," Blahd created 14 slippers to the specifications of Hirshfield’s patented designs of the 1920s.

Don’t miss your chance to view these slippers and learn more about Hirshfield’s background as a tailor before the exhibition closes on January 29th!

Photos by Eva Cruz, EveryStory.

"View: The Modern Magazine" was an influential art and literary magazine published in New York from 1940 to 1947. Edited...
01/24/2023

"View: The Modern Magazine" was an influential art and literary magazine published in New York from 1940 to 1947. Edited by the artist Charles Henri Ford and writer Parker Tyler, View promoted avant-garde art and culture, particularly surrealism, to an American readership. Each issue featured the work of a different artist on the cover. In some cases, the work already existed; in others, a new painting or photograph was made for the occasion.

When Morris Hirshfield was asked to create the cover of the October 1945 issue, he made this painting of a woman, strategically covered by a geometric sash and four large blossoms. Three brilliantly patterned birds perched on the woman’s hand and leafy stems overlaying her body provide visual contrast and companionship. Hirshfield’s dream-like presentation of a nearly n**e figure with a large sprig coming out of her mouth made an appropriately disarming cover image of the surrealist-inspired View.

Don't miss your chance to see this artwork in our exhibition "Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered," closing soon on January 29th!

Photos by Eva Cruz, EveryStory.

Happy ! We’re kicking off the “Year of the Rabbit” with unique rabbit-themed artworks from our collection that were made...
01/22/2023

Happy ! We’re kicking off the “Year of the Rabbit” with unique rabbit-themed artworks from our collection that were made around the world.

Artist unidentified, “Standing rabbit,” Eastern United States, 1860–1900, Paint on plaster of Paris, 10 1/4 × 4 1/8 × 5 7/8 in., Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York, Bequest of Effie Thixton Arthur, 1980.2.74.

Artist unidentified, (1805-1900), “Rabbit Box,” Chiengmai, Thailand, c. 1984, Paint on wood, 24 x 22 x 6 1/2 in., Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York, Gift of Elizabeth F. Wecter, Animal Carnival, Inc., IR85.53.89. Photo by American Folk Art Museum.

Artist unidentified, (1805-1900), “Seated Rabbit,” Indonesia, c. 1980, Paint on wood, 6 x 11 1/2 in., Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York, Gift of Elizabeth F. Wecter, Animal Carnival, Inc., IR85.53.51. Photo by American Folk Art Museum.

"The critically applauded show, on view through January 29, 2023, seeks to not only introduce Hirshfield to a contempora...
01/20/2023
Morris Hirshfield Worked Most of His Life as a Tailor—Here Are 3 Things to Know About the Self-Taught Artist Who Was Revered by the Surrealists and Is Now a Museum Star | Artnet News

"The critically applauded show, on view through January 29, 2023, seeks to not only introduce Hirshfield to a contemporary audience, but also solidify his standing within the greater trajectory of Modern art and rectify years of critical neglect," via Annikka Olsen for artnet.

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/three-things-morris-hirshfield-afam-2243724

Once obscure self-taught artist Morris Hirshfield is experiencing a resurgence through a comprehensive show at the American Folk Art Museum.

In the mid-19th century, one of the most popular floral appliqué patterns created in the red, green, and white color sch...
01/20/2023

In the mid-19th century, one of the most popular floral appliqué patterns created in the red, green, and white color scheme was the Whig Rose, a design that is represented in the Museum’s collection in a number of different variations. This quilt is distinguished by its “swag and tassel” border, evidence of the enduring popularity of the Greek Revival style during this time period.

Artist unidentified, Whig Rose Quilt with Swag and Tassel Border,
United States c. 1850–1860. Cotton, 100 × 82".
Gift of Irene Reichert in honor of Nathan Druet, 1993.1.2. Photo by Gavin Ashworth.

Kathyanne White achieves the effect of an abstract painting by placing fabric intuitively and without premeditation onto...
01/19/2023

Kathyanne White achieves the effect of an abstract painting by placing fabric intuitively and without premeditation onto canvas and then attaching the fabric to the canvas with thread. The artist dyes most of her own cloth, sometimes one hundred yards at a time, and creates specific color palettes for each textile. In this example, she mixed turquoise and cerulean blue, hues she created with colorfast Procion dyes.

