Eli Klein Gallery

Eli Klein Gallery Eli Klein Gallery has an international reputation as one of the foremost galleries specializing in co The Gallery was founded by Eli Klein in 2007.
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Eli Klein Gallery has an international reputation as one of the foremost galleries specializing in contemporary Asian art and continues to advance the careers of its represented artists and hundreds of other Asian artists with whom it has collaborated. The Gallery has been instrumental in the loan of artworks by Asian artists to over 100 museum exhibitions throughout the world. It has published 40

books/catalogues and organized more than 75 exhibitions of Asian contemporary art at our prestigious venues in New York City. Eli Klein’s gallery artists have been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Artforum, Newsweek, and ARTnews and have been on CNN and countless other international broadcasts, publications, and online critical reviews. Located at 398 West Street (between Charles and West 10th) in the trendiest part of the West Village, Eli Klein Gallery is just a few blocks from the new Whitney Museum and the commencement point for the High Line. In a landmarked Federal-style row house that enjoys special cultural, historical and aesthetic value to the City of New York, Eli Klein Gallery occupies 3 levels of the building, boasting 13-foot ceilings on the ground floor. During these formative years, it established a reputation for introducing fresh, contemporary, and often challenging works by rising Asian talents to the western audiences. Now, as the leading dealer of Asian contemporary art outside of China, Eli Klein actively promotes cross-cultural awareness and investment at the highest level amongst some of the world’s most influential nations. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/KleinSunGallery

Exploring family archives, self-portraits, and still life photography, ’s first photography project, Soliloquy, interwea...
01/04/2024

Exploring family archives, self-portraits, and still life photography, ’s first photography project, Soliloquy, interweaves and oscillates between his personal past and present. By remapping q***rness, diaspora, and family within new spatial-temporal relationships, the series aims to unveil identity as a fragmented experience that continually transforms. In particular, Soliloquy sheds light on identities desired, disrupted, and dismissed to consider the dilemmas of belonging and becoming.
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Inspired by a range of film auteurs from Yasujiro Ozu, Ang Lee, and Edward Yang to more recent filmmakers like Maggie Lee, Soliloquy tries to address the so-called “Confucian Confusion” and untangle why many try so relentlessly to fit into the paradigm and look to become the perfect archetype of family within the East Asian culture. Within this context, for Zou, the truer, q***rer self must be suppressed, and therefore, the notion of the “desired” becomes unstable. Such uncertainty of identity experience is further reinforced by the q***r diasporic experience, which constantly fluctuates and only comes into significance when fluctuating.
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As a result, Soliloquy employs a circuitous syntax that repeatedly poses and proposes the unseen relationships between photographs taken at different times and of different subjects. Carefully edited and displayed, Soliloquy not only questions what would happen if we stopped thinking of ourselves in terms of identity categories and roles but also envisions alternative narratives that can otherwise come into existence.
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Image 1: William Zou, Papaya, 2022, Giclee print on hahnemuhle photo rag baryta, 9 5/8 x 11 inches (25 x 28 cm)
Image 2: William Zou, Untitled (Erasure), 2022, Giclee print on hahnemuhle photo rag baryta, 9 5/8 x 8 1/4 inches (25 x 21 cm)
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“(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Images: Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © William Zou
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***r ***rness

“These two images were made eight years apart. Illumination (2014) from my project, One Land To Another, was one of my f...
01/03/2024

“These two images were made eight years apart. Illumination (2014) from my project, One Land To Another, was one of my first few images made in the US. It was created to confront my internalized homophobia as well as how violently society treats marginalized people. Through staging and performing my death, I was able to be reborn.
After living in the ”land of the free“ for six years, I started the ongoing project, Resident Aliens. It sets photographic installations within immigrants’ interior spaces to examine their personal histories and complex experiences. The project blurs the boundaries between familiarity and foreignness, privacy and publicity, belonging and alienation by photographing the layered images of immigrants‘ interior spaces, belongings, personal photo archives, and pictures of places they captured in this world. These convergences of spaces and times invite the viewers to enter spaces of fluidity rather than holding fixed perspectives. They mobilize the viewers’ gaze, imagination, and care, defying strict definitions.”
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Image 1: Xu Guanyu, SL-06172015-02112022, 2022. Archival pigment print, 40 x 50 inches (102 x 127 cm).
Image 2: Xu Guanyu, Illumination, 2014. Archival pigment print, 24 x 30 inches (61 x 76 cm).
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“(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Images: courtesy of the artist, Eli Klein Gallery, and Yancey Richardson Gallery © Xu Guanyu
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***r ***rness

