Northeast Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Northeast Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum As the Northeast Regional Office for USHMM, our goal is to engage the tri-state area in dynamic programs and events that complement the Museum in Washington, D.C.

This space is to educate about the work of the Museum and the events in our region.

10/28/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

People with disabilities were the Nazis' first victims of mass murder. But most remain anonymous. Learn the stories of some of the victims whose names have been recently uncovered.

People with disabilities were the Nazis' first victims of mass murder. But most remain anonymous. Learn the stories of some of the victims whose names have been recently uncovered.

Even though we’re apart, we’re still coming together.Join us tonight at 6 p.m. ET to reaffirm our commitment to the Muse...
10/14/2020
2020 NEW YORK VIRTUAL EVENT

Even though we’re apart, we’re still coming together.

Join us tonight at 6 p.m. ET to reaffirm our commitment to the Museum’s mission. Watch and donate here.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum works every day to rescue Holocaust evidence, confront hatred, and prevent genocide. Your contribution will make an immediate and direct impact.

After the war, the German people said, "We didn't know there were concentration camps, didn’t know they were killing the...
09/30/2020

After the war, the German people said, "We didn't know there were concentration camps, didn’t know they were killing the Jews.' They were silent. They were lying like hell.”

Holocaust survivor David Bayer remembers seeing the wife of the Auschwitz commandant looking down from her house as he and other prisoners, in their striped uniforms, were forced to dig a garden where she planted vegetables and flowers.

"She could see from her home... she could see the whole camp..."

Although the commandant’s wife had a firsthand view of the Nazis’ systematic murder machine, the Holocaust required the complicity of millions of ordinary Germans and average citizens living in lands occupied by Germany and its collaborators.

It is more important than ever for our Museum community in New York, Boston, and across the Northeast Region to come tog...
09/26/2020
What You Do Matters 2020 New York Virtual Event

It is more important than ever for our Museum community in New York, Boston, and across the Northeast Region to come together. We hope you can join us on Wednesday, October 14, at 6 p.m. ET, for the 2020 What You Do Matters New York Virtual Event.

• Name inscribed in perpetuity on the Museum’s Donors Wall• Membership in the Museum’s Leadership Circle• Recognition as a Corporate Partner at the Executive Circle Level*• All additional benefits listed below

09/21/2020
#WeRemember

It is impossible to picture six million people at once, to read six million names, to know six million stories. But by reading one story, saying one name, sharing one person’s legacy, you keep a memory alive.

09/16/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

It's #AskACurator Day, and we're taking your questions. Our Museum holds the world's most diverse collection of objects, artworks, documents, and other artifacts of the Holocaust. These rescued items reveal powerful stories of loss, survival, and hope.

On Ask A Curator Day, learn how seemingly ordinary objects, many once belonging to victims and survivors of the Holocaust, reveal powerful stories of tragedy, survival, and hope.

Coming together has never been more important. Join us on Wednesday, October 14, at 6 p.m. ET, for the 2020 What You Do ...
09/15/2020
What You Do Matters 2020 New York Virtual Event

Coming together has never been more important. Join us on Wednesday, October 14, at 6 p.m. ET, for the 2020 What You Do Matters New York Virtual Event featuring special guests, inspiring stories, and incredible moments.

• Name inscribed in perpetuity on the Museum’s Donors Wall• Membership in the Museum’s Leadership Circle• Recognition as a Corporate Partner at the Executive Circle Level*• All additional benefits listed below

Being able to explain what #antisemitism is and where it comes from can be difficult.Start with the basics: Who are "Jew...
09/10/2020
Antisemitism and Holocaust Denial

Being able to explain what #antisemitism is and where it comes from can be difficult.

Start with the basics: Who are "Jews"? How did antisemitism start? Why is it still with us, even after the Holocaust.

Antisemitism is prejudice against or hatred of Jews. The Holocaust, the state-sponsored persecution and murder of European Jews by Nazi Germany and its collaborators, is history’s most extreme example of antisemitism.

09/09/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

The Holocaust is the best-documented case of genocide. The US military and their allies collected firsthand evidence. Survivors and other eyewitnesses testified about their personal experiences. And the Nazis themselves kept meticulous records.

