Alexander Gray Associates

Alexander Gray Associates Contemporary art gallery located in New York City and Germantown, NY. NYC location open Tuesday – Saturday

Owners and Principals:
Alexander Gray, David Cabrera

Unsolicited artist submissions are not considered.

Melvin Edwards created "Ventana a Isla Negra" in homage to the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, who died in Isla Negra, Chile ...
07/14/2023

Melvin Edwards created "Ventana a Isla Negra" in homage to the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, who died in Isla Negra, Chile in 1973. Edwards was interested in Neruda’s poetry, as well as his political engagement, and made this work while reflecting on the 1971 Attica Prison Riot, one of the most famous and important riots during the Prisoners' Rights Movement. Among the familiar forms incorporated into this work, two point to the politics that framed the time in which Edwards produced "Ventana a Isla Negra" (1973). Edwards incorporates a plaque sourced from collected scraps from a military base on the bottom right side of the work with a hole made from a bullet shot. To the top left, Edwards includes a machete, which he began incorporating in sculptures in 1973, and which he continues to use in his Dakar studio, as a formal and symbolic element in his works. In West Africa, machetes are used as agricultural tools, and Edwards recognizes this daily utilitarian object as “another shape of steel that already exists.” At the same time, the knives connote violence and stand as important symbols for social movements such as the revolutions of Haiti and Cuba.

"Ventana a Isla Negra," 1973, Welded steel and barbed wire

Ricardo Brey's "Every life is a fire" (2010–2015) is an installation created by Ricardo Brey that was showcased at the 2...
07/13/2023

Ricardo Brey's "Every life is a fire" (2010–2015) is an installation created by Ricardo Brey that was showcased at the 2015 Venice Biennale, "All the World’s Futures." Consisting of spheres connected by chains, "Every life is a fire" is a representation of a solar system, implying the vastness of the cosmos, with its disparate yet connected celestial bodies, confirming humanity’s place as but a single speck within the boundless expanse of the universe. Speaking to his artistic process, Brey explains: “I approach spaces in a free stance, moved by intuition rather than by an aesthetic formula, working at the crossroads of construction and deconstruction; my aim is to instill life to shapes with the interaction of their meaning.”

"Every life is a fire," 2010–2015. Mixed media. Installation view: "Fuel to the Fire," Saint-Paul’s Church, Antwerp, 2015. Photo: We Document Art

Teresa Burga’s "Acqua Alta" series comprises deeply saturated drawings of Venetian Carnival costumes that highlight a cl...
07/12/2023

Teresa Burga’s "Acqua Alta" series comprises deeply saturated drawings of Venetian Carnival costumes that highlight a close engagement with color, pattern, and play. In "Untitled (Acqua Alta I)," a solitary female figure anchors the composition, donning a floor-length red cloak, a decorative hat, and a walking cane. Abstract patterns are collaged in the background, including a black-and-white checkerboard design—a recurring motif in Burga’s practice. Layers of ink and indentation marks from ball-point pens and felt-tip markers contribute to the textural quality of the work. Patches of white-out distinguish the bottom portion of the drawing from the rest of the composition. Although formally distinct from her conceptual work of previous decades, which frequently entailed working methodically with data, statistics, and information systems, Burga's more recent drawings similarly acknowledge the parameters of their own production. In the margins of the “Acqua Alta” drawings, Burga inscribes the dates and time spent on working on each piece—tracking her hours as if clocking in and out of a job.

"Untitled (Acqua Alta I)," 2019, Mixed media on collaged paper

Luis Camnitzer's "Copyright" (2022) pinpoints the physical location of an abstract concept. The work is part of an ongoi...
07/11/2023

Luis Camnitzer's "Copyright" (2022) pinpoints the physical location of an abstract concept. The work is part of an ongoing project, begun in 2020, in which Camnitzer has set out to map the entire dictionary by searching each word in Google Maps.

"Copyright" spotlights the consecutive entries for “copyright” and “copyrighter,” annotating the original page of the dictionary with screenshots of the purported destinations. By combining lexicography and cartography, Camnitzer exposes the limitations of both representational systems. His presentation of copyright as a singular entity that can be definitively located advances his critique of individual authorship since the 1960s. The work is a winking acknowledgement of Camnitzer's own intellectual property claim over the piece itself, which is composed of images in the public domain.

