Fraunces Tavern® Museum

Fraunces Tavern® Museum Where George Washington tearfully bade farewell to his officers on December 4th, 1783.
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Fraunces Tavern Museum is a survivor of the early days of New York City. Now registered as a National Historic Landmark with the United States National Park Service, the building was originally built in 1719 as an elegant residence for the merchant Stephan Delancey and his family. In 1762, the home was purchased by tavern-keeper Samuel Fraunces, who transformed it into one of the most popular meeting places of the day. Though it is best known as the site where Washington gave his farewell address to the officers of the Continental Army, in 1783, the tavern also played a significant role in pre– and post-Revolutionary activities. After the war, when New York was the Nation‘s first capi-tal, the tavern was host to the new government‘s offices of the Departments of War, Treasury and Foreign Affairs. In 1904, the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York purchased the tavern and hired preservation architect William Mersereau to restore the building to its colonial appearance. Fraunces Tavern® Museum opened to the public in 1907. Today, the museum complex includes four 19th century buildings in addition to the 18th century Fraunces Tavern building. For over one hundred years, Fraunces Tavern Museum has stood as an historic beacon to this city‘s always changing landscapes and hopes to continue doing so for many years to come.

Mission: Fraunces Tavern® Museum's mission is to educate the public about New York City history as it relates to Colonial America, the Revolutionary War, and the Early Republic. This mission is fulfilled through the preservation and interpretation of the Museum's landmarked 1719 building along with varied exhibitiions of art and artifacts as they relate to the historic site. Fraunces Tavern® Museum is owned and operated by, and FRAUNCES TAVERN® is a registered service mark of, Sons of the Revolution℠ in the State of New York, Inc., a Section 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation instituted in 1876 and incorporated in 1884. Copyright © 2020 SRNY, Inc. All rights reserved.

Fraunces Tavern Museum has partnered with  Untapped New York for our first-ever Virtual Lecture for Insiders! On Thursda...
04/30/2020

Fraunces Tavern Museum has partnered with Untapped New York for our first-ever Virtual Lecture for Insiders! On Thursday, May 7 at 12pm ET, join Programs & Events Assistant Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli to explore the history of 54 Pearl Street, the home of Fraunces Tavern Museum and Restaurant, its significance to the American Revolutionary era, and the efforts to restore and preserve the building over the last 300 years.

This live talk is organized for Untapped New York Insiders, and will be broadcasted via Zoom. Insiders will have the ability to ask questions in a Q&A section at the end.

Fraunces Tavern Museum is a member of Untapped New York's Insiders Program, a members-only club giving you access to virtual tours, talks, access to NYC’s most off-limits places, free admission to museums and much more. Get two months FREE with code STAYHOME. Register: https://qoo.ly/35rsc9

It’s important to stay active, even while staying safe at home. Many of the Founding Fathers recognized the importance o...
04/29/2020

It’s important to stay active, even while staying safe at home. Many of the Founding Fathers recognized the importance of being physically active; the leader in this field was Benjamin Franklin.

Franklin was a staunch advocate for physical fitness. In a 1772 letter to his son, Franklin noted the importance of staying active to stay healthy. He recommended weight lifting, specifically to use “the dumbbell...by the use of it in forty swings quickened my pulse from 60 to 100 minutes.”

Franklin was also a fan of equipment-free workouts, such as swimming or taking a brisk walk. In the same letter, he noted that there seemed to be more health benefits in “one mile’s walking on foot, than five on horseback.” Franklin was even prepared for both staying inside and remaining active, writing that there is more exercise “in walking one mile up and down stairs, than in five on a level floor…[which] may be had within doors, when the weather discourages going abroad.”

Surely George Washington felt the same. He made it onto the cover of Men's Health after all. Be sure to stay at home and stay active! Image by Allie Delyanis

#OnThisDay, April 28, 1780, Cuban representative Juan de Miralles died at George Washington's camp at Morristown, New Je...
04/28/2020

#OnThisDay, April 28, 1780, Cuban representative Juan de Miralles died at George Washington's camp at Morristown, New Jersey. Born into a wealthy Havana merchant family, Miralles was sent to the colonies in 1777 as an observer for Spain and met with the Continental Congress in Philadelphia on their behalf, encouraging trade between the colonies and Cuba, and he was quite successful.