Yet people always have attempted to distort or deny the history. Governments minimize the part played by local Nazi collaborators in order to rehabilitate their images. As time passes, new generations are susceptible to manipulation.

We're live on Facebook discussing how deniers use social media to spread lies.

The Holocaust is the best documented case of genocide. Yet people always have attempted to distort the history or flat-out deny it. Countries minimize or ignore the part played by local collaborators in order to rehabilitate their images. People quickly spread misinformation through the power of social media. And as the history recedes in time, new generations are susceptible to the dangers of manipulation.

At this difficult time for our nation—a time for reflection and action—members of the Museum community from New York, Bo...
09/05/2020
What You Do Matters 2020 New York Virtual Event

At this difficult time for our nation—a time for reflection and action—members of the Museum community from New York, Boston, and across the Northeast Region will come together for a virtual event. We hope you can join us on October 14 at 6 p.m. ET.

• Name inscribed in perpetuity on the Museum’s Donors Wall• Membership in the Museum’s Leadership Circle• Recognition as a Corporate Partner at the Executive Circle Level*• All additional benefits listed below

"Antisemitism has a template with three elements: money and finance; intellect used maliciously and nefariously; and hav...
08/30/2020
Antisemitism

"Antisemitism has a template with three elements: money and finance; intellect used maliciously and nefariously; and having [disproportionate] power in society. That all ties together into a conspiratorial notion of the Jew wanting to do evil—to use their financial ability, their cunning, and their power against non-Jewish people." —Holocaust historian Deborah Lipstadt

The Nazi regime used similar centuries-old myths to stoke fear in the German public about Jews, which are still being used today.

The term antisemitism was coined only in the nineteenth century, but anti-Jewish hatred and Judeophobia (fear of Jews) date back to ancient times and have a variety of causes.

"The minute we landed in New York, it was a place that I felt at home, and it completely eliminated the last nine years....
08/22/2020

"The minute we landed in New York, it was a place that I felt at home, and it completely eliminated the last nine years."

Frank Liebermann was still a child when his family fled the Nazi threat in Germany.

As a young Jewish boy in public school in Germany, he remembered recess as “the most scary part of the day" because some of his Christian classmates threatened him physically. After he arrived in the United States, and he grew to know his new country, Frank recognized flaws in America and wanted to see them improved. But he felt he belonged here.

"This is my country. I studied its history, its Constitution, as well as its weaknesses because I want my home to be as good as it can be."

Would you know #antisemitism if you saw it or heard it?There are many different forms of antisemitism: racial, religious...
08/14/2020
Antisemitism

Would you know #antisemitism if you saw it or heard it?

There are many different forms of antisemitism: racial, religious, economic, political, and denial that the Holocaust occured.

Explore and share the link below.

The term antisemitism was coined only in the nineteenth century, but anti-Jewish hatred and Judeophobia (fear of Jews) date back to ancient times and have a variety of causes.

08/12/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

There's nothing funny about the Holocaust, but mocking perpetrators, as comedian Mel Brooks did, can strip them of their power. Watch now to learn how humor can be used to heal the pain of the Holocaust.

Jewish comedian Robert Clary, who was imprisoned in the Buchenwald concentration camp and later acted in the 1960s sitcom “Hogan’s Heroes,” says that making people laugh during the Holocaust saved his life. Humor helped some people cope with atrocious conditions in ghettos and concentration camps as they suffered under Nazi brutality.

Join Ferne Pearlstein, director of “The Last Laugh,” to explore how humor kept the human spirit alive during the Holocaust and helped some survivors heal.

07/30/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

On the United Nations International Day of Friendship, join Museum experts to learn about individuals who helped their Jewish friends find refuge.

When Pennsylvanian teen Jane Bomberger and American exchange student Robert Harlan learned about Nazi persecution of Jews, they wanted to take action. They were able to help their friends flee Nazi Germany and Austria. Assistance from abroad was vital because few people could obtain the necessary paperwork and permissions needed to emigrate from Nazi-occupied Europe in the 1930s.

