Storefront for Art and Architecture

Storefront for Art and Architecture Founded in 1982 by artists and architects in downtown New York
(50)

Direct Action by Francisca Benitez showcased the processes and procedures of Benítez’s artistic practice, which was cent...
09/28/2023

Direct Action by Francisca Benitez showcased the processes and procedures of Benítez’s artistic practice, which was centered in the use of performance as a method to engage the politics of space and her participation in political and community action. Her involvement with various activist organizations such as The Stop Shopping Choir, Art Against Displacement, Chinatown Working Group, Coalition to Protect Chinatown & The Lower East Side, East River Park Action, and Asamblea Popular de Chile en Nueva York, are crucial aspects of her practice. With her artistic work operating as both backdrop and instigator, Benitez used Storefront as a productive space to strengthen existing collaborations and forge new ones.

Throughout the run of the exhibition, the gallery operated as a meeting room, a rehearsal studio, a writing workshop, and an urban stage. By opening up the space of the institution to the many activist groups she is an integral part of, Benítez transformed Storefront into a site for social intervention.

Direct Action was the second exhibition presented as part of On the Ground, a yearlong research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the heterogeneous threshold between public and private space throughout 2023. Frank Bz

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original by Canal Street Research Association looked at the spatial effects of...
09/28/2023

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original by Canal Street Research Association looked at the spatial effects of the criminalization of informal markets and the contemporary repercussions this had on sidewalks and across the facades of Lower Manhattan.

Over the course of the exhibit, Canal Street Research Association “bootlegged” a historic Canal Street counterfeit bust, by tracing the bust’s historical antecedents in order to understand current-day conditions. The archival and speculative research for this re-staging took various modes: resurfacing Ming Fay's seminal public artwork proposal titled Monumental Fruit and other artworks, creating a modular display system in collaboration with architectural collective common room, and pursuing an active intervention on Storefront’s facade. Offering up Storefront as ad space, Canal Street Research Association mimicked an increasingly frequent Lower Manhattan phenomenon that prioritized buildings as billboards—while attempting to invert the typical flow of funds by redistributing corporate ad money to instead support the real on-the-ground advertisers for luxury fashion houses: shanzhai luxury vendors themselves.

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original was the first exhibition presented as part of On the Ground, a yearlong research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the heterogeneous threshold between public and private space throughout 2023.

04/10/2023
The slippery meeting of legitimate and illegitimate, real and fake, has been a guiding line of inquiry for Canal Street ...
04/05/2023

The slippery meeting of legitimate and illegitimate, real and fake, has been a guiding line of inquiry for Canal Street Research Association (CSRA). In this exhibition, the artists employ the bootleg as a method of re-staging, and therefore more closely examining, complex urban phenomena that may be overlooked due to their unofficial or illicit nature.

In this spirit, CSRA has installed a set composed by a staircase filled with bags full of counterfeit objects underneath which evokes the stairway at New Land Plaza, the key building of the “Counterfeit Triangle” from where Bloomberg held the infamous 2008 press conference criminalizing the tenancy and selling of counterfeit goods in the city.

Understood as a fragment of public space, the stairs invite visitors to gather at the gallery and engage in critical conversations about the ongoing persecution of informal street markets, the displacement of small, local storefront business, and an approach to property that values empty buildings as ad space and real estate holdings rather than as places to live. A collection of reading materials curated by the artists are offered at the gallery to expand on their ongoing research on these enduring issues.

___

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original by Canal Street Research Association is on view through May 27. Storefront’s gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday, from 12pm – 6pm.

___

Images:

1. Installation view of Set (stairs, bags marble), 2023. Photo by PJ Rountree
2. Close up installation view of Set (stairs, bags marble), 2023. Photo by PJ Rountree
3. Framed exhibition’s newsprint, 2023. Photo by PJ Rountree
4. Visitors during opening night, 2023.
5. Photograph of New Land Plaza’s staircase within the installation's mood board, 2023. Photo by PJ Rountree
6. Artist’s portrait at New Land Plaza’s staircase, 2023. Photo by PJ Rountree
7. Set of research books, 2023. Photo by Huei Lin

Tune into Montez Press Radio today at 1pm EST for the first episode of On the Ground: Broadcasts! Titled Threshold, this...
03/26/2023

Tune into Montez Press Radio today at 1pm EST for the first episode of On the Ground: Broadcasts!