By 1781, over half of the ships coming into Philadelphia originated in Havana. He also presented Congress with Spain’s desired outcome for the war: the return of the Florida colony to Spanish control. In 1779, Spain officially entered the war, but not as an American ally. Spain was hesitant to openly support another imperial colony's revolt, so it instead entered into a treaty with one of America’s allies, France. This allowed Spain to support the Revolutionary War without explicitly supporting the colonies’ desire to separate from Great Britain.

During his time in the colonies, Miralles developed a strong relationship with General Washington and his wife Martha, and developed a deep sympathy for the Patriot cause. In the spring of 1780, Miralles came down with pulmonic fever, and although he was treated by Washington's personal doctors, eventually succumbed to the illness.

Learn more about the role both Spain and Cuba played during the American Revolution, and how their efforts helped the Patriots win, on the latest blog post: https://qoo.ly/35qru2

"Molly Pitcher'' was the common nickname for women who carried water to the troops during American Revolutionary War. Du...
04/27/2020

"Molly Pitcher'' was the common nickname for women who carried water to the troops during American Revolutionary War. During the Battle of Monmouth in New Jersey on June 28, 1778, Mary Ludwig Hayes, the wife of a Pennsylvania artilleryman, was carrying water and saw her husband collapse. She heard the order to retire the cannon he had been operating as there were no longer enough gunners to man it. She stepped forward saying she could serve the gun. She kept it firing and was later presented to Washington who, in recognition of her service, made her a non-commissioned officer.

This painting, Molly Pitcher at the Battle of Monmouth by Dennis Malone Carter (1827-1881), is part of the Museum's first-ever digital exhibition, Valuable, which highlights the eight most valuable objects in the entire Museum collection, not only for their financial worth, but also for their contributions to preserving and interpreting American history and culture. Explore the collection: https://qoo.ly/3593d2

#tb to that time George Washington cut his bangs in quarantine #museumbadhairday #museumfromhome #culturefromhome
04/24/2020

#tb to that time George Washington cut his bangs in quarantine #museumbadhairday #museumfromhome #culturefromhome

Did you know that on July 4th, 1804 Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr attended a dinner together at Fraunces Tavern? Hos...
04/24/2020

Did you know that on July 4th, 1804 Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr attended a dinner together at Fraunces Tavern? Hosted by the Society of the Cincinnati in the historic Long Room, the men broke bread with each other, all the while their fellow American and British veterans were unaware their now-infamous duel was scheduled.

According to accounts, Hamilton appeared joyous, even singing a few old military songs allegedly on the table, while Burr conducted himself as his regularly restrained way. There is no evidence that the men even greeted each other, but surely their attitudes were anything but glacial.

Follow Archtober for more pieces of #NYC history as part of their Did You Know series. Image by Elizabeth Williams.

It's #NationalVolunteerWeek, and we're excited to introduce you to another one of our hardworking volunteers, school pro...
04/23/2020

It's #NationalVolunteerWeek, and we're excited to introduce you to another one of our hardworking volunteers, school program educator Lisa Krizman. Lisa is a retired attorney, and set up her own practice where she represented families seeking special education services for their children with disabilities.

In her own words: "I was always interested in American history as a young child and loved to read historical-based novels. The story of America, particularly its founding, never gets old in its ideals and drama. Especially as an attorney, you see the evolution of America through case law, and it’s inspiring. History intrigues me because I love to see how one individual can make a difference that we still feel today in everyday life."

Learn more about Lisa and how to get involved at the Museum: https://qoo.ly/35mzgg

#NVW #LocalLight

#OnThisDay, April 22, 1774, the Sons of Liberty planned their own "tea party," dumping 18 chests of British tea into New...
04/22/2020

#OnThisDay, April 22, 1774, the Sons of Liberty planned their own "tea party," dumping 18 chests of British tea into New York Harbor. Programs & Events Assistant Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli explores the New York Tea Party and the early days of #revolutionary New York on the FTM Blog. Read the whole story: https://qoo.ly/35meh9

In honor of #NationalVolunteerWeek, we want to introduce you to one of our dedicated volunteers, weekend docent Kelsi Co...
04/21/2020

In honor of #NationalVolunteerWeek, we want to introduce you to one of our dedicated volunteers, weekend docent Kelsi Constant. Kelsi is a project manager, member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and history buff.

In her own words: "I love two things: storytelling and facts. And the only place you can find both is history. It's also a selfish love. Call it being an extrovert, a failed theater kid, maybe I'm just nosey, but I love focusing on how people lived their day to day lives in the past and telling those stories. People making decisions just like we do but in a whole different world. And the ability to watch those decisions form our country today is fascinating."

