Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art

Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art Created by our founders to preserve LGBTQ identity and build community, the Leslie-Lohman Museum acts as a cultural hub for the LGBTQ community.
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Museum Programs · 4-6 major exhibitions annually · QUEERPOWER Façade public art installation · Over 30,000 art works and objects in our collections · Educational programming · Artists services and professional development · Various talks, lectures, panel discussions · Teaching artist and curator led tours · Research library · Membership Program · The ARCHIVE, our premiere arts journal · Project Space (127-B Prince St) workshops & exhibitions

Mission: The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art provides a platform for artistic exploration through multi-faceted queer perspectives. We embrace the power of the arts to inspire, explore, and foster understanding of the rich diversity of LGBTQI+ experiences. We are a home for queer art, artists, scholars, activists and allies, anda catalyst for discourse on art and queerness.

Operating as usual

Have you seen the new work in our windows by artist Rashaad Newsome (@rashaadnewsome)? BLACK MAGIC is Newsome’s triparti...
12/23/2020

Have you seen the new work in our windows by artist Rashaad Newsome (@rashaadnewsome)? BLACK MAGIC is Newsome’s tripartite project, which launched on #WorldAIDSDay with a multi-channel work and live performance co-commissioned with Times Square Arts (@tsqarts) and a parallel installation of vinyl wallpaper in the Museum’s Living Room Gallery windows. The work draws from traditions of performance and improvisation born out of Black liberation movements. The pattern, the "King of Arms Tincture," on view through February 1, 2021, is conceptualized by the artist as "a kind of armor creating a more liberatory space for the Queer Black bodies performing within the installation," with a design that references the parades and balls drawn from Newsome’s experiences growing up in New Orleans, as well as the design of domestic lounges and gathering spaces for relaxation and joy. The project continues in 2021 with the debut of a new film by the artist on leslielohman.org and a virtual event presented in partnership with Eyebeam (@eyebeamnyc). Stay tuned for more information!

Head to Wooster St. between Gand St. and Canal St. to enjoy Newsome’s wallpaper as well as artist Chitra Ganesh’s (chitraganeshbkny) street facing installation “A city will share her secrets if you know how to ask”. Both works illuminate the exterior windows of the Museum day and night.

#LeslieLohmanMunsem

[Image: Rashaad Newsome, "Black Magic", 2020. Photo: © Kristine Eudey]

Happy Monday! We heading into the week with an exciting exhibition alert! On January 16, 2021, the Museum reopens, #IRL ...
12/21/2020

Happy Monday! We heading into the week with an exciting exhibition alert! On January 16, 2021, the Museum reopens, #IRL with part one of the two part exhibition, “Dissolution”! The exhibition features works created by the first two cohorts of the annual Leslie-Lohman Museum Artist Fellowship (2017-18 and 2018-19). The Fellows exhibited come from disparate backgrounds and engage in equally divergent art practices, and their artwork presents a multitude of positions within contemporary queer identity. Dissolution refers to artistic strategies of negation and undoing, in which representations of hierarchical and normative structures are fragmented, dissolved, or upended, in an act of resistance to the structures of oppression they uphold. Works in the exhibition subvert and reimagine signifiers of masculinity, imagine new forms of childhood, or resist linear narratives of progress.

Part 1 (Jan 16 -Mar 13, 2021) includes artists Buzz Slutzky, Catalina Schliebener, Eric Rhein, Gwen Shockey, Kiyan Williams, Kristine Eudey, Max Colby, Michael Childress, Rodrigo Moreira, Vanessa Rondon.

Part 2 (April 11-May 25, 2021), includes artists Boris Torres, Caitlin Rose Sweet, Carrie Hawks, Christopher Nuñez, Desiree Almoradie, Eduardo Shlomo Velazquez, Frederick Weston, Jason Villegas, Lola Flash, Nash Glynn, Sal Muñoz, Seyi Odebanjo.