Titled Threshold, this episode explores the tensions between public and private space through a close look at New York City’s ground floor.

Former Cultural Director of the Instituto Bardi, Sol Camacho reads an excerpt from Lina Bo Bardi’s seminal text, Vitrinas. Artist Alvaro Barrington discusses the storefront as a threshold between life and work. Canal Street Research Association further explore their inquiry into billboards and the “facadification” of Manhattan in a four way chat with artists Nick Poe and Gabriela D’Addario, and Levi Eichenstein, CEO of Red Rock Outdoor. Journalist Nathan Kensinger and UPENN Media Studies professor Shannon Mattern engage in conversation around their respective works on the transformation of the city’s streets and sidewalks. Architect Germane Barnes expands on his long-standing research on Porch Politics.

Link in bio, you won’t want to miss it!







sounds

We’re hosting two events to wrap up our programming for the month of March.This evening, Storefront members will be led ...
03/23/2023

We’re hosting two events to wrap up our programming for the month of March.

This evening, Storefront members will be led by curators at 52 Walker through their current exhibition, Gordon Matta-Clark & Pope.L: Impossible Failures

For our first On the Ground: Open Session, David L. Johnson will be hosting an evening of conversation and collective learning around his own video work as well as a single-take film by photographer Robert Frank.

Currently on view at Storefront’s gallery through May 27 is New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York by Canal Street Research Association.

Tap link in bio to learn more!

Join us at the gallery next Wednesday, March 29 at 7pm for the first in our On the Ground: Open Session series. Artist D...
03/21/2023

Join us at the gallery next Wednesday, March 29 at 7pm for the first in our On the Ground: Open Session series.

Artist David L. Johnson () is convening an evening of conversation and collective learning around his own video work and C'est Vrai! (One Hour), a single-take film photographer Robert Frank made in 1990 on the streets of SoHo and the Lower East Side. Johnson will host writers Nicholas Dawidoff, Geelia Ronkina, and special guests to converse around street performance, pedestrian perspectives, and how we choose to document New York as it continues to change.

Open Sessions are a series of evenings curated and hosted at Storefront by an invited guest during the last week of each month. These informal gatherings open a space for shared dialogue on critical issues surrounding the themes of Storefront’s yearlong research project, On the Ground.



This program has limited capacity. RSVP at the link in bio to attend. Attendees are highly encouraged to wear masks.



Image: From the Street, I Can See the Moon by David L. Johnson, 2014. C’est Vrai! (One Hour) by Robert Frank, 1990

Graphic Design: Estudio Herrera

You Can’t Beat a New York Original (About the exhibition title)Since the 2008 bust of the Counterfeit Triangle, New Land...
03/14/2023

You Can’t Beat a New York Original (About the exhibition title)

Since the 2008 bust of the Counterfeit Triangle, New Land Plaza has remained largely vacant. With liability for storing or selling counterfeit goods now falling on property owners, renting building space to bootleg vendors has become a high risk endeavor and some landlords have found an alternate income stream: renting out building facades. The facades of these buildings can be highly lucrative as advertisement space, resulting in the rapid “facadification” of New York City. New Land Plaza’s upper windows are now occupied by a single advertisement for Boar’s Head deli meats which reads, seemingly devoid of irony: “You Can’t Beat a New York Original.” Canal Street Research Association mimics this phenomenon by turning the facade of Storefront into potential ad space. If rented, the income will fund a bootleg luxury ad campaign, to be created in collaboration with Canal Street artisans and vendors.

Read more at the link in bio.
___

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original by Canal Street Research Association is on view through May 27. Storefront’s gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday, from 12pm – 6pm.