Kathyanne White (b. 1950), Reflection, Prescott, Arizona, United States, c. 2001. Hand-dyed cotton, 78 × 48". Collection American Folk Art Museum. Gift of the artist, 2003.11.1. Photo by Gavin Ashworth.

Morris Hirshfield was an observant Jew throughout his life, both in Poland and the United States. He and his wife kept a...
01/18/2023

Morris Hirshfield was an observant Jew throughout his life, both in Poland and the United States. He and his wife kept a Kosher home and lived in Borough Park, Gravesend, and Bensonhurst, all Brooklyn neighborhoods with sizable Jewish populations. Hirshfield painted every day for ten hours, save for the Jewish holidays when he painted not at all.

Two of Hirshfield’s Biblical paintings, “Daniel in the Lions’ Den,” and “Moses and Aaron” are featured in a section of our current exhibition, Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered. In the first painting, the prophet Daniel has been thrown into a lair of lions as punishment for praying to God rather than the Persian King Darius. God saves Daniel by sending an angel to “shut the mouths” of the lions. After Daniel is freed, the enemies who plotted against him are cast into the lion’s den, at which point “the lions had mastery of them.” The second painting depicts a scene from Exodus in which Moses, having received the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai, presents them to his brother Aaron.

View these paintings and more before the exhibition closes on January 29th! The Museum is open Tuesday-Sunday from 11:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and admission is always free.

Photos by Eva Cruz, EveryStory.

This “fancy-weave” coverlet was made to commemorate the Hemfield Railroad, a construction project that began in 1850. Th...
01/17/2023

This “fancy-weave” coverlet was made to commemorate the Hemfield Railroad, a construction project that began in 1850. The seventy-six mile line, intended to provide an eastern outlet to western roads, was to operate in Pennsylvania between Greensburg and West Newton, Westmoreland County, and branch to Donegal Township, Washington County, and then to Wheeling, Virginia (now West Virginia). Sixteen miles of track, laid from the Virginia state line to Washington, Pennsylvania, opened in 1857.

However, the project was abandoned and the Hemfield Railroad was sold in 1871 to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. It is not known who wove the small group of extant Hemfield Railroad coverlets, though they traditionally have been attributed to five Virginia/West Virginia weavers: Martin Burns, Daniel Campbell, Harvey Cook, George Coulter, and William Harper.

Fancy-Weave Doublecloth Coverlet: Snowflake Medallion with Hemfield Railroad Border, Artist unidentified, Possibly West Virginia or Pennsylvania, United States, 1850-1857, Wool and cotton, 90 1/4 × 81". Gift of Stephen L. Snow, 1980.13.1.

Today is , and we are celebrating the profound legacy of the civil rights leader, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This sculpt...
01/16/2023

Today is , and we are celebrating the profound legacy of the civil rights leader, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

This sculpture of King was made by Ulysses Davis (1914–1990) a self-taught artist who created a diverse body of wood-carved works that reflected his deep faith, humor, and dignity. Davis developed his skills over a period of more than 50 years in Georgia, crafting portraits of American and African leaders, Biblical figures, animals, and fantastical beasts. Though his work was sought after by collectors and dealers, Davis largely refused to sell his art throughout his lifetime, noting that the sculptures were his “treasures” and stating that “If I sold these, I’d really be poor.”

This beautiful MLK Jr. sculpture was one of many pieces on view at the American Folk Art Museum in the 2009 exhibition, “The Treasure of Ulysses Davis.”

Martin Luther King, Ulysses Davis (1914–1990), Savannah, Georgia c. 1968, Wood and paint, 9 1/4 x 5 x 5 in. Collection of Jane and Bert Hunecke Photo by Peter Harholdt.

“While ‘Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered’ dives into the painter’s unequivocally dazzling oeuvre, it is also interested in...
01/14/2023

“While ‘Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered’ dives into the painter’s unequivocally dazzling oeuvre, it is also interested in questions of legacy—in the writing and rewriting of art history, the interpretive frameworks that are applied or retrofitted to an artist’s work, and the nebulous relationship between the ‘insider’ and the ‘outsider’” — Cassie Packard for the January edition of .

