Northeast Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Northeast Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum As the Northeast Regional Office for USHMM, our goal is to engage the tri-state area in dynamic programs and events that complement the Museum in Washington, D.C.
(2)

This space is to educate about the work of the Museum and the events in our region.

05/19/2021
Honoring Bravery during Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Polish-born Leo Melamed was only eight years old when he landed in Kobe, Japan. After traversing Siberia by train, it was a paradise. In August 1940, Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara had issued Leo’s family a visa that helped them escape Soviet occupation and the Nazi threat.

Just a year later, following Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were sent to “relocation camps” in the United States. Even as their family members were imprisoned, some joined the American military and helped liberate Nazi camps. Learn about these unexpected rescuers and the impact one man’s lifesaving act has had on Leo 80 years since he survived the Holocaust.

05/05/2021
The Myth of the Perfect Mother: Propaganda and Conspiracy Theories

Nazi propagandists built the myth of the perfect mother to convince "valuable" women to have babies. They peddled nationalism and conspiracy theories about "dangerous Jews," which were designed specifically to appeal to women. Learn how some women today have become messengers and targets for old conspiracies that divide us.

04/08/2021
2021 Days of Remembrance Commemoration

Join our nation and a global community to honor Holocaust survivors, remember the six million Jews murdered, and pay tribute to American soldiers who liberated victims.

Tune in for this moving commemoration featuring remarks from US Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken.

04/07/2021
Defining an Unimaginable Crime: The Story of Raphael Lemkin

Raphael Lemkin, a Polish Jewish lawyer, escaped the Nazis but lost 49 members of his family in the Holocaust. He coined the word "genocide" and devoted the last 15 years of his life to lobbying governments to recognize it as an international crime.

03/10/2021
Women in World War II: The Spies They Never Saw Coming

Josephine Baker, an American vaudeville performer turned glittering star of Paris, was at the peak of her fame in 1939 when the Nazi regime began its stranglehold on Europe. But then came an offer that changed her life.

Like Baker, Virginia Hall, an American who lost a leg in a hunting accident, and Noor Inayat Khan, a Muslim pacifist, weren’t prototypical spies. Learn how they turned prejudice and society’s low expectations of women into weapons that hid their critical work to defeat the Nazis.

Hannah Szenes, a young poet, immigrated from Hungary to the British Mandate for Palestine in 1939 at age 18. She was par...
03/08/2021

Hannah Szenes, a young poet, immigrated from Hungary to the British Mandate for Palestine in 1939 at age 18. She was part of a group of young Jews who joined the British Army and parachuted into German-occupied Europe. Their mission was to organize resistance to the Nazis and aid in the rescue of Allied personnel.

Hannah parachuted into Yugoslavia in March 1944 and crossed into Hungary, where she was captured with a radio transmitter. She was held for nearly five months and tortured but refused to give up the code for the radio transmitter. Hannah was executed at age 23.

Hannah wrote her last poem days before her arrest and gave it to another parachutist. Her poems are now widely published. #InternationalWomensDay

Photo: Beit Hannah Senesh https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/gallery/hannah-szenes?utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=womenshistorymonth&utm_content=internationalwomensday:hannahszenes20210308

Hannah Szenes, a young poet, immigrated from Hungary to the British Mandate for Palestine in 1939 at age 18. She was part of a group of young Jews who joined the British Army and parachuted into German-occupied Europe. Their mission was to organize resistance to the Nazis and aid in the rescue of Allied personnel.

Hannah parachuted into Yugoslavia in March 1944 and crossed into Hungary, where she was captured with a radio transmitter. She was held for nearly five months and tortured but refused to give up the code for the radio transmitter. Hannah was executed at age 23.

Hannah wrote her last poem days before her arrest and gave it to another parachutist. Her poems are now widely published. #InternationalWomensDay

Photo: Beit Hannah Senesh https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/gallery/hannah-szenes?utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=womenshistorymonth&utm_content=internationalwomensday:hannahszenes20210308

The Nazis considered Afro-Germans racially inferior, but they did not have an organized program to eliminate them. Nonet...
02/05/2021

The Nazis considered Afro-Germans racially inferior, but they did not have an organized program to eliminate them. Nonetheless, the Nazi regime isolated, sterilized, incarcerated, and murdered an unknown number of Afro-Germans.

