Fraunces Tavern® Museum

Fraunces Tavern® Museum Where George Washington tearfully bade farewell to his officers on December 4th, 1783. Fraunces Tavern Museum is a survivor of the early days of New York City.
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Now registered as a National Historic Landmark with the United States National Park Service, the building was originally built in 1719 as an elegant residence for the merchant Stephan Delancey and his family. In 1762, the home was purchased by tavern-keeper Samuel Fraunces, who transformed it into one of the most popular meeting places of the day. Though it is best known as the site where Washington gave his farewell address to the officers of the Continental Army, in 1783, the tavern also played a significant role in pre– and post-Revolutionary activities. After the war, when New York was the Nation‘s first capi-tal, the tavern was host to the new government‘s offices of the Departments of War, Treasury and Foreign Affairs. In 1904, the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York purchased the tavern and hired preservation architect William Mersereau to restore the building to its colonial appearance. Fraunces Tavern® Museum opened to the public in 1907. Today, the museum complex includes four 19th century buildings in addition to the 18th century Fraunces Tavern building. For over one hundred years, Fraunces Tavern Museum has stood as an historic beacon to this city‘s always changing landscapes and hopes to continue doing so for many years to come.

Operating as usual

#OnThisDay, April 30, 1789, on the balcony of Federal Hall in New York City, George Washington was sworn in as the natio...
04/30/2021

#OnThisDay, April 30, 1789, on the balcony of Federal Hall in New York City, George Washington was sworn in as the nation’s first president and delivered the first inaugural address. This momentous occasion had originally been scheduled for the first Wednesday in March by the Confederation Congress, however, the early months of that year had been unusually cold and snowy, delaying several members of the First Federal Congress from arriving in New York City, the original location of the U.S. government, to count the electoral ballots. No ballots could be tallied until both the House of Representatives and the Senate reached a quorum, the minimum number of members present to validate a meeting and its proceedings. Finally, on April 6, 1789, enough congressmen had arrived in New York City to count the electoral ballots. George Washington won unanimously with 69 electoral votes. Once he received word of the election, he began the journey to New York City from his home in Mount Vernon, Virginia.

On the second balcony of Federal Hall, Washington took the oath of office before Chancellor Robert Livingston, kissed the Bible, and went to the Senate Chamber to deliver his inaugural address. Senator William Maclay of Pennsylvania noted that Washington “was agitated and embarrassed, more than he ever was by the leveled Cannon or pointed Musket.” In his speech, Washington addressed the need for a strong Constitution and Bill of Rights, and frequently emphasized the public good. Subsequent inaugurations took place on March 4 until the 20th Amendment changed the date to January 20 in 1937 to reduce the long period of time a defeated president or member of Congress would continue to serve after their failed campaign for reelection.

After Washington delivered the address, he walked up Broadway with a group of legislators and local politicians to pray at St. Paul’s Chapel of Trinity Church.

Image: “The Inauguration of Washington” from Heroes of History and Their Grand Achievements, 1903. The Worley Collection at Fraunces Tavern Museum.

#OnThisDay, April 30, 1789, on the balcony of Federal Hall in New York City, George Washington was sworn in as the nation’s first president and delivered the first inaugural address. This momentous occasion had originally been scheduled for the first Wednesday in March by the Confederation Congress, however, the early months of that year had been unusually cold and snowy, delaying several members of the First Federal Congress from arriving in New York City, the original location of the U.S. government, to count the electoral ballots. No ballots could be tallied until both the House of Representatives and the Senate reached a quorum, the minimum number of members present to validate a meeting and its proceedings. Finally, on April 6, 1789, enough congressmen had arrived in New York City to count the electoral ballots. George Washington won unanimously with 69 electoral votes. Once he received word of the election, he began the journey to New York City from his home in Mount Vernon, Virginia.

On the second balcony of Federal Hall, Washington took the oath of office before Chancellor Robert Livingston, kissed the Bible, and went to the Senate Chamber to deliver his inaugural address. Senator William Maclay of Pennsylvania noted that Washington “was agitated and embarrassed, more than he ever was by the leveled Cannon or pointed Musket.” In his speech, Washington addressed the need for a strong Constitution and Bill of Rights, and frequently emphasized the public good. Subsequent inaugurations took place on March 4 until the 20th Amendment changed the date to January 20 in 1937 to reduce the long period of time a defeated president or member of Congress would continue to serve after their failed campaign for reelection.

