Alexandre Gallery

Alexandre Gallery ALEXANDRE GALLERY represents and exhibits contemporary American artists and specializes in works by
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"If Adams can’t be pinned down, the same is true of the paintings on show at Alexandre. All of them are in a mighty stru...
04/17/2024

"If Adams can’t be pinned down, the same is true of the paintings on show at Alexandre. All of them are in a mighty struggle against the limits of the canvas. It’s commotion, expansion, movement."

It's the last few days to see "Pat Adams: Works from the 1950s and ’60s," which closes on April 20. A pivotal period in Adams’s career, these two decades are marked by the birth of the artist’s distinct visual language of “ur forms”—squares, circles, triangles, and S curves—which are essential to Adams’s ongoing quest to seek out the “beginnings of things,” an idea that continues to capture her fascination to this day.

Read Elroy Rosenberg's review in the New Criterion at the link in our bio.
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Images: All by Pat Adams: Le Midi, 1956; Il me plait, 1959; Paradigm, 1957

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Wishing you and yours a happy Easter! 💐 Pictured: Charles Demuth, Single Peonies, 1929, watercolor on paper, 13 1/2 x 19...
03/31/2024

Wishing you and yours a happy Easter! 💐

Pictured: Charles Demuth, Single Peonies, 1929, watercolor on paper, 13 1/2 x 19 1/2 inches

For more than 50 years, Virginia Zabriskie (of the storied Zabriskie Gallery) was Pat Adams’ art dealer. We have been ho...
03/29/2024

For more than 50 years, Virginia Zabriskie (of the storied Zabriskie Gallery) was Pat Adams’ art dealer. We have been honored to represent Adams following Zabriskie’s passing in 2019. Recently, the announced the accession of Adams’ 1972 work “Shift”—a gift to the museum from the late Zabriskie.

Though this work, seen here in detail view, is not currently on view at the Whitney, you can see many earlier works by Adams in our current exhibition, “Pat Adams: Works from the 1950s and ’60s,” on view through April 20.

For more than 50 years, Virginia Zabriskie (of the storied Zabriskie Gallery) was Pat Adams’ art dealer. We have been ho...
03/27/2024

For more than 50 years, Virginia Zabriskie (of the storied Zabriskie Gallery) was Pat Adams’ art dealer. We have been honored to represent Adams following Zabriskie’s passing in 2019. Recently, the announced the accession of Adams’ 1972 work “Shift”—a gift to the museum from the late Zabriskie.

Though this work is not currently on view at the Whitney, you can see many earlier works by Adams in our current exhibition, “Pat Adams: Works from the 1950s and ’60s,” on view through April 20.

Some Norton Museum of Art highlights from their 20th century American collection, including a few iconic paintings, ofte...
03/25/2024

Some Norton Museum of Art highlights from their 20th century American collection, including a few iconic paintings, often reproduced, and a tender image of a man from behind with a bouquet of flowers 💐. The museum is also strong in European works from the same period. All images in detail.
1954
1937
1929
Pelton 1951
1932
1932
1960

“The paintings of Tom Uttech are those of a man who has observed the natural world with a quality of vision that is at o...
03/20/2024

“The paintings of Tom Uttech are those of a man who has observed the natural world with a quality of vision that is at once personal and comprehensive.”—N. Scott Momaday

Alexandre Gallery is pleased to announce its participation in the upcoming edition of Independent New York, which runs from May 9–12 at Spring Studios in Tribeca. At the fair, we will exhibit the work of Tom Uttech, who paints imaginary woodland scenes that celebrate the verdant natural world he has been closely acquainted with since his childhood in Merrill, Wisconsin. His paintings are based on the woods of the Precambrian Shield, a stretch of land across the northern United States and South-Eastern Canada, where the ancient igneous rock that forms the core of the continent is exposed, and miles of lakes, woodland, and wildlife lie untouched by human influence.

