Whitney Museum of American Art

Whitney Museum of American Art The Whitney Museum of American Art houses one of the world's foremost collections of modern and contemporary American art.

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To make this print titled Cage, Zarina repurposed leftover wood scraps. Rather than carve into the wood to add her own m...
02/07/2021

To make this print titled Cage, Zarina repurposed leftover wood scraps. Rather than carve into the wood to add her own marks, she assembled the pieces into a collaged matrix that could be inked and printed directly. As a result, she reveals the intrinsic beauty in her found materials.

Cage—along with other unconventional prints from the collection—is on view now in Nothing Is So Humble: Prints from Everyday Objects.

Zarina, Cage, 1970. Relief collagraph: sheet, 30 1/4 × 22 1/16 in. (76.8 × 56 cm); image, 19 × 19 5/8 in. (48.3 × 49.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Print Committee 2011.9. © 1970, Zarina Hashmi; courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York

Happy birthday to artist Katherine Schmidt, who was born #onthisday in 1899.Known for her meticulously painted still lif...
02/06/2021

Happy birthday to artist Katherine Schmidt, who was born #onthisday in 1899.

Known for her meticulously painted still lifes, the artist has a Whitney relationship that predates the Museum, which was established in 1930. In 1918, she became a founding member of the Whitney Studio Club—a space in Greenwich Village established by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney to support American artists at a time when their work was underappreciated. In 1923, the Studio Club presented Schmidt's first solo exhibition.

Katherine Schmidt, Laurel and Pink Flower, 1930. Oil on linen, 30 1/8 × 24 3/16 in. (76.5 × 61.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.335

Shawn Walker took this photograph in 1968 while traveling in Cuba with Third World Newsreel, a collective that produced ...
02/04/2021

Shawn Walker took this photograph in 1968 while traveling in Cuba with Third World Newsreel, a collective that produced independent films about social justice issues. He was there shooting Isle of Youth, a film that documented, in the words of Third World Newsreel, "the daily activities of young Cubans—their work, recreation, and education—as they participate in converting the Isle of Pines from a prison colony to an experiment to create a new society." While in Cuba, Walker also continued his own artistic work.

Walker compared what he saw in Cuba to the U.S. South: "When I knew that I was going to Cuba, I kept trying to ask people…what I would be seeing. Nobody answered the question until I got there, and all they had to do is say 'the South.' Anytime you have an agrarian society—people with axes and picks and hoes and stuff like that.... For me it was another thing that showed me about the African-ness of us as a people. You never understood that Brazil and Cuba had the largest Black population out of all the countries, where all the slaves went to.... And I think that photograph was just me imagining the South."

Women in the Field, Cuba, along with others by Shawn Walker, is on view through March 28 in Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop.

Shawn Walker, Women in the Field, Cuba, 1968. Gelatin silver print: mount, 13 7/8 × 10 7/8 in. (35.2 × 27.6 cm), image: 4 5/16 × 6 3/8 in. (11 × 16.2 cm), frame: 20 × 16 in. (50.8 × 40.6 cm). Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; Arthur and Margaret Glasgow Endowment. © Shawn Walker

Tomorrow, February 4, at 7 pm, join Christopher Y. Lew, Nancy and Fred Poses Curator, and Ambika Trasi, curatorial assis...
02/03/2021

Tomorrow, February 4, at 7 pm, join Christopher Y. Lew, Nancy and Fred Poses Curator, and Ambika Trasi, curatorial assistant, for a virtual conversation about Salman Toor: How Will I Know. Part of the Whitney's emerging artists program, the exhibition is Toor's first solo museum show, and features new and recent paintings.

Read more and register for free: https://bit.ly/36BhFaB

Salman Toor, Puppy Play Date, 2019. Oil on plywood, 30 × 24 in. (76.2 × 61 cm). Collection of Miyoung Lee and Neil Simpkins. © Salman Toor. Image courtesy the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York

Bundle up! Six more weeks of winter are ahead of us according to Punxsutawney Phil. At least we have an excuse to share ...
02/02/2021

Bundle up! Six more weeks of winter are ahead of us according to Punxsutawney Phil. At least we have an excuse to share Charles Burchfield's Winter Twilight (1930). #GroundhogDay

Charles Burchfield, Winter Twilight, 1930. Oil on composition board and canvas, 27 13/16 × 30 5/8 in. (70.6 × 77.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 31.128. Reproduced with permission from the Charles E. Burchfield Foundation and the BurchfieldPenney Art Center

We will be celebrating #BlackHistoryMonth throughout February by sharing collection works by Black artists currently on ...
02/01/2021

We will be celebrating #BlackHistoryMonth throughout February by sharing collection works by Black artists currently on view at the Museum. We’re starting with Ed Clark (1926–2019), a pioneering abstract painter who radicalized the form by shaping canvases and deploying a broom, instead of always a brush, to handle paint. Clark joined bold gestures with jolting colors, such as the blacks and pinks in Winter Bitch (1959), pictured here, that was titled after a particularly brutal New York winter.