"Copyright," 2022, Inkjet print on paper

Chloë Bass’s "Soft Services" (2022) encompasses a series of sculptural stone benches inscribed with phrases written by t...
07/10/2023

Chloë Bass’s "Soft Services" (2022) encompasses a series of sculptural stone benches inscribed with phrases written by the artist and marked with a silhouette of a local plant rendered in light-responsive pigment. Applied in Optima font­, each inscription pays tribute to the typeface used by Maya Lin in her Vietnam Veterans Memorial while also recalling the minimalist branding of contemporary wellness companies. As a result of these associations, Bass’s project emerges as a simultaneous act of grieving and care. Deeply tied to its site in Volunteer Park in Seattle, a location of AIDS activism, "Soft Services" nods to the funds from the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act, which were distributed for “soft services,” non-medical types of support considered beneficial to those with the virus. Further reinforcing its connection to its site, the outdoor installation incorporates flora unique to the area. Highlighting native, cultivated, and invasive plants whose presence in Volunteer Park is tied to human intervention, Bass’s imagery invites viewers to make connections between the natural world and modern medicine, as well as mythological botanical histories. Juxtaposing what is cultivated with what is allowed to grow wild, Bass articulates the precarity of our present moment, drawing parallels between recent tragedies and historic losses.

"Chloë Bass: "Soft Services" is currently on view through August 2023 at Volunteer Park, Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, WA.

Installation view: "Chloë Bass: Soft Services," Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2022. Photo: Jueqian Fang

Joan Semmel's "Untitled" (1971) and Hugh Steers's "White Gown" (1994) are currently on view through September 24, 2023 i...
07/07/2023

Joan Semmel's "Untitled" (1971) and Hugh Steers's "White Gown" (1994) are currently on view through September 24, 2023 in the group exhibition, "Full and Pure: Body, Materiality, Gender" at Green Family Art Foundation, Dallas, Texas.

"Full and Pure: Body, Materiality, Gender" explores the scene of deliverance by reflecting on the becomings of gender, bodies, and materiality. This exhibition is comprised of the works of 37 intergenerational artists creating in a range of mediums: from poetry, video, and sculpture, to painting, photography, and installation. Every work speaks to some combination of the three axes around which this exhibition is centered: the somatic, materiality, and gendered embodiment. All three are reconsidered in their most generous forms through processes of abstraction and experimentation.

Installation view of Joan Semmel, "Untitled," 1971, Oil on canvas, "Full and Pure: Body, Materiality, Gender," 2023. Photo: Evan Sheldon.

Installation view of Hugh Steers, "White Gown," 1994, Oil on canvas, "Full and Pure: Body, Materiality, Gender," 2023. Photo: Evan Sheldon.

Regina Silveira’s "Biscoito Arte (Art Cookie)" (1976/1997) is currently on view through December 2023 in the exhibition ...
07/06/2023

Regina Silveira’s "Biscoito Arte (Art Cookie)" (1976/1997) is currently on view through December 2023 in the exhibition “EXTRA/ordinary" at MAR, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de la Provincia de Buenos Aires in Mar del Plata, Argentina. The exhibition innagurates the fourth edition of BIENALSUR, The International Biennial of Contemporary Art of the South, which is taking place in more than 70 cities across 28 countries.

Silveira's iconic intervention, photographically documented and displayed in the museum, was reenacted on July 1 at the opening reception for "EXTRA/ordinary" with audiences consuming cookies that read "ARTE" (ART).

“Biscoito Arte,” 1976/1997, Photograph

Valeska Soares's "Vagalume (Firefly)" (2006) is on view through Sunday, July 30 at the Dallas Museum of Art as part of t...
07/05/2023

Valeska Soares's "Vagalume (Firefly)" (2006) is on view through Sunday, July 30 at the Dallas Museum of Art as part of the exhibition "Movement: The Legacy of Kineticism." The exhibition traces the origins and evolution of kineticism through three distinct time periods, unifying two-dimensional paintings, three-dimensional sculptures, projections and interactive objects. Viewers will encounter both contemporary and historical works of kineticism, demonstrating the legacy of early artists in real time.

