Fraunces Tavern® Museum

Fraunces Tavern® Museum Where George Washington tearfully bade farewell to his officers on December 4th, 1783. Fraunces Tavern Museum is a survivor of the early days of New York City.
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Now registered as a National Historic Landmark with the United States National Park Service, the building was originally built in 1719 as an elegant residence for the merchant Stephan Delancey and his family. In 1762, the home was purchased by tavern-keeper Samuel Fraunces, who transformed it into one of the most popular meeting places of the day. Though it is best known as the site where Washington gave his farewell address to the officers of the Continental Army, in 1783, the tavern also played a significant role in pre– and post-Revolutionary activities. After the war, when New York was the Nation‘s first capi-tal, the tavern was host to the new government‘s offices of the Departments of War, Treasury and Foreign Affairs. In 1904, the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York purchased the tavern and hired preservation architect William Mersereau to restore the building to its colonial appearance. Fraunces Tavern® Museum opened to the public in 1907. Today, the museum complex includes four 19th century buildings in addition to the 18th century Fraunces Tavern building. For over one hundred years, Fraunces Tavern Museum has stood as an historic beacon to this city‘s always changing landscapes and hopes to continue doing so for many years to come.

Mission: Fraunces Tavern® Museum's mission is to educate the public about New York City history as it relates to Colonial America, the Revolutionary War, and the Early Republic. This mission is fulfilled through the preservation and interpretation of the Museum's landmarked 1719 building along with varied exhibitiions of art and artifacts as they relate to the historic site. Fraunces Tavern® Museum is owned and operated by, and FRAUNCES TAVERN® is a registered service mark of, Sons of the Revolution℠ in the State of New York, Inc., a Section 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation instituted in 1876 and incorporated in 1884. Copyright © 2020 SRNY, Inc. All rights reserved.

Operating as usual

Join us on Thursday, February 4 at 6:30pm EST for another installment of our Evening Lecture Series, 1774: The Long Year...
01/27/2021

Join us on Thursday, February 4 at 6:30pm EST for another installment of our Evening Lecture Series,
1774: The Long Year of Revolution.

The 16 months from the Boston Tea Party to the Battles of Lexington and Concord changed the course of American history. In this lecture, Mary Beth Norton will explore what is known as the "long year" of the American Revolution, a time when once-loyal colonists began their discordant "discussions," leading to the acceptance of the inevitability of a war against the British Empire.

This lecture will take place virtually. Register: https://bit.ly/39YI8Q6

Join us on Tuesday, February 2 at 6:30 pm for another installment of Tavern Tastings, a virtual lecture series with Keel...
01/26/2021

Join us on Tuesday, February 2 at 6:30 pm for another installment of Tavern Tastings, a virtual lecture series with Keeler Tavern Museum and History Center. Education & Public Programs Associate Theresa DeCicco will join Keeler Tavern Museum’s Chief Curator Catherine Prescott to talk about the history of carrots throughout the colonies.

The Pilgrims first brought carrots to North America, intending to harvest them in the colonies. Carrots were an easy vegetable to grow and were an integral part of nourishing humans and animals alike. In 1787, George Washington wrote in a letter to Benjamin Fitzhugh Grymes, “I am convinced that in proper soil the culture of carrots will be found very advantageous for feeding farm horses and every piece of stock. I am inclined to think that rows of carrots will yield 5 to 8 bushels of carrots to one corn.”

Register for this FREE event: https://bit.ly/3ccsLX0

#OnThisDay, January 25, 1785, the New York Manumission Society held their first meeting. Influential and wealthy white m...
01/25/2021

#OnThisDay, January 25, 1785, the New York Manumission Society held their first meeting. Influential and wealthy white men developed the society to promote the gradual abolition of slavery and the manumission or freeing of enslaved peoples by their owners in New York State. Statesmen such as John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and George Clinton were among the group’s members.

The first meeting of “The New-York Society for Promoting the Manumission of Slaves, and Protecting Such of Them as Have Been, or May be Liberated,” was headed by Continental Army veteran Robert Troup. The organization placed its first efforts against the kidnapping of both freed and enslaved Black New Yorkers and selling them into slavery elsewhere. By the society’s second meeting in February 1785, membership increased and saw men such as Alexander Hamilton join their ranks.