Pictured: Nind Aiangwamendam, 2023 oil on linen 47 x 47 inches, including artists’ hand painted frame; Nin-Babishagi, 2022 oil on linen 91 x 103 inches, including artist’s hand painted frame; Sagiwan Sibi, 2022 oil on linen 67 x 73 inches, including artist’s hand painted frame; portrait of the artist.

While there are “inescapable affinities with Abstract Expressionism in [Pat Adams’] paintings of the 1950s, perceivable ...
03/14/2024

While there are “inescapable affinities with Abstract Expressionism in [Pat Adams’] paintings of the 1950s, perceivable in the looseness of touch, the shifting and overlapping of color areas, and the concept of the painting surface as a field of action,” shared Martica Sawin in Arts Magazine, 1976, there are also “crystallizations of shape, bubbly concentric circles...and an imagery more visibly rooted in natural sources, suggestive of pebbles seen under water or cross-sections of geodes. These forms begin to cluster and drift, to differentiate themselves from the surrounding terrain.”

We are pleased to take a deeper-dive into this critical period from Adams’ career with our current exhibition, “Pat Adams: Works from the 1950s and ’60s,” on view through April 20.

Another must-see from the ’s extraordinary show “The Harlem Renaissance and Transatlantic Modernism” | Horace Pippin, “P...
03/13/2024

Another must-see from the ’s extraordinary show “The Harlem Renaissance and Transatlantic Modernism” | Horace Pippin, “Portrait of My Wife,” 1936

Jennie Ora Pippin (c.1884-1946) was a matter-of-fact, hardworking woman. Her prim, bespectacled appearance matched the pointed neatness of her modest home. Friends remember her as a supportive companion, good neighbor, and religious woman. Pippin was devoted to his wife, who made a logical subject for his first portrait, pictured here. His approach was direct and honest—representing her in plain daily dress, seated in the chair she customarily sewed in, and possessed of a serious nature.

The picture, “Portrait of My Wife” (1936), was a departure from Pippin’s previous work, which depicted broad outdoor scenes ranging from war to landscape. Over a five-year period, the artist painted seven formal portraits, not as official commissions or trite mementos, but as documents of love and admiration for a family member, friends, patrons, and public figures.

(Above text excerpted from Linda Roscoe Hartigan in “I Tell My Heart: The Art of Horace Pippin,” 1993)

Pat Adams:  Works from the 1950s and 60s!On view tomorrow, Saturday, through April 20th.Join us at 25 East 73rd!All deta...
03/09/2024

Pat Adams: Works from the 1950s and 60s!

On view tomorrow, Saturday, through April 20th.

Join us at 25 East 73rd!
All details: UNTITLED, 1959; Il me plait, 1959; INGRESS AND THE RIVER, 1961; TETRAD, 1965.

TOMORROW | We are thrilled to share with you our latest exhibition, “Pat Adams: Works from the 1950s and ’60s,” which wi...
03/08/2024

TOMORROW | We are thrilled to share with you our latest exhibition, “Pat Adams: Works from the 1950s and ’60s,” which will run from Saturday, March 9–April 20. In the vibrant landscape of 1950s and ’60s New York, Adams—a California transplant to the city—charted her own course amidst the dominance of Abstract Expressionism, which oversaturated the New York art scene at the time. This show spotlights the two pivotal decades in the artist’s career, which were marked by the birth of the artist’s distinct visual language of “ur forms”—squares, circles, triangles, and S curves that are essential to Adams’s ongoing quest to seek out the “beginnings of things.”

⏱ Don’t miss the final hours of John Walker’s virtual viewing room, featuring a selection of ink drawings—many of which ...
03/01/2024

⏱ Don’t miss the final hours of John Walker’s virtual viewing room, featuring a selection of ink drawings—many of which were included in the artist’s recent solo exhibition at our Grand Street space (pictured).

John Walker: Recent Ink Drawings
Virtual Viewing Room
On view through Saturday, March 2

Here: The artist pictured with John Yau, who wrote the catalogue text for the gallery exhibition.

