The Walther Collection

The Walther Collection The Walther Collection is dedicated to researching, collecting, exhibiting, and publishing modern and contemporary photography and video art.
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The Walther Collection Project Space 526 West 26th Street, Suite 718 New York, NY 10001 United States The Project Space is closed from November 23–24 for Thanksgiving. The last day of "East of Que Village: The Ends of Nature" is on Saturday, November 25. *** The Walther Collection Reichenauerstrasse 21 Neu-Ulm/Burlafingen Germany Our exhibition premises in Neu-Ulm are closed from November 13, 2017 to May 13, 2018 due to renovations. We ask for your understanding. On May 13, 2018 we will open the exhibition Life and Dreams: Photography & Media Art in China since the 1990s with an open house day from 11am to 5pm. ​For information, tour guide bookings or questions, please contact [email protected] or +49 731 176 91 43. *** The Walther Collection opened in June 2010 in Neu-Ulm / Burlafingen, Germany. The Foundation’s New York City outpost, The Walther Collection Project Space, opened in April 2011. The Collection incorporates works across regions, periods, and artistic sensibilities, giving particular focus to artists and photographers working in Asia and Africa.

Operating as usual

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity” (2010): Nontsikelelo...
02/04/2021

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity” (2010): Nontsikelelo “Lolo” Veleko

South African photographer Nontsikelelo "Lolo" Veleko is known for her command of color and gesture, and her engagement with the fashion of post-apartheid street- and subcultures. "Lolo" Veleko is among a vibrant generation of artists who worked to proliferate hybrid identities, postures, positions, and constructions post-apartheid.

Images: © The artist. Courtesy of the artist and Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg.

#thewalthercollection #exhibitionhistory #africanphotography #portraiture #TWCanniversary #throwback #tbt #throwbackthursday #eventsoftheself #loloveleko #museumfromhome

We are pleased to announce Dr. Sophie-Charlotte Opitz ( @photogra__phi ) as the new Director of Exhibitions and Collecti...
01/28/2021

We are pleased to announce Dr. Sophie-Charlotte Opitz ( @photogra__phi ) as the new Director of Exhibitions and Collections at The Walther Collection.

Sophie is a curator, writer and transdisciplinary scholar of media, arts, and cultures. In the last years, she worked as a curatorial fellow of the @kruppstiftung in various museums such as Fotomuseum Winterthur and Museum Folkwang as well as an art coordinator at Akademie Schloss Solitude. She just relocated from London, where she has been involved in the development of the new Photography Centre at the Victoria & Albert Museum. And more recently, she co-curated “Decode Dress Code: Photographie, mode et genre” with @dariadebona and @katharina.tae at @goetheinstitut_paris. She has published texts for exhibition catalogues, artist books, and scholarly volumes. Her book Bilderregungen: Die Produktionsmechanismen zeitgenössischer Kriegsfotografie (Jonas Verlag, 2020) is an intensive investigation on images of war and conflict and their memory and sociopolitical dynamics. Sophie holds a PhD in visual culture studies from Goethe University Frankfurt. 

Sophie is based in the museum campus in Neu-Ulm. She is responsible for the collection management which includes collecting, preserving and researching photography. Moreover, she oversees and curates international exhibitions and expands the publishing program to provide new insights into The Walther Collection.

Sophie will manage our next exhibition which is expected to open in June 2021. It brings together two of the most important artists of South African photography — Santu Mofokeng and David Goldblatt — in which new synergies emerge between their documentary styles and claims to truth-telling. 

@foto_museum @museum_folkwang @akademiesolitude @vamuseum

The Walther Collection’s inaugural exhibition “Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity” (2010): Hentie van d...
01/15/2021

The Walther Collection’s inaugural exhibition “Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity” (2010): Hentie van der Merwe

Broadly engaged with the issues of masculinity, identity, and representation, Hentie van der Merwe’s photography condenses these themes in a number of works focusing on militarism and the fetishization of the male body. The series “Trappings” (2002–2003) focus on clothing rather than the nude body. Returning to an archival source, van der Merwe photographed nineteenth- and twentieth-century military uniforms in the collection of the South African National Museum of Military History. Drastically blurred through the use of a hand-held camera and extended exposure times, the garments, fitted to headless mannequins and tightly centered within the frame, refuse the legibility explicit in uniform and military decoration.

Images: © The artist. Courtesy the artist.