Don’t miss this critically-acclaimed exhibition before it closes on January 29th! Visit our website for more information and to reserve a free ticket.

Morris Hirshfield, (1872, Russian Poland–1946, Brooklyn, NY), “Boy with Dog,” 1945 Oil on canvas. Collection of Carroll Janis, New York. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.

01/13/2023
Free Music Fridays: Facebook Live, January 13, 2023

The museum’s critically acclaimed performance series begins its 2023 online series tonight via Facebook Live. Music featured at the Free Music Fridays series thematically reflects the spirit of self-taught art on view at the museum. Hosted by Lara Ewen.

This month's show features:
6:00 pm: Chris Michael
6:30 pm: Jessi Robertson
7:00 pm: Ruby Rae

Please consider making a donation of any size to support our virtual programs:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/free-music-fridays-facebook-live-january-13-2023-tickets-481419417437

Note: Music will be broadcast live from 6:00 to 7:30 pm, and donations will be accepted until 9:30 pm.

Image: Chris Michael by Diana Ray; Jessi Robertson by Wolfhart Creative Photography; Ruby Rae by Anna Haas

In the early 1920s, black and dark blue became favorite colors in Midwestern Amish quilts, especially as backgrounds. Bo...
01/13/2023

In the early 1920s, black and dark blue became favorite colors in Midwestern Amish quilts, especially as backgrounds. Both colors provided a strong contrast to the bold reds, yellows, blues, greens, and other hues that quiltmakers frequently selected for their patterns and that were often used in Amish clothing, especially in children’s dresses and shirts.

Artist unidentified, Hummingbirds Quilt, Shipshewana, Indiana, United States c. 1920–1930. Cotton, Frame Dimension: 87 3/4 × 68 1/4". Collection American Folk Art Museum. Gift of David Pottinger, 1980.37.69. Photo by Schecter Lee.

Our critically-acclaimed Free Music Fridays series returns tomorrow on Facebook Live at 6:00pm ET! Tune in to watch thes...
01/12/2023

Our critically-acclaimed Free Music Fridays series returns tomorrow on Facebook Live at 6:00pm ET! Tune in to watch these talented musicians perform by registering via the link below. Hosted each month by Lara Ewen.⁠

-Chris Michael () 6:00-6:30 ⁠
-Jessi Robertson () 6:30-7:00⁠
-Ruby Rae () 7:00-7:30 ⁠

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/free-music-fridays-facebook-live-january-13-2023-tickets-481419417437?aff=odcleoeventsincollection

Photo credits: Chris Michael by Diana Ray; Jessi Robertson by Wolfhart Creative Photography; Ruby Rae by Anna Haas

Which Morris Hirshfield animal painting is your favorite?!Hirshfield created a number of animal works throughout his car...
01/11/2023

Which Morris Hirshfield animal painting is your favorite?!

Hirshfield created a number of animal works throughout his career, including depictions of dogs that resemble horses (with a hint of wolf and even, in terms of patterning, a cow), house cats with arresting facial expressions, and an unforgettable tiger who looks at us with both curiosity and bit of fang-baring ferocity. Don’t miss your chance to see each of these striking works in the exhibition Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered, on view at the Museum through January 29th.

Morris Hirshfield, (1872, Russian Poland–1946, Brooklyn, NY), “Dog and Pups,” c. 1944, Oil on canvas, Milwaukee Art Museum, gift of Donna and Donald Baumgartner, M2000.147. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.

Morris Hirshfield (1872, Poland–1946, United States) “Angora Cat,” 1937–1939 Oil on board on canvas 22 1/8 x 27 1/4 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection, 1967, 607.1967. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

Morris Hirshfield (1872, Poland–1946, United States) “Tiger,” 1940. Oil on canvas, 28 x 39 7/8 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Fund, 1941, 328.1941. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

Samplers and needlework pictures offer rare material glimpses into the daily experiences of early American girls. Throug...
01/10/2023

Samplers and needlework pictures offer rare material glimpses into the daily experiences of early American girls. Through the repetitive movements of sewing, the makers of these works of art actively embodied values of diligence and patience with every stitch.