Through the play on the relationship between the mechanical and organic, the digital and the natural, viewers are empowered to engage with their work. Upon entering the exhibition, viewers are invited to activate artist Valeska Soares’s 2006 installation "Vagalume (Firefly)" by switching overhead light fixtures on and off through the manipulation of a sea of hanging pull chains, creating an impermanent and deeply personal art experience that conjures the childlike wonder that inspired the artist to create the installation.

"Movement: The Legacy of Kineticism," September 18, 2022 - July 30, 2023. Valeska Soares, "Vagalume," 2006, mixed media. © 2022 Valeska Soares Studio, All rights reserved. Image courtesy Dallas Museum of Art.

"I Spy," a group exhibition of paintings, works on paper, and sculptures by Jennie Jieun Lee, Carrie Moyer, and Betty Pa...
07/01/2023

"I Spy," a group exhibition of paintings, works on paper, and sculptures by Jennie Jieun Lee, Carrie Moyer, and Betty Parsons, will have its opening reception today, Saturday, July 1, from 4:00–6:00 PM.

Spanning more than a half-century of artmaking, "I Spy" spotlights alternative, yet complimentary approaches to abstraction that embrace optical pleasure and compositional play. Together, Lee, Moyer, and Parsons use nonrepresentation to challenge divisions between content and form, embedding pseudo-figurative imagery into their work for viewers to parse out over time.

Installation views: “I Spy,” Alexander Gray Associates, Germantown, 2023

Luis Camnitzer will participate in the two-day symposium "THE EDUCATIONAL WEB" at Kunstverein in Hamburg, in conjunction...
06/30/2023

Luis Camnitzer will participate in the two-day symposium "THE EDUCATIONAL WEB" at Kunstverein in Hamburg, in conjunction with the exhibition of the same name. His lecture, "THE ART TURN" will be livestreamed Sunday, July 2, at 4 PM GMT+2 (10 AM EDT).

"Art as discipline” is admired as an area of specialization that promotes professionalism and competitiveness. But it doesn’t generate creative minds, it only allows some creative minds to survive. In educational terms the process of promoting creativity stops after kindergarten. It is then interrupted until one decides to go to art school and specialize. The in-between is STEM education country. It always has been that, since the moment quantitative scientific knowledge was equated as knowledge itself, and made education a partial affair effective for labor and the international pecking order. The “educational turn” of the last thirty years barely touched art institutions, let alone the rest. What we need is to work on an “art turn”, one that radically revamps the whole educational system and makes it an integral process of maturation. We don’t need so much to produce more enlightened art producers, but to ensure that we create a society of free thinkers from which, as byproducts, enlightened art workers may emerge."
- Luis Camnitzer

Please follow the Linktree in our bio to register. Note that the event schedule is subject to change.

Luis Camnitzer, 2012.

Carrie Moyer's "Configuration  #11" (2023)  and "Configuration  #12" (2023) are currently on view at "I Spy," Alexander ...
06/29/2023

Carrie Moyer's "Configuration #11" (2023) and "Configuration #12" (2023) are currently on view at "I Spy," Alexander Gray Associates, Germantown.

As in her paintings, Carrie Moyer combines different techniques and media in her works on paper, drawing on a variety of source material to inform her compositions. Moyer originally created these “configurations” as preparatory studies for her paintings; however, they soon became an independent body of work. Working on paper, Moyer recalls, “I got really interested in the quality of light that’s harder to create on canvas.”

"Configuration #11," 2023, Mixed media on paper

"Configuration #12," 2023, Mixed media on paper

Installation view: “I Spy,” Alexander Gray Associates, Germantown, 2023

Lorraine O’Grady’s “Rivers, First Draft” (1982/2015) is now on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art as a part of t...
06/28/2023

Lorraine O’Grady’s “Rivers, First Draft” (1982/2015) is now on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art as a part of the exhibition “Inheritance”, June 28, 2023-February 2024.