Announcing: Pat Adams: Works from the 1950s and ’60s March 9–April 20, 2024Alexandre25 East 73rd Street, New York 10021W...
02/27/2024

Announcing: Pat Adams: Works from the 1950s and ’60s
March 9–April 20, 2024

Alexandre
25 East 73rd Street, New York 10021

We are pleased to share that the next exhibition at the gallery will spotlight works by Pat Adams executed in the 1950s and ’60s. This marks Adams’ third exhibition with the gallery. A pivotal period in Adams’s career, these two decades are marked by the birth of the artist’s distinct visual language of “ur forms”—squares, circles, triangles, and S curves—which are essential to Adams’s ongoing quest to seek out the “beginnings of things,” an idea that continues to capture her fascination to this day.

Pictured: Norfolk - August 9, 1957, gouache on paper, 12 1/16 x 9 3/8 inches.

🗞 We are truly delighted by the response Lois Dodd’s exhibition is receiving from the press, visitors to the gallery, an...
02/26/2024

🗞 We are truly delighted by the response Lois Dodd’s exhibition is receiving from the press, visitors to the gallery, and our online audience. Many thanks to for the beautiful feature on Lois. “I’m still just painting what I see,” she tells the magazine. “I think of these paintings as my still lifes.”

This is the final week to see Lois’ latest exhibition with the gallery, “Outside In: Recent Small Paintings,” which is on view through March 2.

“Lois Dodd doesn’t do drama,” says Washington Post art critic Sebastian Smee. “She paints, instead, stillness and silenc...
02/22/2024

“Lois Dodd doesn’t do drama,” says Washington Post art critic Sebastian Smee. “She paints, instead, stillness and silence, always in a stripped-back style notable for its acute perceptiveness and absence of fussiness.”

Through March 2, we are pleased to present an exhibition of Dodd’s recent panel paintings, created by the artist from inside her homes in Maine and the Delaware Water Gap.

Lois Dodd
Outside In: Recent Small Panels

Alexandre
25 East 73rd Street, 3rd Floor, Buzzer 3, New York 10021

Here: Twin Arbor Vitae in Snow, 2021, oil on Masonite, 16 1/8 x 12 1/8 inches; Blizzard Cushing, 2021, oil on Masonite, 9 7/8 x 16 1/8 inches (detail).

In March of 1916, Marsden Hartley authored a catalog note for the Forum Exhibition in New York. He states, “Objects are ...
02/20/2024

In March of 1916, Marsden Hartley authored a catalog note for the Forum Exhibition in New York. He states, “Objects are incidents…An apple does not for long remain an apple if one has the concept. Anything is therefore pictorial; it remains only to be observed and considered.”

Later that year, writes Emma Crumbley, “this dynamic concept of objectivity would be evident in the radical evolution of his abstract work, now seen in the collection of approximately twenty-six seaside and boat related paintings completed in Provincetown, Massachusetts and Bermuda, often referred to as the Movement series.” She continues, “‘Boat Abstraction’ (1916), perhaps one of Hartley’s greatest ventures into pure abstraction from this era, reveals a bold exploration of elemental shape and composition which marked the very beginning of this new spatial understanding.”

The gallery was thrilled to facilitate the placement of this tremendous painting into the collection of the Detroit Institute of Arts ().

Here: Marsden Hartley (American, 1847-1943), Boat Abstraction, 1916, oil on board, 20 x 15 7/8 inches, Detroit Institute of Arts, Museum Purchase, with funds from the Robert H. Tannahill Foundation Fund, in honor of Joseph L. Hudson, Jr., partial gift of the Leah and Richard Waitzer Foundation.