Clark was born in Madisonville, Louisiana, and served during World War II in the US Air Corps, stationed in Guam. After attending the Art Institute of Chicago, he moved to France and, like many artists of his generation, studied with funding provided by the GI Bill. He was one of the first Black artists that actively participated in the New York City Tenth Street galleries.

You can see this painting now in The Whitney's Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965.

Ed Clark, Winter Bitch, 1959. Acrylic on canvas, 77 × 77 in. (195.6 × 195.6 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Painting and Sculpture Committee and partial gift of the artist 2019.307. © Ed Clark

Please note that the Museum will be closed on February 1 due to inclement weather. Please check Twitter (@whitneymuseum)...
02/01/2021

Please note that the Museum will be closed on February 1 due to inclement weather. Please check Twitter (@whitneymuseum) for up-to-date information. ❄️

Glenn O. Coleman, Downtown Street, 1926. Oil on linen, 33 3/16 × 44 1/8in. (84.3 × 112.1 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

This Wednesday at 7 pm, the Whitney and Aperture Foundation invite you to a virtual conversation with artists from the K...
01/31/2021

This Wednesday at 7 pm, the Whitney and Aperture Foundation invite you to a virtual conversation with artists from the Kamoinge Workshop moderated by Tanisha C. Ford, writer, cultural critic, and professor. Anthony Barboza, C. Daniel Dawson, and Shawn Walker will discuss the importance of Harlem in the development of their work for the Kamoinge Workshop.

Read more and register for free: https://bit.ly/2KZcEAO. This program will be live captioned.

C. Daniel Dawson, Amiri #10, 1970. Gelatin silver print: sheet, 9 15/16 × 7 7/8 in. (25.2 × 20 cm); image: 8 3/4 × 5 7/8 in. (22.2 × 14.9 cm); frame, 20 × 16 in. (50.8 × 40.6 cm). Collection of the artist. © Daniel Dawson

With David Hammons's Day's End opening this spring (more on this new public sculpture here: https://bit.ly/32IP0zc), we'...
01/30/2021

With David Hammons's Day's End opening this spring (more on this new public sculpture here: https://bit.ly/32IP0zc), we're in a Hammons state of mind. We'll be sharing works from the collection over the next few months, starting with this untitled sculpture from 1992.

Hammons is a shaman of the everyday, gathering castoff and ephemeral materials—ranging from liquor bottles, snow, and, in this case, hair—to create resonant sculptures and performances.

In this sculpture, Hammons affixed kinked black hair he collected from barbershops onto long metal wires.

Pieces of hair inevitably fall beneath and around the work, evoking processes of change and decay. The sculpture alludes to vernacular traditions of making art out of whatever is at hand, as well as a community of anonymous individuals who indirectly contributed to its creation.

Installation view of America Is Hard to See (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, May 1— September 27, 2015). (from left to right, on walls): Fred Wilso, Guarded View, 1991; Roni Horn, Clownmirror (2), 2001; John Currin, Skinny Woman, 1992; (on floor) David Hammons, Untitled, 1992; (stairway) Felix Gonzalez-Torres, "Untitled" (America), 1994. Photo: Ronald Amstutz

In his extensive career, Anthony Barboza has traveled widely and photographed well-known personalities. In this portrait...
01/29/2021

In his extensive career, Anthony Barboza has traveled widely and photographed well-known personalities. In this portrait of model and performer Grace Jones, he filled the frame with her features, communicating her larger-than-life presence.

Barboza spoke about his direct and intuitive approach to his subjects: "I would create the background or the lighting right there and then....You be you and I'll be me, and we'll take this photo.... There are certain little entities in an image that say something beyond the image. And usually that comes from the photographer and their sense, and their doing certain things through the years, their growth. You’re taking a photograph of how you think and feel, and that comes through in the photograph."

This work is on view through March 28 in Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop.

Anthony Barboza, Grace Jones, c. 1970. Gelatin silver print: sheet, 14 × 10 15/16 in. (35.6 × 27.8 cm); image, 13 5/8 × 10 5/8 in. (34.6 × 27 cm); frame: 20 × 16 in. (50.8 × 40.6 cm). Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; National Endowment for the Arts Fund for American Art. © Anthony Barboza

Last chance! It's the final days to see Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945 and Cauleen Smi...
01/28/2021

Last chance! It's the final days to see Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945 and Cauleen Smith: Mutualities before they close on January 31.