Many members were slaveholders themselves and remain so throughout their tenure with the organization, including the society’s first president John Jay. Resolutions to manumit enslaved people “who shall be owned by any of the members of this Society,” failed when put to the vote in November 1785.

The Manumission Society provided freed and enslaved Black New Yorkers with legal assistance. In 1787, the organization founded the New York African Free School, and members were initially responsible for providing and raising funds for teachers and supplies. In continuing their work, the society successfully lobbied for a 1799 law, which granted the gradual abolition of slavery in New York State. One of the last Northeastern states to do so, New York abolished slavery in 1827. The New York Manumission Society disbanded in 1845.

Join us this Thursday, January 21 at 6:30 p.m. for another installment of our evening lecture series, presented by Phill...
01/18/2021

Join us this Thursday, January 21 at 6:30 p.m. for another installment of our evening lecture series, presented by Phillip Goodrich.

Everyone knows about the Revolutionary War, but few know of Benjamin Franklin's secret plan to turn the northern and southern colonies against their oppressors, and how the freeing of one enslaved man, Somersett, was the catalyst for the colonies to come together against the crown. In this lecture, Goodrich will discuss the little-known story behind the origins of the Revolutionary War and explains how several well-known but random events during the war culminated in the creation of the United States of America.

Register: https://bit.ly/39JYEmN

Happy Birthday to Revolutionary War veteran, Jacob Francis! #OnThisDay in 1754, Jacob Francis was born in Amwell, New Je...
01/15/2021

Happy Birthday to Revolutionary War veteran, Jacob Francis! #OnThisDay in 1754, Jacob Francis was born in Amwell, New Jersey. It is unknown if he was born into slavery or born free, but as a child he was bound to at least five men before coming to age. The last was to Benjamin Deacon, where he stayed until reaching the age of 21 in January of 1775.

Soon after, the Revolutionary War began and Francis enlisted as a private in the 8th Massachusetts regiment. His unit became the 16th Continental Regiment, led by Colonel Paul D. Sergeant, that helped to drive the British from Boston. Fighting in the Battle of Long Island and the Battle of Trenton, Francis then returned to his hometown of Amwell to care for his sick mother. He did not return to his unit to receive his back pay or be formally discharged. Instead, he joined the New Jersey militia where he served until 1781.

In September of 1789, Francis married Mary, an enslaved woman, and had four children with her in Flemington, NJ. Eventually, he was able to purchase his wife’s freedom.

Decades later, on July 4, 1826, the town of Flemington honored its living revolutionary war soldiers, which included two African American veterans: Jacob Francis and Lewis English. Francis passed away on July 26, 1836.

Image: Jacob Francis Revolutionary War Pension Claim, 1834

Join us on Tuesday, January 12 at 6:30 p.m. for another installment of Tavern Tastings, a virtual lecture series with Ke...
01/09/2021

Join us on Tuesday, January 12 at 6:30 p.m. for another installment of Tavern Tastings, a virtual lecture series with Keeler Tavern Museum and History Center. Education & Public Programs Coordinator Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli will join Keeler Tavern Museum’s Chief Curator Catherine Prescott to talk about the history of apples throughout the colonies.

Apples were an essential food and drink in the North American colonies during the 18th century. Though not native to North America, early settlers up and down the Atlantic coast soon learned that seeds (or better yet, seedlings) brought with them across the ocean would flourish.

Register for this FREE event: https://bit.ly/38tXWuP

#OnthisDay January 8, 1790, George Washington arrived at Federal Hall in New York City, just down the block from Fraunce...
01/08/2021

#OnthisDay January 8, 1790, George Washington arrived at Federal Hall in New York City, just down the block from Fraunces Tavern, to address the members of Congress in the first State of the Union Address in our country’s history. The State of the Union is one of the constitutionally mandated responsibilities of the President of the United States; as stated in Article 11 Section 3 of the Constitution, “[The president] shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the state of the union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.” As with many aspects of the presidency, George Washington was left to determine how exactly to interpret this instruction. The Constitution does not say whether the State of the Union must be given in person or in writing, it does not ascribe a specific list of topics that must be addressed, and it does not demand any degree of specificity.