We wish you a happy holiday season!Eli Klein Gallery will close at 5:00pm on Saturday, December 23, 2023.We will reopen ...
12/22/2023

We wish you a happy holiday season!

Eli Klein Gallery will close at 5:00pm on Saturday, December 23, 2023.
We will reopen with our regular gallery hours on Tuesday, January 2, 2024.

Image: Ye Funa, Southern Asian Sentiments, 2022. Mixed media collage on fabric mounted on board. 38 1/4 x 56 3/4 inches (97 x 144 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Ye Funa

’s works are included in the exhibition “Tip Off” at .art at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. The exhibition is...
12/20/2023

’s works are included in the exhibition “Tip Off” at .art at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. The exhibition is currently on view and will run through February 2, 2024.
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“Tip Off” showcases the diverse works of the eight participating artists, discusses the role of paper media, and exposes and denounces the issue of censorship: a lack of freedom of speech and regulation under the authoritarian regime.

The way “tip-offs” are gotten for newspapers, magazines, and books: state-sponsored paper media, religious paper media culture, paper media under (authoritarian) leadership, paper media under the traditional Chinese autocracy, textbooks for youth brainwashing and for improving college acceptance rates, and paper media of entertainment and tabloid press.
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Images: courtesy of the artist, Eli Klein Gallery, and Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery © Li Hongbo.
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# history

Our current exhibition “(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is reviewed by Michael Galati on ...
12/19/2023

Our current exhibition “(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is reviewed by Michael Galati on . Read “(IN)DIRECTIONS: QUEERNESS IN CHINESE CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY” via link in bio or the exhibition’s selected press section on our website.
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“(In)directions is a phenomenological observation of the creative possibilities of gender, sexuality, temporality, and photography. It considers what is pictured and what is not and lives in that undefined space. It asks us to discard monolithic thinking and to hold the contradictions, excesses and emptiness, and gaps in understanding together at the same time without forcing them into a certain logic. It sees the present as both ephemeral and as the vector of history, but most importantly, as an opportunity to create. (In)directions moves us to go forward and (re)discover.”
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Curated by .z.cai and .sugarbaker, “(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery.
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***rness ***r

Beatrix Pang Sin Kwok is a visual artist, cultural producer, educator, and independent publisher based in Hong Kong. Pan...
12/19/2023

Beatrix Pang Sin Kwok is a visual artist, cultural producer, educator, and independent publisher based in Hong Kong. Pang primarily works in photography, video art, and installation art. They founded Small Tune Press and ZINE COOP to promote zine culture in Hong Kong and create space for q***r inclusivity and visibility in Hong Kong and the Asian Diaspora.
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“I began to do blind drawings (contour drawing) for them (migrant workers from Southeast Asia working in Hong Kong) - an act and gesture about “looking” and “drawing” within a certain time and space. This act enabled me to be present with the workers together in the public space as an artist and as someone who records. [...]
After some time, they started calling me “Gor Gor” (Brother) and asked if I had a girlfriend. At that moment, they saw my presence, and I saw myself clearer.”
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Image 1: Beatrix Pang, BOI, 2018. Sixteen 4-color risograph prints on uncoated paper.
Each: 15 5/8 x 11 inches (40 x 28 cm).
Sheet: 62 1/4 x 43 7/8 inches (158 x 112 cm).
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“(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Image: Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Beatrix Pang
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***r ***rness

“I hate when people talk about light only as a romantic symbol. Light is a necessity, I am proud to capture it at the sp...
12/15/2023