Learn more about Kelsi and how you can get involved: https://qoo.ly/35kpsv

#NVW #LocalLight

Today in #MuseumsFromHome, Programs & Events Assistant Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli recreates the renowned Gilbert Stuart po...
04/20/2020

Today in #MuseumsFromHome, Programs & Events Assistant Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli recreates the renowned Gilbert Stuart portrait of the General himself, part of the collection at George Washington's Mount Vernon for our #GeneralAtHome series. Watch our story for a tutorial on how to make your own paper wig, and share your creations with us!




#MuseumFromHome #Museums #CultureFromHome #NYCMuseum #History #AmericanHistory #VirtualMuseum #DigitalContent #FiDi #Tavern #NYCTavern

Calling all educators (you too, parents-turned-teachers)! Check out Fraunces Tavern Museum's slate of Educational Resour...
04/17/2020

Calling all educators (you too, parents-turned-teachers)! Check out Fraunces Tavern Museum's slate of Educational Resources, specifically designed to bring the American Revolution to life. Our favorite is an exploration of the memoir of Benjamin Tallmadge, which encourages students to think critically about primary sources and how we remember history: qoo.ly/35ie5h

New on the blog! Visitor Services Associate Stephen Wood dives into New York City's (and Fraunces Tavern's) enduring rel...
04/15/2020

New on the blog! Visitor Services Associate Stephen Wood dives into New York City's (and Fraunces Tavern's) enduring relationship with crassostrea virginica — the Atlantic Oyster. Read the full story: https://qoo.ly/35gx86

Pictured: Heap of shells from mussels which have been pickled for the New York market. The shells are used as cultch for seed oysters (1911). George A. Carman. Collection at NYPL The New York Public Library

#OnThisDay April 14, 1719, The City Common Council grants Etienne Delancey’s petition for a small piece of land on the c...
04/14/2020

#OnThisDay April 14, 1719, The City Common Council grants Etienne Delancey’s petition for a small piece of land on the corner of Dock (now Pearl) and Broad Streets to build a house.

The petition stated: “a Small Slip of Ground be Granted unto him upon the Corner of the Broad Street and Dock Street…for the making more regular the Said Broad Street and Dock Street a large brick house which he is now going to build upon his Lott.”

City records indicate Stephanus Van Cortlandt, Delancey’s father-in-law, and the original owner of the water lot, filled in the land in 1686. It is believed that no other building ever existed on the premises before Delancey began construction on the home that still stands today. There are no known documents about the construction of the building other than it was built in “a British taste.” It is also suspected that the Delancey’s never actually lived in the building once it was completed. Check out the Museum’s Archival Photo Collection to see how 54 Pearl Street has changed over the last three hundred years: https://qoo.ly/35gaip

Pictured: Etching of Fraunces Tavern (1776). Samuel Hollyer. Digital Collection at the New York Public Library.

Our Museum staff is busy at home, 18th century style! Education in colonial America was very different from today’s scho...
04/09/2020

Our Museum staff is busy at home, 18th century style! Education in colonial America was very different from today’s schools. If they were able to attend school, boys often studied traditional academic subjects. Girls, however, studied skills that would enable them to run a household. Needlework was an essential part of this education.

The sampler pictured here, created by Education & Public Programs Manager Sarah Kneeshaw, allowed girls to practice their needlework, as well as learn letters and numbers. Girls from wealthier families could study needlework and a variety of other “feminine” subjects, such as music and watercolors, at schools run by older women. Most girls were taught in their own homes, with skills passed down by their mothers and grandmothers.

Send us photos of your own colonial crafts! (Swipe for a more #revolutionary creation)




#MuseumsFromHome #CultureFromHome #Museum #NYCMuseum #Education #History #AmericanHistory #Needlework #Art

Now, you can #StayHome and still explore the Museum! Visit our Digital Content hub to browse our online offerings, inclu...
04/06/2020

Now, you can #StayHome and still explore the Museum! Visit our Digital Content hub to browse our online offerings, including the FTM Blog, Object of the Month collection, and Tavern Talks: A #Revolutionary Podcast. The founding fathers really seem to enjoy Valuable, our new digital exhibition and online guided tour. Check it out here: https://qoo.ly/35bguj

In today’s installment of #museumsfromhome, Generals Ottomanelli cross the Delaware. We borrowed this painting from The ...
04/05/2020

