The Morgan Library & Museum

The Morgan Library & Museum Once library of financier Pierpont Morgan—now a museum, research library, music venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States.

Today it is a museum, independent research library, music venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. A century after its founding, the Morgan maintains a unique position in the cultural life of New York City and is considered one of its greatest treasures.

Operating as usual

10/21/2021
Van Eyck to Mondrian: 300 Years of Collecting in Dresden Virtual Press Preview

Van Eyck to Mondrian: 300 Years of Collecting in Dresden

Exhibition Opening October 22, 2021 running through January 23, 2022

Building on the Morgan’s tradition of presenting to the American public distinguished works from outstanding institutions abroad, Van Eyck to Mondrian: 300 Years of Collecting in Dresden focuses on the exceptional drawing collection of the Kupferstich-Kabinett, Dresden. Established by Augustus II the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in 1720, the museum is one of the oldest and finest depositories of works on paper in the world. The Morgan will serve as the sole American venue for this exhibition, which is timed to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the founding of the collection.

The exhibition will celebrate pivotal moments and key traditions in the history of European draftsmanship. Most remarkably, it will feature Jan van Eyck’s Portrait of an Elderly Man (ca. 1435–40)—an exceptionally rare drawing by the great Netherlandish Renaissance painter, which has never before traveled to the United States. The Kupferstich-Kabinett’s strength in Northern Renaissance and Baroque drawings will be further showcased through works by Lucas Cranach the Elder, Hans Holbein the Younger, Rembrandt, and Rubens, while the museum’s rich holdings of Southern European works will be represented by Correggio, Bronzino, Sofonisba Anguissola, and others. Among works produced in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, highlights include studies by Caspar David Friedrich, Goya, Käthe Kollwitz, Gustav Klimt, Otto Dix, and Piet Mondrian

This treasure binding is a composite made of two distinct covers brought together on a Gospel book written and illuminat...
10/20/2021

This treasure binding is a composite made of two distinct covers brought together on a Gospel book written and illuminated toward the end of the tenure of Hartmut, abbot of St. Gall, likely for ceremonial use in the abbey church. The jeweled front cover must have been a royal gift of immense importance. It is one of only three surviving examples of metalwork that can be attributed to the court workshop of Emperor Charles the Bald (823–877), who, like his grandfather Charlemagne, was a great patron of illuminated manuscripts.
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The back cover may have once belonged to a Gospel book commissioned by Charlemagne’s rival Tassilo III (ca. 741–796), Duke of Bavaria. Also, the rare Byzantine and Syrian silks lining the inside covers were likely gifts. Because Carolingians lacked the technology to produce silk, such textiles were highly coveted luxury items, often distributed through royal networks.
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On View // Imperial Splendor: The Art of the Book in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 800–1500
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"Lindau Gospels," in Latin, Switzerland, St. Gall, ca. 880 (manuscript), Eastern France, ca. 870 (front cover). Austria, Salzburg region, ca. 780–800 (back cover). The Morgan Library & Museum, MS M.1. Purchased by J. Pierpont Morgan, 1901.
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This exhibition is made possible by the Janine Luke and Melvin R. Seiden Fund for Exhibitions and Publications, the Ricciardi Family Exhibition Fund, the Christian Humann Foundation, and Katharine J. Rayner. Additional support is provided by the David L. Klein Jr. Foundation; the Andrew W. Mellon Fund for Research and Publications; Caroline Sharfman Bacon; Elizabeth A. R. and Ralph S. Brown, Jr.; Mr. and Mrs. Alain Goldrach; Marguerite Steed Hoffman and Tom Lentz; Professor James H. Marrow and Dr. Emily Rose; Mrs. Andrew C. Schirrmeister; the Samuel H. Kress Foundation; Gifford Combs; Salle Vaughn; William M. Voelkle; Gregory T. Clark; Bob McCarthy; and an anonymous donor. #morganlibrary #medieval #medievalart

10/19/2021

Having first established his reputation in the 1940s as an abstract painter, Richard Diebenkorn switched to figuration in the mid-1950s. In 1967, however, after moving to Southern California, where he was drawn to the quality of the light, he embarked in a series of luminous, abstract compositions that would occupy him for the rest of his life.

Made on the occasion of "Richard Diebenkorn: Paintings and Works on Paper, 1946-1952" (March 19 – August 21, 2020), a historical exhibition @vandorenwaxter devoted to the artist’s stylistic and technical origins in oil, watercolor, gouache, ink, crayon, and collage, this new video by @DiebenkornFoundation (and featuring our very own Rachel Federman, Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Drawings!) documents work that had previously never been shown in the Northeast.
These works toured with the exhibition, organized by the Foundation in conjunction with the @CrockerArt Museum in Sacramento, CA.