“I hate when people talk about light only as a romantic symbol. Light is a necessity, I am proud to capture it at the speed of 1/125 second.”
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’s work explores the paradox of intimacy and distance using mediums including photography, text, video, installation, and performance. His works take an aleatoric approach to cultural nuances and interrogate the ethics of language and representation through strategies of reenactment, exchange, and mistranslation. Growing up bilingual and practicing art in diverse cultural locales, he strives for his works to embody the experience of being in linguistic and cultural contact zones. Particularly drawn to liminal spaces of intimacy, he explores alternative forms of political radicality through the “quiet work” of the camera.
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Image 1: Amiko Li, Erin (takes a break), 2023. Archival inkjet print, 11 x 17 inches (28 x 43 cm).
Image 1: Amiko Li, Sounds of a Sweat (Brooklyn), 2017. Archival inkjet print, 12 x 15 inches (30 x 38 cm).
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“(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Images: courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Amiko Li
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***r ***rness

By mixing love and chaos, fantasy and eroticism, ’s photographs serve as a collective poetic diary for the post-80s and ...
12/14/2023

By mixing love and chaos, fantasy and eroticism, ’s photographs serve as a collective poetic diary for the post-80s and 90s generation of non-mainstream Chinese youth eager to escape societal pressures and embrace the pleasures of life in a rapidly evolving, indifferent society.
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“Sexuality and gender have long been the topics that I explore. Whether in my own experience or the stories of my friends, they have always fascinated me. To photograph my peers for an extended period of time and explore the attributes of each individual, I initiated a call for gay couples and started the project – 100boys. Captured in different shoots, the diversified desires, which cannot be concealed or hidden amongst the younger generation, are so natural yet so timid, so arrogant yet so raw.” - Lin Zhipeng (No.223)
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Image: Lin Zhipeng (No.223), When The Chemistry Is Simplified, 2021. Archival pigment print, 39 3/8 x 26 3/8 inches (100 x 67 cm).
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“(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Images: courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Lin Zhipeng (No.223)
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***r ***rness

“I strive to show that family, community, and culture ground us as human beings amid the chaos and confusion of the worl...
12/12/2023

“I strive to show that family, community, and culture ground us as human beings amid the chaos and confusion of the world. They are the training ground in which we learn how to identify our purpose and fulfill our potential. Through our desire to connect, and from our pride in celebrating our individuality, we develop the skills to face the world.
My work is a vision that validates multiple ways of being. Connecting my home country of Indonesia and my chosen home in America, my work challenges the use of identity, family, and community as political weapons to limit, erase, and oppress our fundamental rights. No matter the complications, we are better humans when we celebrate one another’s specificities.”
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Image 1: Leonard Suryajaya, Dad Duck, 2020. Archival inkjet print, 40 x 32 inches (102 x 81 cm).
Image 2: Leonard Suryajaya, Arisan, 2017. Archival inkjet print, 40 x 50 inches (102 x 127 cm).
Image 3: Leonard Suryajaya, Gold Condo Room, 2020. Archival inkjet print, 40 x 50 inches (102 x 127 cm).
Image 4: Leonard Suryajaya, Sparrow, 2023. Archival inkjet print, 40 x 50 inches (102 x 127 cm).
Image 5: Leonard Suryajaya, Salem, 2014. Archival inkjet print, 40 x 32 inches (102 x 81 cm).
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“(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Images: Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Leonard Suryajaya
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***r ***rness

Ren Light Pan  is a Chinese-American transgender artist living and working in New York. Her work engages with biographic...
12/09/2023

Ren Light Pan is a Chinese-American transgender artist living and working in New York. Her work engages with biographical issues dealing with hybridized and transgressive cultural and gender identities. She uses traditional Chinese ink against modes of Western contemporary painting, creating work that blends, and then subverts, various modes of painting and genre.
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“The first time I saw myself was in 2016. It was the beginning of a slow image, of the softest glow in the tenderest blur; it might’ve been an impossible image, but there I am, the light and the lens.

