Fraunces Tavern® Museum

Fraunces Tavern® Museum Where George Washington tearfully bade farewell to his officers on December 4th, 1783. Fraunces Tavern Museum is a survivor of the early days of New York City.
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Now registered as a National Historic Landmark with the United States National Park Service, the building was originally built in 1719 as an elegant residence for the merchant Stephan Delancey and his family. In 1762, the home was purchased by tavern-keeper Samuel Fraunces, who transformed it into one of the most popular meeting places of the day. Though it is best known as the site where Washington gave his farewell address to the officers of the Continental Army, in 1783, the tavern also played a significant role in pre– and post-Revolutionary activities. After the war, when New York was the Nation‘s first capi-tal, the tavern was host to the new government‘s offices of the Departments of War, Treasury and Foreign Affairs. In 1904, the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York purchased the tavern and hired preservation architect William Mersereau to restore the building to its colonial appearance. Fraunces Tavern® Museum opened to the public in 1907. Today, the museum complex includes four 19th century buildings in addition to the 18th century Fraunces Tavern building. For over one hundred years, Fraunces Tavern Museum has stood as an historic beacon to this city‘s always changing landscapes and hopes to continue doing so for many years to come.

Mission: Fraunces Tavern® Museum's mission is to educate the public about New York City history as it relates to Colonial America, the Revolutionary War, and the Early Republic. This mission is fulfilled through the preservation and interpretation of the Museum's landmarked 1719 building along with varied exhibitiions of art and artifacts as they relate to the historic site. Fraunces Tavern® Museum is owned and operated by, and FRAUNCES TAVERN® is a registered service mark of, Sons of the Revolution℠ in the State of New York, Inc., a Section 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation instituted in 1876 and incorporated in 1884. Copyright © 2020 SRNY, Inc. All rights reserved.

Operating as usual

This Veteran's Day we celebrate the service of all military veterans, past and present, and their dedication and service...
11/11/2020

This Veteran's Day we celebrate the service of all military veterans, past and present, and their dedication and service to our country. The seeds of the American Revolution were planted at Fraunces Tavern, and we're honored to still stand alongside the brave men and women who serve our country. We’ve put together a walking tour of Lower Manhattan that celebrates some of the earliest soldiers who fought for our burgeoning nation. Stops: 1. City Hall Park 2. Nathan Hale Statue 3. General Montgomery Monument 4. Soldier's Monument 5. Fraunces Tavern Museum

This Veteran's Day we celebrate the service of all military veterans, past and present, and their dedication and service to our country. The seeds of the American Revolution were planted at Fraunces Tavern, and we're honored to still stand alongside the brave men and women who serve our country. We’ve put together a walking tour of Lower Manhattan that celebrates some of the earliest soldiers who fought for our burgeoning nation.

This Veteran's Day we celebrate the service of all military veterans, past and present, and their dedication and service...
11/11/2020

This Veteran's Day we celebrate the service of all military veterans, past and present, and their dedication and service to our country. The seeds of the American Revolution were planted at Fraunces Tavern, and we're honored to still stand alongside the brave men and women who serve our country. We’ve put together a walking tour of Lower Manhattan that celebrates some of the earliest soldiers who fought for our burgeoning nation.

This Veteran's Day we celebrate the service of all military veterans, past and present, and their dedication and service to our country. The seeds of the American Revolution were planted at Fraunces Tavern, and we're honored to still stand alongside the brave men and women who serve our country. We’ve put together a walking tour of Lower Manhattan that celebrates some of the earliest soldiers who fought for our burgeoning nation.

Celebrate #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth with the  Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian on Thursday, Novem...
11/10/2020

Celebrate #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian on Thursday, November 12 at 2pm for a virtual lecture with Alexandra Harris. Harris is co-author of Why We Serve: Native Americans in the United States Armed Forces. This talk will discuss identity and the warrior stereotype of Native people serving in the military, as well as actual—and remarkable—traditions of peace and war within American Indian communities. Register: https://qoo.ly/395qm4

Did you know that long before the skyscrapers and subways, the area around Fraunces Tavern was occupied for thousands of...
11/09/2020