"Vida Americana Is the Most Relevant Show of the 21st Century"—Vulture. Don't miss the opportunity to see nearly 200 works by over 60 Mexican and American artists including Frida Kahlo, Jackson Pollock, Diego Rivera, Tina Modotti, and many more.

Called a "visual feat" by The Art Newspaper, Cauleen Smith: Mutualities is the artist's first solo show in New York, featuring two films, Sojourner and Pilgrim, along with a new group of drawings collectively titled Firespitters.

Don't forget that admission is Pay What You Wish today from 1:30 to 6 pm. Reserve tickets: https://bit.ly/356cmQs

Vida Americana photo: Ryan Lowry
Cauleen Smith, still from Sojourner, 2018. Video, color, sound, 22:41 min. Courtesy the artist, Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago, and Kate Werble Gallery, New York

On International Holocaust Remembrance Day, we share Henry Koerner's Mirror of Life (1946), on view now. Koerner, who wa...
01/27/2021

On International Holocaust Remembrance Day, we share Henry Koerner's Mirror of Life (1946), on view now.

Koerner, who was Jewish, fled Austria in 1938 when Hitler annexed the country during World War II. After a brief stay in Italy, he came to New York. The year Mirror of Life was painted, Koerner returned to Austria for the first time and learned that his parents died in the genocide. The painting's references blend the everyday, the tragic, and the surreal—from New York streets to Old World scenes, from Coney Island amusements to the couple in the foreground who could be his parents. The shirtless man leaning out the window can be seen as a stand-in for the artist, witnessing all that has been lost and all that remains.

Henry Koerner, Mirror of Life, 1946. Oil on composition board, 36 × 42 in. (91.4 × 106.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 48.2. With permission of the Estate of Henry Koerner

In honor of Angela Davis's birthday today, we're sharing this 1972 photograph by Beuford Smith on view in Working Togeth...
01/26/2021

In honor of Angela Davis's birthday today, we're sharing this 1972 photograph by Beuford Smith on view in Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop.

This image was taken the year Davis, notable prison abolitionist, scholar, and feminist, was acquitted of charges leveled against her by the state of California for allegedly supplying firearms in a fatal altercation at the Marin County Civic Center. Davis was detained without bail for over 16 months. During that time, support for her innocence emerged nationally and internationally, including at rallies like the one depicted here in Central Park.

Following her acquittal, Davis resumed her work as a professor, author, and activist. In recent years, Davis has spoken out against the prison–industrial complex, a term describing how the for-profit prison model supports economic and political gains and disproportionately affects Black people.

Beuford Smith, Angela Davis Rally, Central Park, NYC, 1972. Gelatin silver print: sheet, 10 15/16 × 14in. (27.8 × 35.6 cm), image: 10 3/8 × 13 15/16in. (26.4 × 35.4 cm), frame: 16 × 20in. (40.6 × 50.8 cm). Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; Arthur and Margaret Glasgow Endowment. © Beuford Smith

Our newest public art installation is now on view! Red Exit by Andrea Carlson, presented by the Whitney and High Line Ar...
01/25/2021

Our newest public art installation is now on view! Red Exit by Andrea Carlson, presented by the Whitney and High Line Art, is on the facade of 95 Horatio Street across from the Museum and the The High Line.

The panoramic seascape features vibrant, prismatic motifs—some drawn from the land of the artist's ancestral home, and others from effigies, petroglyphs, and navigational signs. Throughout the work, symbols of Native advocacy come together in a gesture of reclamation, creating new narratives of Indigenous experience in North America. Red Exit is, in the artist's words, a celebration of "the place we (Native People) reserve for ourselves . . . places of joy amidst removal, exclusion, and attempted assimilation."

Andrea Carlson, Red Exit, 2020. Oil, watercolor, opaque watercolor, ink, acrylic, colored pencil, ball-point pen, fiber-tipped pen, and graphite pencil on paper, sixty sheets, 115 x 183 in. (292.1 x 464.8 cm) overall. Collection of the artist; courtesy Bockley Gallery, Minneapolis. Photograph by Rik Sferra

01/24/2021
Ruth Asawa in ASL

Happy birthday to Ruth Asawa, born on this day in 1926! In her honor, we're sharing this video clip of educator Lauren Ridloff discussing a 1955 wire sculpture in American Sign Language. The sculpture is on view now in Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019.