After Washington delivered the address, he walked up Broadway with a group of legislators and local politicians to pray at St. Paul’s Chapel of Trinity Church.

Image: “The Inauguration of Washington” from Heroes of History and Their Grand Achievements, 1903. The Worley Collection at Fraunces Tavern Museum.

Join us next Thursday, May 6 at 6:30pm EDT for Fourteenth Colony: The Forgotten Story of the Gulf South During America’s...
04/28/2021

Join us next Thursday, May 6 at 6:30pm EDT for Fourteenth Colony: The Forgotten Story of the Gulf South During America’s Revolutionary Era.

In this lecture, historian Mike Bunn offers the first comprehensive history of the British colony of West Florida. For a host of reasons, including the fact that West Florida did not rebel against the British government, the colony has long been dismissed as a loyal but inconsequential fringe outpost, if considered at all.

This lecture will take place on Zoom. Register: https://bit.ly/2RaDYPd

Join us next Thursday, May 6 at 6:30pm EDT for Fourteenth Colony: The Forgotten Story of the Gulf South During America’s Revolutionary Era.

In this lecture, historian Mike Bunn offers the first comprehensive history of the British colony of West Florida. For a host of reasons, including the fact that West Florida did not rebel against the British government, the colony has long been dismissed as a loyal but inconsequential fringe outpost, if considered at all.

This lecture will take place on Zoom. Register: https://bit.ly/2RaDYPd

Today’s #FlagFriday showcases some rather rebellious stripes. The Sons of Liberty adopted this flag in 1767. The stripes...
04/23/2021

Today’s #FlagFriday showcases some rather rebellious stripes. The Sons of Liberty adopted this flag in 1767. The stripes represent delegates from each of the nine colonies who attended the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. Curiously, this version is overlaid with Benjamin Franklin’s famous illustration of a rattlesnake. The rattlesnake, indigenous to the United States, was one of the earliest symbols of American identity. Colonists saw themselves like the resilient reptile, which only defends itself when provoked.

Learn more about the symbols behind some of the American Revolution’s iconic flags at our newest exhibition To the Beat of Their Own Drums: American Regimental Flags of the Revolutionary War. This exhibition is included with regular Museum admission. Reserve tickets: https://bit.ly/3exfCYi

Today’s #FlagFriday showcases some rather rebellious stripes. The Sons of Liberty adopted this flag in 1767. The stripes represent delegates from each of the nine colonies who attended the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. Curiously, this version is overlaid with Benjamin Franklin’s famous illustration of a rattlesnake. The rattlesnake, indigenous to the United States, was one of the earliest symbols of American identity. Colonists saw themselves like the resilient reptile, which only defends itself when provoked.

Learn more about the symbols behind some of the American Revolution’s iconic flags at our newest exhibition To the Beat of Their Own Drums: American Regimental Flags of the Revolutionary War. This exhibition is included with regular Museum admission. Reserve tickets: https://bit.ly/3exfCYi

The Forgotten Woman of Valley Forge from America’s Forgotten Ally
04/22/2021
The Forgotten Woman of Valley Forge from America’s Forgotten Ally

The Forgotten Woman of Valley Forge from America’s Forgotten Ally

During the winter encampment at Valley Forge, as thousands of men huddled around drafty wooden cabins, with dwindling supplies, and battled boredom and disease, a relief effort was organized hundre…

New blog post alert! Education & Public Programs Associate Theresa DeCicco details the life and work of the “forgotten F...
04/22/2021

New blog post alert! Education & Public Programs Associate Theresa DeCicco details the life and work of the “forgotten Founding Father” Gouvenor Morris, who influenced not one, but two historic Revolutions. Read the full story: https://bit.ly/3v9sFpb

Can you spot him in this painting from the Museum's collection?

New blog post alert! Education & Public Programs Associate Theresa DeCicco details the life and work of the “forgotten Founding Father” Gouvenor Morris, who influenced not one, but two historic Revolutions. Read the full story: https://bit.ly/3v9sFpb

Can you spot him in this painting from the Museum's collection?