"The Beginnings of Richard Diebenkorn" features interviews with Federman, who wrote about the artist’s use of the ballpoint pen, and Daisy Murray Holman, Head of Archives at the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation.
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Video by @bowerblue with a special contribution by @mpsan © 2020 Richard Diebenkorn Foundation

10/19/2021

Having first established his reputation in the 1940s as an abstract painter, Richard Diebenkorn switched to figuration in the mid-1950s. In 1967, however, after moving to Southern California, where he was drawn to the quality of the light, he embarked in a series of luminous, abstract compositions that would occupy him for the rest of his life.

Made on the occasion of "Richard Diebenkorn: Paintings and Works on Paper, 1946-1952" (March 19 – August 21, 2020), a historical exhibition @vandorenwaxter devoted to the artist’s stylistic and technical origins in oil, watercolor, gouache, ink, crayon, and collage, this new video by @DiebenkornFoundation (and featuring our very own Rachel Federman, Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Drawings!) documents work that had previously never been shown in the Northeast.
These works toured with the exhibition, organized by the Foundation in conjunction with the @CrockerArt Museum in Sacramento, CA.

"The Beginnings of Richard Diebenkorn" features interviews with Federman, who wrote about the artist’s use of the ballpoint pen, and Daisy Murray Holman, Head of Archives at the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation.
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Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993), Untitled (Ocean Park Series), 1974. Opaque watercolor, acrylic, and graphite. Thaw Collection. 2017.72.

Video by @bowerblue with a special contribution by @mpsan © 2020 Richard Diebenkorn Foundation

10/18/2021
A Look at 18th Century Bindings

Lydia Aikenhead, Pine Tree Foundation Fellow, and Frank Trujillo, Drue Heinz Book Conservator, demonstrate the process of gold tooling on leather bindings in the tradition of 18th century French bindings on view in "Bound for Versailles: The Jayne Wrightsman Bookbindings Collection."

Jack Whitten was one of the most innovative artists to emerge in the second half of the twentieth century. In this video...
10/18/2021
Collection in Focus: Jack Whitten

Jack Whitten was one of the most innovative artists to emerge in the second half of the twentieth century. In this video, Rachel Federman, Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Drawings, takes a look at Whitten's "Dispersal 'A' #2," a work emblematic of the type of experimentation associated with the groundbreaking artist: www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQ0s7PiH9Z4&t=1s

Jack Whitten was one of the most innovative artists to emerge in the second half of the twentieth century. In this video, Rachel Federman, Associate Curator ...

It’s #ArchivesMonth! Some of the most frequently consulted material in the Reading Room comes from the Pierre Matisse Ga...
10/17/2021

It’s #ArchivesMonth! Some of the most frequently consulted material in the Reading Room comes from the Pierre Matisse Gallery Archives.
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Pierre Matisse, son of Henri Matisse, opened his New York gallery in November 1931. The artists who were the mainstay of the gallery — Joan Miró, Marc Chagall, Balthus, Jean Dubuffet, Alberto Giacometti, and Yves Tanguy — were joined by others, including Leonora Carrington, Kay Sage, Zao Wou‐ki, Wifredo Lam, Alexander Calder, and many more.
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This collection, a gift from the Pierre Matisse Foundation in 1997, contains the complete records of the gallery from 1931 to 1990 (with familial correspondence dating from 1903), and it is most often consulted for provenance research. At 227 cubic feet, it includes records of gallery installations, original works of art, artist manuscript letters, black-and-white photographs of artists and their work, stock books, client correspondence, and more (swipe to see examples!).
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Learn more about the collection at the link in our bio.
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Joan Miró exhibition invitation card. Pierre Matisse Gallery Archives, MA 5020, Box 105.

Yves Tanguy, Untitled [print]. Pierre Matisse Gallery Archives, MA 5020, Box 221.83.© 2021 Estate of Yves Tanguy / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Alberto Giacometti, Autograph letter signed to Pierre Matisse, August 24, 1936. Pierre Matisse Gallery Archives, MA 5020, Box 57.