Check out the full video (and others in ASL) here: https://bit.ly/364no8B.

Artwork: Ruth Asawa, Untitled (S.270, Hanging Six-Lobed, Complex Interlocking Continuous Form within a Form with Two Interior Spheres), 1955, refabricated 1957–1958
Video: Ben Cohen
Editor and ASL translator/captioner: Lauren Kinsler

This Thursday, January 28, is the culmination of our 3-part series focused on new scholarship about Latinx art and cultu...
01/23/2021

This Thursday, January 28, is the culmination of our 3-part series focused on new scholarship about Latinx art and culture. To celebrate the publication of Elizabeth Ferrer's Latinx Photography in the United States: A Visual History, Ferrer and scholar Roberto Tejada will discuss the breadth and depth of Latinx photography. The conversation will examine some of the artists and movements that have defined this field and its vitality in the context of the US.

This program will be live captioned. Interpretación en vivo en español por Colectivo Babilla. Register for free: https://bit.ly/35f12Rj

01/22/2021
Last Chance: Vida Americana

"It won't happen again in our lifetime," says Barbara Haskell, curator. Don't miss the groundbreaking exhibition #VidaAmericana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945, on view through January 31. Reserve timed tickets: whitney.org/visit

Herb Robinson took this photograph of jazz musician Miles Davis at the Village Vanguard in Greenwich Village in 1961. "I...
01/21/2021

Herb Robinson took this photograph of jazz musician Miles Davis at the Village Vanguard in Greenwich Village in 1961. "I snuck in, and Miles was just coming off the bandstand. And I followed him, so I was right on his heels, practically...This is all instinct...I was intimidated because Miles was a giant...I'm a kid shadowing him. There was one light in the hallway and there was no shade on the bulb. And Miles turned... and as he turned then—instinct. I didn't set it up; it was improvisational where I clicked the shutter."

Robinson credits this photograph as one that helped him gain admittance to the Kamoinge Workshop, which had dauntingly high standards for membership. This work is on view through March 28 in Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop.

Herb Robinson, Miles Davis at the Vanguard, 1961. Gelatin silver print: sheet, 19 7/8 × 6 1/8 in. (50.5 × 15.6 cm); image, 13 7/8 × 9 13/16 in. (35.2 × 24.9 cm); frame, 24 × 20 in. (61 × 50.8 cm). Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; Arthur and Margaret Glasgow Endowment. © Herb Robinson

President Biden and Vice President Harris, please visit once you've settled in.Since 1937, the inauguration of the Presi...
01/20/2021

President Biden and Vice President Harris, please visit once you've settled in.

Since 1937, the inauguration of the President and Vice President of the United States has been held at noon Eastern Standard Time on January 20, the first day of the new term.

This study for Roy Lichtenstein's Inaugural Print was made in 1977 on the occasion of the inauguration of President Jimmy Carter.

Roy Lichtenstein, Inaugural Print (Study), c. 1977. Graphite and colored pencils on tracing paper over ink on board: sheet, 18 13/16 × 28 7/16 in. (47.8 × 72.2 cm); image, 16 × 26 1/16 in. (40.6 × 66.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Roy Lichtenstein Study Collection, gift of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation 2019.257. © Roy Lichtenstein Foundation, all rights reserved

Catch Jill Mulleady's We Wither Time into a Coil of Fright before it's gone!Part of our series of public art installatio...
01/19/2021

Catch Jill Mulleady's We Wither Time into a Coil of Fright before it's gone!

Part of our series of public art installations organized in collaboration with High Line Art and TF Cornerstone, this work will be on view through January 24 across from the Museum and The High Line on the facade of 95 Horatio Street. Head to the link in our bio for more about the work and artist.

Installation view of Jill Mulleady: We Wither Time into a Coil of Fright (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, March 2, 2020–January 2021). Photo: Ron Amstutz

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we're sharing this photograph by Herman Howard, March on Washington (1963), on v...
01/18/2021

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we're sharing this photograph by Herman Howard, March on Washington (1963), on view now in Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop.

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom took place in the nation's capital on August 28, 1963, the year the Kamoinge Workshop was founded. The occasion drew a quarter million people, including leaders from the most prominent civil rights groups of the time. That day, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his iconic "I Have a Dream" speech, which called for an end to racism in the United States. Herman Howard photographed a moment at the march, which he attended with several other Kamoinge members.

Herman Howard, March on Washington, 1963. Gelatin silver print: frame, 16 × 20 in. (40.6 × 50.8 cm), image, 5 13/16 × 9 3/8in. (14.8 × 23.8 cm). Collection of Herb Robinson

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