“Inheritance” traces the profound impacts of legacy and the past across familial, historical, and aesthetic lines. Featuring new acquisitions and rarely-seen works from the Whitney collection by forty-three leading artists, the exhibition includes paintings, sculptures, videos, photographs, and time-based media installations from the 1970s to today. This diverse array of works consider what has been passed on and how it may shift, change, or live again.

The exhibition is organized by Rujeko Hockley, Arnhold Associate Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

"Rivers, First Draft," 1982, printed 2015, 48 chromogenic prints. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Photography Committee 2019.298.1-6

"Rivers, First Draft: A Little Girl with Pink Sash memorizes her Latin lesson," 1982, printed 2015. Chromogenic print: sheet. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Photography Committee 2019.298.1f

"Chloë Bass |    : Hindsight for a Future America" is a public sculpture and performance art project by conceptual artis...
06/27/2023

"Chloë Bass | : Hindsight for a Future America" is a public sculpture and performance art project by conceptual artist Chloë Bass on view at California African American Museum starting June 21, 2023, the summer solstice. The sculpture, which takes the form of a participatory analemmatic sundial, consists of sixteen blue glass panels that collectively form a partial ellipse. While engaging with the sculpture, the human body functions as the gnomon—the necessary projecting element that casts its shadow onto each glass panel, determining the time of the day. Bass has engraved contemplative phrases onto each sundial panel that appear on the ground below in shadow form.

"Public Sculpture—Chloë Bass | : Hindsight for a Future America," Ongoing, Curated by: Taylor Renee Aldridge, Visual Arts Curator, CAAM

"Chloë Bass: : Hindsight for a Future America." Public sculpture opening June 21, 2023 at the California African American Museum (installation view). Photo: Elon Schoenholz

Joan Semmel's "Secret Spaces" (1976) is currently on view at Tate Modern, London as a part of the exhibition "Capturing ...
06/24/2023

Joan Semmel's "Secret Spaces" (1976) is currently on view at Tate Modern, London as a part of the exhibition "Capturing the Moment." "Capturing the Moment" explores the dynamic relationship between contemporary painting and photography. This group exhibition unfolds as an open-ended conversation between some of the greatest painters and photographers of recent generations, looking at how the brush and the lens have been used to capture moments in time, and how these two mediums have inspired and influenced each other.

Joan Semmel painted "Secret Spaces" in 1976, two years after making a definitive formal shift from abstraction by fully embracing figuration. Using a camera and her own figure as the subject, Semmel painted her n**e body on canvas from the image she captured; thereby, shifting the perspective from that of an observer to a personal point of view. Importantly, “Secret Spaces” is the first work in which Semmel painted from a color Xerox rather than a photograph of her body. In turning her eye inward, Semmel consciously liberated the traditionally male gaze of creator and spectator.

"Secret Spaces," 1976 (detail), Oil on canvas

“I Spy," a group exhibition of paintings, works on paper, and sculptures by Jennie Jieun Lee, Carrie Moyer, and Betty Pa...
06/23/2023

“I Spy," a group exhibition of paintings, works on paper, and sculptures by Jennie Jieun Lee, Carrie Moyer, and Betty Parsons, opens today, June 23, 2023 at Alexander Gray Associates, Germantown, with an opening reception on Saturday, July 1 from 4:00–6:00 PM. Spanning more than a half-century of artmaking, "I Spy" spotlights alternative, yet complimentary approaches to abstraction that embrace optical pleasure and compositional play. Together, Lee, Moyer, and Parsons use nonrepresentation to challenge divisions between content and form, embedding pseudo-figurative imagery into their work for viewers to parse out over time.

Lee, Moyer, and Parsons’s distinct approaches to abstraction are united by their shared joy in exploring the potentials of their chosen mediums. Their works use color and referential forms to speak to present moments while also looking beyond them. As Moyer concludes, “But I’m getting such joy—to use a corny word—in the studio from just the process of making work. It’s like, ‘Oh, wow, look at this, enjoy this, come into the space where you get to be transported.’ I think we are living in a particular atmosphere right now. Perhaps the desire to protect an emotion like joy is more political than ever.”

