The Morgan Library & Museum

The Morgan Library & Museum Once library of financier Pierpont Morgan—now a museum, research library, music venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States.
(2007)

Today it is a museum, independent research library, music venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. A century after its founding, the Morgan maintains a unique position in the cultural life of New York City and is considered one of its greatest treasures.

Operating as usual

04/06/2021

WEDNESDAY: Young Concert Artists and The Morgan Library are delighted to present violinist Randall Goosby's Encore performance in Gilder Lehrman Hall. Randall is joined by incredible YCA pianist Zhu Wang in a program that you don't want to miss!

We look forward to welcoming you back into the concert hall soon - but in the meantime, sit back and enjoy this virtual performance.

RAVEL: Violin Sonata No. 2 in G major, M. 77
COLERIDGE-TAYLOR PERKINSON: Blue/s Forms for Solo Violin
COLERIDGE-TAYLOR PERKINSON: Louisiana Blues Strut: A Cakewalk for Solo Violin
BRAHMS: Violin Sonata No. 3 in D minor, Op. 108

See the full program here: https://www.flipsnack.com/youngconcertartists/randall-goosby-zhu-wang-encore-recital/full-view.html

Learn more about Randall at yca.org/goosby-randall
Learn more about Zhu at yca.org/wang-zhu

Did you know that “The Little Prince” was born in New York City? On this day in 1943, the beloved story was first publis...
04/06/2021

Did you know that “The Little Prince” was born in New York City? On this day in 1943, the beloved story was first published (in English and French) in New York. The Morgan is proud to safeguard the draft manuscript and drawings.

Let us know what the book means to you in the comments!
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Antoine de Saint Exupéry, The Little Prince, PML 150743.

Antoine de Saint Exupéry, Le petit prince survolant une planète avec montagnes et fleuve, watercolor, ink, onionskin paper, MA 2592.34.

This watercolor of a blooming field glimpsed through a bouquet-shaped void seems to illustrate Belgian surrealist René M...
04/06/2021

This watercolor of a blooming field glimpsed through a bouquet-shaped void seems to illustrate Belgian surrealist René Magritte’s definition of a garden as “a space set between a landscape and a bunch of flowers.” Created during World War II, it encapsulates what Magritte called “a search for the bright side of life, the whole traditional range of charming things, women, flowers, birds, trees, the atmosphere of happiness."⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Online Exhibition // Morganmobile: Spring(ing): www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/morganmobile/springing
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René Magritte (1898–1967), Plagiarism (Le plagiat), 1944. Watercolor and gouache over graphite. 13 13/16 x 10 9/16 inches (35 x 26.9 cm). Thaw Collection; 2017.164. © René Magritte/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The only surviving manuscript of John Milton's "Paradise Lost" is this 33-page fair copy, written in secretary script by...
04/05/2021

The only surviving manuscript of John Milton's "Paradise Lost" is this 33-page fair copy, written in secretary script by a professional scribe, who probably transcribed patchwork pages of text Milton had dictated to several different amanuenses. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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This fair copy was corrected by at least five different hands under Milton's personal direction and became the printer's copy, used to set the type for the first edition of the book. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Browse our digital copy, and listen to Mark Rylance reciting the invocation to the muse: https://www.themorgan.org/collection/John-Miltons-Paradise-Lost⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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John Milton⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1608–1674⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Paradise Lost.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Manuscript of Book I, in the hand of an amanuensis, ca. 1665.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Purchased by Pierpont Morgan, 1904⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
MA 307

On #EasterSunday, 1976, the temperature in New York City hit the high nineties, and this assortment of citizens shelteri...
04/04/2021

On #EasterSunday, 1976, the temperature in New York City hit the high nineties, and this assortment of citizens sheltering in the shade of St. Patrick’s Cathedral attracted the attention of Peter Hujar. Hujar did most of his portrait work under the controlled conditions of his live-in studio, but on holidays he could be found on the streets, photographing parade crowds. This year, he clearly noticed a new quality in the midday light at 51st Street and Fifth Avenue. The people seen here, though bathed in shadow, are also illuminated by secondary light, slanting down from the high glass facade of Olympic Tower, a new building across the street.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Peter Hujar (1934-1987), St Patrick’s, Easter Sunday, 1976, Gelatin silver print. Purchased on The Charina Endowment Fund. 2013.108:1.92 © The Peter Hujar Archive, LLC, courtesy of Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York and Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

