Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art

Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art Created by our founders to preserve LGBTQ identity and build community, the Leslie-Lohman Museum acts as a cultural hub for the LGBTQ community.
(206)

Museum Programs
· 4-6 major exhibitions annually
· QUEERPOWER Façade public art installation
· Over 30,000 art works and objects in our collections
· Educational programming
· Artists services and professional development
· Various talks, lectures, panel discussions
· Teaching artist and curator led tours
· Research library
· Membership Program
· The ARCHIVE, our premiere arts journal
· Project Space (127-B Prince St) workshops & exhibitions

Operating as usual

Up next in our series of four virtual public programs spotlighting the vibrant fourth cohort of the LLMA Artist Fellowsh...
05/28/2021

Up next in our series of four virtual public programs spotlighting the vibrant fourth cohort of the LLMA Artist Fellowship were excited to announce that art historian and curator, Dr. Alexis Salas will be in conversation with three of our Artist Fellows.

#SaveTheDate June 4th, 4-6 pm (EDT) the presenting Fellows include Pati Cruz (@pecacruz), Maksaens Denism (@maksaens), and María José Maldonado (@saymariajose). Register via the link in our profile! 📣

Dr. Alexis Salas (she/ ella) is an art historian, curator, and professor of global contemporary art with a specialization in the Americas (Latin America and the Latinx United States). Her curatorial projects, teaching, and scholarship emphasize the voices of people of color as well as feminist and queer critique. Her first book, Disparity at Play: The Artists and Projects of Temístocles 44 (Mexico City, 1991-2003), currently a manuscript in process, looks at how an artist collective in Mexico City used the conditions of neoliberalism to produce subversive collective projects. Her second book will focus on the relationship of art (practices, markets, patrons) and oil. Dr. Salas is currently at work on an article titled “Rooted in Desmadre: Vick Quezada Planting Queer Fertility” which analyzes relationships between queer and Latinx bodies and kinship structures in relation to plant life, Spanish colonial missions, and the US Southwest.

#LeslieLohmanMuseum #LeslieLohmanArtistFellowship

Up next in our series of four virtual public programs spotlighting the vibrant fourth cohort of the LLMA Artist Fellowship were excited to announce that art historian and curator, Dr. Alexis Salas will be in conversation with three of our Artist Fellows.

#SaveTheDate June 4th, 4-6 pm (EDT) the presenting Fellows include Pati Cruz (@pecacruz), Maksaens Denism (@maksaens), and María José Maldonado (@saymariajose). Register via the link in our profile! 📣

Dr. Alexis Salas (she/ ella) is an art historian, curator, and professor of global contemporary art with a specialization in the Americas (Latin America and the Latinx United States). Her curatorial projects, teaching, and scholarship emphasize the voices of people of color as well as feminist and queer critique. Her first book, Disparity at Play: The Artists and Projects of Temístocles 44 (Mexico City, 1991-2003), currently a manuscript in process, looks at how an artist collective in Mexico City used the conditions of neoliberalism to produce subversive collective projects. Her second book will focus on the relationship of art (practices, markets, patrons) and oil. Dr. Salas is currently at work on an article titled “Rooted in Desmadre: Vick Quezada Planting Queer Fertility” which analyzes relationships between queer and Latinx bodies and kinship structures in relation to plant life, Spanish colonial missions, and the US Southwest.

#LeslieLohmanMuseum #LeslieLohmanArtistFellowship

This letter was collectively drafted by the following artists who are part of the fourth cohort (2020-2021) of The Lesli...
05/28/2021

This letter was collectively drafted by the following artists who are part of the fourth cohort (2020-2021) of The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art, Artist Fellowship program; Anna Parisi, Bassem Saad, Felicita Felli Maynard, Kearra Amaya Gopee, Leasho Johnson, María José Maldonado, Pó Rodil, and Vick Quezada.

The Fellows ask that you consider supporting (if you are able to) the below organizations and aid resources.

- Medical Aid for Palestinians (@medicalaidpal)
- Middle East Children's Alliance (@mecaforpeace)
- alQaws for Sexual and Gender Diversity in Palestine (@alqaws_org)
- Aswat (Palestinian Feminist Center for Gender and Sexual Freedoms) (@aswatfreedoms

#LeslieLohmanMuseumArtistFellowship

Exhibition Alert 🚨 Have you visited our current exhibition, “Dissolution”? Now’s your chance, this is your final weekend...
05/28/2021

Exhibition Alert 🚨 Have you visited our current exhibition, “Dissolution”? Now’s your chance, this is your final weekend to see it before the exhibition closes on Sunday, May 30th at 6 pm (EDT).