___

Images:

1. good luck and make money!, 2023. Courtesy Canal Street Research Association.
2. New Land Plaza (interior), 2023. Photo by Huei Lin. Courtesy Canal Street Research Association.
3. This is not Empty Space, 2023. Courtesy Canal Street Research Association.
4. Set (Boar’s Head) and Research Items. Gallery installation, 2023. Photo by PJ Rountree

Bootlegging the Counterfeit Triangle“Even under extreme pressure, a triangle is capable of holding its shape. Within New...
03/04/2023

Bootlegging the Counterfeit Triangle

“Even under extreme pressure, a triangle is capable of holding its shape. Within New York’s cityscape, triangle scraps of land are formed where Lower Manhattan’s curves resist the grid. Visible from multiple angles to traffic and pedestrians, the triangle is valuable real estate. Layering triangles creates a prism through which to see a spectrum of phenomena that often elude documentation: the ongoing persecution of informal street markets, the displacement of small, local storefront business, and an approach to property that values empty buildings as ad space and real estate holdings rather than as places to live and gather. Hooray for the triangle, whose position allows us to see things we couldn’t before, and invites us to imagine different ways of inhabiting a city of squares!”

– Canal Street Research Association
Winter, 2023

__

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original by Canal Street Research Association is now on view! Thank you to all who joined us on Wednesday for the opening. The exhibition will be up through May 27, Wednesday to Saturday, from 12pm – 6pm.

Read more at the link in bio.
__

Images:
1. Canal Street Triangle, NYC. Contest site for the Gateways to Chinatown competition, backed by the Chinatown Partnership and Van Alen Institute, seeking proposals for the Canal Street Triangle.

2. Google Maps screenshot of 97 Kenmare triangle, home to Storefront’s gallery.

Join us next Wednesday, March 1st, for the opening of New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original. This newly com...
02/26/2023

Join us next Wednesday, March 1st, for the opening of New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original. This newly commissioned exhibition by Canal Street Research Association presents a speculative research on the shifting landscapes of Canal Street, featuring works by Ming Fay.

RSVP at link in bio.

This slippery meeting of legitimate and illegitimate, real and fake, has been a guiding line of inquiry for Canal Street Research Association, a fictional office entity set up by poetic research unit Shanzhai Lyric (Ming Lin and Alex Tatarsky) in 2020. “Shanzhai” is a Chinese neologism that has come to mean bootleg or fake. The concept of shanzhai offers a different mode of thinking about authorship, unsettling understandings of property, theft, and the traditional flow of economic exchange. Canal Street is one site where the embrace of shanzhai concepts has enabled informal modes of commerce to survive within an increasingly hostile environment. Canal Street Research Association employs the bootleg as a method of re-staging, and therefore more closely examining, complex urban phenomena that may be overlooked due to their unofficial or illicit nature.

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original is presented as part of On the Ground, a yearlong research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the heterogeneous threshold between public and private space throughout 2023.

Image: Canal Street Research Association at New Land Plaza, 2023. Photo by PJ Rountree

Graphic Design: Estudio Herrera

  season finale tonight !  Who is going to die? Will it be Albie’s last days reading “The Architecture of Closed Worlds:...
12/11/2022

season finale tonight ! Who is going to die? Will it be Albie’s last days reading “The Architecture of Closed Worlds: Or, What Is the Power of Sh*t?” by published by Storefront?

It’s been so fun spotting in ! Since we love this show so much, we will be giving away copies of Albie’s favorite book at our Members Party 𝑪𝑳𝑼𝑩 𝑲𝑬𝑵𝑴𝑨𝑹𝑬 next Thursday, Dec 15. Join us !

In 1992, artist Vito Acconci and architect Steven Holl were commissioned by co-directors Kyong Park and Shirin Neshat an...
12/10/2022

In 1992, artist Vito Acconci and architect Steven Holl were commissioned by co-directors Kyong Park and Shirin Neshat and curator Claudia Gould to transform Storefront’s aging facade through a collaborative architectural intervention. Acconci and Holl replaced the old storefront with a series of hinged panels arranged in a puzzle-like configuration that remain to this date. When the panels are locked in their open position, the facade dissolves and the interior space of the gallery expands out onto the sidewalk.