Installation view: “I Spy,” Alexander Gray Associates, Germantown, 2023
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Hassan Sharif's "Iron No. 2" (2013) is comprised of wire coiled around pieces of wood and spread across a surface in a g...
06/22/2023

Hassan Sharif's "Iron No. 2" (2013) is comprised of wire coiled around pieces of wood and spread across a surface in a grid-like pattern. Hassan Sharif believed all materials were inherently political. Responding to the landscape of material culture in the U.A.E., which had undergone rapid social and economic changes since its independence in 1971, Sharif’s sculptures were created from consumer products sourced from local markets and stores.

Sharif combined wood from trees that grew in the U.A.E. and iron imported to Dubai. While speaking about "Iron No. 2" Sharif said, “I like the combination between two contradicting materials which both come from the earth. From iron ore, and from the tree. Each material has some kind of relational or erotic aspect in its combination with another. I think materials carry individual narratives. With some materials you can create a story. The material remains as a wire, it remains as rubber, or cotton ropes, but in the end it is also a vocabulary. It’s like an alphabet. When you mix wood and wire it gives you two alphabets together. It’s not any more wood, neither is it any more wire.”

"Iron No. 2," 2013 (detail), Wood and iron in 27 parts

"Iron No. 2," 2013, Wood and iron in 27 parts

Harmony Hammond: "Accumulations," the artist's sixth one-person exhibition with the Gallery, is on view at Alexander Gra...
06/20/2023

Harmony Hammond: "Accumulations," the artist's sixth one-person exhibition with the Gallery, is on view at Alexander Gray Associates, New York through Saturday, June 24, 2023.

The show features a selection of paintings from the last three years that continue Hammond’s project of imbuing abstraction with bodily content and a corporeal narrative, disrupting the utopian myth of modernist abstraction. Underlying this practice is the artist’s belief that materials and the ways they are manipulated can bring social and political content into formal abstraction.

Highlighting Hammond’s interest in “material engagement,” diptychs like "Then and Now" and "Now and Then" (both 2022) juxtapose the artist’s visual strategies from the 1970s with her current formal and conceptual concerns. These two-part works combine her "Bandaged Quilts" with panels that recall her "Weave Paintings" (1973–77). In these compositions, Hammond draws parallels between minimalist monochromatic painting and vernacular gendered craft traditions, advancing her mission of advocating for an expanded art history that challenges reductive, sexist historical narratives of abstraction.

Installation view: Harmony Hammond: "Accumulations," Alexander Gray Associates, New York, 2023

"Chenille #11," 2020-2021, Oil and mixed media on canvas

"Chenille #11," 2020-2021 (detail), Oil and mixed media on canvas

Chloë Bass's “   : Hindsight for a Future America” will debut at the California African American Museum on June 21, 2023...
06/19/2023

Chloë Bass's “ : Hindsight for a Future America” will debut at the California African American Museum on June 21, 2023. Celebrate the solstice—the longest day of the year—at a lecture/performance by Bass, followed by an outdoor sound bath provided by Sol & Sound on Wednesday, June 21 from 3:00–4:30 pm.

“Chloë Bass | : Hindsight for a Future America” is a photography, text-based, performance art, and public sculpture project by conceptual artist Chloë Bass. It represents the culmination of the artist’s ongoing project, “ ”, which presented images of cloudless blue skies in an effort to mark time in the lead up to the 2016 US presidential election. Bass then coupled the images with personal and political writings that she shared on Instagram over the course of a year.

For this presentation, Bass has conceived a newly commissioned public sculpture in south Los Angeles featuring sixteen blue glass panels adapted from the original “ ” photographs. Together they form a participatory analemmatic sundial, where the viewer’s body functions as the shadow-casting element that determines the time of day. Each sundial panel is engraved with text drawn from Bass’s original “ ” writings, offering a linguistic point of reflection as it casts its own shadow.

“Chloë Bass | : Hindsight for a Future America” is curated by Taylor Renee Aldridge, Visual Arts Curator, CAAM. The exhibition is co-presented by CAAM and Art + Practice. The public art sculpture is commissioned by CAAM, with support from Teiger Foundation.