➡️ Get your (free) ticket today by following the the link in our prifile!

Part 2 of “Dissolution” features works of art by the artists in the first two cohorts of the annual Leslie-Lohman Museum Artist Fellowship (2017-2019). The Fellows come from disparate backgrounds and engage in equally divergent art practices, and their artwork presents a multitude of positions within contemporary queer identity. Part 2  includes artist  Salvador Muñoz, Boris Torres (@boristorres), Caitlin Rose Sweet (@caitlinrosesweet, Carrie Hawks (@maroonhorizon), Christopher Unpezverde Núñez, Desireena Almoradie (@deswad), #FrederickWeston, Jason Villegas (@chubbytanuki), Lola Flash (@flash9), Nash Glynn (@nashglynn), and Seyi Adebanjo (@tengade_productions).

[📸: Federick Weston, “Blue Bathroom Blues”, 1999. Courtesy of Gordon Robichaux Gallery, NY (@gordonrobichaux]

Exhibition Alert 🚨 Have you visited our current exhibition, “Dissolution”? Now’s your chance, this is your final weekend to see it before the exhibition closes on Sunday, May 30th at 6 pm (EDT).

➡️ Get your (free) ticket today by following the the link in our prifile!

Part 2 of “Dissolution” features works of art by the artists in the first two cohorts of the annual Leslie-Lohman Museum Artist Fellowship (2017-2019). The Fellows come from disparate backgrounds and engage in equally divergent art practices, and their artwork presents a multitude of positions within contemporary queer identity. Part 2  includes artist  Salvador Muñoz, Boris Torres (@boristorres), Caitlin Rose Sweet (@caitlinrosesweet, Carrie Hawks (@maroonhorizon), Christopher Unpezverde Núñez, Desireena Almoradie (@deswad), #FrederickWeston, Jason Villegas (@chubbytanuki), Lola Flash (@flash9), Nash Glynn (@nashglynn), and Seyi Adebanjo (@tengade_productions).

[📸: Federick Weston, “Blue Bathroom Blues”, 1999. Courtesy of Gordon Robichaux Gallery, NY (@gordonrobichaux]

Bassem Saad (@bassem_s_) #LeslieLohmanMuseumArtistFellow (2020-2021) is an artist and writer born on September 11th and ...
05/27/2021

Bassem Saad (@bassem_s_) #LeslieLohmanMuseumArtistFellow (2020-2021) is an artist and writer born on September 11th and trained in architecture.

His projects have examined strategies and performativities of dissent in the 2019-2020 uprisings in Beirut and New York; mediations of collective trauma and ritual in visualization technologies employed by both the US Army and Hezbollah; and the flagrant architectures of migrant work in the so-called Middle East.

His most recent film, "Congress of Idling Persons", features five interlocutors who play themselves and greater fictions, in the shadows of recent world-historical events. Artist and writer Bassem Saad, DJ and translator Rayyan Abdel Khalek, musical artist Sandy Chamoun, writer Islam Khatib, and organiser Mekdes Yilma examine a cartography of protest, crisis, humanitarian and mutual aid, migrant labour, and Palestinian outsider status. Punctuated by the late Arab Spring, the Black Lives Matter revolts of 2020, and the Beirut port explosion, the film weaves through transhistorical constants — from collective rage to mourning and mutualism — the film asks: if a group action is a riot and not a revolution, then who films it? If four is a riot, it is also a congress.

#SaveTheDate JUNE 3rd, 6:30-8:30 PM (EDT) join Bassem Saad, Leasho Johnson (@leasho_johnson), and Eva Wǒ (@yoevawo) in conversation with scholar Catherine Damman for the second event in a series of four virtual public programs spotlighting the fourth cohort of the LLMA Artist Fellowship.

➡️ RSVP via the link in our profile.

Learn more about Saad's work by visiting their website www.bassemsaad.com.

#LeslieLohmanMuseum #LLMArtistFellow

📸
1- 5. Bassem Saad, “Congress of Idling Persons” (film still), 2021. Courtesy the artist.
6. Bassem Saad, “Brace 002 (There are still many hours to be spent at the Square)”. Courtesy the artist.
7. Bassem Saad, “Brace 001 (To an acquaintance detained on November 15th and their mother)”. Courtesy the artist. Photo (c) François Lauginie.