Beatrix Potter wrote several letters to children with references to Peter and made at least three drawings of him asleep...
04/03/2021

Beatrix Potter wrote several letters to children with references to Peter and made at least three drawings of him asleep before the fire. She bought Peter in 1892, taught him tricks, took him on summer vacations, sketched him in a multitude of poses, and mourned his loss when he died in 1901: "whatever the limitations of his intellect or outward shortcomings of his fur, and his ears and toes, his disposition was uniformly amiable and his temper unfailingly sweet. An affectionate companion and a quiet friend."⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Browse the Picture Letters: https://www.themorgan.org/collection/Beatrix-Potter-Picture-Letters⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Beatrix Potter⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1866–1943⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
utograph letter signed, London, to Noel Moore, February 4, 1895⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
February 4, 1895⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Gift of Colonel David McC. McKell, 1959⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
MA 2009.2

One of Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres’s largest and most ambitious portrait drawings, this work depicts the Parisian soci...
04/02/2021

One of Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres’s largest and most ambitious portrait drawings, this work depicts the Parisian society hostess, writer, and critic the Comtesse Marie d’Agoult and her daughter Claire.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Ingres typically produced his portrait drawings without preparation and in a single sitting. This work, in contrast, required at least two sittings and three preparatory studies. The drawing is notable for its evocation of the richly furnished interior of d’Agoult’s home. The artist selectively applied yellow watercolor to enhance objects and added white heightening to the sitters’ dresses to suggest the sheen of silk.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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On View // Conversations in Drawing: Seven Centuries of Art from the Gray Collection. Plan your visit: www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/online/gray-collection⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
French, 1780–1867⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Comtesse Charles d’Agoult (Born Marie de Flavigny) and Her Daughter Claire d’Agoult, 1849⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Graphite, heightened with white opaque watercolor, with touches of yellow watercolor⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Art Institute of Chicago, gift of Richard and Mary L. Gray; 2019.852⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Gray Collection Trust, Art Institute of Chicago⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Photography by Art Institute of Chicago Imaging Department⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Conversations in Drawing: Seven Centuries of Art from the Gray Collection was organized by The Art Institute of Chicago in cooperation with the Morgan Library & Museum.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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The exhibition is made possible by an anonymous donor, with additional support from the Charles E. Pierce, Jr. Fund for Exhibitions, and assistance from Mr. and Mrs. Clement C. Moore II and Hubert and Mireille Goldschmidt.

Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1,800 poems. Many of these exist in multiple drafts, but some are unique copies. Only ten p...
04/01/2021

Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1,800 poems. Many of these exist in multiple drafts, but some are unique copies. Only ten poems were published during her lifetime, all anonymously and likely without her consent, but she was not completely averse to sharing her work and she sent hundreds of drafts to a wide range of friends and correspondents.
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Dickinson is widely recognized as one of the most important poets of the nineteenth century and her work is acknowledged as a precursor to modernism. She profoundly influenced later generations of poets, writers, musicians, and visual artists.
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Listen to a selection of poems by Emily Dickinson, as read by contemporary poet Lee Ann Brown: www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/online/emily-dickinson
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Emily Dickinson, Daguerreotype, ca. 1847. The Emily Dickinson Collection, Amherst College Archives & Special Collections. Gift of Millicent Todd Bingham, 1956, 1956.002
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The sun kept stooping – stooping – low –
Poem sent to Susan Dickinson, signed and dated ca. 1860. The Morgan Library & Museum, purchased as the gift of William H. McCarthy, Jr., and Frederick B. Adams, Jr., 1953 #poetrymonth #emilydickinson #nationalpoetrymonth

03/31/2021

"David Hockney: Drawing from Life" explores the renowned artist's practice on paper through a small group of sitters he has depicted repeatedly over the years: his muse and confidante, the designer Celia Birtwell; his mother; his friend and curator Gregory Evans, master printer Maurice Payne; and the artist himself. Each of these individuals have been important to Hockney.

Over time he has rendered them in different forms: pencil, pen and ink, etchings, photocollages, iphone and ipad drawings. In re-visiting these people over decades, Hockney gives us a unique insight into how his practice has evolved over time.
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On View // David Hockney: Drawing from Life

An exhibition organized by the National Portrait Gallery, London, in collaboration with the artist and the Morgan Library & Museum.