On the United Nations International Day of Friendship, join Museum experts to learn about individuals who helped their Jewish friends find refuge.

07/29/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum : Some Were Neighbors

What motives and pressures led so many individuals to abandon their fellow human beings? Why did others make the choice to help?

While the role of Hitler and the Nazis is indisputable, the Holocaust could not have happened without tens of thousands of ordinary people actively collaborating with—or indifferent to— the actions of perpetrators. Many more supported or tolerated the crimes.

The central role of Hitler and other Nazi Party leaders is indisputable. Less well understood is these perpetrators’ dependence on countless others. In countries across Europe, tens of thousands of ordinary people actively collaborated with German perpetrators of the Holocaust. Many more supported...

Nesse Godin grew up in Siauliai, Lithuania—a town that boasted a large and culturally vibrant Jewish population. Life fo...
07/25/2020

Nesse Godin grew up in Siauliai, Lithuania—a town that boasted a large and culturally vibrant Jewish population. Life for Siauliai’s 10,000 Jewish residents changed dramatically when Nazi Germany occupied the town in 1941. ⁣

“I was a prisoner from the age of 13 to 17," she said. "I lived through a ghetto, concentration camp, four labor camps, and a death march. I was not strong, I was not smart, I was a little girl.” Nesse survived four years of Nazi imprisonment, all before her 18th birthday. She credits her survival as a young girl to the care and protection she received from Jewish women in the camps.

07/15/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Art has long been used as a form of protest and to influence social and political action. We're live on Facebook discussing art's power then and now to influence and to inspire action.

Polish-born artist Arthur Szyk was alarmed by the Nazi threat and used his pen and paper to call public attention to the persecution of Europe’s Jews. Art has long been used as a form of protest to influence social and political action. Learn about the power of art—then and now—to change minds and highlight our shared humanity.

07/04/2020
Donald Hall- American Flag

“Seeing the American flag rekindled something in each of us. Every star on the American flag stood for something precious we had lost: One for hope, one for freedom, one for justice." —Holocaust survivor Simon Wiesenthal

In 1945, Sergeant Donald Hall was presented with a handmade American flag by newly liberated prisoners of the Langenstein-Zwieberge concentration camp. It had been made as a gesture of gratitude.

Hall, a member of the 83rd Infantry Division of the US Army, took part in the liberation of the camp on April 11, 1945. #FourthofJuly

04/23/2020
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

During the annual Days of Remembrance, members of the Museum community from across the country committed to our mission of teaching the history and lessons of the Holocaust. The 30-minute gathering featured Museum Director Sara Bloomfield and Maziar Bahari, the 2020 Elie Wiesel Award recipient, and closed with Holocaust survivors’ messages for the future.

Today, during the annual Days of Remembrance, join members of the Museum community from across the country who are committed to our mission of teaching the history and lessons of the Holocaust. The 30-minute gathering will feature Museum Director Sara Bloomfield and Maziar Bahari, the 2020 Elie Wiesel Award recipient, and will close with Holocaust survivors’ messages for the future.

04/22/2020
National Tribute Gathering

During the annual Days of Remembrance, members of the Museum community from across the country committed to our mission of teaching the history and lessons of the Holocaust. The 30-minute gathering featured Museum Director Sara Bloomfield and Maziar Bahari, the 2020 Elie Wiesel Award recipient, and closed with Holocaust survivors’ messages for the future.

Museum Welcomes Vatican Archive Announcement
03/04/2019
Museum Welcomes Vatican Archive Announcement

Museum Welcomes Vatican Archive Announcement

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum welcomes today’s announcement that His Holiness Pope Francis intends to open the Vatican’s archival record of Pope Pius XII to allow for in-depth scholarly study beginning on March 2, 2020.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
12/07/2018
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Today we raise our voice to say we believe there is compelling evidence that the Burmese military has committed genocide against the #Rohingya. Our goal in sounding the alarm is to prod a meaningful and sustained engagement by the international community. As an institution, we work to ensure that the commitment to prevent genocide is not empty rhetoric, that "Never Again" means something.

