Muriel Guépin Gallery

Muriel Guépin Gallery is pleased to announce "Towards the Light," featuring works by Ole Brodersen and James Minden, bot...
04/12/2014

Muriel Guépin Gallery is pleased to announce "Towards the Light," featuring works by Ole Brodersen and James Minden, both of whom use light to create unpredictable compositions, make the unseen visible, and transform still images into untraceable events.

Ole Brodersen starts with unpredictable natural forces and photographic processes to arrive at concrete, two-dimensional color works. After assembling LED lights in a landscape, Ole sets up a large format camera with a long exposure. He allows winds, waves and currents to interact with the lights. Ole surrenders to the unseen forces of nature and the unpredictability of his photographic process, allowing the compositions to create themselves. The results are vibrant swaths of light leaping through ethereal compositions.

Unlike Ole, James Minden starts with a precise, controlled process, incising sheets of plastic with concentric and/or overlapping ellipses. When lit from a single point source, his previously still drawings become holograms, their layers and movement alive and untraceable.

Ole starts from a place of unpredictability, capturing in 2-dimensional form natural forces we can feel (wind, waves, currents), but not see. James starts with a controlled, tight process, later adding light to arrive at something unpredictable and less traceable. While James and Ole start from opposite ends of the spectrum of control, they both allow light and related processes to add elements of unpredictability, resulting in mysterious, movement-filled "light paintings."

"Towards the Light" opens Friday, April 18th with an opening reception from 6:30-8pm.
The exhibit will remain on view through May 31st.

Be Good for Goodness Sake December 13, 2013 - January 19, 2014Celebrated for presenting critical works by emerging artis...
12/13/2013

Be Good for Goodness Sake
December 13, 2013 - January 19, 2014
Celebrated for presenting critical works by emerging artists who utilize innovative art practices and materials, Muriel Guépin Gallery is pleased to announce the forthcoming exhibition “Be Good for Goodness Sake”.
This three-person show features new works by Nathan Vincent, Iviva Olenick, and Kathy Halper. Taking its name from Vincent’s large-scale work installed in the exhibition space, “Be Good for Goodness Sake” will push audiences to question their stance on surveillance and privacy in the age of social media. As people around the world fret over the limits of their real world versus online personas, the “live-out-loud” party of the social-networking era has given way to caution as people worry about the amount of personal details available online.
Nathan Vincent’s six-foot crocheted doily acts as Big Brother and invites viewers to sit on a bench flanked by security cameras, while Kathy Halper and Iviva Olenick create embroideries that question the psychosocial impacts of intimate over-sharing via social media. Inspired by her own Facebook feed, Olenick uses embroidery and watercolor to render her own “selfies” and portraits of others. Halper’s work similarly questions the disappearing space between public and private online through embroidered drawings of found images from teens’ Twitter and Facebook accounts.

Laurent Chéhère Flying Houses November 1 - December 1, 2013Laurent Chéhère is an award-winning French photographer known...
10/30/2013

Laurent Chéhère Flying Houses
November 1 - December 1, 2013
Laurent Chéhère is an award-winning French photographer known for his commercial work for clients such as Audi and Nike. He left the advertising industry to travel the world and along the way was born his flying houses series, a collection of fantastical buildings, homes, tents and trailers removed from their backgrounds and suspended in the sky as if permanently airborne.

As stated by the Huffington Post: “Caught in the hustle and bustle of crowded streets, big city dwellers might not always have the time to stop and enjoy the scenery. But a French photographer named Laurent Chehere is giving you a reason to admire your street-side architecture. In a series titled "Flying Houses," the artist takes images of ordinary urban and suburban residents and places them in the skies, creating captivating photographs of homes that appear to be floating through the air. Some are adorned with clotheslines and flower boxes while others are bellowing smoke and eschewing flames, but all of the houses seem to be captured mid-journey, moving above the clouds as they remain tethered out of frame. No longer hidden in the monotony of a congested street, the isolated structures become whimsical imaginations you can't help but notice.
Combining his love of architecture and exploration, the series of "Flying Houses" not only urges the viewer to readdress the obscure beauty of urban houses, but also to think of the transitory experience of being lifted away from your permanent residence.”

Laurent Chéhère first exposed the series Flying Houses at Docks-en-Seine City of Fashion and Design in France in June 2012 -where he won the Special Award of the “Biennale des Créateurs d'images". Since then his photographs have toured the world. Muriel Guépin is proud offer him his first solo show in the US and present some of his most recent flying houses - which haven’t been exhibited before.

Using a range of mediums, Dary’s work is consistent throughout New Nature in its sensitivity towards environments in tra...
09/28/2013

Using a range of mediums, Dary’s work is consistent throughout New Nature in its sensitivity towards environments in transition. Her focus on flux in natural spaces is mirrored in her choice of forms and materials, such as kinetic sculptures made of fabric, steel and glass pins to translucent drawings on handmade paper with egg tempera and beeswax. Throughout her work, there is an emphasis on transformation and evolution, capturing a moment in time poised in a delicate balance between sustainability and decline. Dary explores the liminal space between nature untouched by human intervention and the "new nature" we ourselves have created.

The sculptures created by Joan Lurie in Vessels Oblique are ambiguous, denying function for the visual pleasure of multiplicity and repetition. In crafting these bold yet delicate sculptures, Lurie manages to create forms that both echo nature while feeling fully otherworldly and unique.Through the use of porcelain and paper clay, Lurie is able to allude to a human presence while evading representation and maintaining an uncertainty within the work. Her vessels are a nexus of architecture, sculpture, and craft.

There will be an opening reception on Sunday, September 8, 2013 from 6 - 8 pm

06/07/2013

Come and visit our new solo show "Years of Veneers" featuring new works from Matthew Conradt. The show will be on view until June 30, 2013.

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83 Orchard St
New York, NY
10002

Opening Hours

Wednesday 12:00 - 18:00
Thursday 12:00 - 18:00
Friday 12:00 - 18:00
Saturday 12:00 - 18:00
Sunday 12:00 - 18:00

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(347) 244-1052

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