Georgia O’Keeffe made several paintings of the Skunk Cabbage, challenging tradition through atypical framing, magnificat...
02/16/2024

Georgia O’Keeffe made several paintings of the Skunk Cabbage, challenging tradition through atypical framing, magnification, and simplification of her plant subject. The artist experimented with perspective and, in this instance, provided a “worm’s-eye” view of the Skunk Cabbage as if looking up at it from the ground.

We were pleased to place this painting in the collection of the .

Image: Georgia O’Keeffe, Skunk Cabbage, 1922, oil on canvas, 18 x 14 inches. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Burnett Foundation

 names “Outside In: Recent Small Panels” a top pick of week in its Kritic’s Korner. “[Lois] Dodd is virtuosic in the way...
02/15/2024

names “Outside In: Recent Small Panels” a top pick of week in its Kritic’s Korner.

“[Lois] Dodd is virtuosic in the way I like, more in terms of her eye than her technique, although she can be technically refined when she feels like it with pieces like Plant Study or Dried White Hydrangea Flower. Rather, more than just her eye, her skill is in navigating the dialectic between seeing and rendering in paint what one sees. Classic Cézanne stuff, in short. Also like Cézanne, there’s a pronounced difference between her still lives and her landscapes, which is a surprisingly rare quality when you think about it. It seems clear to me that a close-up object study should require a categorically different approach from a wide expanse of space, but then I’m not a painter and I guess people don’t really paint from life that much these days. Even when they ostensibly do they’re usually so imitative of art history or photography that they’re barely “from life” in any real sense. That’s too bad, I’m of the belief that something real, like a plant in your backyard, will always be more complex than anything purely from your mind.”

The show is on view through March 2!

Here: Plant Study, 2021, oil on Masonite, 18 7/8 x 11 inches

Loren MacIver, CAPE NIGHT, 1934, oil on board, 11 1/2 x 9 3/4 inches.  Private Collection.The gallery is honored to have...
02/14/2024

Loren MacIver, CAPE NIGHT, 1934, oil on board, 11 1/2 x 9 3/4 inches. Private Collection.

The gallery is honored to have represented the MacIver estate since 2000.

Only love and respect for Betty Cuningham on the occasion of the opening THE LAST PICTURE SHOW at her gallery on Irvingt...
02/11/2024

Only love and respect for Betty Cuningham on the occasion of the opening THE LAST PICTURE SHOW at her gallery on Irvington. A spectacular run, and so many extraordinary shows and artists championed!
Among our favorites, always, and !

“Of course, all of [Lois] Dodd’s work is a map of where her hand has landed in response to her eye. The difference is no...
02/09/2024

“Of course, all of [Lois] Dodd’s work is a map of where her hand has landed in response to her eye. The difference is not so much between topography and horizontality, but between a survey and an elegy, in that Dodd’s subjects are fleeting, or at least in the middle of changing. We get to measure her trees and windows season by season, decade by decade,” writes in the . “But the only measurements that matter, in the moment, are a length of brown along a split log, or the short yellow spray of November foliage, the way that a calculated rotation of the wrist turns a shadow into a blade of grass.”

Many thanks to Louis for the beautiful review of “Lois Dodd: Outside In,” an exhibition of recent panel paintings on view at the gallery through March 2.

🔗Find the link to the full review in our stories today and at the link in our bio.

“What I find in nature is infinitely more exciting than anything I could invent. Therefore I go to nature,” said Lois Do...
02/08/2024

“What I find in nature is infinitely more exciting than anything I could invent. Therefore I go to nature,” said Lois Dodd, 1973. This statement still rings true today, as evidenced by Lois’ recent work, which is the subject of our latest exhibition at the gallery. Open through March 2, “Outside In: Recent Small Panels” spotlights the natural scenes observed and rendered by the artist at her homes in Maine and the Delaware Water Gap.

Pictured: Dried White Hydrangea Flower, 2021, oil on wood panel, 16 x 12 inches; Barberry Twig, 2022, oil on wood panel, 16 x 12 inches; and Dried Hydrangea Flower, 2023, oil on Masonite, 17 7/8 x 14 inches.