Photograph (undated) of Wifredo Lam in his studio kneeling in front of The Jungle. Pierre Matisse Gallery Archives, MA 5020, Box 130, Folder 70. © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Stock book, 1931-1969. Pierre Matisse Gallery Archives, MA 5020, Box 172, Folder 2.
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#MorganLibrary #MorganLibraryReadingRoom #IGlibraries #ig_libraries #LibrariesOfInstagram #SpecialCollections #BetweenTheStacks #AmericanArchivesMonth #Archives #PierreMatisseGallery #Matisse #Miro #Tanguy #WifredoLam #Giacometti

H. Siddons Mowbray's decorative scheme for the lunettes in the Library incorporates two series of figures. Representatio...
10/16/2021

H. Siddons Mowbray's decorative scheme for the lunettes in the Library incorporates two series of figures. Representations of "muses" and their attributes, derived from Pinturicchio's sibyls in the Church of Santa Maria del Popolo in Rome (ca. 1508–9), alternate with cultural luminaries of the past. Beginning directly above the fireplace and moving to the right, these figures are Dante Alighieri, Comedy, Sandro Botticelli, Painting, Michelangelo Buonarotti, Architecture, Antonio da Sangallo, Poetry, Socrates, History, William Caxton, Music, Herodotus, Science, Galileo Galilei, Astronomy, Christopher Columbus, and Tragedy.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Photo: @kirstenhellwigunderwood #morganlibrary

H. Siddons Mowbray's decorative scheme for the lunettes in the Library incorporates two series of figures. Representations of "muses" and their attributes, derived from Pinturicchio's sibyls in the Church of Santa Maria del Popolo in Rome (ca. 1508–9), alternate with cultural luminaries of the past. Beginning directly above the fireplace and moving to the right, these figures are Dante Alighieri, Comedy, Sandro Botticelli, Painting, Michelangelo Buonarotti, Architecture, Antonio da Sangallo, Poetry, Socrates, History, William Caxton, Music, Herodotus, Science, Galileo Galilei, Astronomy, Christopher Columbus, and Tragedy.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Photo: @kirstenhellwigunderwood #morganlibrary

"Imperial Splendor: The Art of the Book in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 800–1500" offers a sweeping overview of manuscript...
10/15/2021

"Imperial Splendor: The Art of the Book in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 800–1500" offers a sweeping overview of manuscript production in the Holy Roman Empire, one of the most impressive chapters in the history of medieval art. While they are little known and rarely seen by the general public, these luxurious illuminated manuscripts—designed to edify, to entertain, and above all to embody the sacred—retain the ability to dazzle and inspire modern audiences just as they did for those of the Middle Ages.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Now On View // Imperial Splendor: The Art of the Book in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 800–1500. Learn more: www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/imperial-splendor

“Heiningen Gospels” (fragment), in Latin, Germany, Hamersleben, ca. 1180–1200. Morgan Library & Museum, MS M.565, fols. 13v–14r. Purchased by J. Pierpont Morgan, 1905. #MorganLibrary

"Imperial Splendor: The Art of the Book in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 800–1500" offers a sweeping overview of manuscript production in the Holy Roman Empire, one of the most impressive chapters in the history of medieval art. While they are little known and rarely seen by the general public, these luxurious illuminated manuscripts—designed to edify, to entertain, and above all to embody the sacred—retain the ability to dazzle and inspire modern audiences just as they did for those of the Middle Ages.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Now On View // Imperial Splendor: The Art of the Book in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 800–1500. Learn more: www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/imperial-splendor

“Heiningen Gospels” (fragment), in Latin, Germany, Hamersleben, ca. 1180–1200. Morgan Library & Museum, MS M.565, fols. 13v–14r. Purchased by J. Pierpont Morgan, 1905. #MorganLibrary

10/14/2021
Imperial Splendor: The Art of the Book in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 800–1500 Press Preview

The Morgan Presents "Imperial Splendor: The Art of the Book in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 800–1500" Press Preview

October 14, 2021 at 9:30am

The Morgan Library & Museum proudly presents Imperial Splendor: The Art of the Book in the Holy Roman Empire, ca. 800–1500, opening October 15, 2021, and running through January 23, 2022. The exhibition offers a sweeping overview of manuscript production in the Holy Roman Empire, one of the most impressive chapters in the history of medieval art. Rarely seen by the general public, these illuminated manuscripts are among the most luxurious works of art from the Middle Ages. Designed to edify, to entertain, and above all to embody the sacred, these manuscripts and their spectacular illuminations retain the ability to dazzle and inspire modern audiences just as they did those of the Middle Ages.

Exhibition Opening October 15, 2021 running through January 23, 2022.