Join us on Saturday, April 24 at 11am for our walking tour, A Rebellious Brew: New York’s Tea Party of 1774. Boston was ...
04/21/2021

Join us on Saturday, April 24 at 11am for our walking tour, A Rebellious Brew: New York’s Tea Party of 1774. Boston was not the only city to have a "tea party" in revolutionary times. Many seaport cities, including New York, had their own rebellions. Join New York City Tour Guide Fred Cookinham to envision New York's 1774 waterfront and discover why the city was so late in the game to revel in patriotic spirit.

Please note that these walking tours are operating at a reduced capacity. Space is limited. Tickets: https://bit.ly/3efFvLW

Join us on Saturday, April 24 at 11am for our walking tour, A Rebellious Brew: New York’s Tea Party of 1774. Boston was not the only city to have a "tea party" in revolutionary times. Many seaport cities, including New York, had their own rebellions. Join New York City Tour Guide Fred Cookinham to envision New York's 1774 waterfront and discover why the city was so late in the game to revel in patriotic spirit.

Please note that these walking tours are operating at a reduced capacity. Space is limited. Tickets: https://bit.ly/3efFvLW

#OnThisDay April 20, 1775, Lemuel Haynes, writer, and later prominent clergyman, enlisted in the Continental Army. Born ...
04/20/2021

#OnThisDay April 20, 1775, Lemuel Haynes, writer, and later prominent clergyman, enlisted in the Continental Army. Born in 1753, Haynes was the son of an enslaved African American and Scottish indentured servant. Abandoned as an infant, Haynes was indentured as a servant to Deacon David Rose of Granville, Massachusetts. As part of his indenture, Rose was required to provide Haynes with an education. Exposed to his local church’s works, Haynes quickly learned to read and write and soon preached sermons.

Freed from his indenture at the age of 21, Haynes joined the Granville militia as a minuteman in 1774. In April 1775, the Battle of Lexington and Concord marked the start of the American Revolution. Haynes, following the event, was assigned to the command of Captain Lebbeus Ball and marched to meet Patriot forces at the siege of Boston. In 1776, Haynes became one of three Black men to serve in Ethan Allen’s famed Green Mountain Boys and garrisoned at the captured Fort Ticonderoga. The same year, inspired by the Declaration of Independence, Haynes wrote an antislavery essay entitled Liberty Further Extended.

After his service in the Revolution, Haynes studied Latin and Greek with clergy persons in Connecticut. In 1785, he became the first Black man in the United States to become an ordained minister. Three years later, Haynes accepted a call in Rutland, Vermont, where he would preach for nearly 30 years. During this time, Haynes continued to write and speak against slavery. His sermons and writings on the injustices of slavery were published in various newspapers, gaining him vast recognition and an honorary Master of the Arts degree from Middlebury College.

An ardent Federalist, conflicts soon arose with his congregation over political views and preaching style. In 1818, Haynes was dismissed from his church in Vermont. He later moved to South Granville, New York, and served as the community’s minister until his death in 1833.

#OnThisDay April 20, 1775, Lemuel Haynes, writer, and later prominent clergyman, enlisted in the Continental Army. Born in 1753, Haynes was the son of an enslaved African American and Scottish indentured servant. Abandoned as an infant, Haynes was indentured as a servant to Deacon David Rose of Granville, Massachusetts. As part of his indenture, Rose was required to provide Haynes with an education. Exposed to his local church’s works, Haynes quickly learned to read and write and soon preached sermons.

Freed from his indenture at the age of 21, Haynes joined the Granville militia as a minuteman in 1774. In April 1775, the Battle of Lexington and Concord marked the start of the American Revolution. Haynes, following the event, was assigned to the command of Captain Lebbeus Ball and marched to meet Patriot forces at the siege of Boston. In 1776, Haynes became one of three Black men to serve in Ethan Allen’s famed Green Mountain Boys and garrisoned at the captured Fort Ticonderoga. The same year, inspired by the Declaration of Independence, Haynes wrote an antislavery essay entitled Liberty Further Extended.