Washington chose to give his State of the Union in the form of a speech given in person to the 64 members of the House of Representatives and the 26 members of the Senate, a decision which President Thomas Jefferson later contradicted by sending the State of the Union to Congress in the form of a written report. Washington also chose to make his address succinct, giving a speech that was only 1,085 words long, making it the shortest State of the Union address in presidential history, specifically in comparison to modern versions that average about 6,000 words.
In this brief oration, Washington laid out a list of matters which he believed should be the top concerns of the young nation. Within this list, there was highlighted the need to strengthen the military to provide defense, to create a uniform rule for naturalizing new immigrants, to put resources towards the support of the Postal system, to increase the educations of the country’s citizens in science and literature, and to support a stable economy by supporting public credit.

Image: View of the Federal Edifice in New York, 1789, Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Weren’t able to find that perfect gift for the history lover in your life over the holidays? Looking to treat yourself f...
01/06/2021

Weren’t able to find that perfect gift for the history lover in your life over the holidays? Looking to treat yourself for the New Year? Our online gift shop has you covered. Shop our historical souvenirs: https://qoo.ly/3a3uj3

National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers
01/06/2021

National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers

Fraunces Tavern Restaurant in New York City is one of the many businesses located in historic buildings that is struggling during the coronavirus pandemic. Fraunces Tavern has played a prominent role in history before, during, and after the American Revolution. At various points in its history, Fraunces Tavern served as a headquarters for George Washington, a venue for peace negotiations with the British, and housing federal offices in the early republic. In 1900, the tavern was slated for demolition by its owners, who reportedly wanted to use the land for a parking lot. A number of organizations, most notably the Daughters of the American Revolution National Headquarters, worked to preserve it, and convinced New York state government leaders to use their power of eminent domain and designate the building as a park (which was the only clause of the municipal ordinances that could be used for protection, as laws were not envisioned at the time for the subject of "historic preservation", then in its infancy). The temporary designation was later rescinded when the property was acquired in 1904 by the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York. Since 1907, the Fraunces Tavern® Museum on the second and third floors has helped to interpret the Fraunces Tavern and the collection of artifacts that it holds. The building was listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 2008. The organizations and businesses that call historic properties, like the Fraunces Tavern, home have been under a great deal of stress during the coronavirus pandemic. NY State Parks & Historic Sites and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members are committed to working with these organizations and businesses to help them weather the pandemic.
Fraunces Tavern Restaurant

Merry Christmas! #OnThisDay in 1776, General Washington led his Continental Army across the Delaware through freezing ra...
12/25/2020

Merry Christmas! #OnThisDay in 1776, General Washington led his Continental Army across the Delaware through freezing rain, snow, and strong winds for a surprise attack on Hessian troops in New Jersey.

Having experienced some painful defeats in the war, Washington was determined to boost the morale of his troops and deliver a victory. He devised to cross the frigid Delaware River, protected from view by the night sky, and lead a surprise attack against roughly 1,380 Hessian soldiers. The original plan included three separate river crossings, but battling the harsh winter weather, only one was able to make it, three hours behind schedule.

Despite all of these obstacles, Washington and his men were able to successfully complete the crossing and achieve a victory over the Hessians in under 45 minutes. This ambitious plan and glorious win re-ignited the spirits of the American soldiers and motivated them to continue fighting for freedom.

#OnThisDay, December 23, 1783, George Washington resigned as the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army. After the h...
12/23/2020

#OnThisDay, December 23, 1783, George Washington resigned as the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army. After the heartfelt events of Washington’s Farewell Speech in the Long Room of Fraunces Tavern on December 4, 1783, he traveled to Annapolis, MD, to address the Continental Congress.

In his address, Washington said in earnest, “Having now finished the work assigned to me, I retire from the great theatre of action; and bidding an affectionate farewell to this august body, under whose orders I have to long acted, I here offer my commission, and take any leave of all the employments of public life.”