While such objects were made in part as evidence of a girl’s industry, accomplishment, and taste, they also bridge the gap between history and the present through arresting color, texture, and pattern, as well as recorded dates and names. As an expression of shared identity and taste, needleworkers and their teachers created compositions that were variations of common themes, seen in the reiteration of houses, rolling hills, prettily dressed figures, and abundant plants and animals. This particular needlework example was made in New England in the late 1700s.

Hannah Staples, Sampler, Probably vicinity of Portland, Maine c.
1791. Silk thread on linen. 10 3/4 x 10 3/8 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York. Gift of Louise Nevelson and Mike Nevelson, 1978.31.19.

This beautifully decorated tinware basket was made by the Boynton Shop in the early 19th century. John Boynton (1791–186...
01/09/2023

This beautifully decorated tinware basket was made by the Boynton Shop in the early 19th century. John Boynton (1791–1867) began making tinware in 1812, first in the Old Saunders Tinshop in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, and after about 1825 in Templeton, Massachusetts. Unlike other tinware examples, much of the tinware produced by Boynton featured stenciled rather than freehand-painted decoration. This example has multiple colors washed over metallic powders that have been stenciled onto asphaltum, a substance that softens easily and requires multiple applications to create an opaque cover.

Boynton Shop, (act. 1812–1877), “Apple Basket,” New Hampshire or Massachusetts, United States, c. 1815–1835. Paint and metallic powders on asphaltum over tinplate, 2 3/4 × 11 1/8" in diam. Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York. Gift of the Historical Society of Early American Decoration, courtesy Ruth Bowles in memory of her mother, Mildred Abbott, 75.1.4. Photo by John Parnell.

Looking for a (free) way to spend your Sunday afternoon? Visit to see the critically-acclaimed exhibition, Morris Hirshf...
01/08/2023

Looking for a (free) way to spend your Sunday afternoon? Visit to see the critically-acclaimed exhibition, Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered, before it closes on January 29th!

The exhibition marks the first retrospective devoted to Hirshfield in nearly 80 years, and allows viewers to experience the full range of his intricate brushwork, visual dazzle, and radical departures from realism.

Photo by Eva Cruz, EveryStory.

Address

2 Lincoln Square, Columbus Avenue At 66th St
New York, NY
10023

By subway: 1 train to 66 Street - Lincoln Center By bus: M5, M7, M11, M20, M66, M104

Opening Hours

Tuesday 11:30am - 6pm
Wednesday 11:30am - 6pm
Thursday 11:30am - 6pm
Friday 11:30am - 6pm
Saturday 11:30am - 6pm
Sunday 11:30am - 6pm

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(212) 595-9533

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One of the most technically challenging – and visually exciting – star quilts are those that feature a single large star blazing across the expanse of the textile. Precision in cutting and assembling multiple diamond patches is typically essential to the success of this type of quilt, which goes by many names depending on differences in color, fabric, composition, and size. The Star of Bethlehem Quilt is constructed in the same fashion as a Lone Star Quilt, but the quilt top might feature several stars rather than just one, and they may be of varying sizes.

Star of Bethlehem with Star Border Quilt, Artist unidentified, United States c. 1840–1860. Cotton. Frame Dimension: 90 3/4 × 90 1/2". Gift of Cyril Irwin Nelson in honor of Robert Bishop, American Folk Art Museum director (1977-1991), 1990.17.3. Photo by Gavin Ashworth.
“Parliamentary Buildings,” was the last painting that Morris Hirshfield produced before his death in 1946. This beautifully detailed work was inspired by a postcard of the iconic Parisian church, Sacre Coeur, sent to him by art collector Sidney Janis. The exhibition “Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered” includes an excerpt from a tribute that Janis later wrote for Hirshfield in View magazine, in which he describes the piece to be “touchingly prophetic.”

“No longer a view of a church in a strict sense, the painting is nevertheless infused with a high degree of spirituality and philosophic over-tone. As Hirshfield’s final work, it symbolizes life after death, and virtually becomes the painter’s own monument,” he added.