#LeslieLohmanMuseum #LeslieLohmanArtistFellowship

[Image: Catalina Schliebener (@catalina_schliebener), "Satanic Panic series, Monster Inc.(Sulley)", 2019, Porcelain figurine, articulated plastic figures, paper, light box, Variable sizes. Courtesy the artist.]

Through the simplest of lines and shapes, Bartlett gives us a quietly vibrating landscape, evoking the starkness and hus...
12/18/2020

Through the simplest of lines and shapes, Bartlett gives us a quietly vibrating landscape, evoking the starkness and hush of winter. Bartlett's titular house is nestled among grids: a row of thicket-like black lines, vertical, horizontal, and diagonal--and a square field below. Each line brims with individuality--some are straight, some gently waver, some meet and then diverge again.

The house itself--a box and a triangle--is a rudimentary icon, a motif that has appeared in Bartlett's work since the late 1970s. Subjecting it to endless analysis, repetition, and refiguring, Bartlett (like many others working in the context of second-wave feminism) deconstructs any fixed notions of domesticity and the meaning of "home." Even the painting's ground and support--yet another grid, made of steel plates--was inspired by road and subway signs, pointing to this symbol's endless deferment and lack of fixity.
For many, queerness comes with a complicated relationship to the idea of home, especially at this time of year. This piece came into LLM's holdings through the collection of the late artist Tony Feher (1956-2016) whose predilection for repetition and what Wayne Kostenbaum called "kinky rigor" found an affinity with Bartlett's compositions--and perhaps, with her subtle troubling of "home."

#LeslieLohmanMuseum

[Image: Jennifer Bartlett, "House (Christmas)", 2002, Heated enamel on steel plate. Gift of the Estate of Tony Feher.]

Exhibition Alert! We are thrilled to reopen the Museum's doors on February 6, 2021 with "Laura Aguilar: Show and Tell". ...
12/17/2020

Exhibition Alert! We are thrilled to reopen the Museum's doors on February 6, 2021 with "Laura Aguilar: Show and Tell". The exhibition is the first comprehensive retrospective of photographer Laura Aguilar (1959-2018), assembling over 70 works produced over three decades. Through photographs and videos that are frequently political as well as personal, and which traverse performative, feminist, and queer art genres, Aguilar offers candid portrayals of herself, her friends and family, and LGBT and Latinx communities. Aguilar’s now iconic triptych, “Three Eagles Flying” (1990), set the stage for her future work by using her nude body as an overt and courageous rebellion against the colonization of Latinx identities — racial, gendered, cultural, and sexual. Her practice intuitively evolved over time as she struggled to negotiate and navigate her ethnicity and sexuality, her challenges with depression and auditory dyslexia, and the acceptance of her large body. This exhibition tells the story of the artist who for most of her life struggled to communicate with words, yet ironically emerged as a powerful voice for numerous and diverse marginalized groups.

"Laura Aguilar: Show and Tell" is organized by the Vincent Price Art Museum in collaboration with the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, and is guest curated by Sybil Venegas, Independent Art Historian and Curator and Professor Emerita of Chicana/o Studies at East Los Angeles College

[Image: Laura Aguilar, "Grounded #111", 2006. Inkjet print, 14.5 x 15 in. Gift of the Laura Aguilar Trust of 2016, jointly acquired by the Vincent Price Art Museum Foundation and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.]

We are thrilled to announce that Alyssa Nitchun who has worked for several years at the intersection of art, culture, an...
12/15/2020
Leslie-Lohman Museum Announces New Director

We are thrilled to announce that Alyssa Nitchun who has worked for several years at the intersection of art, culture, and social justice, has been named Executive Director of the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art 🎉 ! Nitchun most recently served as Acting Executive Director at Creative Time, where she helped realize an ambitious program of socially concerned art projects and convenings. She previously served as Deputy Director and Director of External Affairs, among other roles spanning a seven year tenure at the vanguard public art organization, enhancing its audiences and presence in the Middle East, Mexico, Canada, and Europe.