Bassem Saad (@bassem_s_) #LeslieLohmanMuseumArtistFellow (2020-2021) is an artist and writer born on September 11th and ...
05/27/2021

Bassem Saad (@bassem_s_) #LeslieLohmanMuseumArtistFellow (2020-2021) is an artist and writer born on September 11th and trained in architecture.

His projects have examined strategies and performativities of dissent in the 2019-2020 uprisings in Beirut and New York; mediations of collective trauma and ritual in visualization technologies employed by both the US Army and Hezbollah; and the flagrant architectures of migrant work in the so-called Middle East.

His most recent film, "Congress of Idling Persons", features five interlocutors who play themselves and greater fictions, in the shadows of recent world-historical events. Artist and writer Bassem Saad, DJ and translator Rayyan Abdel Khalek, musical artist Sandy Chamoun, writer Islam Khatib, and organiser Mekdes Yilma examine a cartography of protest, crisis, humanitarian and mutual aid, migrant labour, and Palestinian outsider status. Punctuated by the late Arab Spring, the Black Lives Matter revolts of 2020, and the Beirut port explosion, the film weaves through transhistorical constants — from collective rage to mourning and mutualism — the film asks: if a group action is a riot and not a revolution, then who films it? If four is a riot, it is also a congress.

#SaveTheDare JUNE 3rd, 6:30-8:30 PM (EDT) join Bassem Saad, Leasho Johnson (@leasho_johnson), and Eva Wǒ (@yoevawo) in conversation with scholar Catherine Damman for the second event in a series of four virtual public programs spotlighting the fourth cohort of the LLMA Artist Fellowship.

➡️ RSVP via the link in our profile.

Learn more about Saad's work by visiting their website, www.bassemsaad.com!

#LeslieLohmanMuseum #LLMArtistFellow

📸
1- 5. Bassem Saad, “Congress of Idling Persons” (film still), 2021. Courtesy the artist.
6. Bassem Saad, “Brace 002 (There are still many hours to be spent at the Square)”. Courtesy the artist.
7. Bassem Saad, “Brace 001 (To an acquaintance detained on November 15th and their mother)”. Courtesy the artist. Photo (c) François Lauginie.

Leasho Johnson (@leasho_johnson) #LeslieLohmanMuseumArtistFellow (2020-2021) is a visual artist working primarily in pai...
05/27/2021

Leasho Johnson (@leasho_johnson) #LeslieLohmanMuseumArtistFellow (2020-2021) is a visual artist working primarily in painting, installation, and sculpture. He was born in Montego-Bay but raised in Sheffield, a small town on the outskirts of Negril Jamaica. Johnson uses his experience growing up Black, queer, and male to explore concepts around forming an identity within the post-colonial condition within Jamaican Dancehall street culture. Focusing on the ephemerality of psychological interiorities and black mythologies, he utilizes mediums, made or found, to blur the distinction of stereotype and representation, geography and memory, and to reveal or hide western contentions with the black body.

Working in the conjunction of painting and drawing, Johnson makes characters, simultaneously visible and invisible, that live on the edge of perception. His work disrupts historical, political and biological expectations of the Black queer body. His work garners space and autonomy of Black bodies and allows it to reimagine itself.

#SaveTheDate JUNE 3, 6:30-8:30 PM (EDT) Join Leasho Johnson, Eva Wǒ (@yoevawo), and Bassem Saad (@bassem_s_) in conversation with scholar Catherine Damman for the second event in a series of four virtual public programs spotlighting the fourth cohort of the LLMA Artist Fellowship. Register through the link in our profile!

Learn more about Johnson’s practice by visiting their website via our Linktree.

#LeslieLohmanMuseum #LLMArtistFellow

Images:
1. Leasho Johnson, “Anansi: A place where no one can hear us, where no one can see us cry”, 2020. Courtesy the artist.