This iconic piece of public art, inserted into the outer layer of the building at 97 Kenmare, visually articulates Storefront’s enduring focus on the built environment and commitment to public life.

As founder Kyong Park notes:

(When opened)
There is no wall,
No barrier,
No inside,
No outside,
No space,
No building,
No place,
No institution,
No art,
No architecture,
No Acconci,
No Holl,
No Storefront,
(No money)

— Kyong Park, 1993

Today is the last day of 𝘗𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘢 𝘗𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘛𝘪𝘮𝘦! Come by the gallery any time between 12pm and 6pm to celebrate the closing of this very special show with us.
__

Images:

1. Facade construction, 1993
2. Facade construction, 1993
3. Steven Holl in back and Vito Acconci in front working on 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘢𝘤𝘢𝘥𝘦, 1993
4. Steven Holl with scale model, 1993
5. Steven Holl, Shirin Neshat, and Claudia Gould working on 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘢𝘤𝘢𝘥𝘦, 1993
6. Shirin Neshat opening small panel, 1993
7. Kyong Park in front of Storefront, 1993
8. Vito Acconci and guests at 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘢𝘤𝘢𝘥𝘦 opening, November 13, 1993
9. 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘢𝘤𝘢𝘥𝘦 opening, November 13, 1993
10. Child playing on open facade panel, 1993

Storefront moved to 97 Kenmare street in 1985. Prior to the intervention by Vito Acconci and Steven Holl in 1993, the or...
12/09/2022

Storefront moved to 97 Kenmare street in 1985. Prior to the intervention by Vito Acconci and Steven Holl in 1993, the original facade also served as a space for artistic experimentation.

In 1992 the facade was cut to install five functioning portable toilets for public use. Titled 𝘜𝘯𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘫𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘏𝘢𝘣𝘪𝘵, this intervention by artists James Keyden Cathcart, Frank Fantauzzi, and Terrence Van Elslander, commented on the lack of access to public restrooms in New York City.

The exhibition 𝘗𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘴𝘶𝘳𝘦 𝘉𝘶𝘪𝘭𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘉𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘬𝘰𝘶𝘵𝘴 by architect Mark West created a series of sensual, organic concrete forms that flowed onto the street. Through specially-carved openings in the gallery’s facade, West employed a technique he developed to cast concrete with fabric tension membranes.

Tomorrow is the last day of 𝘗𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘢 𝘗𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘛𝘪𝘮𝘦. Come by the gallery any time between 12pm and 6pm to celebrate the closing of this very special show with us.

__

Captions:

1. Photographic elevation of 97 Kenmare before Holl/Acconci intervention, 𝘗𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘴𝘶𝘳𝘦 𝘉𝘶𝘪𝘭𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘉𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘬𝘰𝘶𝘵𝘴 (1982) and 𝘜𝘯𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘫𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘏𝘢𝘣𝘪𝘵 (1982).
2. Photographic elevation of 97 Kenmare before Holl/Acconci intervention, detail
3. Photographic elevation of 97 Kenmare before Holl/Acconci intervention, detail
4. Photographic elevation of 97 Kenmare before Holl/Acconci intervention, detail
5. 𝘜𝘯𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘫𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘏𝘢𝘣𝘪𝘵, photograph of exterior installation.
6. 𝘜𝘯𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘫𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘏𝘢𝘣𝘪𝘵, photograph of interior installation.
7. 𝘗𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘴𝘶𝘳𝘦 𝘉𝘶𝘪𝘭𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘉𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘬𝘰𝘶𝘵𝘴 photograph of exterior installation.
8. 𝘗𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘴𝘶𝘳𝘦 𝘉𝘶𝘪𝘭𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘉𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘬𝘰𝘶𝘵𝘴 photograph of interior installation

Join us this Thursday, December 8, at 7:00pm to welcome The Studio Museum at Storefront for The Smokehouse Associates Wr...
12/06/2022

Join us this Thursday, December 8, at 7:00pm to welcome The Studio Museum at Storefront for The Smokehouse Associates Writers Forum!