Washington then handed his military commission to the Congress President, bowed to the legislative body, and left Annapolis to return to Mount Vernon. News of Washington’s voluntary resignation from public service surprised many, including the British monarch King George III. In an audience with artist Benjamin West, the King remarked, “If [Washington] does that, he will be the greatest man in the world.”

Washington returned to Mount Vernon on December 24, 1783, and would spend the next four years as a private citizen. Public service would beckon Washington once again in 1787 as president of the Constitution Convention, and finally as the first President of the United States in 1789.

Image: Image: General George Washington Resigning His Commission. John Trumbull (1826). Architect of the Capitol.

Need a last-minute gift for the history buff in your life? Give the gift of a Fraunces Tavern Museum Membership! We have...
12/21/2020

Need a last-minute gift for the history buff in your life? Give the gift of a Fraunces Tavern Museum Membership! We have a variety of membership levels, including the Fraunces Family membership, which includes free, unlimited admission for families of two adults and children 18 or under, invitations to exhibition openings and members events, a discount at Fraunces Tavern Restaurant, and much more.

Learn about all of our membership levels: https://bit.ly/3gXsSGg

#OnThisDay, December 19th, 1777, the Continental Army set up camp at Valley Forge, PA. An estimated 12,000 patriot soldi...
12/19/2020

#OnThisDay, December 19th, 1777, the Continental Army set up camp at Valley Forge, PA. An estimated 12,000 patriot soldiers and 400 women and children marched onto the storied site, in what essentially became the fourth largest city in the United States at the time. During the six-month long encampment, Gen. George Washington and troops experienced great hardship throughout their stay.

Following the British occupation of Philadelphia in late 1777, Washington settled to have troops stationed at Valley Forge, about a day’s march from the city. Washington chose the site for its strategic value, but roads to the camp became impassable, and supplies lines dwindled as the winter commenced. With no adequate supply of food and clothing and the risk of disease increasing, soldiers within the Continental Army became angered at the situation.

On December 23, 1777, Washington reported: “a dangerous mutiny” was suppressed. In the following months, his fears steadily continued as he wrote “a general mutiny and dispersion” might be forthcoming if Congress does not address the army’s needs. When Prussian noble Baron Friedrich von Steuben arrived at Valley Forge in February 1778, Washington received the help he needed.

Under Baron von Steuben’s guidance, the Continental Army trained to improve fighting and discipline. The Prussian officer also helped reform supply command, hygiene standards, and army organization, laying the foundation for the modern United States Army. Conditions continued to improve, as Washington received word of a formal alliance with France had been established in May 1778. The British evacuated Philadelphia to New York City shortly after, and Washington and his troops followed, leaving the camp in June 1778. Through the hardship of Valley Forge, the Continental Army emerged as a more unified force against the British Empire.

Today we're listening to 365 days with mxmtoon's podcast episode "spilling the boston (tea)," where host Maia talks abou...
12/16/2020

Today we're listening to 365 days with mxmtoon's podcast episode "spilling the boston (tea)," where host Maia talks about one of the events that foretold the beginning of the Revolutionary War: the Boston Tea Party. Listen to the episode: https://bit.ly/2WkhDhN

Today marks the 221st anniversary of the death of George Washington. Two years after his final term as president and his...
12/14/2020

Today marks the 221st anniversary of the death of George Washington. Two years after his final term as president and his retirement from public life, Washington died #OnThisDay, December 14, 1799, between 10 and 11 pm. He was surrounded by his wife Martha, his doctor and good friend Dr. James Craik, and his private secretary Tobias Lear.

On December 12, George Washington rode out on horseback to survey the lands of Mount Vernon. During that journey, the weather shifted between light snow, rain, and hail, leaving Washington cold and damp, a condition that was further aggravated when Washington refused to change his damp clothing upon arriving home. In a typical display of strict punctuality, Washington insisted on going straight to dinner rather than taking the time to change and arrive to dinner late.