Wishing a very happy birthday to the incomparable Stephen Westfall!“Westfall’s paintings, while rigorous in visual conce...
02/06/2024

Wishing a very happy birthday to the incomparable Stephen Westfall!

“Westfall’s paintings, while rigorous in visual concept and exacting ex*****on, are idiosyncratically allusive and expressive. His invention and ex*****on of new work within a field of apparent contradictions is a masterful balancing act.”—Robert Berlind from “Stephen Westfall: Jesus and Bossa Nova,” The Brooklyn Rail, 2013

Here: Portrait of Westfall () in his studio in Upstate New York; a selection of new, in-progress works by the artist.

“What I find in nature is infinitely more exciting than anything I could invent. Therefore I go to nature,” said Lois Do...
02/05/2024

“What I find in nature is infinitely more exciting than anything I could invent. Therefore I go to nature,” said Lois Dodd, 1973. This statement still rings true today, as evidenced by Lois’ recent work, which is the subject of our latest exhibition at the gallery. Open through March 2, “Outside In: Recent Small Panels” spotlights the natural scenes observed and rendered by the artist at her homes in Maine and the Delaware Water Gap.

Here: Dried White Hydrangea Flower, 2021, oil on wood panel, 16 x 12 inches; Barberry Twig, 2022, oil on wood panel, 16 x 12 inches; Dried Hydrangea Flower, 2023, oil on Masonite, 17 7/8 x 14 inches; Plant Study, 2021, oil on Masonite, 18 7/8 x 11 inches.

Installed at MoMA.Lois Dodd, VIEW THROUGH ELLIOT’S SHACK LOOKING NORTH.Could not look better, and with a sight line of 3...
02/04/2024

Installed at MoMA.

Lois Dodd, VIEW THROUGH ELLIOT’S SHACK LOOKING NORTH.

Could not look better, and with a sight line of 300 or 400 feet as you turn from Bob Thompson! (Also, love the Plexi box frame that allows the canvas to read as an object - with so much activity at the edges.).

Thank you, Bob Gober, and thank you, Ann Temkin and all!

Today we celebrate the life and work of Loren MacIver, who was born on this day in 1909 (1909-1998). MacIver—the first w...
02/02/2024

Today we celebrate the life and work of Loren MacIver, who was born on this day in 1909 (1909-1998). MacIver—the first woman represented in MoMA’s permanent collection—quietly carved out a place for herself in the history of American art through poetic depictions of everyday observations. Writes Roberta Smith in the New York Times: “[Her work] succeeds in instilling transient entities with a shimmering inner life, at once potent and fragile.”

Images: Undated image of the artist in her New York studio; MacIver together with her husband, the poet Lloyd Frankenberg, in Venice in 1962; The couple on a picnic in France from that same year. All photos courtesy Maryette Charlton

On this day in art history (February 1, 1932), Arthur Dove wrote the following to Alfred Stieglitz: “Decided to let go o...
02/01/2024

On this day in art history (February 1, 1932), Arthur Dove wrote the following to Alfred Stieglitz: “Decided to let go of everything and just try to make oil paint beautiful in itself with no further wish. The result is that this thing, to me, exists in light and space as something decidedly itself. It seems to have the joy in the means that music does. What I have been trying to do is to make what would be called an abstraction be self-creative in its own space and not be confined to a flat canvas for its existence. May look otherwise to a person just looking at it but at least I have had as much joy from it as anything since the first ten you showed at 291.”