#thewalthercollection #exhibitionhistory #africanphotography #portraiture #TWCanniversary #throwback #fbf #flashbackfriday #eventsoftheself #hentievandermerwe #museumfromhome

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity” (2010): Guy TillimGu...
01/07/2021

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity” (2010): Guy Tillim

Guy Tillim‘s series “Kunhinga” was made during the Angolan civil war in 2002. The images depict displaced civilians who fled their homes and walked for five days to seek refuge in the town of Kunhinga. Despite being anchored in photojournalism, Tillim‘s work cuts against the grain of the genre, refusing its spectacle of climatic events in favor of a slowed-down, more personal and sensitive approach.

Images: © The artist. Courtesy the artist and Stevenson, Cape Town and Johannesburg.

#thewalthercollection #exhibitionhistory #africanphotography #portraiture #TWCanniversary #throwback #tbt #throwbackthursday #eventsoftheself #guytillim #museumfromhome

The Walther Collection wishes everyone a safe and healthy New Year! There will continue to be challenges, but with coura...
01/01/2021

The Walther Collection wishes everyone a safe and healthy New Year! There will continue to be challenges, but with courage, empathy, and goodwill we look forward to 2021.

#snowman #newyear #2021

Diane di Prima(August 6, 1934 — October 25, 2020).The New York Times Magazine remembered the poet Diane di Prima in “Rem...
12/31/2020

Diane di Prima
(August 6, 1934 — October 25, 2020).

The New York Times Magazine remembered the poet Diane di Prima in “Remembering some of the artists, innovators and thinkers we lost in the past year.” Di Prima, who died on October 25 at the age of 86, is best remembered for her radical feminist writings that burst through the male-dominated Beat literary culture of her generation. Born in Brooklyn, di Prima first gained attention for her poetry in the jazz clubs and coffeehouses of Greenwich Village in the late 1950s. Beginning in 1961, she coedited with LeRoi Jones (later Amiri Baraka) the mimeographed poetry journal “The Floating Bear,” which featured work by Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs, and others. She also cofounded the New York Poets Theatre. In 1968, di Prima left New York for San Francisco, where she studied Buddhism and became involved with the Diggers, Liberation News Service, and other social activist groups. Her most notable writings include “Memoirs of a Beatnik” (1969), “Revolutionary Letters” (1971), “Loba” (1974), and “Recollections of My Life as a Woman: The New York Years” (2001). “Di Prima wasn’t one to wait for history to authorize the freedoms she desired,” eulogized writer Carina del Valle Schorske in the New York Times, “Misogyny continued to structure her life among artists but she behaved as though mutual aid, free love and poetry itself would pave her way forward.”

Di Prima was also an important visual artist, producing photographs, collages, and watercolors throughout her life. The Walther Collection has an extraordinary series of 123 black-and-white Polaroid prints attributed to Diane di Prima and her circle. These images include numerous sophisticated studies of New York vernacular architecture, as well as intimate and sometimes erotic portraits of di Prima and her creative friends.

#dianediprima #vernacularphotography #nytimesmagazine #nyc #poetry @semifluentmundo @tmagazine

Wishing everyone a safe and peaceful holidays! ⛄️
12/25/2020

Wishing everyone a safe and peaceful holidays! ⛄️

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity" (2010): Mikhael Subo...
12/17/2020

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity" (2010): Mikhael Subotzky

Mikhael Subotzky has been depicting South African life through the prism of its prisons since 2004. The series “Die Vier Hoeke” (The Four Corners) was conceptualized when then-student Subotzky accompanied members of the Independent Elections Commission to document the Pollsmoor prisoners at the polling booth. The project, comprising a series of relentless flattened panoramic images constructed from as many as eighteen separate negatives, was the exhibited at Pollsmoor Prison on Freedom Day, 27 April 2005, in the cell that once housed Nelson Mandela.

Images: © The artist. Courtesy the artist and Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg.

#thewalthercollection #exhibitionhistory #africanphotography #portraiture #TWCanniversary #throwback #tbt #throwbackthursday #eventsoftheself #mikhaelsubotzky #museumfromhome @mikhael_subotzky

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition “Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity” (2010): Jo Ractliffe...
12/03/2020

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition “Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity” (2010): Jo Ractliffe

Throughout a career spanning nearly four decades, Jo Ractliffe has approached the photographic medium from widely varying strategies. Ractliffe sometimes patiently composes large-scale black-and-white images of depopulated or overrun vistas, elusive and indeterminate places strangely discharged of their subject—yet still haunted by unseen events and engeries. At other moments she eschews such “major” productions for the immediacy of inexpensive snapshots of everyday or disposable objects. Shot between 1990 and 1994, “reshooting Diana” features dozens of such fragmentary moments, all woven together in a manner that suggests a transformative road trip, a visual vocabulary indebted to both the logic of the snapshot and the documentary photograph.