The nonprofit executive Alyssa Nitchun will lead the museum after its last director, Gonzalo Casals, became the Cultural Affairs Commissioner of New York City.

Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art's cover photo
12/10/2020

Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art's cover photo

“I see this dance form [vogueing] as an open-source code. The language or binary code is based on five elements: hands p...
12/09/2020

“I see this dance form [vogueing] as an open-source code. The language or binary code is based on five elements: hands performance, catwalk, floor performance, spin dips, and duck-walking. I'm fascinated by how different performers continue to add to the code.” writes Rashaad Newsome (@rashaadnewsome).

TOMORROW DEC.10 from 11:30 PM (est) to midnight, Newsome invites the public to a special, socially distanced, live performance with several dancers from the New York Ballroom community at Broadway plaza between 46th and 47th street in celebration of his tripartite project, BLACK MAGIC. Newsome’s new site-specific work which combines improvisational performance, animations, and intricately designed graphics is part of @tsqarts, “Midnight Moment”.

*VIEWERS ARE REQUIRED TO WEAR MASKS AND STAY SOCIALLY DISTANCED.

[Image: (c) Rashaad Newsome, "Black Magic" (detail), 2020]

Tune in next Wednesday, December 16, 8 PM (EST) PM for Mikki Yamashiro, aka, Professional Wrestler, Candy Pain’s live re...
12/08/2020

Tune in next Wednesday, December 16, 8 PM (EST) PM for Mikki Yamashiro, aka, Professional Wrestler, Candy Pain’s live reading of, “Candy Pain goes to Washington”, for our next installment of Remote Intimacies. RSVP via 🔗 in profile. The reading will be followed by a conversation between the artist and curator and scholar Jeanne Vaccaro (@whateverjeanne).

There are only 2 things you need to know about Candy Pain; she loves to wrestle and she hates men. After a tragic tag team match in the ring, Ms. Pain retires from the mayhem of Professional Wrestling, only to find herself in the chaos and dirty fighting of Washington, DC. Tune into Remote Intimacies for a live reading of, Candy Pain goes to Washington. An angry, Lesbian, Professional Wrestling-centric reinterpretation of "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington". Will Candy Pain crush the corrupt corporate careerists on the Senate floor, or will this bruiser end up a loser? Click the 🔗 in our profile to RSVP to the main event NOW! NOW! NOW!

Remote Intimacies is a series of experimental performances created specifically for online viewing and commissioned and co-organized by the ONE Archives at USC Libraries (@onearchives) and the Museum.

Image: Candy Pain, painting by Takako Olson (Mikki Yamashiro’s mother). Courtesy Mikki Yamashiro.

Join us Tuesday, December 15, 6PM EST,  for “Searching for missing narratives” a conversation presented by Residency Unl...
12/07/2020

Join us Tuesday, December 15, 6PM EST, for “Searching for missing narratives” a conversation presented by Residency Unlimited (RU) (@residencyunlimited) with artist Carlos Motta (@carlosalejandromotta), Karol Radziszewski (@karolradziszewski), and our own Interim Director Laura Raicovich (@lauraraicovich). The panel discussion will reflect on how the past can be used for shaping a better future and how to think about history whilst actively re-writing it.

“In the light of the recent protests and mass demonstrations led by repressed groups throughout Poland and the USA, the artists Karol Radziszewski (RU Alum 2011) and Carlos Motta will share how their respective and extensive archival based practices focus on queering and decolonizing histories to challenge dominant and normative discourses through artistic strategies and institutional critique. They will be joined by Laura Raicovich who provides a unique perspective as curator, writer and Interim Director of Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art.”

Karol Radziszewski is an artist and founder of The Queer Archives Institute (@QueerArchivesInstitute), a non-profit artist-run organization dedicated to research, collection, digitalization, presentation, exhibition, analysis and artistic interpretation of queer archives, with special focus on Central and Eastern Europe.