Hilarius Gilges was an Afro-German dancer and Communist activist from Düsseldorf, Germany. Nazis murdered him on June 20, 1933. Today Hilarius Gilges Platz in Düsseldorf memorializes Gilges as a victim of Nazi terror. #BlackHistoryMonth

Photo: Mahn-und Gedenkstaette Duesseldorf

The Nazis considered Afro-Germans racially inferior, but they did not have an organized program to eliminate them. Nonetheless, the Nazi regime isolated, sterilized, incarcerated, and murdered an unknown number of Afro-Germans.

Hilarius Gilges was an Afro-German dancer and Communist activist from Düsseldorf, Germany. Nazis murdered him on June 20, 1933. Today Hilarius Gilges Platz in Düsseldorf memorializes Gilges as a victim of Nazi terror. #BlackHistoryMonth

Photo: Mahn-und Gedenkstaette Duesseldorf

01/27/2021
Eisenhower’s Foresight: Protecting the Truth of the Holocaust

On International Holocaust Remembrance Day, join Susan Eisenhower live on Facebook as we remember the efforts of her grandfather, Dwight D. Eisenhower, to preserve the truth of the Holocaust, even as World War II waged on. He wrote of the Nazi brutality he saw: "I have never at any other time experienced an equal sense of shock."

"And they said, 'From now on you do not answer by your name. Your name is your number.' And the delusion, the disappoint...
01/26/2021
Auschwitz

"And they said, 'From now on you do not answer by your name. Your name is your number.' And the delusion, the disappointment, the discouragement that I felt, I felt like I was not a human person anymore." —Lilly Appelbaum, Auschwitz survivor

The Germans established the Auschwitz camp complex in the spring of 1940 in German-occupied Poland. It eventually consisted of three main camps: Auschwitz I, Auschwitz II Birkenau, and Auschwitz III Monowitz. By the time Soviet troops liberated the remaining prisoners in Auschwitz on January 27, 1945, approximately 1.1 million people had been murdered there.

Tomorrow, we mark the 76th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. #WeRemember

Photo: Yad Vashem

The Auschwitz camp system, located in German-occupied Poland, was a complex of 3 camps, including a killing center. Learn about the history of Auschwitz.

When we think of Nazi camps, our thoughts often begin and end with Auschwitz. However, the camp system set up by Nazi Ge...
01/21/2021
Nazi Camps

When we think of Nazi camps, our thoughts often begin and end with Auschwitz. However, the camp system set up by Nazi Germany and its collaborators was a far-reaching network of concentration camps, killing centers, forced labor sites, and other places of detention that spanned much of Europe.

The Nazi state and its allies established more than 44,000 incarceration sites between 1933 and 1945, according to ongoing Museum research. Eighty years since the Holocaust began, scholars are still working to untangle the Nazi camp system.

Nazi Germany and its allies established over 44,000 concentration camps and incarceration sites during the Holocaust. Read about the Nazi camp system.

When we think of Nazi camps, our thoughts often begin and end with Auschwitz. However, the camp system set up by Nazi Ge...
01/21/2021
Nazi Camps

When we think of Nazi camps, our thoughts often begin and end with Auschwitz. However, the camp system set up by Nazi Germany and its collaborators was a far-reaching network of concentration camps, killing centers, forced labor sites, and other places of detention that spanned much of Europe.

The Nazi state and its allies established more than 44,000 incarceration sites between 1933 and 1945, according to ongoing Museum research. Eighty years since the Holocaust began, scholars are still working to untangle the Nazi camp system.

Nazi Germany and its allies established over 44,000 concentration camps and incarceration sites during the Holocaust. Read about the Nazi camp system.

01/13/2021
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Last week's attack on the US Capitol and our democracy remind us of the ever-present dangers of hatred and propaganda. Join us for a discussion about how, 75 years after the Holocaust, white supremacist and other hate groups continue to exploit racism, conspiracy theories, and antisemitic lies.

The attack on the US Capitol and our democracy reminds us of the ever-present dangers of hatred and propaganda. Learn how, 75 years after the Holocaust, white supremacist and other hate groups continue to exploit racism, conspiracy theories, and antisemitic lies.

The timeless image of two children next to a Christmas tree served a purpose far greater than most such photos. It helpe...
12/25/2020
What Happened after this Christmas Photo Saved a Jewish Family?

The timeless image of two children next to a Christmas tree served a purpose far greater than most such photos. It helped save the lives of a Jewish family during the Holocaust.

Read the story about the Mandil family and how one holiday photo made the difference between life and death.