Smokehouse Associates publication editor, Eric Booker () and contributing writers Charles L. Davis II (), Ashley James (), and James Trainor () gather for a conversation on the collective that transformed Harlem. In addition to contextualizing Smokehouse within larger histories of public art, abstraction, and architecture, each writer will discuss their contributions to the book, offering entry points into their individual artistic or academic practices in the process.

This program is free to attend, provides live ASL interpreters, and has limited capacity. Register for the conversation on The Studio Museum website linked in bio !

Please note Storefront will be closed on the day of Thursday, December 8, in preparation for the evening program.

Join us on December 8, at 7:00pm to welcome The Studio Museum at Storefront for The Smokehouse Associates Writers Forum!...
12/05/2022

Join us on December 8, at 7:00pm to welcome The Studio Museum at Storefront for The Smokehouse Associates Writers Forum!

This Thursday, Smokehouse Associates publication editor, Eric Booker () and contributing writers Charles L. Davis II (), Ashley James (), and James Trainor () gather for a conversation on the collective that transformed Harlem. In addition to contextualizing Smokehouse within larger histories of public art, abstraction, and architecture, each writer will discuss their contributions to the book, offering entry points into their individual artistic or academic practices in the process.

This program is free to attend, provides live ASL interpreters, and has limited capacity. Registrar for the conversation on The Studio Museum website linked in bio !

Please note Storefront will be closed on the day of Thursday, December 8, in preparation for the evening program.

“What makes space q***r?” asked the 1994 exhibition, 𝘘𝘶𝘦𝘦𝘳 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 at Storefront. “How can such space be legitimized, give...
12/02/2022

“What makes space q***r?” asked the 1994 exhibition, 𝘘𝘶𝘦𝘦𝘳 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 at Storefront. “How can such space be legitimized, given a history and a future?”

Curated by Beatriz Colomina, Dennis Dollens, Cindi Patton, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Henry Urbach, and Mark Wigley, 𝘘𝘶𝘦𝘦𝘳 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 aimed to commemorate the 15th anniversary of Stonewall. The exhibition consisted of installations, interventions and proposals at the gallery and at other New York City locations addressing this issue. As part of the exhibition, a call soliciting proposals and manifestos responding to these questions was circulated. The submissions were published in a printed book and featured work by twenty-five participants including Jay Critchley, Brian McGrath, Charles Renfro, Maura Sheehan, and Marc Tsurumaki. This catalogue acts as both an archive of the manifestos but also as a documentation of the discourse surrounding the New York q***r community in the early nineties.

A selection of materials from this exhibition, including curatorial texts, correspondence, and artworks from this exhibition is on view at 𝘗𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘢 𝘗𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘛𝘪𝘮𝘦, on view at Storefront through December 10th. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 12pm - 6pm.
__

Photos by Andrea Molina Cuadro:

1. 𝘘𝘶𝘦𝘦𝘳 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 “Manifestos” archival reader
2. Prints of street signs displayed on various sites during 𝘘𝘶𝘦𝘦𝘳 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 (1994)
3. 𝘈𝘳𝘤𝘩𝘪𝘵𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘦: 𝘐𝘯𝘤𝘰𝘳𝘱𝘰𝘳𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘈𝘳𝘤𝘩𝘪𝘵𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘢𝘭 𝘛𝘦𝘤𝘩𝘯𝘰𝘭𝘰𝘨𝘺 press clippings, August, 1994
4. 𝘘𝘶𝘦𝘦𝘳 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 Manifestos/Proposals

Throughout its history, Storefront has organized forums, symposia, reports, and publications to interrogate changes in t...
11/26/2022

Throughout its history, Storefront has organized forums, symposia, reports, and publications to interrogate changes in the natural and built environment beyond disciplinary confines. These interdisciplinary discussions in alliance with other arts organizations expanded Storefront’s impact beyond the gallery.