The first time I started taking selfies was the last time he cried, and I caught her tears. And oh Olly, you fu***ng as***le, you were a good cat. I haven’t been taking selfies so much recently, but images don’t really end until there’s nothing left to see.”
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Image 1: Ren Light Pan, Boy’s Tears - 11.25.16, Los Angeles, CA, 2017. California sun, ink, canvas, 25 5/8 x 19 3/4 inches (65 x 50 cm).
Image 2: Ren Light Pan, Olly’s Birthday Party - 4.22.17, Los Angeles, CA, 2017. California sun, ink, canvas, 25 5/8 x 19 3/4 inches (65 x 50 cm).
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“(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Images: Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Ren Light Pan
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***r ***rness

“Standing in front of her breathtaking beauty, I set up my camera but did not know what to do with it. I fell victim to ...
12/08/2023

“Standing in front of her breathtaking beauty, I set up my camera but did not know what to do with it. I fell victim to genre expectations, and powerlessness became the only form of resilience available to me.” - Kanthy Peng, Tuesday, February 19tg, 2019.
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is an artist who specializes in lens-based mediums. Peng’s current practice focuses on the uneven mobility caused by and/or embodied in colonialism, disasters, and globalized tourism. Her works have been exhibited and screened internationally, most recently, at Stuttgart Filmwinter in Stuttgart, Germany, the Power Station of Art in Shanghai, China, and the Times Art Museum in Chengdu, China.
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Image 1: Kanthy Peng, Artificial Tear, 2019. Archival pigment print, 30 x 24 inches (76 x 61 cm).
Image 2: Kanthy Peng, A Rino Labeled Gay #4, 2019. Archival pigment print, 16 x 20 inches (41 x 51 cm).
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“(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Images: Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Kanthy Peng
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***rness ***r

 “In the Soft Thorn series, I try to explore the lives of certain young q***r individuals in China. For many traditional...
12/07/2023

“In the Soft Thorn series, I try to explore the lives of certain young q***r individuals in China. For many traditional Chinese families, sexual orientation can be a painful topic that is often difficult to broach. The experience of being q***r within the context of one’s family is like a soft thorn embedded in the relationships. This tender thorn, disguised as fine fur at first glance, goes unnoticed, but when touched, it inflicts pain on both sides.”
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Image 1: Yang Bowei, Symbolistic Father, 2017, Archival pigment print, 14 1/8 x 17 3/4 inches (36 x 45 cm)
Image 2: Yang Bowei, Caged Butterflies, 2017 Archival pigment print, 9 x 7 7/8 inches (23 x 20 cm)
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“(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Images: Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Yang Bowei
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***r ***rness

 is a multimedia visual artist, photographer, and filmmaker. He’s fascinated by humans’ relation to the natural environm...
12/06/2023

is a multimedia visual artist, photographer, and filmmaker. He’s fascinated by humans’ relation to the natural environment and processes. He produces work using various mediums including different forms of video, projection and photography, installations, and writings.
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“In these images I am attempting to give form to my personal perspective as a Chinese citizen and gay man living as an immigrant traveling between New York City and Wuhan.”
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Image 1: Fang Daqi, Untitled (Butterfly 2), 2023. Archival pigment print. Image: 27 x 40 inches (69 x 102 cm).
Image 2: Fang Daqi, Detail of Untitled (Bream), 2023. Archival pigment print. Image: 30 x 20 inches (76 x 51 cm).
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”(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography“ is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery
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Images: Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Fang Daqi
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***r ***rness

We’d like to thank everyone for joining our opening for “(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography”....
11/23/2023

We’d like to thank everyone for joining our opening for “(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography”. It was a memorable evening filled with love.
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Photos by Tianxing Xu

We are thrilled to be releasing the print catalog “(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography,” accom...
11/14/2023

We are thrilled to be releasing the print catalog “(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography,” accompanying the exhibition under the same title opening this Saturday November 18th, 2023, 5-8PM.
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Designed by , the catalog includes an essay by Douglas Ray .sugarbake, an essay by Phil Zheng Cai .z.cai, and artist statements by Mengwen Cao, Chi Peng, Whiskey Chow, Fang Daqi, Tommy Kha, Liao Jiaming, Lin Zhipeng (No.223), Ren Light Pan, Beatrix Pang, Shen Wei, Leonard Suryajaya, Tseng Kwong Chi, Xu Guanyu, Yang Bowei, and William Zou.
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This fully illustrated catalog also features:
Proses by Alec Dai and Amiko Li
A poem by Fang Daqi
Pixy Liao’s collection of pen*ses
Tommy Kha’s interview with Ren Hang
An inventory of objects by Zhang Zhidong
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To purchase:
Please join us at the opening of the exhibition or email [email protected]
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***rness ***r