It’s a timeless holiday photo: two children dressed for a special occasion standing next to a Christmas tree. Thousands of similarly…

12/16/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Learn how a family cook heroically rescued her former employer’s treasured recipes, preserving their connection to childhood memories and Holocaust history.

In 1944, 12-year-old Steven Fenves and his family were forced from their home in Subotica, Yugoslavia, into a Jewish ghetto. While neighbors turned against them and looted their home, their former cook, Maris, rescued their treasured family recipes. Steven, a Holocaust survivor and Museum volunteer, and James Beard Award–winning Chef Alon Shaya discuss family recipes and their connections to childhood memories and Holocaust history.

Thanksgiving is a special holiday for Holocaust survivor Rae Goldfarb. “My mother and I arrived to the United States on ...
11/26/2020

Thanksgiving is a special holiday for Holocaust survivor Rae Goldfarb. “My mother and I arrived to the United States on November 17, 1947.” The women had survived the Holocaust in hiding in Nazi-controlled Poland. The week after arriving in America, surrounded by her aunt, uncle, and cousins, Rae celebrated her first #Thanksgiving. “It is very memorable to me because it was a dual celebration for us. We were grateful to finally join my aunt and find a permanent home.”

To mark the anniversary of the Nuremberg trials, which began 75 years ago, the Museum has released recordings and film f...
11/23/2020
Museum Makes Available Nuremberg War Crimes Trial Recordings

To mark the anniversary of the Nuremberg trials, which began 75 years ago, the Museum has released recordings and film from the trials, including 1,942 gramophone discs holding 775 hours of hearings and 37 reels of film. This is the first time these digital records are available in their entirety.

For the first time, public receives digital access to full sound recordings and film of war crimes proceedings, marking the 75th anniversary of the Nuremberg Trials.

On this day 75 years ago, the trial of major Nazi war criminals began at the International Military Tribunal at Nurember...
11/20/2020
International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg

On this day 75 years ago, the trial of major Nazi war criminals began at the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg.

The trials of leading German officials before the International Military Tribunal (IMT) are the best known of the postwar war c...

11/18/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

At age 27, in his first turn as a prosecutor, Benjamin Ferencz led what was then called "the biggest murder trial in history." The Nuremberg Trials, which began 75 years ago this month, aimed to achieve a measure of justice for Germany’s monstrous crimes, including the Holocaust. Ben, now 100, has devoted his life to pursuing peace, demanding justice for victims, and preventing genocide. Learn Ben's inspiring story and why his motto is: “Never give up.”

Benjamin Ferencz, now 100, is a role model for many. Learn his inspiring story, his role at an important moment in history, and why his motto is: “Never give up.”

10/28/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

People with disabilities were the Nazis' first victims of mass murder. But most remain anonymous. Learn the stories of some of the victims whose names have been recently uncovered.

People with disabilities were the Nazis' first victims of mass murder. But most remain anonymous. Learn the stories of some of the victims whose names have been recently uncovered.

Even though we’re apart, we’re still coming together.Join us tonight at 6 p.m. ET to reaffirm our commitment to the Muse...
10/14/2020
2020 NEW YORK VIRTUAL EVENT

Even though we’re apart, we’re still coming together.

Join us tonight at 6 p.m. ET to reaffirm our commitment to the Museum’s mission. Watch and donate here.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum works every day to rescue Holocaust evidence, confront hatred, and prevent genocide. Your contribution will make an immediate and direct impact.

After the war, the German people said, "We didn't know there were concentration camps, didn’t know they were killing the...
09/30/2020

After the war, the German people said, "We didn't know there were concentration camps, didn’t know they were killing the Jews.' They were silent. They were lying like hell.”

Holocaust survivor David Bayer remembers seeing the wife of the Auschwitz commandant looking down from her house as he and other prisoners, in their striped uniforms, were forced to dig a garden where she planted vegetables and flowers.

"She could see from her home... she could see the whole camp..."

Although the commandant’s wife had a firsthand view of the Nazis’ systematic murder machine, the Holocaust required the complicity of millions of ordinary Germans and average citizens living in lands occupied by Germany and its collaborators.

It is more important than ever for our Museum community in New York, Boston, and across the Northeast Region to come tog...
09/26/2020
What You Do Matters 2020 New York Virtual Event

It is more important than ever for our Museum community in New York, Boston, and across the Northeast Region to come together. We hope you can join us on Wednesday, October 14, at 6 p.m. ET, for the 2020 What You Do Matters New York Virtual Event.