Did you know that long before the skyscrapers and subways, the area around Fraunces Tavern was occupied for thousands of years by the Lenni Lenape tribe? As we celebrate Native American Heritage Month, we bring you the story of the Lenape, meaning “the people,” who spoke either Unami or Munsee, which were different dialects of the Algonquian language. The Lenapehoking (the land the Lenape called home) included Manahatta, meaning ‘island of many hills,’ and encompassed parts of today’s New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. The island of Manhatta was rich with natural resources and food supplies, including fruit and vegetables and wildlife. The Hudson River, known to the Lenape as Shatemuc (meaning ‘the river that flows both ways,’ because it flowed north and south along with the Atlantic ocean’s tides) was a vital water route for trading with other Indigenous tribes along the shoreline.

The Lenape communities moved seasonally, occupying lower Manhattan in the warmer months, likely using a well-worn walking trail that we now refer to as Broadway, which stretched from the southern tip of the island to as far as Boston. The Lenape used many of the island’s natural resources in all aspects of daily life, from tree bark which covered houses to deerskin sewn into clothing. The Lenape hunted and fished in Lower Manhattan, harvesting shellfish, including oysters and clams, that were abundant along the shoreline. Archaeological research shows that the harbor around the area where 54 Pearl Street exists today was rich in mounds of oyster shells, called middens, which often measured almost 12 inches long. The shoreline was so full in oysters that discarded oyster shells from the Lenape were later ground up and used to pave the original Pearl Street by Europeans.

Image: Pearl Street in the seventeenth century, 1901. Unknown artist. Courtesy of NYPL The New York Public Library

On December 4, 1783, nine days after the last British soldiers left American soil, General George Washington visited Fra...
11/08/2020

On December 4, 1783, nine days after the last British soldiers left American soil, General George Washington visited Fraunces Tavern. He invited his officers from the Continental Army to thank them for their service, and to bid them farewell. After embracing each officer and wishing them well, Washington left for Annapolis, where he would resign his military commission before traveling on to Mount Vernon. The only first-hand account of this emotional goodbye comes from The Memoirs of Colonel Benjamin Tallmadge, which Fraunces Tavern Museum has on display.

This year, Fraunces Tavern Museum is bringing Washington’s farewell to you with a brand new film which reimagines General Washington’s emotional parting with his officers in the historic Long Room at Fraunces Tavern. On Friday, December 4, at 6:30pm, join Fraunces Tavern Museum and the team behind Washington’s Farewell for an exclusive screening of the film, followed by a Q&A with the reenactors. Tickets: https://qoo.ly/394kvb

#TB to the 143rd Annual George Washington Birthday Ball, hosted by Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York on Fe...
11/07/2020

#TB to the 143rd Annual George Washington Birthday Ball, hosted by Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York on February 21, 2020. Check out the highlights below, and explore the full album here: https://bit.ly/32hMoaq

The 2021 Virtual George Washington Birthday Ball is Friday, February 19. Join the Benefit Committee today: https://bit.ly/3evFsvm

143rd Annual George Washington Birthday Ball
11/07/2020

143rd Annual George Washington Birthday Ball

Got 5 minutes? Take Fraunces Tavern Museum's Fall Survey and enter to win a FREE Fraunces Tavern Museum t-shirt!At Fraun...
11/06/2020

Got 5 minutes? Take Fraunces Tavern Museum's Fall Survey and enter to win a FREE Fraunces Tavern Museum t-shirt!

At Fraunces Tavern Museum, we always strive to deliver the very best in programming, tours, special events, exhibitions, membership, and social media. Your feedback is the most important catalyst for the new and creative changes taking place at the Museum every day. So we want to hear from you!

Now through November 15, take our Fall Survey and you’ll be entered for a chance to win one of three Fraunces Tavern Museum t-shirts: https://qoo.ly/393knv

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, we bring you the story of Akiatonharónkwen, which means “he unhangs himself ...
11/04/2020

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, we bring you the story of Akiatonharónkwen, which means “he unhangs himself from the group,” who was the son of an Abenaki woman and African father born in upstate New York around the 1730s. His English name is Joseph Louis Cook. In 1745, Cook’s family was taken captive by French soldiers and Mohawk warriors around Fort Saratoga. His parents died shortly after, and Cook was adopted by a Mohawk family who taught him their language and customs. Cook learned English and French from missionaries, where he was taught about Catholicism.