Eli Klein Gallery is thrilled to present “(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography,” curated by Phi...
11/04/2023

Eli Klein Gallery is thrilled to present “(In)directions: Queerness in Chinese Contemporary Photography,” curated by Phil Zheng Cai .z.cai and Douglas Ray .sugarbaker.
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Opening Reception with the artists and curators:
Saturday, November 18, 5-8PM
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Artists: Mengwen Cao, Chi Peng, Whiskey Chow, Alec Dai, Fang Daqi, Tommy Kha, Amiko Li, Liao Jiaming, Pixy Liao, Lin Zhipeng (No.223), Ren Light Pan, Beatrix Pang, Kanthy Peng, Ren Hang, Shen Wei, Leonard Suryajaya, Tseng Kwong Chi, Xu Guanyu, Yang Bowei, Zhang Zhidong, William Zou
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The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with an essay by Phil Zheng Cai and an essay by Douglas Ray. The exhibition catalog also features Tommy Kha’s interview with Ren Hang in 2016.
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With the desire to facilitate a critical conversation surrounding the topic of “q***rness” inside a culture known for its discursive approaches on questions relating to genders and sexualities, the exhibition brings together a diverse group of artists who see q***rness as a possibility, embracing the imaginative even when the status quo might otherwise be limiting. The title acknowledges that the means through which each artist expresses this notion takes a variety of modes in the photographic medium, at times boldly and directly celebrating the beauty of q***r bodies and at other times obliquely gesturing, winking, or suggesting that another reality is at play.
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, , .chow, .dai, , , , , , , ,, , , , , , , , ,
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***rness ***r

 is included in the exhibition “Killing TV” at .hk. The exhibition is currently on view and will run through Nov 29, 202...
10/04/2023

is included in the exhibition “Killing TV” at .hk. The exhibition is currently on view and will run through Nov 29, 2023.
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“Killing TV” features works by 15 global artists spanning from the 1970s to today. These artworks illuminate television's impact on art and its role in shaping culture. Curated by and , 'Killing TV' explores how artists have critiqued and dissected television's pervasive influence on our world. Through videos and diverse artworks, the exhibition examines everything from reality TV to news broadcasts, offering a fresh perspective on the transformative power of the small screen.
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Images: Courtesy of the artist, Tai Kwun Contemporary, and Eli Klein Gallery © Chow Chun Fai.
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's solo exhibition "Suffocation" at Eli Klein Gallery is reviewed by  on . Read "Zhang Dali’s Plants Reflect the Shadow ...
09/21/2023

's solo exhibition "Suffocation" at Eli Klein Gallery is reviewed by on . Read "Zhang Dali’s Plants Reflect the Shadow of the World" via link in bio or Zhang Dali's selected press section on our website.
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"In response to the real-world scenario, Zhang expanded his research gear to include the city’s wild plants in the cyanotype series, showcasing his thoughts on the rural-urban fringe’s landscape. Unlike other types of landscape, this one is home to a variety of uncategorized and undesirable wild plants. Botanists and locals will most likely assign them a scientific name and an alias. Regardless of the name, but, they are the outcome of human observation and the replication of man’s imagined rights, which in turn impose restrictions."
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Eli Klein Gallery is honored to present “The Big Dream Show,” ’s first solo show with the gallery. Opening Reception wit...
08/31/2023