David Hockney: Drawing from Life is made possible by Mr. and Mrs. Robert King Steel and Katharine J. Rayner. Additional support is provided by the Rita Markus Fund for Exhibitions, with assistance from Dian Woodner and David and Tanya Wells.

03/31/2021

"David Hockney: Drawing from Life" explores the renowned artist's practice on paper through a small group of sitters he has depicted repeatedly over the years: his muse and confidante, the designer Celia Birtwell; his mother; his friend and curator Gregory Evans, master printer Maurice Payne; and the artist himself. Each of these individuals have been important to Hockney.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Over time he has rendered them in different forms: pencil, pen and ink, etchings, photocollages, iphone and ipad drawings. In re-visiting these people over decades, Hockney gives us a unique insight into how his practice has evolved over time.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
——⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
On View // David Hockney: Drawing from Life. Plan your visit: link in bio.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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An exhibition organized by the National Portrait Gallery, London, in collaboration with the artist and the Morgan Library & Museum.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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David Hockney: Drawing from Life is made possible by Mr. and Mrs. Robert King Steel and Katharine J. Rayner. Additional support is provided by the Rita Markus Fund for Exhibitions, with assistance from Dian Woodner and David and Tanya Wells.

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Antoine Watteau's drawing, made around 1718, is one of eight intimate studies of a female model captured in a v...
03/30/2021

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Antoine Watteau's drawing, made around 1718, is one of eight intimate studies of a female model captured in a variety of informal poses. Not intended as preparatory for any painting, these drawings were made in private rented rooms where Watteau and his friends took pleasure in "posing the model, painting and drawing." As a fully formed, mature artist, Watteau continued to draw from the live model, even if his n**e studies--so immediate and seemingly natural to modern eyes--were found wanting by academic standards. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
——⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Antoine Watteau⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1684-1721.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Young Woman Wearing a Chemise. Verso: various slight sketches in red chalk, including a sketch of a foot⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
ca. 1718⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Black, red, and white chalk.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
6 7/8 x 8 1/8 inches (174 x 206 mm)⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Thaw Collection.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
2000.53

In the 1970s, Helène Aylon was still immersed in the first chapter of a career that she later referred to as if it were ...
03/29/2021

In the 1970s, Helène Aylon was still immersed in the first chapter of a career that she later referred to as if it were a play in three intricately interconnected acts: Body-Earth-God.
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The Morgan’s collection includes two works from this early phase: "Sparkling Firmament" (1973) and "Torn Drawing" (1973). They are part of a larger series called “Paintings that Change in Time."
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Working in a range of sizes, she applied oil and sometimes other materials, like pigment and glue, to sheets of paper. She said, “I painted from behind the surface of the paper, allowing the oils to seep through naturally, in their own time, outside of my doing. I’d wait for the image to manifest on the front surface through chance—absorption—and I would accept the outcome. … I wanted the art to tell me something that I did not know.”
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Read more: www.themorgan.org/blog/slow-art-helene-aylon
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Aylon in her Earth Ambulance (1982), surrounded by pillowcase “sacs” filled with earth salvaged from nuclear weapons bases.
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Helène Aylon (1931–2020), Sparkling Firmament, 1973. Oil and glue on paper, mounted between Masonite and Plexiglas, 12 5/8 x 23 x 1 inches (32.1 x 58.4 x 2.5 cm). Gift of an anonymous donor; 2017.363. © Helène Aylon/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
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Helène Aylon (1931–2020), Torn Drawing, 1973. Oil and glue on paper, mounted between Masonite and Plexiglas, 10 1/4 x 18 1/4 x 1 inches (26 x 46.4 x 2.5 cm). Gift of an anonymous donor; 2017.362. © Helène Aylon/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Happy Holi! Are you celebrating?⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Holi, the festival of colors, represents the arrival of spring and the...
03/28/2021

Happy Holi! Are you celebrating?⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Holi, the festival of colors, represents the arrival of spring and the triumph of good over evil. It is considered to be the reenactment of a game the Hindu god Lord Krishna played with his consort Radha and the gopis (milkmaids.)⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
——⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
[Krishna sprayed with colored water at the Holi festival].⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
India⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
ca. 1650-1675⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
165 x 188 mm.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Gift; Mr. Paul F. Walter; 1984.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
MS M.1060.1

Haggadot are among the most beloved Hebrew liturgical books. The text, comprising biblical passages, prayers, and hymns,...
03/27/2021

