Ricco/Maresca Gallery

Ricco/Maresca Gallery For 35+ years, Ricco/Maresca Gallery has specialized in Outsider, Self-Taught, Contemporary, and his Knopf, Little Brown and Company, and Pomegranate Press.

Following in the footsteps of the legendary New York dealer Sidney Janis, Ricco/Maresca champions and showcases the art of self-taught masters working outside the continuum of art history. The gallery specializes in Outsider, Self-Taught, Contemporary, and historically significant American Folk art in various media. Over a period of more than 35 years, Ricco/Maresca has helped blur the lines that

have habitually separated conventional art-historical categories and “marginal” art. The gallery has carried out this mission through a pioneering program that emphasizes crossover between vernacular and mainstream traditions, the management of key estates (William Hawkins and Martín Ramírez among them), and seminal books produced with publishing partners such as Alfred A. Ricco/Maresca Gallery was founded in 1979 on Broome Street, within New York’s then-emerging SoHo gallery district. The gallery relocated to TriBeCa in the 1980s and later moved to Wooster Street in SoHo—which had by then become an established contemporary art hub. In 1997, Ricco/Maresca became one of the first galleries to move to the new Chelsea art district and is currently located at 529 West 20th Street. The gallery participates and has participated in the Armory Show, the Outsider Art Fair (New York and Paris), Metro Curates, Art Chicago, SCOPE (New York and Miami), and AIPAD. We work closely with major museums and collectors, and offer services that range from curatorial advisory to collection management, installation design, and conservation.

Join us today (4-7pm) for the closing reception of “Grant Wallace: Over the Psychic Radio,” featuring complimentary 15-m...
12/03/2022

Join us today (4-7pm) for the closing reception of “Grant Wallace: Over the Psychic Radio,” featuring complimentary 15-minute tarot readings conducted by Laetitia Barbier / .cartomancy (for those who signed up in advance) and a wine bar for everyone else. / In association with Morbid Anatomy.
https://riccomaresca.viewingrooms.com/viewing-room/90-closing-reception-grant-wallace-over-the-psychic/
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Artwork pictured: . “Les Veuves de la Mort”, ca. 1919 - 1925. Ink, watercolor, and gouache on paper. 20 1/4 x 12 1/4 in. (51.4 x 31.1 cm.)
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Wallace was born in Hopkins, Missouri, in 1868, one of 9 children. He set out for New York City at age 19, where he studied and developed his interest in the occult. Wallace eventually made his way to California, where he worked as an editorial illustrator and reporter for the San Francisco Examiner and San Francisco Chronicle. He graduated to editorial writer for the Evening Bulletin and covered the Russo-Japanese War in 1904 among a group of war correspondents that included Jack London and Richard Harding Davis.
Just before World War I, Wallace settled with his family in Carmel, California, where he began experimenting with telepathy, or what he referred to as "mental radio.” Over the next two decades, he channeled his visions and messages into elaborate portraits, texts, and complex diagrams and calculations. Through his work, Wallace endeavored to prove reincarnation, extraterrestrial life, and the coexistence of the living with the dead.
[Artwork image © The Berger Wallace Art Collection]
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10/28/2022

FREE EVENT! We hope you'll join us Saturday, October 29 for Over the Psychic Radio: A Live, Online Symposium Dedicated to Artist and Occultist Grant Wallace, Produced in Partnership with Ricco/Maresca Gallery. Learn more and register at bit.ly/3fLyKpn.

We hope you’ll join us for a special symposium devoted to the forgotten life and work of American artist, occultist, and journalist Grant Wallace. This event is produced in partnership with Ricco/Maresca Gallery and celebrates their exhibition Grant Wallace: Over the Psychic Radio (October 20 - December 3, 2022).

Grant Wallace (1868–1954) had a storied life before settling with his family in Carmel, California right before WWI. Here, he began experimenting with telepathy, or what he referred to as "mental radio.” Over the next two decades, Grant Wallace channeled his visions and messages into elaborate portraits, texts, and complex diagrams and calculations. Through his work, Wallace endeavored to prove reincarnation, extraterrestrial life, and the coexistence of the living with the dead.

This symposium will explore the life, work, and cultural milieu of this enigmatic creator, featuring presentations by:

🔹Curator and gallerist Frank Maresca

🔹Writer, critic, and artist Lucy Sante, author of Low Life

🔹Matt Berger, great-grandson of Grant Wallace

🔹Art Historian Susan Aberth, professor at Bard College, author of Not Without My Ghosts

🔹Robert Cozzolino, curator of Supernatural America: The Paranormal in American Art

🔹Practicing medium Tiffany Hopkins, who will lead us on a guided meditation allowing us to engage in some artistic channeling of our own

Ricco/Maresca’s Grant Wallace: Over the Psychic Radio is the first gallery exhibition ever to be mounted of the artist's work. It features 31 works from a collection that was recently discovered by Wallace's great-grandchildren.

Image: Grant Wallace, “A More Splendid Race" (detail), ca. 1919 - 1925, courtesy of Ricco/Maresca Gallery | © Berger Wallace Art Collection

From our online programming: "William Hawkins: Drawings"More information 👉 Link in profile •••William Hawkins’s main sou...
09/10/2022

From our online programming: "William Hawkins: Drawings"
More information 👉 Link in profile
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William Hawkins’s main source of inspiration was the print media of his time, the pictures in newspapers and magazines that he retrieved from the trash stored in a suitcase.
Before starting to work on a painting, Hawkins would often work out basic compositional problems on paper. The drawings presented in this online exhibition were always meant to be the beginning of a process that was wonderfully spontaneous. When asked about art-making, the first thing the artist would say was that he had been drawing all his life. This was true. Even though he did not start painting in earnest until the late 1970s (he was always a hard, industrious worker and never had the luxury of time), drawing could be done anywhere, quickly.
It was never Hawkins's intention to sell his drawings, so he didn’t treat them with particular care—he might have been working on one while eating lunch or dinner. There is nothing "precious" about the artist's work, and this extends to his drawings. It’s also true that they are as fearless and whimsical as his paintings are.
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Address

529 W 20th Street, Fl 3rd
New York, NY
10011

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10am - 6pm
Wednesday 10am - 6pm
Thursday 10am - 6pm
Friday 10am - 6pm
Saturday 11am - 6pm

Telephone

(212) 627-4819

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