2. Leasho Johnson, “Those without whom the earth would not be the earth”, 2020. Courtesy the artist.

3. Leasho Johnson, “Love, cm and forgetfulness (Anansi #7)”, 2020. Courtesy the artist.

4. Leasho Johnson, “Rules for being free (Anansi #6)’, 2020. Courtesy the artist.

5. Leasho Johnson, ”Death of the soundboy”, 2019. Courtesy the artist.

6. Leasho Johnson, “The power and the glory”, 202. Courtesy the artist.

7. Leasho Johnson, “Jaw bone (man looking back at the cane fields)”, 2019. Courtesy the artist.

Bassem Saad is an artist and writer born on September 11th and trained in architecture. His projects have examined strat...
05/27/2021

Bassem Saad is an artist and writer born on September 11th and trained in architecture. His projects have examined strategies and performativities of dissent in the 2019-2020 uprisings in Beirut and New York; mediations of collective trauma and ritual in visualization technologies employed by both the US Army and Hezbollah; and the flagrant architectures of migrant work in the so-called Middle East.

His most recent film, Congress of Idling Persons, features five interlocutors who play themselves and greater fictions, in the shadows of recent world-historical events. Artist and writer Bassem Saad, DJ and translator Rayyan Abdel Khalek, musical artist Sandy Chamoun, writer Islam Khatib, and organiser Mekdes Yilma examine a cartography of
protest, crisis, humanitarian and mutual aid, migrant labour, and Palestinian outsider status. Punctuated by the late Arab Spring, the Black Lives Matter revolts of 2020, and the Beirut port explosion, the film weaves through transhistorical constants — from collective
rage to mourning and mutualism — the film asks: if a group action is a riot and not a revolution, then who films it? If four is a riot, it is also a congress.

Curious to learn more about Saad leading up to the Fellowship program? Head to their website www.bassemsaad.com! 

#LeslieLohmanMuseum #LLMArtistFellow

Images:

1.Bassem Saad, “Congress of Idling Persons” (film still), 2021. Courtesy the artist.


2.Bassem Saad, “Congress of Idling Persons” (film still), 2021. Courtesy the artist.


3.Bassem Saad, “Congress of Idling Persons” (film still), 2021. Courtesy the artist.


4.Bassem Saad, “Congress of Idling Persons” (film still), 2021. Courtesy the artist.


5.Bassem Saad, “Congress of Idling Persons” (film still), 2021. Courtesy the artist.


6.Bassem Saad, “Brace 002 (There are still many hours to be spent at the Square)”. Courtesy the artist.


7.Bassem Saad, “Brace 001 (To an acquaintance detained on November 15th and their mother)”. Courtesy the artist. Photo (c) François Lauginie

Do you remember the last time you went to an #IRL performance? Neither can we. This is why we are so excited to open our...
05/26/2021

Do you remember the last time you went to an #IRL performance? Neither can we. This is why we are so excited to open our doors to the public for the first in-person presentation by the Museum in over two years with a durational performance by artist Carlos Martiel (@martielcarlos).

#SaveTheDate Jun 2nd, 6-8pm. ➡️Register via the link in our profile!

Building on Cuban and international histories, Martiel’s artistic repertoire offers visceral political critiques on social tensions while both embodying and challenging commonly perceived limitations. The performance will gesture toward the vulnerabilities of Black and Latinx LGBTQ people in HIV/AIDs discourse where structural stigmatization, systematic racism, poverty and lack of access to adequate healthcare continue to adversely weigh down marginalized communities who are immensely affected by such inequities.

Carlos Martiel (b. 1989, Havana) lives and works in NY. Martiel’s works have been shown in the biennials of Venice, Sharjah, and Vancouver; at the Stedelijk Museum, Walker Art Center, Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea, MOLAA, Frost Art Museum, and the National Museum of Fine Arts of Havana, and elsewhere. His works are included in the collections of the Guggenheim Museum; Museu de Arte do Rio, and the PAMM, among others.

[📸: Carlos Martiel, “Encomienda” (2018), CCK, Buenos Aires, Argentina.]

Do you remember the last time you went to an #IRL performance? Neither can we. This is why we are so excited to open our doors to the public for the first in-person presentation by the Museum in over two years with a durational performance by artist Carlos Martiel (@martielcarlos).

#SaveTheDate Jun 2nd, 6-8pm. ➡️Register via the link in our profile!

Building on Cuban and international histories, Martiel’s artistic repertoire offers visceral political critiques on social tensions while both embodying and challenging commonly perceived limitations. The performance will gesture toward the vulnerabilities of Black and Latinx LGBTQ people in HIV/AIDs discourse where structural stigmatization, systematic racism, poverty and lack of access to adequate healthcare continue to adversely weigh down marginalized communities who are immensely affected by such inequities.