Tomorrow is the last day to see this exhibition and explore the most comprehensive gathering of Hirshfield’s work ever assembled. The Museum is open from 11:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and admission is always free.

Morris Hirshfield (1872, Russian Poland–1946, Brooklyn, NY), "Parliamentary Buildings," c. 1946. Oil on canvas. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection, 1969. 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.
Looking for fun weekend plans?! We’ve got you covered.

This weekend marks the last chance to see our critically-acclaimed exhibition, Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered! As the first retrospective of Hirshfield’s work in nearly 80 years, the exhibition explores the full range of the artist’s intricate brushwork, visual dazzle, and radical departures from realism – and you won’t want to miss it.

Reserve a ticket online or drop-in before the show closes on Sunday, January 29th. Admission is always free.

Morris Hirshfield, (1872, Russian Poland–1946, Brooklyn, NY), "Cat and Two Kittens," c. 1945. Oil on canvas, Collection of KAWS. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.
We’re thrilled to share that our next two exhibitions, "What That Quilt Knows About Me," and "Material Witness: Folk and Self-Taught Artists at Work" will open on March 17, 2023!

Ahead of these openings, the Museum galleries will be temporarily closed starting on January 30th for design renovations and installation work. Visit our website to read a letter from Director & CEO Jason T. Busch for more information about these exciting plans.

https://folkartmuseum.org/news/a-message-from-the-jason-t-busch/

“What That Quilt Knows About Me” features approximately 40 quilts and related works of art from the 19th to 21st centuries. Crafted from both traditional and unorthodox materials, the quilts are presented as deeply emotional objects that give us insight into a range of personal and cultural histories. Meanwhile, “Material Witness: Folk and Self-Taught Artists at Work” is the first in a series of thematic shows generously supported by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation. This exhibition will be on view in the Museum’s Daniel Cowin Gallery, and explores how artists learn with and through material engagement – often in ways that exceed conventional frameworks for artistic training.

Images: Carl Klewicke (1835–1913), Original Design Quilt, Corning, New York c. 1907. Pieced silk, faille, taffeta, and satin, 60 x 72 1/2 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, Museum purchase, 2012.1.1. (On view in “What That Quilt Knows About Me”).

Consuelo “Chelo” González Amézcua (1903-1975) Scrutinare Del Rio, Val Verde Couny, Texas Work is dated December 14, 1970 (TMS record says c. 1970s) Pencil and ballpoint pen on paper 27 3/16 x 21 1/8 in. Frame: 29 9/16 x 23 3/8 in. American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Jacqueline Loewe Fowler, 2018.19.1 (On view in “Material Witness: Folk and Self-Taught Artists at Work.”)
To create these gorgeous slippers that Morris Hirshfield originally designed over a century ago, contemporary artist Liz Blahd researched historically accurate colors and lightly stained fabrics with tea or coffee so they would resemble the appearance of vintage textiles.

Long before he became a celebrated self-taught painter, Hirshfield and his wife launched a wholesale foot-care business cleverly titled “E-Z Walk Manufacturing Company,” which featured arch support and ankle straighteners, as well as a line of bo***ir slippers. Bo***ir slippers were decorative shoes intended for home use, particularly in the bedroom, dressing room, or private sitting room. For our current exhibition, "Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered," Blahd created 14 slippers to the specifications of Hirshfield’s patented designs of the 1920s.

Don’t miss your chance to view these slippers and learn more about Hirshfield’s background as a tailor before the exhibition closes on January 29th!

Photos by Eva Cruz, EveryStory.
"View: The Modern Magazine" was an influential art and literary magazine published in New York from 1940 to 1947. Edited by the artist Charles Henri Ford and writer Parker Tyler, View promoted avant-garde art and culture, particularly surrealism, to an American readership. Each issue featured the work of a different artist on the cover. In some cases, the work already existed; in others, a new painting or photograph was made for the occasion.

When Morris Hirshfield was asked to create the cover of the October 1945 issue, he made this painting of a woman, strategically covered by a geometric sash and four large blossoms. Three brilliantly patterned birds perched on the woman’s hand and leafy stems overlaying her body provide visual contrast and companionship. Hirshfield’s dream-like presentation of a nearly n**e figure with a large sprig coming out of her mouth made an appropriately disarming cover image of the surrealist-inspired View.