During the French and Indian War, Cook grew into a distinguished warrior who fought alongside the French with the Mohawk tribe. In August 1775, Cook traveled to Cambridge, Massachusetts to offer his help to General Washington, and went with Major General Arnold on his expedition to Quebec at the end of the year.

Cook is prominently featured in John Trumbull’s painting “The Death of General Montgomery in the Attack of Quebec” to the left General Montgomery (pictured here). Cook participated in several significant battles during the Revolutionary War, including the Saratoga Campaign. On June 15, 1779, the Continental Congress awarded Cook the commission of Lieutenant Colonel, making him the highest-ranking African and American Indian in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. After the war, Cook married and settled in Onondaga, New York, and negotiated land treaties on behalf of the Mohawk and Oneida tribes through the end of the century. Cook also served in the War of 1812; during the Battle of Lundy’s Lane, he died from injuries he sustained falling from his horse. His death was announced by cannon salute by American forces. #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

New blog post! This month’s Object of the Month is from Confidential: The American Revolution’s Agents of Espionage, an ...
11/02/2020

New blog post! This month’s Object of the Month is from Confidential: The American Revolution’s Agents of Espionage, an exhibition in the Adeline Moses Loeb Gallery at Fraunces Tavern Museum that ran from September 2017 to March 2020. Curatorial & Collections Intern Amanda Nesci uses a self portrait to explore the life and death of Major John André. Read the full story: https://qoo.ly/38zc98

Happy Native American Heritage Month from Fraunces Tavern Museum! In 1916, New York was the first state to declare Ameri...
11/01/2020

Happy Native American Heritage Month from Fraunces Tavern Museum! In 1916, New York was the first state to declare American Indian Day, celebrated on the fourth Friday in September. During the nation's bicentennial celebrations, President Gerald Ford designated a week in October as Native American Awareness Week; in the 1980s, the celebratory week moved to November.

In 1990, President George H.W. Bush issued a joint resolution designating the month of November as National American Indian Heritage Month, recognizing and celebrating Indigenous people's contributions and achievements. In his proclamation, President Bush encourages Americans to move forward and "celebrate the fascinating history and time-honored traditions of Native Americans" through programs, ceremonies, and activities. Today there are 574 federally recognized Native American tribes in the United States. Throughout November, we will be sharing the stories of Indigenous peoples and their heroic contributions to the Revolutionary War. Check out the Library of Congress resource for more information about Native American Heritage Month: https://qoo.ly/38yr2z

In what ways will you be celebrating Indigenous people this month? Comment below!

10/31/2020

Happy Halloween from Fraunces Tavern Museum! We present you with the George Washington Birthday Ball / Halloween mash-up you didn’t know you needed. Can you spy Director Scott Dwyer? They say he’s always been the caretaker…

Benefit Committee tickets on sale now: https://bit.ly/2Jg51ES

10/30/2020

When the Museum was closed in the spring, our security cameras picked up audio of a.... visitor. Listen closely at the very beginning #FrauncesTavernGhost

Check out our story for more!




#paranormal #Halloween #paranormalinvestigation #ghosts #MuseumFromHome #Museums #DigitalExhibition #DigitalContent #VirtualContent #History #CultureFromHome #NYC #MuseumsOfInstagram #NYCMuseum #History #AmericanHistory #VirtualMuseum #FiDi #Tavern #NYCTavern

New podcast alert! On this special spooky edition of Tavern Talks, hosts Allie Delyanis and Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli sit...
10/29/2020

New podcast alert! On this special spooky edition of Tavern Talks, hosts Allie Delyanis and Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli sit down with members of the Fraunces Tavern Museum staff to discuss Fraunces Tavern's most recent paranormal investigation and detail their findings. Listen to the full episode: https://bit.ly/2HBKMkN

#OnThisDay, October 26, 1775, Phillis Wheatley sends her poem “His Excellency George Washington” to General Washington. ...
10/26/2020

#OnThisDay, October 26, 1775, Phillis Wheatley sends her poem “His Excellency George Washington” to General Washington. Wheatley was born in Senegal in 1753, enslaved, and shipped to Boston in 1761. She was purchased by the Wheatley family, who provided her with a classical education.