Between 1992 and 1999, Dia Art Foundation and Storefront embarked on project called 𝘌𝘊𝘖-𝘛𝘌𝘊, an international ecology and sustainability forum with the aim to develop a program for an international school of environmental art and architecture. This initiative gathered a multidisciplinary group of cultural practitioners at conferences in France, Italy, and the United States to help shape this program and included the participation of Mel Chin, Felix Guatarri, Anton Schneider, Francesco Morace, K. Eric Drexle, Kyong Park, and Shirin Nashat, among others.

Hope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving! We are back open today and are offering guided tours of our current exhibition 𝘗𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘢 𝘗𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘛𝘪𝘮𝘦 at 1pm and 4pm.
__

Photos by Andrea Molina Cuadro:

1. Poster for “New York International Forum: The Ecology of the Artificial” presented by Dia Dia Art Foundation and Storefront
2. Press release with participating panelists for 𝘌𝘊𝘖-𝘛𝘌𝘊 𝘐𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘍𝘰𝘳𝘶𝘮 in Morsiglia, Corsica, September 1-14, 1992
3. Photograph of Kyong Park at the first 𝘌𝘊𝘖-𝘛𝘌𝘊 𝘐𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘍𝘰𝘳𝘶𝘮 and the program from the first 𝘌𝘊𝘖-𝘛𝘌𝘊 𝘐𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘍𝘰𝘳𝘶𝘮 in Corsica, France, June, 1992
4. Group photograph of event participants and attendees

𝘗𝘳𝘰𝘫𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘋𝘔𝘡 (1988) aimed at addressing the effects of conflict from an architectural standpoint by proposing alternative...
11/23/2022

𝘗𝘳𝘰𝘫𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘋𝘔𝘡 (1988) aimed at addressing the effects of conflict from an architectural standpoint by proposing alternative spatial strategies in relation to the Korean Demilitarized Zone. The project called for the use of design strategies rather than military force to initiate paths toward reunification of the Korean peninsula and its people. Participants included Nam June Paik, Paul Virilio and Avant Travaux Studio, and Lebbeus Woods.

𝘗𝘳𝘰𝘫𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘈𝘵𝘭𝘢𝘴 (1990) was an international competition soliciting proposals for the reuse and transformation of one of the iconic architectural artifacts of the Cold War, the Atlas nuclear missile silos. The site of the competition was a group of twelve newly-decommissioned silos located in the region surrounding Plattsburgh Air Force Base, at the edge of Lake Champlain and the Adirondack Mountains in New York State. Of the 140 proposals submitted, 27 were selected for inclusion in the exhibition. The jury included Vito Acconci, Neil Denari, Elizabeth Diller, Patricia Phillips and Lebbeus Woods.

Both these projects are examples of Storefront’s commitment to repositioning the role of art and architecture in respect to geopolitical and economic conflicts both locally and around the world.

We will be closed tomorrow and Friday for Thanksgiving break. The gallery will reopen on Saturday with guided tours at 1pm and 4pm! Link in bio to sign up!
__

Photos by Andrea Molina Cuadro:

1. Detail of drawing submission, Nam June Paik, 𝘗𝘳𝘰𝘫𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘋𝘔𝘡, 1988
2. Exhibition Poster
3. “Project DMZ Korea” submission booklet
4. Preliminary Program Package, 𝘗𝘳𝘰𝘫𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘈𝘵𝘭𝘢𝘴, 1990
5. Silo Crib Arrangement and photograph of missile
6. 𝘗𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘴-𝘙𝘦𝘱𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘯 press clipping, August 17, 1989

Storefront had an active role in connecting artists with city politics and activists, through in-depth research, advocac...
11/19/2022

Storefront had an active role in connecting artists with city politics and activists, through in-depth research, advocacy, and community organizing.