Carlos Motta is an artist and historian of untold narratives and an archivist of repressed histories, committed to in-depth research on the struggles of post-colonial subjects and societies.

This program is initiated and funded by the Polish Cultural Institute New York (@polishculturalinstituteny).

[Image: Queer Archives Institute, installation detail, 2016, Videobrasil, São Paulo]

In 1977, Audre Lorde (1934-1992) met visual artist Mildred Thompson (1936-2003) (@mildredthompsonart) at the Second Worl...
12/03/2020

In 1977, Audre Lorde (1934-1992) met visual artist Mildred Thompson (1936-2003) (@mildredthompsonart) at the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture in Nigeria, where Thompson was exhibiting work. The two had a brief intimate relationship through 1978 while they were based in Washington D.C.--Thompson was an Artist-in-Residence for the year at Howard University (@howard1867). Their relationship generated an unfinished collaboration, “The Journey Stones” sketchbook, which features Thompson’s pen and ink drawings alongside ten poems by Lorde. This sketchbook may have been a plan for an unpublished illustrated book, however Lorde’s poems--including “Timepiece”, which the drawing seen here accompanies--were eventually published in her book “The Black Unicorn” (1978) (@w.w.norton).

Thompson, whose work spanned four decades, is most well-known for her abstract paintings and wooden sculptures informed by science and music. In “Journey Stones”, however, she represents female nudes--women of color alone or coupled (as seen here), and set against abstracted, celestial backgrounds. A year later, Thompson rendered her “Death and Orgasm” series (1979), as artist and art historian Margaret Vendryes (@mrvendryes) notes, “in intaglio lines that sweep the page and shatter into delicate fragments.” Artworks from both series by Thompson were included in our 2019 exhibition “Art After Stonewall: 1969-1989”, which was organized by the Columbus Museum of Art (@colombusmuseum), and curated by Jonathan Weinberg, with Tyler Cann and Drew Sawyer.

To read Thompson’s 1987 essay “Memoirs of an Artist” published in SAGE: A Scholarly Journal for Black Women, Vol. IV, No. 1, head to the 🔗 in our profile.

Images:
1. Mildred Thompson, Illustration for Audre Lorde's "Timepiece", 1977-1978. Drawing in spiral bound- sketchbook. 11.25 x 14 in. From the collection @lesbianherstoryarchives. (c)The Mildred Thompson Estate, Courtesy Galerie Lelong & Co., New York (@galerielelong).

2. Mildred Thompson, “Montsalvat”, from the series “Death and Orgasm”, 1979. Mixed intaglio on paper, 30 x 22 ⅜ in. Collection of @smithsonian. Gift of the artist. (c) The Mildred Thompson Estate.

Today, December 1 is World AIDS Day. In partnership with @visual_aids, an arts-based organization that uses art to fight...
12/01/2020

Today, December 1 is World AIDS Day. In partnership with @visual_aids, an arts-based organization that uses art to fight AIDS, #LeslieLohmanMuseum is proud to support Day With(out) Art 2020. 

This year Visual AIDS presents a program of six new videos about the ongoing HIV and AIDS crisis, from artists around the world: Jorge Bordello (@jorgebordello), Mexico; Gevi Dimitrakopoulou (@gevidimi), Greece; Las Indetectables (@shalistika), Chile; George Stanley Nsamba (@theghettofilmmaker), Uganda; Lucía Egaña Rojas (@luciaegana), Chile/Spain; and Charan Singh (@random_access01), India/UK. 

As the world continues to adapt to living with a new virus, COVID-19, these videos offer an opportunity to reflect on the resonances and differences between the two epidemics and their uneven distribution across geography, race, and gender.

Starting today, TRANSMISSIONS is available to view online for free. Watch the full video program at visualaids.org/transmissions or follow the 🔗 in our profile.