Images: © The artist. Courtesy the artist and Stevenson, Cape Town and Johannesburg.

#thewalthercollection #exhibitionhistory #africanphotography #portraiture #TWCanniversary #throwback #tbt #throwbackthursday #eventsoftheself #joractliffe #museumfromhome @stevenson_za

The exhibition ‘Destruction and Transformation: Vernacular Photography and the Built Environment’ [2019] examines the de...
12/02/2020

The exhibition ‘Destruction and Transformation: Vernacular Photography and the Built Environment’ [2019] examines the decisive role of vernacular photog­raphy in documenting the destructive forces that were often central to engineering the modernist built environment. Since the 19th century, engineers, city planners, architects, industrialists, and tourists have used photography to record and promote metropolitanism: a global affirmation of modern urban expansion, often at the expense of natural ecology, historic structures, or existing populations. The sixteen photographic series in this exhibition, spanning the 20th century, depict the inescapable obsolescence of urban and indus­trial projects, which often traverse and partition the natural environment. Together these pictures provide a counter-narrative to the presupposed sta­bility of aesthetic and structural planning within modernist city spaces and architecture.” — Brian Wallis

Brian Wallis’ essay “Destruction and Transformation in the Built Environment,” as well as new essays and research by leading scholars and writers, are included in “Imagining Everyday Life: Engagements with Vernacular Photography.” Published by Steidl and The Walther Collection. 

Images: Courtesy The Walther Collection.

#thewalthercollection #freshoffthepress #steidlbooks #photobook #vernacularphotography @steidlverlag @wallisbrian

The exhibition ‘Destruction and Transformation: Vernacular Photography and the Built Environment’ [2019] examines the de...
12/02/2020

The exhibition ‘Destruction and Transformation: Vernacular Photography and the Built Environment’ [2019] examines the decisive role of vernacular photog­raphy in documenting the destructive forces that were often central to engineering the modernist built environment. Since the 19th century, engi­neers, city planners, architects, industrialists, and tourists have used photography to record and promote metropolitanism: a global affirmation of modern urban expansion, often at the expense of natural ecology, historic structures, or existing populations. The sixteen photographic series in this exhibition, spanning the 20th century, depict the inescapable obsolescence of urban and indus­trial projects, which often traverse and partition the natural environment. Together these pictures provide a counter-narrative to the presupposed sta­bility of aesthetic and structural planning within modernist city spaces and architecture.” — Brian Wallis

Brian Wallis’ essay “Destruction and Transformation in the Built Environment,” as well as new essays and research by leading scholars and writers, are included in “Imagining Everyday Life: Engagements with Vernacular Photography.” Published by Steidl and The Walther Collection.

Images: Courtesy The Walther Collection.

#thewalthercollection #freshoffthepress #steidlbooks #photobook #vernacularphotography @steidlverlag @wallisbrian

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity" (2010): Grace Ndirit...
11/27/2020

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity" (2010): Grace Ndiritu

London-based Grace Ndiritu frequently works with pieces of fabric to create what she has referred to as “hand-crafted” videos and installations, coaxing subtle gestures, striking patterns, and amorphous forms into dynamic statements that draw connections between sculpture, performance, and photography. In Nightingale (2003) the artist appears before the video camera, framed in an intimate close-up, interacting with a large piece of bright red fabric, wrapping it around her head, shoulders, arms, and body. The movements appear accelerated, hovering between playful and forceful (a quality communicated largely through the artist’s gaze, which meets that of the camera throughout), provoking rapid-fire free associations of burkas, belly dancers, headscarves, and keffiyehs.

Images: © The artist. Courtesy The Walther Collection and brancolinigrimaldi, Roma.

#thewalthercollection #exhibitionhistory #africanphotography #portraiture #TWCanniversary #throwback #tbt #throwbackthursday #eventsoftheself #gracendiritu #museumfromhome @thearkgracendiritu

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition ”Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity“ (2010): Ingrid Mwang...
11/19/2020

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition ”Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity“ (2010): Ingrid Mwangi

Born in Nairobi, Kenya, but living primarily in Germany, where she moved at age fifteen, Ingrid Mwangi has developed an artistic
style that seeks to interrogate the status of the individual, yet in so doing never assumes that notions such as identity,
singularity, or personality are uncomplicated or simply given. Rather, Mwangi’s work, which frequently involves photography
and documentation of her own body, may be read as perpetually challenging terms such as autonomy and agency at a register
at once sensual and theoretical, suggesting a critical engagement with the concept of duality: dual spaces, natures, and
identities, all mapped simultaneously onto the same locus.