Here: Dawn I, 1932, private collection and Sunday, 1932, private collection, which were both included in our recent exhibition of Dove’s work; Dawn II, 1932, which we placed in the collection of the Detroit Institute of Arts (Museum Purchase, with funds from the Robert H. Tannahill Foundation Fund, Beatrice W. Rogers Fund, and the Associates of the American Wing)

In a letter to the artist Carl Sprinchorn, Marsden Hartley explained that the collector and dealer Hudson Walker had req...
01/29/2024

In a letter to the artist Carl Sprinchorn, Marsden Hartley explained that the collector and dealer Hudson Walker had requested a self-portrait of Hartley for an upcoming exhibition. Though Hartley was unable to complete the work in time, he wrote, “But I would have one—a likeness [of] one seated, my beautiful and black plaid cap on—some burning spots of blue for eyes—Billy the Bantam on my shoulder which is a daily trick and a lobster hanging down from left hand or left knee—all very typical and I have every reason to believe will be a likeness, that is for me.” 

The painting “Young seadog with Friend Billy” from 1942 matches Hartley’s description almost exactly. But without the evidence of his letter to Sprinchorn we would never think of it as a self-portrait. The painting shows a virile young man and belongs to the group of representative figures of Maine that occupied Hartley from 1941, all of them brawny young men. 

In this painting, Hartley becomes one of them—the young man he never was, blending in with the local community, part of a family. “Foreground being the fruition of background,” as he had once written, the background, in this case, is both his present community of local fishermen in Corea, Maine, and his childhood in Lewiston; the foreground of this fantasy image of himself. (Above text adapted from the writing of curator Elizabeth Kornhauser).

We were pleased to place this painting in a major private collection on behalf of the late Myron Kunin.

Image: Marsden Hartley, Young Sea Dog with Friend Billy, 1942, oil on Masonite. Private Collection

Following the critical acclaim of John Walker’s spring show at the gallery, we are pleased to present a virtual viewing ...
01/25/2024

Following the critical acclaim of John Walker’s spring show at the gallery, we are pleased to present a virtual viewing room, featuring eighteen ink drawings, many of which were on view in that exhibition.

Of Walker’s work, the late art critic Dore Ashton has written: “His quest for light brings him so often to a familiar place–a place that his imagination inhabits and in which he feels most at home. It is a place where other artists have dwelled, most of all Rembrandt, whom Max Beckmann always called ‘the Chief,’ and after him Goya, particularly in his aquatints with their grainy intimation of mystery. Of course, light in those old masters was always invented, and so it is with the light that Walker creates.”

Tap the link in our bio to enter the virtual viewing room.

Here: John Walker, Untitled, 2021, charcoal, gouache and ink on paper, 29 3/4 x 22 inches

Our thanks to Lois Dodd for a spectacular opening celebration on Saturday afternoon, and for a sublime show of new panel...
01/24/2024

Our thanks to Lois Dodd for a spectacular opening celebration on Saturday afternoon, and for a sublime show of new panel paintings. Observation pared to essence. It was heartening to see so many old friends at this first public gathering for Lois since before Covid - circumstances prevented events with Lois at her recent Bruce Museum retrospective and at our 2021 Grand Street show. Also, to see so many touching posts and comments for Lois, now 96, over these past two days.

Thanks also to our great staff for tending to all details of the presentation and weekend events. Martin, Marie, Emma, Jamie and Lois. Lois, Phil, Erica and Lucy. Not pictured :( John and Maria.

OUTSIDE IN remains on view through March 2nd.

“There is something about knowing a place. Over time you keep changing, you see things differently. And the various plac...
01/22/2024

“There is something about knowing a place. Over time you keep changing, you see things differently. And the various places I love to paint change as well.”—Lois Dodd

Many thanks to all those who came to celebrate our exhibition of recent panel paintings by Lois, captured from within the artist’s homes in rural Maine and the Delaware Water Gap, on Saturday. “Outside In: Recent Small Panels” remains on view through March 2!

Here: Chicken House + Outhouse + Apple Tree, 2021, oil on Masonite, 13 x 16 3/16 inches

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291 Grand Street
New York, NY
10002

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Tuesday 10am - 5:30pm
Wednesday 10am - 5:30pm
Thursday 10am - 5:30pm
Friday 10am - 5:30pm

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(212) 755-2828

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