In 1982, the Gowanus Memorial Artyard organized an architectural competition calling for critical reinterpretations of the Gowanus Canal area in Brooklyn. New York. Proposals from this competition were presented at Storefront in the exhibition 𝘎𝘰𝘸𝘢𝘯𝘶𝘴 𝘊𝘢𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘙𝘦𝘥𝘦𝘧𝘪𝘯𝘦𝘥 (1982).

In 1996, Storefront partnered with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council to initiate a competition to redesign Lt. Petrosino Park, the wedge-shaped open space at the intersection of Lafayette, Centre and Kenmare Streets and Cleveland Place—right next to Storefront’s gallery. The aim was to turn this under-used traffic island into an active public space. Selected entries from the competition were presented at Storefront in the exhibition 𝘖𝘱𝘦𝘯 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 / 𝘗𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤 𝘓𝘪𝘧𝘦: 𝘗𝘦𝘵𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘰 𝘗𝘢𝘳𝘬 𝘙𝘦𝘥𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘭𝘰𝘱𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘋𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘨𝘯 𝘊𝘰𝘮𝘱𝘦𝘵𝘪𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 (1996).

𝘗𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘢 𝘗𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘛𝘪𝘮𝘦 is on view until December 10. Make your visit to Storefront today!
__

Photos by Andrea Molina Cuadro:

1. Gowanus Annual II - “The Monument Redefined: An International Exhibition of Contemporary Monuments”
2. Photograph of Storefront gallery at 51 Prince Street
3. Installation photograph of 𝘎𝘰𝘸𝘢𝘯𝘶𝘴 𝘊𝘢𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘙𝘦𝘥𝘦𝘧𝘪𝘯𝘦𝘥 exhibition, 1982
4. “The Monument Redefined” Panel Discussions poster
5. Aerial view collage of Lt. Petrosino Park, Alberto Kalach, 1996 and Letter from Robert A. M. Stern Architects to Jenny Dixon, Executive Director of Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, March 14, 1995
6. Lt. Petrosino Park Project Package
7. Competition entry, Alberto Kalach, 𝘖𝘱𝘦𝘯 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 / 𝘗𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤 𝘓𝘪𝘧𝘦: 𝘗𝘦𝘵𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘰 𝘗𝘢𝘳𝘬 𝘙𝘦𝘥𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘭𝘰𝘱𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘋𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘨𝘯 𝘊𝘰𝘮𝘱𝘦𝘵𝘪𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯, 1996
8. Aerial view photograph of Lt. Petrosino Park

Storefront is thrilled to be a Ruth Arts grantee! Today, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts () announces 140 arts organiza...
11/18/2022

Storefront is thrilled to be a Ruth Arts grantee!

Today, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts () announces 140 arts organizations have been recognized by two new grants inspired by how artists live, make, and are remembered.

We are honored to be among the Fall 2022 recipients. Thank you, !

Supported by the late Ruth DeYoung Kohler II, Ruth Arts launched earlier this year with a unique nomination process guided by 50+ artists, providing funding to nonprofit arts organizations nationwide.

Congratulations to all the Fall 2022 grantees! 🎉

Rather than interpreting the city's transformations through technocratic solutionism, from its earliest years Storefront...
11/17/2022

Rather than interpreting the city's transformations through technocratic solutionism, from its earliest years Storefront put forward ambitious proposals in order to imagine new futures. 𝘉𝘦𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘞𝘩𝘪𝘵𝘯𝘦𝘺 (1985) was an exhibition reacting to the expansion to the Whitney Museum proposed by Michael Graves in 1985, presenting an opportunity to investigate critical issues relating to the tradition of postmodern architecture. Storefront invited artists and architects to submit their visions of the Whitney Museum in the form of a drawing or model.

𝘈𝘧𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘛𝘪𝘭𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘈𝘳𝘤 (1985) curator Tom Finkelpearl wrote, “The only positive of the 𝘛𝘪𝘭𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘈𝘳𝘤 controversy is that it has produced a lively discussion about public art.” The exhibition responded to the debate surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s 𝘛𝘪𝘭𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘈𝘳𝘤 from Federal Plaza. It included contributions from David Hammons, Sanford Kwinter, Carolee Schneemann, Michael Sorkin, Nancy Spero, Mierle Laderman-Ukeles, and Hannah Wilke, among others, and asked questions such as “What is the artist’s responsibility when proposing a work for a public place?”