In 1773, at the age of twenty, Wheatley became the first African American woman to publish a book of poetry, titled Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, in the colonies. As one of the foremost poets of her time, Wheatley either met or corresponded with many of our founding fathers. In her poem, “His Excellency George Washington,” Wheatley praises the Revolutionary War and Washington’s inspiring and patriotic efforts to lead the country to independence.

The poem, composed in a neoclassical form, incorporates ancient Greek and Roman mythology into the modern world. Wheatley refers to the American Revolution as “Columbia,” a composite of Phoebus Apollo, representing Liberty, and Pallas Athene, the goddess of war, representing Washington. Under the divine right, she urges Washington to continue fighting for victory and independence from the British Empire.

Washington responds to Wheatley in February 1776, apologizing for his delay and thanking her. He writes, ” I thank you most sincerely for your polite notice of me, in the elegant Lines you enclosed; and however undeserving I may be of such encomium and panegyrick, the style and manner exhibit a striking proof of your great poetical Talents.” He also invites Wheatley to his headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and signs the letter, “I am, with great respect, your obedient humble servant.” The poem was published first in the Virginia Gazette in March 1776, and then by Thomas Paine in the Pennsylvania Gazette.

Image: George Washington to Phillis Wheatley, February 28, 1776. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Happy Birthday to Etienne Delancey, who was born #OnThisDay, October 24, 1663! Born into French nobility in Caen, France...
10/24/2020

Happy Birthday to Etienne Delancey, who was born #OnThisDay, October 24, 1663! Born into French nobility in Caen, France, his family served the French Crown as administrators and bureaucrats. In 1686, thousands of Huguenots, including the Delanceys, fled France from the persecution by French Catholics under the Edict of Nantes. Etienne arrived in New York City on June 6, signed an Oath of Allegiance to the British Crown, and anglicized his name to Stephen.

Delancey married Anne Van Cortlandt on January 23, 1700, and in 1719 the couple broke ground on their home at 54 Pearl Street, which today is home to Fraunces Tavern Museum and Restaurant. Stephan and Anne had ten children, with only five surviving past infancy. All of their children married into other prominent families in the city. James Delancey became a Supreme Court Justice in New York, and Oliver Delancey became a Brigadier General in the British Army during the Revolutionary War.

By the 1730s, Stephen Delancey became one of the most successful merchants in New York City. The Delancey, Robinson & Company operated a retail store and granary that operated out of 54 Pearl Street because it was conveniently located next to the Great Dock. Delancey was also a prominent member of the New York Provincial Assembly and served as an Alderman and the State Senate.

Image: Portrait of Etienne de Lancy, known as Stephen Delancey

Join us on Thursday, November 19 at 6:30pm for Hamilton: Man, Myth, Musical...Mensch. By now, most everyone has heard th...
10/23/2020

Join us on Thursday, November 19 at 6:30pm for Hamilton: Man, Myth, Musical...Mensch.

By now, most everyone has heard the hit Broadway musical Hamilton: An American Story and has become a Hamilton buff. In this talk, Robert Watson will examine some of the little known, intriguing aspects of the Founder's remarkable life, including his Jewish roots and hard scrabble upbringing. This talk will also feature a fun fact-checking of the musical and look at the backstory for some of the show's main scenes. Register: https://qoo.ly/38ty5p

#ICYMI - On Friday, October 2, Fraunces Tavern Museum teamed up with  Archtober to present Preserving the Past: The Rest...
10/21/2020

#ICYMI - On Friday, October 2, Fraunces Tavern Museum teamed up with Archtober to present Preserving the Past: The Restoration of Fraunces Tavern.

Preserving the Past is a digital lecture that takes a comprehensive look at the architecture, design, and history of 54 Pearl Street, one of the oldest buildings in New York City. Led by historian Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli, the lecture explores three hundred years of the building’s history – from its early construction on some of the city’s oldest landfill, to the extensive restoration in the 20th century, to how the building continues to survive surrounded by skyscrapers.