As both artists and patrons, women played an important role in the development of the natural sciences in the early mode...
10/14/2021

As both artists and patrons, women played an important role in the development of the natural sciences in the early modern period. While often excluded from working in more prestigious genres, such as history painting, female artists could establish successful and lucrative careers in the fields of zoological and especially botanical illustration. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Especially in the early part of the period, the division between art and science was not as clearly delineated as it is today. Many women artists not only skillfully recorded specimens but also produced new knowledge about them, simultaneously inhabiting the two spheres. Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717) exemplifies this dual focus, having researched and published a brilliantly illustrated treatise on the metamorphosis of insects, a subject only partially understood in her day.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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On View in the Lower Lobby // Women Artists and Patrons in the Natural Sciences, 1650–1800⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Maria Sibylla Merian 1647–1717, Black Tegu Lizard (Tupinambis teguixin), Pen and black ink, transparent and opaque watercolor on vellum, 13 x 17 inches (329 x 430 mm), Purchased on the Sunny Crawford von Bülow Fund 1978. 2001.10. #MorganLibrary

As both artists and patrons, women played an important role in the development of the natural sciences in the early modern period. While often excluded from working in more prestigious genres, such as history painting, female artists could establish successful and lucrative careers in the fields of zoological and especially botanical illustration. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Especially in the early part of the period, the division between art and science was not as clearly delineated as it is today. Many women artists not only skillfully recorded specimens but also produced new knowledge about them, simultaneously inhabiting the two spheres. Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717) exemplifies this dual focus, having researched and published a brilliantly illustrated treatise on the metamorphosis of insects, a subject only partially understood in her day.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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On View in the Lower Lobby // Women Artists and Patrons in the Natural Sciences, 1650–1800⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Maria Sibylla Merian 1647–1717, Black Tegu Lizard (Tupinambis teguixin), Pen and black ink, transparent and opaque watercolor on vellum, 13 x 17 inches (329 x 430 mm), Purchased on the Sunny Crawford von Bülow Fund 1978. 2001.10. #MorganLibrary

As both artists and patrons, women played an important role in the development of the natural sciences in the early mode...
10/14/2021

As both artists and patrons, women played an important role in the development of the natural sciences in the early modern period. While often excluded from working in more prestigious genres, such as history painting, female artists could establish successful and lucrative careers in the fields of zoological and especially botanical illustration. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Especially in the early part of the period, the division between art and science was not as clearly delineated as it is today. Many women artists not only skillfully recorded specimens but also produced new knowledge about them, simultaneously inhabiting the two spheres. Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717) exemplifies this dual focus, having researched and published a brilliantly illustrated treatise on the metamorphosis of insects, a subject only partially understood in her day.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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On View in the Lower Lobby // Women Artists and Patrons in the Natural Sciences, 1650–1800⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Maria Sibylla Merian 1647–1717, Black Tegu Lizard (Tupinambis teguixin), Pen and black ink, transparent and opaque watercolor on vellum, 13 x 17 inches (329 x 430 mm), Purchased on the Sunny Crawford von Bülow Fund 1978. 2001.10. #MorganLibrary

As both artists and patrons, women played an important role in the development of the natural sciences in the early modern period. While often excluded from working in more prestigious genres, such as history painting, female artists could establish successful and lucrative careers in the fields of zoological and especially botanical illustration. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Especially in the early part of the period, the division between art and science was not as clearly delineated as it is today. Many women artists not only skillfully recorded specimens but also produced new knowledge about them, simultaneously inhabiting the two spheres. Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717) exemplifies this dual focus, having researched and published a brilliantly illustrated treatise on the metamorphosis of insects, a subject only partially understood in her day.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
——⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
On View in the Lower Lobby // Women Artists and Patrons in the Natural Sciences, 1650–1800⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Maria Sibylla Merian 1647–1717, Black Tegu Lizard (Tupinambis teguixin), Pen and black ink, transparent and opaque watercolor on vellum, 13 x 17 inches (329 x 430 mm), Purchased on the Sunny Crawford von Bülow Fund 1978. 2001.10. #MorganLibrary

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About the Morgan

The Morgan Library & Museum began as the personal library of financier, collector, and cultural benefactor Pierpont Morgan. Today it is a museum, independent research library, music venue, architectural landmark, and historic site located in the heart of New York City.

A century after its founding, the Morgan remains committed to offering visitors close encounters with great works of human accomplishment in a setting treasured for its intimate scale. Its collection of manuscripts, rare books, music, drawings, and works of art comprise a unique and dynamic record of civilization, as well as an incomparable repository of ideas and of the creative process from 4000 BC to the present.

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