Images: © The artist. Courtesy of the artist.

#thewalthercollection #exhibitionhistory #africanphotography #portraiture #TWCanniversary #throwback #tbt
#throwbackthursday #eventsoftheself #ingridmwangi #ingridmwangiroberthutter #museumfromhome

“The so-called military-stamp scrapbook album (1943-59) is typical of the military scrapbook or military veteran’s famil...
11/18/2020

“The so-called military-stamp scrapbook album (1943-59) is typical of the military scrapbook or military veteran’s family album; it evokes an emotional message that goes beyond representation and that connects to a recharacterization of various African American experiences. This essay mediates between (re)presenting black masculinity during wartime and framing black life on the home front, while visualizing the stories of women during World War II—a particularly complex period in 20th-century America.” — Deborah Willis.

Deborah Willis’ essay “‘Speaking of Pictures’: Shaping and Creating Narratives in the African American Family Album,” as well as new essays and research by leading scholars and writers, are included in “Imagining Everyday Life: Engagements with Vernacular Photography.” Published by Steidl and The Walther Collection.

Images: Courtesy The Walther Collection.

#thewalthercollection #freshoffthepress #steidlbooks #photobook #vernacularphotography @steidlverlag @debwillisphoto

“Acknowledging the endemic tension between ‘the natural’ and ‘the staged’ that plagues the portrait genre as a whole, Fo...
11/16/2020

“Acknowledging the endemic tension between ‘the natural’ and ‘the staged’ that plagues the portrait genre as a whole, Fosso constructs the rigorous compositions of ‘SIXSIXSIX’ in a format often used for snapshots. By focusing attention on varieties in bodily expression, he is able to collapse distinctions across photographic modes, allowing for a consideration of the aesthetic relevance of visual materials not often regarded as ‘privileged objects, but as common cultural artifacts.’” — Oluremi C. Onabanjo

Oluremi C. Onabanjo‘s essay on “SIXSIXSIX,” as well as new essays and research by leading scholars and writers, are included in “Samuel Fosso: Autoportrait,” the first comprehensive survey of self-portraits by Samuel Fosso, published by Steidl and The Walther Collection.

Images: © The artist. Courtesy the artist and JM Patras, Paris.

#samuelfosso #thewalthercollection #freshoffthepress #steidlbooks #africanphotograpy #photobook #selfportraits @oluremi.onabanjo @steidlverlag @jmpatrasgalerie

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity" (2010): James Muriuk...
11/12/2020

The Walther Collection‘s inaugural exhibition "Events of the Self: Portraiture and Social Identity" (2010): James Muriuki

James Muriuki’s Matatus photographs (2005), from his “Town” series, represent these buses alternately speeding through the frame or stopped in gridlocked traffic after dark. While these images can be read as an everyday return home after business hours, the sharp contrasts, blurred imagery, and doubled lights more aptly suggest the careening and mobile social fabric of late-night Nairobi. Much like the blurred streets seen from the colorful matatu windows, Muriuki presents a view of Nairobi’s dynamic and hybrid culture.

Images: © The artist. Courtesy the artist and The Walther Collection.

#thewalthercollection #exhibitionhistory #africanphotography #portraiture #TWCanniversary #throwback #tbt #throwbackthursday #eventsoftheself # jamesmuriuki #museumfromhome @4jamesmuriuki

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The Walther Collection

The Walther Collection is an art foundation dedicated to the critical understanding of historical and contemporary photography and related media. Through a program of international exhibitions, in-depth collecting, original research, and scholarly publications, The Walther Collection aims to highlight the social uses of photography and to expand the history of the medium worldwide.

Where to Find Us

The Walther Collection Project Space 526 West 26th Street, Suite 718 New York, NY 10001, USA

The Walther Collection Project Space, with Three Shadows Photography Art Centre in Beijing, is pleased to present Day After Day: RongRong and the Beijing East Village. The exhibition features forty of RongRong's seminal photographs from 1993–1998 portraying the Beijing East Village—an artistic community poignantly described by Silvia Fok as “a meteor in the history of contemporary Chinese art.”

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