Missed the presentation? Watch the recording here: https://qoo.ly/38ssu3

#OnthisDay, October 19, 1781, the British garrison at Yorktown led by Lieutenant General Charles Cornwallis entered the ...
10/19/2020

#OnthisDay, October 19, 1781, the British garrison at Yorktown led by Lieutenant General Charles Cornwallis entered the Field of Surrender to lay down their weapons after nearly two weeks of siege. This surrender marked the end of the last major battle of the American Revolution with a decisive victory for the Americans and their French Allies. Although fighting continued for at least another year, and peace was not officially achieved until 1783, this victory at Yorktown was the moment “the world turned upside down.”

What many people don’t know is that an hour later and a mile away, the British soldiers at Gloucester Point surrendered to the combined forces of French Generals Weedon, Lauzun, and Choisy. Gloucester Point is the small strip of land that juts out into the York River, making the river less than a half a mile wide where it passes Yorktown. This second surrender came after a single confrontation between British and Allied soldiers before the Siege of Yorktown even began. However, it was integral to the success of the Siege of Yorktown because, in order to successfully hold Yorktown, the Continental Army also needed hold Gloucester Point.

On the blog, Museum Services & Events Associate Jessica Bryant explores the lesser-known second surrender at the Battle of Yorktown, and the rowdy legion of foreign volunteers who made both surrenders possible. Read the full story: https://bit.ly/3kd2JE4

Image: Sebastian Bauman and Robert Scot, “To His Excellency Genl. Washington, Commander in Chief of the armies of the United States of America, this plan of the investment of York and Gloucester has been surveyed and laid down,” 1782. Courtesy of Library of Congress Geography and Map Division Washington, D.C.

Address

54 Pearl St
New York, NY
10004

Fraunces Tavern Museum is located at 54 Pearl Street, at the corner of Broad Street, in Lower Manhattan. Subway: R to Whitehall St., 4/5 to Bowling Green, 2/3 to Wall Street, 1 to South Ferry, J/M/Z to Broad Street Buses: M1, M6, M15

General information

Adult (18+): $7.00 Seniors (65+): $4.00 Students (w/ proof of ID): $4.00 Children (6-18): $4.00 Children (under 5): FREE Active Military (w/ proof of ID): FREE

Opening Hours

Wednesday 12:00 - 17:00
Thursday 12:00 - 17:00
Friday 12:00 - 17:00
Saturday 12:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 18:00

Telephone

(212) 425-1778

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FLAG DAY 2018
John Adams may have said it all: “Without the pen of Paine, the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain.” Read the astonishing story of the man who freed American minds in “Thomas Paine and the Clarion Call for American Independence” at harlowungerbooks.com and all booksellers.
Had dinner after seeing Hamilton today. Appetizers were good, but the menu is limited and the chef did not allow any changes to be made. We had lamb and filet mignon, food good but not good enough to go back again. Really wanted to like this place as the staff were great.
PHOTOS. Today's big Flag Day parade down Broadway and ceremonies at historic Fraunces Tavern.
History has its eyes on Nina at the Fraunces Tavern Museum!
New York City's First Public celebration of George Washington's birthday, February 11th 1784. The conversion from the old calendar to the new was also a problem. Washington's birthday was moved from February 11th to February 22nd. This apparently caused a great deal of confusion throughout his lifetime. Frequently one finds dates shown with (New Style, Gregorian Calendar) or (Old Style, Julian Calendar) after it, denoting it as either new style or old style. During his career as a public official and after his retirement to Mount Vernon, Washington appears to have celebrated his birthday on either date. On February 14th 1790, Tobias Lear, Washington's faithful private secretary, responded to a letter of inquiry by writing: "In reply to your wish to know the President’s birthday it will be sufficient to observe that it is on the 11th of February, Old Style; but the Almanac makers have generally set down opposite to the 22nd day of February of the present style; how far that may go towards establishing it on that day I don't know; but I could never consider it any other way than as stealing so many days from his valuable life as is the difference between the old and new styles. With sincere esteem, etc. Tobias Lear" Washington appears to have accepted the new style date in the last years of his life. On February 6, l799, he wrote John Trumbull and mentioned that his granddaughter, Nelly Custis was marrying Lewis, his nephew on his birthday, the 22nd,
Hope everyone enjoys this teacher's creativity! What a fun way to engage students. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10101169492675935&id=183404261
Found this while cleaning out my dad's house today.
Battle of Brooklyn, 1776, reenactment at Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn. 113 photos in this album.