In today’s installment of #museumsfromhome, Generals Ottomanelli cross the Delaware. We borrowed this painting from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, but our collection is full of stoic portraits of the General (have you see our George Washington portrait gallery?). Pick your favorite and recreate it from home! Make sure you tag us! #GeneralFromHome Browse the collection: https://www.frauncestavernmuseum.org/collections

Kids going stir crazy in the house? Try out this traditional colonial toy, a whirligig. We love this tutorial from Mount...
04/03/2020

Kids going stir crazy in the house? Try out this traditional colonial toy, a whirligig. We love this tutorial from Mount Clare Museum House in Baltimore. It's easy to assemble and made of common household objects — most 18th toys were. Dolls were often constructed from corn husks and rags, while scraps of wood were used to create spinning tops. All you need to create a whirligig is a button and some string - no batteries required! Swipe for instructions. Post of photo of your creations and tag us!

Fraunces Tavern Museum has gone digital! Check out our brand new virtual exhibition, Valuable, a digital interpretation ...
04/02/2020

Fraunces Tavern Museum has gone digital! Check out our brand new virtual exhibition, Valuable, a digital interpretation of one of our most popular in-house exhibitions. Explore the collection, which highlights the eight most valuable objects in the entire Museum collection, not only for their financial worth, but also for their contributions to preserving and interpreting American history and culture. As you view this exhibition and the guided tour, consider the ways in which each artifact is valuable, and how we can use these artifacts to understand this period of America’s history. These artifacts are one of a kind, and therefore priceless. View the collection: https://qoo.ly/3593d2

Pictured: Martha Washington’s Slipper

New on the blog: George Washington's Public Health Crisis. In 1777, George Washington faced an enemy that had the potent...
03/30/2020

New on the blog: George Washington's Public Health Crisis. In 1777, George Washington faced an enemy that had the potential to decimate the entire Continental Army: smallpox. Education & Public Programming Manager Sarah Kneeshaw takes a close look at the history of smallpox, and how it nearly cost Americans the war. Full story: https://qoo.ly/3578dc

Today’s #RevolutionaryWoman is Mercy Otis Warren. Mercy was born on September 25, 1728, in Barnstable, Massachusetts. As...
03/26/2020

Today’s #RevolutionaryWoman is Mercy Otis Warren. Mercy was born on September 25, 1728, in Barnstable, Massachusetts. As a member of a wealthy Cape Cod family, Mercy was able to acquire a very strong education—rare for a woman at the time. She received private tutoring lessons from Reverend Jonathan Russell along with her brothers.

At the age of twenty-six, Marcy married John Warren, one of her brother’s classmates at Harvard, and an active Patriot. Mercy became increasingly politically active when, in 1769, her brother was beaten by colonial revenue officers. She channeled her activism into her writing. Mercy is best known for her series of three plays, The Adulateur, Defeat, and The Group, which were all anonymously published in the Boston newspaper The Massachusetts Spy.

Through the political networks of her brother and husband, Mercy met and became good friends with John and Abigail Adams. This friendship lasted well past the Revolution, despite the opposing views Mercy and Adam held regarding the governing of the new nation. It is in her correspondence with Abigail that Mercy articulated her belief that, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica, the relegation of women to minor concerns reflected not their inferior intellect, but the inferior opportunities offered them to develop their capacities.

Mercy was a staunch Republican and even published her own pamphlet entitled Observations on the New Constitution which opposed the ratification of the Constitution without a Bill of Rights.

It was also during the time of the Early Republic when Mercy made one of her most significant contributions to history, publishing her book History of the Rise, Progress and Termination of the American Revolution, one of the first works of non-fiction to be written by an American woman AND the first history of the Revolution to be written by a woman.

03/25/2020
Localish

Localish

Fraunce's Tavern is the oldest bar in New York City!

Housing History: A Search for Place, Past & Community
03/25/2020

Housing History: A Search for Place, Past & Community

This pitch from Fraunces Tavern® Museum is so well-done I thought I'd share it as a model. Every museum that depends on visitation for operating revenue - as most do - is sure to be affected by the #CoronaVirus pandemic. This is a museum I believe operates on a thin margin. And yet, our nation's largest historic city, NY - has few distinguished #housemuseums and #localhistory orgs. This is absolutely one of my favorites - so I helped out and hope you will. https://mailchi.mp/frauncestavernmuseum.org/help-save-fraunces-tavern-now?e=fc0306d24d

Downtown Alliance
03/25/2020

Downtown Alliance

Did you know Fraunces Tavern® Museum has a podcast?? They sure do!