Chloë Bass, 2023. Photo: Ross Collab

Betty Parsons’s “Lavender” (1965), “St. Jean – Cap Ferrat” (1960), and Untitled (1958) are on view as a part of Alexande...
06/18/2023

Betty Parsons’s “Lavender” (1965), “St. Jean – Cap Ferrat” (1960), and Untitled (1958) are on view as a part of Alexander Gray Associate’s presentation for Art Basel 2023.

These drawings come from notebooks and sketchbooks that Parsons filled over the course of her career, their edges bearing the line of holes characteristic of spiral binding. These sketchbooks were Parsons’s constant companions throughout her travels and played a fundamental part in her artmaking practice. As art historian Lisa Peters has observed, her sketchbooks “provided a forum for Parsons to work out her visual ideas, reflect on her experiences, summon memories, and capture emotions.”

Beginning in the late 1940s Parsons developed her own unique mode of abstraction, explaining that she was interested not in capturing what something “looked like,” but rather “what it made me feel.” This approach can be seen in all three works which boast bold colors, biomorphic shapes, and dynamic brushstrokes. The compositions of island-like forms on near-monochromatic backgrounds ultimately emerges as a recurring visual motif throughout the 1960s and 1970s, when Parsons continued to experiment with abstraction and refine her approach to color as she reaffirmed her commitment to capturing what she referred to as the “sheer energy” of a scene or composition.

Art Basel 2023
Booth P14 (Hall 2.1)
Preview (invitation only): June 13–14, 2023
Public Days: June 15–18, 2023
Messe Basel, Messeplatz 10, 4058 Basel, Switzerland

“Lavender,” 1965, Gouache on paper

“St. Jean – Cap Ferrat,” 1960, Gouache on paper

Untitled, 1958, Gouache on paper

Joan Semmel’s “Cornered Nipple” (1976) and “Shameless” (2022) are on view as part of Alexander Gray Associate’s presenta...
06/17/2023

Joan Semmel’s “Cornered Nipple” (1976) and “Shameless” (2022) are on view as part of Alexander Gray Associate’s presentation for Art Basel 2023.

Joan Semmel’s “Cornered Nipple”, from the artist’s “Self-Images” series (1974-79), serves as a prime example of her radical shift in artistic practice, where she adopted her own body as the focus of her paintings, rendered in a near photorealist style. With this shift, she transformed her point of view from that of an observer–a view outside of the canvas–to that of both an observer and subject in order to capture “the feeling of self, and the experience of oneself.”

Painted nearly 50 years later, "Shameless" (2022) exemplifies Semmel's long standing focus on representing the female body from a personal perspective. In recent paintings like "Shameless," Semmel explores the portrayal of the aging female form in abstracted color and rendered with gestural brushstrokes. Regarding this stage in life, Semmel explains, "We all have difficulty confronting our aging physical selves... When you are painting yourself in that position, it means you have to say, 'I'm doing this, and I'm not going to make it pretty. I won't hide or disguise it, no face-lifts. It will be the way I see it.’"

Art Basel 2023
Booth P14 (Hall 2.1)
Preview (invitation only): June 13–14, 2023
Public Days: June 15–18, 2023
Messe Basel, Messeplatz 10, 4058 Basel, Switzerland

“Cornered Nipple,” 1976, Oil on canvas

“Shameless,” 2022, Oil on canvas

Hugh Steers’s “Bath Curtain” (1992), “Futon Couch” (1991), “High-Heeled Embrace” (1989), “Red & White Sheet” (1988), and...
06/16/2023

Hugh Steers’s “Bath Curtain” (1992), “Futon Couch” (1991), “High-Heeled Embrace” (1989), “Red & White Sheet” (1988), and “Undress” (1992) are on view as part of Alexander Gray Associate’s presentation for Art Basel Kabinett 2023.

Hugh Steers (1962–1995) was a New York-based artist whose painterly finesse and allegorical imagery was grounded in the history of Western art to capture what he characterized as “the humanity of a moment.” While intrinsically contextualized by the HIV/AIDS epidemic that ultimately cut his life short at age 32, Steers rejected reductive labels like “AIDS art,” asserting that his work spoke “more generally to illness and incompletion.”