The next morning, he awoke with a sore throat, but that did not stop him from going out in three inches of snow to select trees for removal on the east side of the mansion. Washington’s condition deteriorated throughout the day, with his voice becoming more and more hoarse, and in Dr. Craik was summoned at daybreak of December 14. While waiting for Dr. Craik to arrive, an overseer of Mount Vernon, George Rawlins, was brought to to care for Washington. At Washington’s request, Rawlins bled him, removing half a pint of blood in a medical procedure that Washington believed would help cure him, despite his wife’s doubts. Between Dr. Craik, George Rawlins, and the other two doctors summoned to Washington’s bedside, it is estimated that a total of 32 ounces of blood were removed from Washington over the course of his final illness.

By 4:30pm on December 14, Washington began to believe that he would not recover from this illness. He asked Martha to bring him the two versions of his will that he had written. After confirming which of the two he wanted to keep, he asked Martha to burn the other. As his final wish, Washington asked that he not be buried until three days after death and, finally, thanked the doctors. George Washington was buried on December 18, 1799, at Mount Vernon.

Address

54 Pearl St
New York, NY
10004

Fraunces Tavern Museum is located at 54 Pearl Street, at the corner of Broad Street, in Lower Manhattan. Subway: R to Whitehall St., 4/5 to Bowling Green, 2/3 to Wall Street, 1 to South Ferry, J/M/Z to Broad Street Buses: M1, M6, M15

General information

Adult (18+): $7.00 Seniors (65+): $4.00 Students (w/ proof of ID): $4.00 Children (6-18): $4.00 Children (under 5): FREE Active Military (w/ proof of ID): FREE

Opening Hours

Wednesday 12:00 - 17:00
Thursday 12:00 - 17:00
Friday 12:00 - 17:00
Saturday 12:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(212) 425-1778

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Comments

Hi. I was reading The Unexpected George Washington by Harlow Unger and heard of Fraunces Tavern, I had no idea the establishment which Washington gave his farewell to his officers was still standing. Hopefully one day I'll be able to visit, only been in your state a few times. I'm related to Washington myself. Thought I'd share this article with you, https://www.toddsarchives.com/division-of-washington-estate-revealed-in-an-obscure-spotswood-letter/.
FLAG DAY 2018
John Adams may have said it all: “Without the pen of Paine, the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain.” Read the astonishing story of the man who freed American minds in “Thomas Paine and the Clarion Call for American Independence” at harlowungerbooks.com and all booksellers.
Had dinner after seeing Hamilton today. Appetizers were good, but the menu is limited and the chef did not allow any changes to be made. We had lamb and filet mignon, food good but not good enough to go back again. Really wanted to like this place as the staff were great.
PHOTOS. Today's big Flag Day parade down Broadway and ceremonies at historic Fraunces Tavern.
History has its eyes on Nina at the Fraunces Tavern Museum!
New York City's First Public celebration of George Washington's birthday, February 11th 1784. The conversion from the old calendar to the new was also a problem. Washington's birthday was moved from February 11th to February 22nd. This apparently caused a great deal of confusion throughout his lifetime. Frequently one finds dates shown with (New Style, Gregorian Calendar) or (Old Style, Julian Calendar) after it, denoting it as either new style or old style. During his career as a public official and after his retirement to Mount Vernon, Washington appears to have celebrated his birthday on either date. On February 14th 1790, Tobias Lear, Washington's faithful private secretary, responded to a letter of inquiry by writing: "In reply to your wish to know the President’s birthday it will be sufficient to observe that it is on the 11th of February, Old Style; but the Almanac makers have generally set down opposite to the 22nd day of February of the present style; how far that may go towards establishing it on that day I don't know; but I could never consider it any other way than as stealing so many days from his valuable life as is the difference between the old and new styles. With sincere esteem, etc. Tobias Lear" Washington appears to have accepted the new style date in the last years of his life. On February 6, l799, he wrote John Trumbull and mentioned that his granddaughter, Nelly Custis was marrying Lewis, his nephew on his birthday, the 22nd,
Hope everyone enjoys this teacher's creativity! What a fun way to engage students. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10101169492675935&id=183404261
Found this while cleaning out my dad's house today.