On Tuesday, November 13th the Museum partnered with The Westport Library to bring the film 82 Names: Syria, Please Don't...
11/15/2018

On Tuesday, November 13th the Museum partnered with The Westport Library to bring the film 82 Names: Syria, Please Don't Forget Us to Westport, Connecticut. The film screening was followed by a panel discussion with Mina Abdelmalak, the Museum's Arabic Audience Outreach Specialist, Rafif Jouejati, Co-Founder and Director, FREE-Syria and Jill Savitt, the acting director of the Museum's Simon-Skjodt Center for the Prevention of Genocide.

To learn more about the Museum's work in Syria, please visit our website at ushmm.org/82names. We look forward to bringing future events to the Westport Community.

08/16/2018
The Nazi Olympics Berlin 1936

August's Museum Highlight is on our newly designed Encyclopedia.

82 years ago the Berlin Olympics ended. Used as a propaganda tool, these games tried to show a strong and united Germany with an illusion of civility. As hindsight has told us these games were so much more. To learn more and commemorate the 82nd anniversary, search in our new Holocaust Encyclopedia.

The 1936 Berlin Olympic Games were more than just a worldwide sporting event, it was show of Nazi propaganda, stirring significant conflict. Despite the exclusionary principles of...

Address

60 East 42nd Street, Suite 1000
New York, NY
10165-1099

Telephone

(212) 983-0825

Website

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Northeast Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Northeast Region of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum:

Videos

Category

Welcome to our official page

The purpose of this page is to share information about Museum programs and resources; memorialize the Nazis’ victims; launch discussion about the Holocaust and its relevance today; and raise awareness that antisemitism, hatred, and genocide are ongoing threats and that we each have a role in combating them.

Towards these goals, we welcome your feedback about our efforts and your contributions to our Wall about issues that are consistent with the Museum's mission to advance and disseminate knowledge about the Holocaust; to preserve the memory of those who suffered; and to encourage people to reflect upon the moral and spiritual questions raised by the events of the Holocaust as well as their own responsibilities as global citizens.

The Museum strives to keep our Wall a forum that is open and welcoming to many issues and opinions. Towards that goal, we reserve the right to remove posts and comments that violate the following guidelines. Repeat offenders may be banned:

1. Stay on topic—all contributions to this page should be relevant to its stated purpose (see above).

Nearby museums


Comments

Subject: FW: fyi rabbi rosenberg-proposed new book on the holocaust ie children , grandchildren , Rabbi Dr. Bernard Rosenberg is in a process of preparation materials to his new book about 2-3d generations of Holocaust survivors (pls also see attached). The e-mail in the bottom specifies what Q&A are expected to be addressed. If you want to participate, pls send your materials directly to Rabbi Rosenberg (red font below) or to me and I’ll forward to him. My page devoted to my perished great grandparents was a part of the previous book, which was issued 5-6 years ago. An expected maximum length of the essay is 4 pages (pls see details below). PLEASE SEND TO CHAIMDOV @AOL.COM include pictures please. -----Original Message----- To: [email protected] Sent: Wed, May 20, 2020 6:36 am Subject: fyi rabbi rosenberg everyone I am seeking the following in the proposed new book on the holocaust ie children , grandchildren etc. as a survivors child or grandchild 1. what do you miss if they perished, what do you appreciate if they are still alive, do you feel you gained from being a 2g or 3g..how so. What did you experience with the survivors ie joy, sadness, the cooking, the love, the stories. Do you have any feelings of guilt, how so. When did they start talking to you about the holocaust or were they always silent. What do you feel is your mission if any to preserve the memory of the holocaust.. how do you feel we must fight anti-Semitism based on your knowledge of the holocaust. did you name members of the family after those who perished in the holocaust. What traits do you have that you inherited from them, guilt, happiness, need to survive, always to have plenty of food at home, to save money, to give money to your children . Tell us about your family life, married, divorced, how many children, grandchildren , great grandchildren …..these are just a few ideas. excuse the typing. submit everything via e mail, use spell check and grammar check. if essay not longer than 4 typed pages.. poems, songs, illustrations, family pictures especially of the survivors and their family are needed. RABBI DR. BERNHARD ROSENBERG