Material from these shows are on view until December 10 in Storefront’s current exhibition, 𝘗𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘢 𝘗𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘛𝘪𝘮𝘦.
__

Photos by Andrea Molina Cuadro:

1. Competition call mockup and press release
2. Photograph of model proposal for the Whitney Museum of American Art, Christo Vladimirov Javacheff and drawing of competition site for architects to intervene
3. Ephemera from 𝘉𝘦𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘞𝘩𝘪𝘵𝘯𝘦𝘺, 1985
4. Competition entry, Julie Hacker, 𝘉𝘦𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘞𝘩𝘪𝘵𝘯𝘦𝘺, 1985
5. “After Tilted Arc: The Aesthetic Quest and Public Life” booklet
6. Photographs of Foley Federal Plaza during removal of Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc, courtesy of Tom Finkelpearl
7. Photograph of Foley Federal Plaza showing Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc installed
8. Competition entry - Serra in an Expanded Field, Michael Sorkin, 𝘈𝘧𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘛𝘪𝘭𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘈𝘳𝘤, 1985
9. Competition entry, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, 𝘈𝘧𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘛𝘪𝘭𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘈𝘳𝘤, 1985
10. Curator’s statement, Tom Finkelpearl

On Saturday we partnered with the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space () to guide a walking tour of community gardens in Low...
11/15/2022

On Saturday we partnered with the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space () to guide a walking tour of community gardens in Lower Manhattan. All of the seven gardens along the route were places of resistance in the struggles against increasing real estate expansion and austerity.

One of the sites we visited was the former Garden of Eden on Forsyth St, whose fraught history is presented in our current exhibition, 𝘗𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘤 𝘚𝘱𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘢 𝘗𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘛𝘪𝘮𝘦 which is on view until December 10. Thank you everyone who joined us and a special thank you to Bill Di Paola and Marco Lanier from MoRUS for leading the tour!

Storefront used the gallery to address challenges of urban transformation on the ground and as a platform to amplify the...
11/12/2022

Storefront used the gallery to address challenges of urban transformation on the ground and as a platform to amplify the political agency of artistic practice. Adam Purple’s Garden of Eden was a self-initiated community garden in the Lower East Side created over the course of ten years on neglected vacant lots. The exhibition 𝘈𝘥𝘢𝘮’𝘴 𝘏𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘗𝘢𝘳𝘢𝘥𝘪𝘴𝘦 (1984) presented alternative designs for the integration of this public garden with the proposed housing initiative by the city, that threatened to destroy this oasis. Storefront forwarded these proposals to the Housing Authority in an unsuccessful attempt to preserve it, and Purple’s garden was bulldozed in 1986.

Today we will visit the former site of the Garden of Eden on People’s Gardens: Walking Tour with The Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space (). We are at capacity for this event but if you have signed up, we will see you at 2:30pm at the gallery!
__

Photos by Andrea Molina Cuadro:

1. Photograph of the Garden of Eden from exhibition poster
2. Letter from Alison Smithson, August 6, 1984
3. Publication, Adam Purple
4. Storefront Plan - Axonometric drawing
5. Letter from Charles Reiss, Deputy Commissioner of NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development, to Glenn Weiss, September 25, 1984
6. Ephemera from 𝘈𝘥𝘢𝘮’𝘴 𝘏𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘗𝘢𝘳𝘢𝘥𝘪𝘴𝘦 , 1984

Address

97 Kenmare Street
New York, NY
10012

Opening Hours

Wednesday 12pm - 6pm
Thursday 12pm - 6pm
Friday 12pm - 6pm
Saturday 12pm - 6pm

Telephone

(212) 431-5795

Website

http://storefrontnews.org/

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Storefront for Art and Architecture posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Storefront for Art and Architecture:

Videos

Share

Category

Nearby museums


Other Art Galleries in New York

Show All