A connecting theme across these paintings are scenes of men caring for one another, reflecting, in part, Steers’s own longing for intimacy. “It’s as if painting it will make it become real,” said Steers. “That painting of a man holding another man is conjuring that tenderness, that hope that someone will still care about you and will be there.” Imbuing wary glances and tender gestures with an elegiac yearning, Steers infused his works with the complex feelings of isolation, desire, fear, and hope experienced in a world shattered by AIDS.

Art Basel 2023
Booth P14 (Hall 2.1)
Preview (invitation only): June 13–14, 2023
Public Days: June 15–18, 2023
Messe Basel, Messeplatz 10, 4058 Basel, Switzerland


“Bath Curtain”, 1992, Oil on canvas

“Futon Couch”, 1991, Oil on canvas

“High-Heeled Embrace”, 1989, Oil on canvas

“Red & White Sheet”, 1988, Oil on gessoed paper

“Undress”, 1992, Oil on gessoed paper

-HeeledEmbrace

Alexander Gray Associates announces representation of Carrie Moyer (b. 1960). Her vibrant paintings and works on paper c...
06/15/2023

Alexander Gray Associates announces representation of Carrie Moyer (b. 1960). Her vibrant paintings and works on paper critically interrogate the formal and conceptual conventions of painting while embracing an approach to abstraction rooted in optical pleasure. Moyer’s playful compositions, layered surfaces, and fluid forms, which freely oscillate between abstraction and representation, speak not only to her commitment to feminist political theory, but also to her deep investment in art history. As she explains, “What is political about my painting is its basis in my own experience. The work engages the history of 20th-century painting from the margins, a position defined by humor, exuberance, and disruption.”

Carrie Moyer, 2023. Photo: Ross Collab

"Pirate Jenny," 2012, Acrylic, graphite on canvas, Collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

D**e Action Machine! (DAM!) (Carrie Moyer and Sue Schaffner), "Do You Love the D**e in Your Life?" 1993, Offset poster, Collection of The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, Saratoga, NY

"Seed Release," 2021, Acrylic, sand, and glitter on canvas

"Love You Tammy Faye," 2022, Acrylic and glitter on canvas in 2 parts

"Present in a Lonely Image," a group exhibition spotlighting the artistic practices of current and former Gallery staff,...
06/14/2023

"Present in a Lonely Image," a group exhibition spotlighting the artistic practices of current and former Gallery staff, is on view at Alexander Gray Associates, Germantown, through Saturday, June 17, 2023.

The show foregrounds the singular approach of seven artists while bringing to the fore their shared proclivity towards introspection. This inclination—defined by both self-representation and/or a critique of the illusory nature of visual art—unites the seemingly disparate works and mediums in the presentation.

Of the exhibition, Alexander Gray commented, “We deeply value the contributions of artists on our staff, who balance their own practices while advancing the Gallery’s mission of supporting artists. They are part of a long lineage of artists working in the arts, contributing to New York’s expansive creative cultures and economies. It is an honor to turn the spotlights to these remarkable individuals and their innovative art."

Cumulatively, the artworks in "Present in a Lonely Image" underscore the often-solitary act of making art. And yet, in each work, a part of the artist is left present for the viewer to encounter, transforming that independent act of creation into an ever-expanding dialogue.

Installation view: "Present in a Lonely Image," Alexander Gray Associates, Germantown, 2023

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Owners and Principals: Alexander Gray, David Cabrera

Alexander Gray Associates is a New York-based contemporary art gallery. Through exhibitions, research, and artist representation, the Gallery spotlights artistic movements and artists who emerged in the mid- to late-Twentieth Century. Influential in cultural, social, and political spheres, these artists are notable for creating work that crosses geographic borders, generational contexts and artistic disciplines. Alexander Gray Associates is an organization committed to anti-racist and feminist principles.

Alexander Gray Associates is a member of the Art Dealers Association of America.

New York 510 West 26 Street, New York NY 10001 Hours: Tuesday – Saturday: 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM Telephone +1 212 399 2636 Temporarily closed to help reduce the spread of COVID-19 By appointment: [email protected]

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