In each episode, hosts (and Fraunces Tavern® Museum employees) Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli and Allie Delyanis dig into the early Colonial Revolutionary War Era and highlight upcoming Museum events and programs.

Check it out >>> https://www.frauncestavernmuseum.org/tavern-talks

As we had previously announced, on March 16, 2020, the museum and restaurant closed our doors following government manda...
03/25/2020

As we had previously announced, on March 16, 2020, the museum and restaurant closed our doors following government mandates in response to the COVID-19 public health emergency in New York City. The resulting financial impact to the restaurant has been immediate and catastrophic. Given the modest margins the industry operates on, no customers mean no revenue nor means to pay expenses, including staff, most of whom have been laid off.

The rental income generated by the restaurant was also critical to supporting the Museum's operating budget and the Museum will also need to make difficult decisions in the days and weeks ahead to ensure its survival.

Both Fraunces Tavern Museum and Restaurant would be helped by the proposed relief measures for independent restaurants for which the newly formed Independent Restaurant Coalition (IRC) is advocating. Please visit https://www.saverestaurants.co/ and use IRC's online portal to quickly and easily locate your legislator and reach out on behalf of Fraunces Tavern Museum and Restaurant. Congress could vote as early as tonight. Please act now.

Address

54 Pearl St
New York, NY
10004

Fraunces Tavern Museum is located at 54 Pearl Street, at the corner of Broad Street, in Lower Manhattan. Subway: R to Whitehall St., 4/5 to Bowling Green, 2/3 to Wall Street, 1 to South Ferry, J/M/Z to Broad Street Buses: M1, M6, M15

General information

Adult (18+): $7.00 Seniors (65+): $4.00 Students (w/ proof of ID): $4.00 Children (6-18): $4.00 Children (under 5): FREE Active Military (w/ proof of ID): FREE

Opening Hours

Monday 12:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 12:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 12:00 - 17:00
Thursday 12:00 - 17:00
Friday 12:00 - 17:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(212) 425-1778

Alerts

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Comments

John Adams may have said it all: “Without the pen of Paine, the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain.” Read the astonishing story of the man who freed American minds in “Thomas Paine and the Clarion Call for American Independence” at harlowungerbooks.com and all booksellers.
Had dinner after seeing Hamilton today. Appetizers were good, but the menu is limited and the chef did not allow any changes to be made. We had lamb and filet mignon, food good but not good enough to go back again. Really wanted to like this place as the staff were great.
PHOTOS. Today's big Flag Day parade down Broadway and ceremonies at historic Fraunces Tavern.
History has its eyes on Nina at the Fraunces Tavern Museum!
New York City's First Public celebration of George Washington's birthday, February 11th 1784. The conversion from the old calendar to the new was also a problem. Washington's birthday was moved from February 11th to February 22nd. This apparently caused a great deal of confusion throughout his lifetime. Frequently one finds dates shown with (New Style, Gregorian Calendar) or (Old Style, Julian Calendar) after it, denoting it as either new style or old style. During his career as a public official and after his retirement to Mount Vernon, Washington appears to have celebrated his birthday on either date. On February 14th 1790, Tobias Lear, Washington's faithful private secretary, responded to a letter of inquiry by writing: "In reply to your wish to know the President’s birthday it will be sufficient to observe that it is on the 11th of February, Old Style; but the Almanac makers have generally set down opposite to the 22nd day of February of the present style; how far that may go towards establishing it on that day I don't know; but I could never consider it any other way than as stealing so many days from his valuable life as is the difference between the old and new styles. With sincere esteem, etc. Tobias Lear" Washington appears to have accepted the new style date in the last years of his life. On February 6, l799, he wrote John Trumbull and mentioned that his granddaughter, Nelly Custis was marrying Lewis, his nephew on his birthday, the 22nd,
Hope everyone enjoys this teacher's creativity! What a fun way to engage students. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10101169492675935&id=183404261
Found this while cleaning out my dad's house today.
Battle of Brooklyn, 1776, reenactment at Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn. 113 photos in this album.
Is today "cannonball day" for Fraunces Tavern? August 24 1775, In the dark of night American militia in New York captured the cannon battery at the tip of Manhattan. The crew of the HMS Asia (pictured in 1797) saw what was happening and began fire on the raiders. A cannonball from the ship went into town and crashed through the roof of the famous Fraunces Tavern. The Americans captured all 20 cannon.
Do you have your own parking garage or is it just hopefully you'll find somewhere to park?