Haggadot are among the most beloved Hebrew liturgical books. The text, comprising biblical passages, prayers, and hymns, is read aloud at the #Passover seder, the domestic ceremony held annually in Jewish homes to commemorate the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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The Rose Haggadah sits within a long and rich tradition of Hebrew manuscripts. Illuminated Haggadot first became popular around the 13th century. The relatively short text fostered pictorial elaboration, and the domestic context allowed patrons and artists a certain freedom in their choice of decoration. Haggadot were often illustrated with biblical scenes, episodes from Jewish legend, and the celebration of the seder itself.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Barbara Wolff is one of the rare contemporary artists using the techniques of medieval manuscript illumination.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Page through the Morgan's Rose Haggadah: https://www.themorgan.org/collection/rose-haggadah⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Barbara Wolff⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Rose Haggadah, 2011–13⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Gift of Joanna S. Rose, 2014⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
MS M.1191, pages 38–39

It’s #ForeEdgeFriday! When this gilt and gauffered fore-edge catches the light, a glimmering crescent pattern appears, p...
03/26/2021

It’s #ForeEdgeFriday! When this gilt and gauffered fore-edge catches the light, a glimmering crescent pattern appears, peeking out from behind an equally beautiful binding 🌙 ✨
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Last week, a Rutgers University graduate student examined this small 16th-century psalter (along with several other psalters and Books of Common Prayer) in the Reading Room for an essay on the history of verse numeration in English psalters. One aspect of this project involved inspecting the books for signs of reader use and hand-written verse numbers.
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Swipe to see more →
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Les CL. Pseavmes de David, mis en rime françoise ([Rouen?] : Par Abel Clemence, 1564). The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, Bequest of Julia P. Wightman, 1994; PML 152628.
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#MorganLibrary #MorganLibraryReadingRoom #IGlibraries #ig_libraries #LibrariesOfInstagram #SpecialCollections #BetweenTheStacks #FunFindFriday #psalters #BookOfPsalms #bible
#BookOfCommonPrayer

03/25/2021

“Conversations in Drawing: Seven Centuries of Art from the Gray Collection” celebrates the remarkable collection of drawings assembled by the collecting couple Richard Gray, one of America’s foremost art dealers, and art historian Mary L. Gray.

Amassed over the course of nearly 50 years, the collection encompasses works produced in Europe and the United States between the fifteenth and the twenty-first centuries, tracing the long and distinguished history of one medium: drawing.

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On view February 19, 2021 through June 6, 2021
www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/gray-collection

Conversations in Drawing: Seven Centuries of Art from the Gray Collection was organized by The Art Institute of Chicago in cooperation with the Morgan Library & Museum.

The exhibition is made possible by an anonymous donor, with additional support from the Charles E. Pierce, Jr. Fund for Exhibitions, and assistance from Mr. and Mrs. Clement C. Moore II and Hubert and Mireille Goldschmidt.

This prayer book was commissioned by Anne de Bretagne, wife of two successive kings of France, Charles VIII and Louis XI...
03/24/2021

This prayer book was commissioned by Anne de Bretagne, wife of two successive kings of France, Charles VIII and Louis XII, to teach her son, the dauphin Charles-Orland (1492–1495), his catechism, a summary of the principles of Christian religion in the form of questions and answers.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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It was painted in Tours by Jean Poyer, an artist documented as working for the queen. The book is richly illustrated, and its thirty-four airy, light-flooded miniatures are among the most delicate examples of late-fifteenth-century art.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Browse online: https://www.themorgan.org/collection/Anne-De-Bretagne⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Prayer Book of Anne de Bretagne⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Illuminated by Jean Poyer⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
France, Tours, ca. 1492–95⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
126 x 80 mm⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Pierpont Morgan Library, Purchased in 1905; MS M.50

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About the Morgan

The Morgan Library & Museum began as the personal library of financier, collector, and cultural benefactor Pierpont Morgan. Today it is a museum, independent research library, music venue, architectural landmark, and historic site located in the heart of New York City.

A century after its founding, the Morgan remains committed to offering visitors close encounters with great works of human accomplishment in a setting treasured for its intimate scale. Its collection of manuscripts, rare books, music, drawings, and works of art comprise a unique and dynamic record of civilization, as well as an incomparable repository of ideas and of the creative process from 4000 BC to the present.