Carlos Martiel (b. 1989, Havana) lives and works in NY. Martiel’s works have been shown in the biennials of Venice, Sharjah, and Vancouver; at the Stedelijk Museum, Walker Art Center, Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea, MOLAA, Frost Art Museum, and the National Museum of Fine Arts of Havana, and elsewhere. His works are included in the collections of the Guggenheim Museum; Museu de Arte do Rio, and the PAMM, among others.

[📸: Carlos Martiel, “Encomienda” (2018), CCK, Buenos Aires, Argentina.]

Address

26 Wooster St
New York, NY
10013

Opening Hours

Wednesday 12:00 - 18:00
Thursday 12:00 - 20:00
Friday 12:00 - 18:00
Saturday 12:00 - 18:00
Sunday 12:00 - 18:00

Telephone

(212) 431-2609

Website

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art:

Videos

Category

Our Story

VISION To be a home for queer art, artists, scholars, activists and allies, and a catalyst for discourse on art and queerness.

MISSION The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art provides a platform for artistic exploration through multi-faceted queer perspectives. We embrace the power of the arts to inspire, explore, and foster understanding of the rich diversity of LGBTQI+ experiences.

ABOUT Created by our founders to preserve LGBTQ identity and build community, the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art acts as a cultural hub for the LGBTQ community. Our roots trace back to 1969 when Charles Leslie and Fritz Lohman held an exhibit of gay artists for the first time in their SoHo loft. Throughout the 1970s, they continued to collect and exhibit gay artists while supporting the SoHo art community. During the AIDS pandemic of the 1980s, the collection continued to grow as they rescued the work of dying artists from families who, out of shame or ignorance, wanted to destroy it. This led to the formation of the Leslie-Lohman Gay Art Foundation in 1987. In recognition of its importance in the collection and preservation of LGBTQ history, the organization was accredited as a museum in 2016. With a collection of over 30,000 objects, the Museum hosts six major exhibitions annually, offers several public programs throughout the year, publishes an arts newsletter, and maintains a research library of over 3,000 volumes. The Museum examines the juxtaposition between art and social justice in ways that provoke thought and dialogue.

Image: Photo: (c) Kristine Eudey, 2019, JEB (Joan E. Biren), BEING SEEN MAKES A MOVEMENT POSSIBLE, Facade Installation, Leslie-Lohman Museum.

Nearby museums


Other Art Museums in New York

Show All

Comments

Thank you for viewing my artist husband, Lon Michel Mfa 3 min short!
This Friday, January 22, my collaborator and I will be presenting "Fatherland: Culture, Violence, and the Peruvian Landscape" via Zoom at 6:30pm EST. The talk is free and will include a segment by trans activist and Director of Féminas Perú, Leyla Huerta. Please follow this link to register: https://gaycenter.org/fatherland/ Fatherland: Culture, Violence, and the Peruvian Landscape will provide a direct connection to our Virgenes de la Puerta series of portraits of transgender Peruvians, as well as a historical context for the “Fatherland” series. It coincides with the release of our monograph, FATHERLAND / PADRE-PATRIA published by Daylight Books. For more info please visit: barbozagubo-mroczek.com. The talk is graciously hosted by The Center in New York, which is an LGBTQ community center that was founded 1983 and home to the iconic bathroom mural by Keith Haring titled, “Once Upon a Time.” For those of you who have yet to see the mural, it’s worth Googling! It was completed in 1989, just one year prior to Keith’s passing. Please join us if you can!
Are you actually still in business, as you do not communicate?
Trying to find an email to make contact. Maybe I'm just totally inept but...….. I have some material that I just came across related to George Dudley and I wanted to post it on Facebook for Gay Pride Month. It's a postcard Dudley copyrighted in 1979 called America The Beautiful and is a photograph taken by my friend Bill Bernardo. Please contact me. [email protected]
Bye
I have some erotic le***an art I need to give away. I have shown at your gallery a few times. I have no room and I know my work would have to be thrown away. Do you have any room for a box of small sculptures and a shopping bag of framed art?
A highlight of Detroit Art Week, Young Curators, New Ideas V captures the cultural, artistic, social, and political transformations brought to life by artists and curators identifying as women, black, people of color, LGBTQ+, and gender-nonconformists.
Before Stonewall, few gay writers dared to venture out of the closet. Fifty years later, we’re in a new struggle to keep those closet doors open. Bookstr has selected 5 LGBTQ books to honor the 50th anniversary of Stonewall. Please check them out!
Best wishes for your show opening today. Such a great collection of work to display for people to take in. Have a most awesome day. Cheers!