• Name inscribed in perpetuity on the Museum’s Donors Wall• Membership in the Museum’s Leadership Circle• Recognition as a Corporate Partner at the Executive Circle Level*• All additional benefits listed below

09/21/2020
#WeRemember

It is impossible to picture six million people at once, to read six million names, to know six million stories. But by reading one story, saying one name, sharing one person’s legacy, you keep a memory alive.

09/16/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

It's #AskACurator Day, and we're taking your questions. Our Museum holds the world's most diverse collection of objects, artworks, documents, and other artifacts of the Holocaust. These rescued items reveal powerful stories of loss, survival, and hope.

On Ask A Curator Day, learn how seemingly ordinary objects, many once belonging to victims and survivors of the Holocaust, reveal powerful stories of tragedy, survival, and hope.

Address

60 East 42nd Street, Suite 1000
New York, NY
10165-1099

Telephone

(212) 983-0825

Website

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Northeast Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Northeast Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum:

Videos

Category

Welcome to our official page

The purpose of this page is to share information about Museum programs and resources; memorialize the Nazis’ victims; launch discussion about the Holocaust and its relevance today; and raise awareness that antisemitism, hatred, and genocide are ongoing threats and that we each have a role in combating them.

Towards these goals, we welcome your feedback about our efforts and your contributions to our Wall about issues that are consistent with the Museum's mission to advance and disseminate knowledge about the Holocaust; to preserve the memory of those who suffered; and to encourage people to reflect upon the moral and spiritual questions raised by the events of the Holocaust as well as their own responsibilities as global citizens.

The Museum strives to keep our Wall a forum that is open and welcoming to many issues and opinions. Towards that goal, we reserve the right to remove posts and comments that violate the following guidelines. Repeat offenders may be banned:

1. Stay on topic—all contributions to this page should be relevant to its stated purpose (see above).

Nearby museums


Other Museums in New York

Show All

Comments

Remembering Gilbert Mazuz za"l Dec. 9, 1942 – Death of Gilbert Mazuz, za”l, shot in N**i-occupied Vichy Tunisia, in The Shoah in France: The First Round Up of the Jews in N**i-occupied Vichy Tunisia. Context: Today, it is difficult to visualize the three Arab North African Arab countries of Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco as part of France, and the persecution of the Jews there as part of the Shoah in France, as correctly described by Yad Vashem’s academic advisor Yehuda Bauer in his book The Holocaust. The fact is that “France” was, and still is, a transcontinental empire nation consisting of metropolitan France (la Metropole), located in continental France, and its oversea empire called “Overseas France” (France d’Outre-Mer; that’s why France in German is called Frankreich). Thus, during the Shoah, the close-by French territories in North Africa, called “France on the other side of the Mediterranean,” were part of Europe, a political imperial Europe. And Hi**er defined Europe as “the European nations and their colonies.” The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure appropriately states the Holocaust occurred in “Europe, including the North African colonies.” And it is INCORRECT to write and talk about “the Shoah in North Africa,” BUT one must write: THE. SHOAH IN FRANCE, INCLUSIVE OF THE JEWS IN FRANCE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MEDITERRANEAN, in Vichy Tunisia, Vichy Algeria, and Vichy Morocco. Indeed, following the 1940 French-German armistice during World War II and the Shoah in France, Field-Marshal Henri-Philippe Pétain, the head of the new French Vichy regime, governed the southern part of France in continental Europe (metropolitan Vichy), and French North Africa as the unoccupied territories of Vichy Tunisia, Vichy Algeria, and Vichy Morocco, while most of the northern part of Metropolitan/continental France came under direct German military administration. Yad Vashem and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum acknowledge that French North Africa was an integral part of Vichy France. Therefore, during the Shoah in France, 700,000 Jews (300,000 in metropolitan France and 400,000 in Vichy North Africa) came under the German sphere of influence, because Pétain decided to collaborate with Hi**er. “In the name of France and state antisemitism,” and to solve “the Jewish question,” collaborationist Pétain enacted two antisemitic Statut des Juifs (October 1940 and June 1941) to be applicable, de facto and de jure, not only in metropolitan France, but also in Vichy Tunisia, Vichy Algeria, and Vichy Morocco. Persecuted by the same pro-N**i ruler, the Vichy Jews living on France’s both sides of the Mediterranean Sea suffered the same fate. They were identified, counted, ostracized, isolated, systematically discriminated, objectified, incarcerated, diabolized and deprived of their civil rights and property – the preparatory measures that laid the foundation for an annihilation. The bureaucracy and the machinery to implement the “Final Solution” were set for them. – one people, one destiny. Ahdut am, ahdut goral. On November 8, 1942, Operation Torch began, to open a second front in the European theater of the war, at the request of Soviet leader Joseph Stalin. US and British forces, led by American General Dwight D. Eisenhower, supreme commander of Allied forces in Europe, landed on the beaches of of the French territories of Vichy Morocco and Vichy Algeria. Eisenhower wrote the story in his memoir Crusade in Europe. The Allies successfully fought against Vichy France forces. On November 10, they started to advance toward Tunis, in order to invade Italy and continue to N**i Germany. But, the Allied landings during Operation Torch triggered the simultaneous invasion of Vichy metropolitan France and Vichy Tunisia by Hi**er’s forces, on November 10 and 9, respectively. An Einsatzkommando unit (an SS task force, a unit of the Einsatzgruppen mobile killing squads in charge of annihilating Jews) led by SS commander Walter Rauff, who was responsible for the murder of Jews in N**i-occupied Eastern Europe using mobile gas vans, also entered Tunis, prepared to continue to implement the “Final Solution,” started by Vichy France. He was empowered to “take executive measures against the civilian population” – N**i jargon for robbery, murder and enslavement.” During its six months of occupation, the ruthless N**i regime forced the creation of local Judenrat, and imposed antisemitic policies, including fines, confiscation of property and the forced wearing of the yellow badge (Star of David) by Jews, especially in Mahdia, Nabeul, Sousse and Sfax. About 5,000 Jews were sent to more than 30 forced labor camps. ON DECEMBER 9, a German soldier shot in cold blood the first Shoah victim, Gilbert Mazuz, a young handicapped man who couldn’t anymore march to the slave labor camp. At its Central Database of Shoah Victims’ Names, where it records the Shoah victims, Yad Vashem has a Page of Testimony for him. In May 13, 1943, the Allies involved in Operation Torch liberated the 100,0 00 Jews of N**i-occupied Vichy Tunisia where about 700 are known to have died. So, like the Jews of Denmark, who were evacuated to neutral Sweden, a total of about 100,000 Vichy Jews were spared the deadly mass deportations that took place in the rest of N**i-occupied Europe, because of Operation Torch. Today, the Jews of the French protectorates of Tunisia and Morocco, and of the three departments of French Algeria, who suffered during N**i occupation of France, receive Holocaust compensation payments, just as the Jews of mainland France do. Edith Shaked, a specialist of the Shoah in France. She is a member of the advisory board of H-Holocaust, an international academic consortium/H-Net’s network for scholars of the Holocaust
Subject: FW: fyi rabbi rosenberg-proposed new book on the holocaust ie children , grandchildren , Rabbi Dr. Bernard Rosenberg is in a process of preparation materials to his new book about 2-3d generations of Holocaust survivors (pls also see attached). The e-mail in the bottom specifies what Q&A are expected to be addressed. If you want to participate, pls send your materials directly to Rabbi Rosenberg (red font below) or to me and I’ll forward to him. My page devoted to my perished great grandparents was a part of the previous book, which was issued 5-6 years ago. An expected maximum length of the essay is 4 pages (pls see details below). PLEASE SEND TO CHAIMDOV @AOL.COM include pictures please. -----Original Message----- To: [email protected] Sent: Wed, May 20, 2020 6:36 am Subject: fyi rabbi rosenberg everyone I am seeking the following in the proposed new book on the holocaust ie children , grandchildren etc. as a survivors child or grandchild 1. what do you miss if they perished, what do you appreciate if they are still alive, do you feel you gained from being a 2g or 3g..how so. What did you experience with the survivors ie joy, sadness, the cooking, the love, the stories. Do you have any feelings of guilt, how so. When did they start talking to you about the holocaust or were they always silent. What do you feel is your mission if any to preserve the memory of the holocaust.. how do you feel we must fight anti-Semitism based on your knowledge of the holocaust. did you name members of the family after those who perished in the holocaust. What traits do you have that you inherited from them, guilt, happiness, need to survive, always to have plenty of food at home, to save money, to give money to your children . Tell us about your family life, married, divorced, how many children, grandchildren , great grandchildren …..these are just a few ideas. excuse the typing. submit everything via e mail, use spell check and grammar check. if essay not longer than 4 typed pages.. poems, songs, illustrations, family pictures especially of the survivors and their family are needed. RABBI DR. BERNHARD ROSENBERG