#daywithoutart

Image: Gevi Dimitrakopoulou, “This is Right: Zak, Life and After”, 2020. Commissioned by Visual AIDS for Day With(out) Art 2020. Still courtesy of Visual AIDS

“I feel that the power of Black creative and resistance modalities are akin to Quantum Physics”, remarks Rashaad Newsome...
11/30/2020

“I feel that the power of Black creative and resistance modalities are akin to Quantum Physics”, remarks Rashaad Newsome (@rashaadnewsome) whose tripartite project, BLACK MAGIC (2020) launches with two simultaneous events on December 1, World AIDS Day. The premiere of “Black Magic”, a multi-channel work and live performance co-commissioned with Times Square Arts (@tsqarts) that combines improvisational performance, animations, and intricately designed graphics, opens with a parallel installation of vinyl wallpaper in the Museum’s Living Room Gallery windows. That pattern, the "King of Arms Tincture," is conceptualized by the artist as "a kind of armor creating a more liberatory space for the Queer Black bodies performing within the installation," with a design that references the parades and balls drawn from Newsome’s experiences growing up in New Orleans, as well as the design of lounges--gathering spaces for relaxation and joy. The project continues in 2021 with the debut of the full film by the artist on leslielohman.org and a virtual event presented in partnership with Eyebeam (@eyebeamnyc).

Bringing together the visual, musical, and performative expressions of marginalized communities through boundary-defying cross-cultural aesthetics is at the heart of Newsome’s practice. Through this installation, Newsome hopes to encourage an interrogation of family dynamics and community constructions in a celebration of difference and togetherness.

Learn more about Newsome's project via the @nytimes exclusive out today! 🔗 in our profile.

[Image: (c) Rashaad Newsome, "Black Magic", 2020]

11/27/2020
Day With(out) Art 2020: TRANSMISSIONS

MONDAY, November 30, 6 PM (EST) we are proud to partner with Visual AIDS (Visual AIDS) for Day With(out) Art 2020 by screening TRANSMISSIONS! The program features six new videos about the ongoing HIV and AIDS crisis, from artists around the world including, Jorge Bordello, Mexico; Gevi Dimitrakopoulou, Greece; Las Indetectables, Chile; George Stanley Nsamba, Uganda; Lucía Egaña Rojas, Chile/Spain; and Charan Singh, India/UK.

Tune in for the online premiere, November 30 at 6 PM (EST), the night before #WorldAIDSDay, followed by a live Q&A with the artists and Jih-Fei Cheng.

RSVP at visualaids.org/transmissions or follow the 🔗 in our profile.�� #DayWithoutArt

[Video: ©Visual AIDS for Day With(out) Art, 2020.]

On November 20, 1969, Indigenous activists began a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island, San Francisco, in an attempt ...
11/26/2020

On November 20, 1969, Indigenous activists began a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island, San Francisco, in an attempt to take back stolen land under the terms of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie, which stated that “retired, abandoned, or out-of-use federal land was to be returned to the Indians who once occupied it”. While the occupation was not able to secure their land rights, it did help end the termination laws that were taking tribes’ lands and attempting to negate their sovereignty. Since 1975, the Indigenous Peoples Sunrise Ceremony, also known as Unthanksgiving Day, is held on that site. Today also marks the National Day of Mourning protest in Plymouth, MA, “a day of remembrance and spiritual connection as well as a protest of the racism and oppression which Native Americans continue to experience”, states United American Indians of New England (UAINE).

Leslie-Lohman Museum acknowledges that New York City as well as the entire country is located on stolen land and founded on the erasure and exclusion of numerous indigenous tribes. Today we look to Chitra Ganesh’s #QueerPower facade which honors the erased histories and architectures of indigenous people (specifically the Lenape) alongside native, now-extinct plants including the sacred Tulip Tree. Her installation is populated with images that recognize the multiple past histories of this city and hemisphere, and expose myths about sparsely populated lands used to justify settler colonialism.