Eli Klein Gallery is honored to present “The Big Dream Show,” ’s first solo show with the gallery. Opening Reception with the Artist: Wednesday September 6 | 6-8pm
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The exhibition features 12 new, mixed-media collage works from the “Neo Folk Matrix” series, in addition to a video and two paintings, each demonstrating a unique “dream” where different characteristics, items, symbols, colors, traditions, and cultures intersect. Filled with intricate details, these pieces are elaborately executed and contain a variety of elements such as plastics, artificial crystals, metals, fabrics, and an assortment of found objects. These “little worlds and dreams,” in Ye Funa’s own words, highlight her aspiration to explain what roles “folk” should play under the framework of contemporary art.
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The co-creation process between the artist and her mother echoes Funa’s determination to empower women in Chinese society, which has been a prominent component throughout her artistic career. As is true with the majority of single-child families in China, Funa’s relationship with her mother was “offspring-centered.” Her mother, Fu Liya, started her career as a talented painter and sculptor, but decided that she needed to become a full-time housewife in order to care for the family. With “Neo Folk Matrix,” the artist further examines the reciprocal relationship between her and her mother, or the “provider” and the “recipient.” What if traditional crafts and skills (folk), are supported by a contemporary framework (collage)?
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Image 1: Big Dreamer's Collage, 2022. Mixed media collage on fabric mounted on board. 41 x 57 1/2 inches (104 x 146 cm).
Image 2: Buddha and Blossoms, 2022. Mixed media collage on fabric mounted on board. 33 x 42 1/2 inches (84 x 108 cm).
Image 3: Collage of Life, 2022. Mixed media collage on fabric. 40 1/2 x 58 1/4 inches (103 x 148 cm).
Image 4: Paradise on Earth, 2022. Mixed media collage on fabric. 59 x 84 1/4 inches (150 x 214 cm).
Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Ye Funa
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  ・・・Current PhD student Funa Ye ( ) has a new solo exhibition "The Big Dream Show," 6 September - 1 November ,New York....
08/30/2023


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Current PhD student Funa Ye ( ) has a new solo exhibition "The Big Dream Show," 6 September - 1 November ,New York.

The exhibition features 12 new mixed media collage works from the “Neo Folk Matrix” series, in addition to a video and two paintings, each demonstrating a unique “dream” where different characteristics, items, symbols, colours, traditions, and cultures intersect.

Opening reception: 6 September

  ・・・Liu Bolin (b. 1973) combines performance, painting, and photography to dramatize the tension between the individual...
08/24/2023


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Liu Bolin (b. 1973) combines performance, painting, and photography to dramatize the tension between the individual body and the urban environment. Working with assistants for his series “Hiding in the City,” Liu stands in front of significant sites and has himself painted to seamlessly blend into the background. “Info Wall” (2011) points to the influx of workers who have migrated from the countryside since China began its rapid economic growth following the end of the Cultural Revolution. Without a legal path to urban residency many seek temporary housing such as those advertised here and are subject to eviction and displacement. This work was a gift to our permanent collection from the Kremnitzer Family (Amy Sklar ’79 and Kathryn Kremnitzer ’13) in 2015, and will be on view in the exhibition "Between Performance and Documentation: Contemporary Photography and Video from China," opening this Saturday, August 26.

Shen Shaomin's Arena is included in "Art Macao: Macao International Art Biennale 2023". This mechanical installation sho...
08/11/2023

Shen Shaomin's Arena is included in "Art Macao: Macao International Art Biennale 2023". This mechanical installation showcases several quadruped robots positioned on and off a boxing arena. The scene reveals a brutal fact: iterations abandoned by the relentless march of time.

Drawing inspiration from the evolutionary journey of Boston Dynamics' robot dog Spot, Shen displays some robots jumping with agility, while others struggle nearing their final gasp. Through this thought-provoking artwork, Shen delves into the significance of failure and futility encountered in scientific development. “The robot theater reflects on life and death. In the future, where do we belong and where will we go?” the artist asks.
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“Art Macao: Macao International Art Biennale 2023” is currently on view at Macao Contemporary Art Center - Navy Yard No.1, through October 28, 2023.
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Image: Shen Shaomin, Mechanical Installation: Quadruped robot, 2022. Metal frame, architectural panel, feather, 279 1/2 x 128 3/8 x 15 3/4 inches (710 × 326 × 40 cm).
Courtesy of the artist and Macao Contemporary Art Center.
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Plants, like ruins, also hold significance in Zhang Dali 's artwork, as they embody the complex themes and experiences r...
08/09/2023