Don't miss your chance to see this artwork in our exhibition "Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered," closing soon on January 29th!

Photos by Eva Cruz, EveryStory.
Happy ! We’re kicking off the “Year of the Rabbit” with unique rabbit-themed artworks from our collection that were made around the world.

Artist unidentified, “Standing rabbit,” Eastern United States, 1860–1900, Paint on plaster of Paris, 10 1/4 × 4 1/8 × 5 7/8 in., Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York, Bequest of Effie Thixton Arthur, 1980.2.74.

Artist unidentified, (1805-1900), “Rabbit Box,” Chiengmai, Thailand, c. 1984, Paint on wood, 24 x 22 x 6 1/2 in., Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York, Gift of Elizabeth F. Wecter, Animal Carnival, Inc., IR85.53.89. Photo by American Folk Art Museum.

Artist unidentified, (1805-1900), “Seated Rabbit,” Indonesia, c. 1980, Paint on wood, 6 x 11 1/2 in., Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York, Gift of Elizabeth F. Wecter, Animal Carnival, Inc., IR85.53.51. Photo by American Folk Art Museum.
"The critically applauded show, on view through January 29, 2023, seeks to not only introduce Hirshfield to a contemporary audience, but also solidify his standing within the greater trajectory of Modern art and rectify years of critical neglect," via Annikka Olsen for artnet.

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/three-things-morris-hirshfield-afam-2243724
In the mid-19th century, one of the most popular floral appliqué patterns created in the red, green, and white color scheme was the Whig Rose, a design that is represented in the Museum’s collection in a number of different variations. This quilt is distinguished by its “swag and tassel” border, evidence of the enduring popularity of the Greek Revival style during this time period.

Artist unidentified, Whig Rose Quilt with Swag and Tassel Border,
United States c. 1850–1860. Cotton, 100 × 82".
Gift of Irene Reichert in honor of Nathan Druet, 1993.1.2. Photo by Gavin Ashworth.
Kathyanne White achieves the effect of an abstract painting by placing fabric intuitively and without premeditation onto canvas and then attaching the fabric to the canvas with thread. The artist dyes most of her own cloth, sometimes one hundred yards at a time, and creates specific color palettes for each textile. In this example, she mixed turquoise and cerulean blue, hues she created with colorfast Procion dyes.

Kathyanne White (b. 1950), Reflection, Prescott, Arizona, United States, c. 2001. Hand-dyed cotton, 78 × 48". Collection American Folk Art Museum. Gift of the artist, 2003.11.1. Photo by Gavin Ashworth.
Morris Hirshfield was an observant Jew throughout his life, both in Poland and the United States. He and his wife kept a Kosher home and lived in Borough Park, Gravesend, and Bensonhurst, all Brooklyn neighborhoods with sizable Jewish populations. Hirshfield painted every day for ten hours, save for the Jewish holidays when he painted not at all.

Two of Hirshfield’s Biblical paintings, “Daniel in the Lions’ Den,” and “Moses and Aaron” are featured in a section of our current exhibition, Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered. In the first painting, the prophet Daniel has been thrown into a lair of lions as punishment for praying to God rather than the Persian King Darius. God saves Daniel by sending an angel to “shut the mouths” of the lions. After Daniel is freed, the enemies who plotted against him are cast into the lion’s den, at which point “the lions had mastery of them.” The second painting depicts a scene from Exodus in which Moses, having received the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai, presents them to his brother Aaron.

View these paintings and more before the exhibition closes on January 29th! The Museum is open Tuesday-Sunday from 11:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and admission is always free.

Photos by Eva Cruz, EveryStory.
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Other Art Museums in New York (show all)

Museum of Art and Design The Museum of Arts & Design Museum of Arts & Design Museum of Arts and Design MAD | Museum of Arts and Design Herbert & Eileen Bernard Museum of Judaica Frick Collection The Frick Collection Frick Museum Museum of Early American Folk Arts Museo de Arte Moderno (Nueva York) The unPrivate House MoMA Manhattan Museum of Art Museum Of Modern Art, Queens