Looking for ways to support indigenous people today and every day? 1. Support queer indigenous artists--including those spotlighted in our collaborations with Knowledge of Wounds earlier this year. 2. Donate to indigenous orgs. Below is a small list to get you started:

-Indigenous Kinship Collective @indigenouskinshipcollective
-Coalition to StopViolence Against Native Women @csvanw
-Indian Law Resource Center @IndianLawResourceCenter
-The Native Youth Sexual Health Network @nyshn
-NDN Collective @ndncollective
-The American Indian College Fund @instacollegefund

Image: Chitra Ganesh, “A city will share her secrets if you know how to ask”, (detail) 2020.

Address

26 Wooster St
New York, NY
10013

Opening Hours

Wednesday 12:00 - 18:00
Thursday 12:00 - 20:00
Friday 12:00 - 18:00
Saturday 12:00 - 18:00
Sunday 12:00 - 18:00

Telephone

(212) 431-2609

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Our Story

VISION To be a home for queer art, artists, scholars, activists and allies, and a catalyst for discourse on art and queerness.

MISSION The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art provides a platform for artistic exploration through multi-faceted queer perspectives. We embrace the power of the arts to inspire, explore, and foster understanding of the rich diversity of LGBTQI+ experiences.

ABOUT Created by our founders to preserve LGBTQ identity and build community, the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art acts as a cultural hub for the LGBTQ community. Our roots trace back to 1969 when Charles Leslie and Fritz Lohman held an exhibit of gay artists for the first time in their SoHo loft. Throughout the 1970s, they continued to collect and exhibit gay artists while supporting the SoHo art community. During the AIDS pandemic of the 1980s, the collection continued to grow as they rescued the work of dying artists from families who, out of shame or ignorance, wanted to destroy it. This led to the formation of the Leslie-Lohman Gay Art Foundation in 1987. In recognition of its importance in the collection and preservation of LGBTQ history, the organization was accredited as a museum in 2016. With a collection of over 30,000 objects, the Museum hosts six major exhibitions annually, offers several public programs throughout the year, publishes an arts newsletter, and maintains a research library of over 3,000 volumes. The Museum examines the juxtaposition between art and social justice in ways that provoke thought and dialogue.

Image: Photo: (c) Kristine Eudey, 2019, JEB (Joan E. Biren), BEING SEEN MAKES A MOVEMENT POSSIBLE, Facade Installation, Leslie-Lohman Museum.

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Comments

Are you actually still in business, as you do not communicate?
Trying to find an email to make contact. Maybe I'm just totally inept but...….. I have some material that I just came across related to George Dudley and I wanted to post it on Facebook for Gay Pride Month. It's a postcard Dudley copyrighted in 1979 called America The Beautiful and is a photograph taken by my friend Bill Bernardo. Please contact me. [email protected]
Bye
I have some erotic lesbian art I need to give away. I have shown at your gallery a few times. I have no room and I know my work would have to be thrown away. Do you have any room for a box of small sculptures and a shopping bag of framed art?
A highlight of Detroit Art Week, Young Curators, New Ideas V captures the cultural, artistic, social, and political transformations brought to life by artists and curators identifying as women, black, people of color, LGBTQ+, and gender-nonconformists.
Before Stonewall, few gay writers dared to venture out of the closet. Fifty years later, we’re in a new struggle to keep those closet doors open. Bookstr has selected 5 LGBTQ books to honor the 50th anniversary of Stonewall. Please check them out!
Best wishes for your show opening today. Such a great collection of work to display for people to take in. Have a most awesome day. Cheers!
Will the space for the reception for JEB's work be wheelchair accessible? Joan E. Biren
CALL FOR ART ENTRIES / DEADLINE LAST DAY APRIL 12th The Greater Erie Alliance for Equality (GEAE) is pleased to present a juried art exhibit of works by LGBTQ artists during Pride month, June 1-30, 2019, at the Erie Art Gallery.