After his service in the Revolution, Haynes studied Latin and Greek with clergy persons in Connecticut. In 1785, he became the first Black man in the United States to become an ordained minister. Three years later, Haynes accepted a call in Rutland, Vermont, where he would preach for nearly 30 years. During this time, Haynes continued to write and speak against slavery. His sermons and writings on the injustices of slavery were published in various newspapers, gaining him vast recognition and an honorary Master of the Arts degree from Middlebury College.

An ardent Federalist, conflicts soon arose with his congregation over political views and preaching style. In 1818, Haynes was dismissed from his church in Vermont. He later moved to South Granville, New York, and served as the community’s minister until his death in 1833.

Join us this Thursday, April 22 at 6:30pm EDT for Valcour: the 1776 Campaign that Saved the Cause of Liberty.During the ...
04/19/2021

Join us this Thursday, April 22 at 6:30pm EDT for Valcour: the 1776 Campaign that Saved the Cause of Liberty.

During the summer of 1776, patriots worked frantically to head off a British invasion from Canada. Their effort culminated in a wild three-day naval battle on Lake Champlain in northern New York. In this lecture, Jack Kelly will argue that, although the campaign has often been neglected by historians, its success was an important impetus to Washington's decision to cross the Delaware and attack Trenton. This lecture will take place on Zoom. Register: https://bit.ly/3dtM6TS

Join us this Thursday, April 22 at 6:30pm EDT for Valcour: the 1776 Campaign that Saved the Cause of Liberty.

During the summer of 1776, patriots worked frantically to head off a British invasion from Canada. Their effort culminated in a wild three-day naval battle on Lake Champlain in northern New York. In this lecture, Jack Kelly will argue that, although the campaign has often been neglected by historians, its success was an important impetus to Washington's decision to cross the Delaware and attack Trenton. This lecture will take place on Zoom. Register: https://bit.ly/3dtM6TS

Thank you to Kym S. Rice for sitting down and talking all things taverns with us last night! In this special presentatio...
04/16/2021

Thank you to Kym S. Rice for sitting down and talking all things taverns with us last night! In this special presentation, Rice offers a glimpse into her journey to open the museum-wide exhibition Taverns: For the Entertainment of Friends and Strangers in 1983. She also discusses the role taverns played throughout the 18th century and take a look at life inside an urban tavern. Watch the recording: https://bit.ly/2OVcHQg

And thank you to everyone who helped us celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Long Room reinterpretation at Fraunces Tavern Museum. Cheers to nearly 300 years!

Thank you to Kym S. Rice for sitting down and talking all things taverns with us last night! In this special presentation, Rice offers a glimpse into her journey to open the museum-wide exhibition Taverns: For the Entertainment of Friends and Strangers in 1983. She also discusses the role taverns played throughout the 18th century and take a look at life inside an urban tavern. Watch the recording: https://bit.ly/2OVcHQg

And thank you to everyone who helped us celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Long Room reinterpretation at Fraunces Tavern Museum. Cheers to nearly 300 years!

What was it like to drink in a tavern in the 1700s? As part of our Long Room 50th anniversary celebration, we invited Be...
04/15/2021

What was it like to drink in a tavern in the 1700s? As part of our Long Room 50th anniversary celebration, we invited Beers with Mandy to find out. We're talking oysters as big as your forearm, a much smaller island of Manhattan, and rum made by your neighbor down the street. Check out these videos to learn more, and get the recipe for the colonial cocktail once served at Fraunces Tavern, Fish House Punch: https://bit.ly/3mRteBp

What was it like to drink in a tavern in the 1700s? As part of our Long Room 50th anniversary celebration, we invited Beers with Mandy to find out. We're talking oysters as big as your forearm, a much smaller island of Manhattan, and rum made by your neighbor down the street. Check out these videos to learn more, and get the recipe for the colonial cocktail once served at Fraunces Tavern, Fish House Punch: https://bit.ly/3mRteBp

Today, we’re celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Long Room renovation. #OnThisDay, April 15, 1971, after more than a...
04/15/2021

Today, we’re celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Long Room renovation. #OnThisDay, April 15, 1971, after more than a year of research and renovation, Fraunces Tavern Museum officially reopened the newly restored Long Room.

Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York (SRNY) hosted a ceremony to mark the occasion, and invited Delancey Kane Hollos, a direct descendant of Stephen De Lancey, the building’s original owner, to cut the ribbon with SRNY President Charles S. Whitman Jr. (image one).

SRNY hired architect Gerald R. W. Watland, who specialized in 18th century restorations, to complete the project. Watland stripped the Long Room back to its studs and revealed what was believed to be original bricks and beams from the eighteenth-century structure (image two). The Long Room was then reassembled into what is believed to be a more authentic representation of the room George Washington would have seen when he delivered his Farewell Address in 1783.

The gathering celebrated the enduring legacy of the Long Room, which, today, has served as a community space for New York City for nearly 300 years. Learn more about the history of the space in the Long Room Archive: https://bit.ly/2OP4fSq

Images:
1. Long Room reopening ceremony, April 15, 1971
2. Long Room renovation by Gerald R. W. Watland, 1969-1971
3. The newly restored Long Room, 1971
4. The Long Room today, 2018

Address

54 Pearl St
New York, NY
10004

Fraunces Tavern Museum is located at 54 Pearl Street, at the corner of Broad Street, in Lower Manhattan. Subway: R to Whitehall St., 4/5 to Bowling Green, 2/3 to Wall Street, 1 to South Ferry, J/M/Z to Broad Street Buses: M1, M6, M15

General information

Adult (18+): $7.00 Seniors (65+): $4.00 Students (w/ proof of ID): $4.00 Children (6-18): $4.00 Children (under 5): FREE Active Military (w/ proof of ID): FREE

Opening Hours

Wednesday 12:00 - 17:00
Thursday 12:00 - 17:00
Friday 12:00 - 17:00
Saturday 12:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(212) 425-1778

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Comments

Hi. I was reading The Unexpected George Washington by Harlow Unger and heard of Fraunces Tavern, I had no idea the establishment which Washington gave his farewell to his officers was still standing. Hopefully one day I'll be able to visit, only been in your state a few times. I'm related to Washington myself. Thought I'd share this article with you, https://www.toddsarchives.com/division-of-washington-estate-revealed-in-an-obscure-spotswood-letter/.
FLAG DAY 2018
John Adams may have said it all: “Without the pen of Paine, the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain.” Read the astonishing story of the man who freed American minds in “Thomas Paine and the Clarion Call for American Independence” at harlowungerbooks.com and all booksellers.
Had dinner after seeing Hamilton today. Appetizers were good, but the menu is limited and the chef did not allow any changes to be made. We had lamb and filet mignon, food good but not good enough to go back again. Really wanted to like this place as the staff were great.
PHOTOS. Today's big Flag Day parade down Broadway and ceremonies at historic Fraunces Tavern.
History has its eyes on Nina at the Fraunces Tavern Museum!
New York City's First Public celebration of George Washington's birthday, February 11th 1784. The conversion from the old calendar to the new was also a problem. Washington's birthday was moved from February 11th to February 22nd. This apparently caused a great deal of confusion throughout his lifetime. Frequently one finds dates shown with (New Style, Gregorian Calendar) or (Old Style, Julian Calendar) after it, denoting it as either new style or old style. During his career as a public official and after his retirement to Mount Vernon, Washington appears to have celebrated his birthday on either date. On February 14th 1790, Tobias Lear, Washington's faithful private secretary, responded to a letter of inquiry by writing: "In reply to your wish to know the President’s birthday it will be sufficient to observe that it is on the 11th of February, Old Style; but the Almanac makers have generally set down opposite to the 22nd day of February of the present style; how far that may go towards establishing it on that day I don't know; but I could never consider it any other way than as stealing so many days from his valuable life as is the difference between the old and new styles. With sincere esteem, etc. Tobias Lear" Washington appears to have accepted the new style date in the last years of his life. On February 6, l799, he wrote John Trumbull and mentioned that his granddaughter, Nelly Custis was marrying Lewis, his nephew on his birthday, the 22nd,
Hope everyone enjoys this teacher's creativity! What a fun way to engage students. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10101169492675935&id=183404261
Found this while cleaning out my dad's house today.