Plants, like ruins, also hold significance in Zhang Dali 's artwork, as they embody the complex themes and experiences resulting from China's rapid urbanization process. The demolition of the Heiqiao Art District in 2009, among numerous other reconstructions that commenced in the 1990s, led Zhang’s attention to the resilience of life amid ruins. Within these forsaken spaces, he observed the blossoming of flowers and plants, and decided to capture their essence — symbols of human adaptability to changing environments and the interconnectedness of all living beings.
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The cyanotype technique allows Zhang to transform plants grown in the ruins, or his own “herbarium”, onto canvases, emphasizing the cyclical nature of existence and the intrinsic value found within decay and regeneration.
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“Zhang Dali: Suffocation” is currently on view at Eli Klein Gallery, through August 19, 2023.
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Image 1: Zhang Dali, Herbarium Pagoda Tree (S. japonicum) (7), 2020. Yellow cyanotype on cotton, 68 7/8 x 53 1/8 inches (175 x 135 cm).
Image 2: Zhang Dali, Herbarium Blue Crabapple (M. spectabilis) (11), 2020. Blue cyanotype on cotton, 88 5/8 x 62 inches (225 x 160 cm).
Image 3: Zhang Dali, Herbarium Red Rose (R. chinensis) (7), 2020. Red cyanotype on cotton, 82 3/4 x 72 7/8 inches (210 x 185 cm).
Image 4: Zhang Dali, Herbarium Pagoda Tree (S. japonicum) (2), 2020. Blue cyanotype on cotton, 53 1/8 x 37 3/4 inches (135 x 96 cm).
Image 5: Zhang Dali, Herbarium Red Crabapple (M. spectabilis) (1), 2020. Red cyanotype on cotton, 98 1/2 x 94 1/2 inches (250 x 240 cm).
Image 6: Zhang Dali, Herbarium Blue Rose (R. chinensis) (1), 2020. Blue cyanotype on cotton, 94 1/2 x 86 5/8 inches (240 x 220 cm).
Image 7: Herbarium Foxtail (S. viridis) (4), 2020. Red cyanotype on cotton, 46 1/2 x 67 inches (118 x 170 cm).
Courtesy of the artist and Eli Klein Gallery © Zhang Dali
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#蓝晒 #张大力

 is interviewed by  on the most recent episode of Yale University Radio . Zhang Dali discussed the thought process and t...
08/04/2023

is interviewed by on the most recent episode of Yale University Radio . Zhang Dali discussed the thought process and technique behind his solo exhibition "Suffocation" with host Brainard Carey. Listen to the interview via link in bio or Zhang Dali's selected press section on our website.
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Zhang Dali: "Suffocation" is on view at Eli Klein Gallery and will run through August 19.
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Translation:
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Our Story

Eli Klein Gallery has an international reputation as one of the foremost galleries specializing in contemporary Chinese art and continues to advance the careers of its represented artists and hundreds of other Chinese artists with whom it has collaborated. The Gallery has been instrumental in the loan of artwork by Chinese artists to over 100 museum exhibitions throughout the world, has published 40 books/catalogues, and has organized more than 75 exhibitions for Chinese art at our prestigious venues in New York City. Our artists have been featured in the The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Art Forum, Newsweek, ARTnews and have been on CNN and countless other international broadcasts, publications and online critical reviews.

Located at 398 West Street (between Charles and W 10th) in the trendiest part of the West Village, just blocks from the new Whitney Museum and the commencement point for the High Line. In a historic, landmarked Federal-style row house enjoying special cultural and aesthetic value to the City of New York, Eli Klein Gallery occupies 3 levels of the building, boasting 13-foot ceilings on the ground floor.

The Gallery was founded by Eli Klein in 2007. During these formative years, it established a reputation for introducing to the West fresh, contemporary, and often challenging works by rising Chinese talents. Now, as the leading dealer of Chinese contemporary art outside of China, Eli Klein actively promotes cross-cultural awareness and investment at the highest level amongst some of the world’s most influential nations.

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