Fraunces Tavern® Museum

Fraunces Tavern® Museum Where George Washington tearfully bade farewell to his officers on December 4th, 1783. Fraunces Tavern Museum is a survivor of the early days of New York City.
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Now registered as a National Historic Landmark with the United States National Park Service, the building was originally built in 1719 as an elegant residence for the merchant Stephan Delancey and his family. In 1762, the home was purchased by tavern-keeper Samuel Fraunces, who transformed it into one of the most popular meeting places of the day. Though it is best known as the site where Washingt

Now registered as a National Historic Landmark with the United States National Park Service, the building was originally built in 1719 as an elegant residence for the merchant Stephan Delancey and his family. In 1762, the home was purchased by tavern-keeper Samuel Fraunces, who transformed it into one of the most popular meeting places of the day. Though it is best known as the site where Washingt

Operating as usual

This #FlagFriday comes courtesy of Ryan, who completed our new Design Your Own Flag activity during his visit to the Mus...
07/23/2021

This #FlagFriday comes courtesy of Ryan, who completed our new Design Your Own Flag activity during his visit to the Museum’s newest exhibition, To the Beat of Their Own Drums: American Regimental Flags of the War.

Ryan used a variety of symbols and colors when he created his flag, including a torch, which symbolizes enlightenment and hope. Explore our accompanying digital exhibition from home to learn more about regimental flag design: https://bit.ly/2V4ZNBR

This #FlagFriday comes courtesy of Ryan, who completed our new Design Your Own Flag activity during his visit to the Museum’s newest exhibition, To the Beat of Their Own Drums: American Regimental Flags of the War.

Ryan used a variety of symbols and colors when he created his flag, including a torch, which symbolizes enlightenment and hope. Explore our accompanying digital exhibition from home to learn more about regimental flag design: https://bit.ly/2V4ZNBR

#OnThisDay, July 21, 1815, Lady Harriet Ackland died in Somerset, England. Harriet was born into the Fox family in Janua...
07/21/2021

#OnThisDay, July 21, 1815, Lady Harriet Ackland died in Somerset, England.

Harriet was born into the Fox family in January of 1750. In 1756, her father was made the first Earl of Ilchester, making her Lady Harriet. Little is known about Lady Harriet’s life until 1770, when she married John D**e Ackland. John was two years older than her and joined Parliament four years after their marriage. According to most sources, Harriet and John had a happy marriage, shown through Harriet’s devotion and willingness to accompany John to America in March 1776.

During her time in America, Harriet showed great loyalty, bravery, and resilience. Upon first arriving in Canada, Harriet traveled to Chamblee rather than remaining safe in Montreal to nurse John when he became ill. He directed her to remain behind when he became part of the Lake Champlain campaign, but she followed him again in July of 1777 after he was injured at Fort Ticonderoga. During her time traveling with the army, Harriet faced the hardships that comes with war, famously sleeping in a tent which caught on fire with the couple inside.

Her most significant act of bravery and devotion came in October of 1777 when John was injured and captured during a skirmish. Upon hearing of her husband’s capture, Lady Harriet petitioned General Burgoyne to be allowed to give herself up to the Americans so that she might nurse John back to health. Lady Harriet remained with her husband until they were both allowed to go to New York, where John negotiated for his release through an exchange for the American Major Otho Williams.

Harriet and John lived quite happily in British occupied New York, where their first son was born, and returned to England in the spring of 1778. During this time, John kept close watch over the conditions of American prisoners, becoming an advocate for better treatment. John died on November 15, 1778, leaving behind Harriet and their children.

Image 1: Joshua Reynolds, Lady Christian Henrietta Caroline ‘Harriot’ Acland, née Fox-Strangways, 1771, Courtesy of National Trust, Killerton. Image 2: Robert Pollard and Francis Jukes, Lady Harriet Ackland, 1784, Courtesy of the British Museum.

Join us on Thursday, August 19 at 6:30pm for another FREE Virtual Evening Lecture, The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldi...
07/19/2021

Join us on Thursday, August 19 at 6:30pm for another FREE Virtual Evening Lecture, The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware.

On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts, who saved the army by navigating the treacherous waters of the river the Manhattan. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. In this lecture, Patrick O’Donnell discusses how the Marbleheaders repeatedly altered the course of events during the Revolution—from forming the elite Guard that protected General Washington to ferrying Continental forces across the Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776.

This lecture will take place via Zoom. Register: https://bit.ly/3xSstfQ

Join us on Thursday, August 19 at 6:30pm for another FREE Virtual Evening Lecture, The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware.

On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts, who saved the army by navigating the treacherous waters of the river the Manhattan. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. In this lecture, Patrick O’Donnell discusses how the Marbleheaders repeatedly altered the course of events during the Revolution—from forming the elite Guard that protected General Washington to ferrying Continental forces across the Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776.

This lecture will take place via Zoom. Register: https://bit.ly/3xSstfQ

This #FlagFriday, explore the history of flags in the United States of America from home in our digital exhibition, To t...
07/16/2021

This #FlagFriday, explore the history of flags in the United States of America from home in our digital exhibition, To the Beat of Their Own Drums: American Regimental Flags of the Revolutionary War. The digital exhibition will take you through the history and design of a selection of regimental flags and now includes a selection of Curator’s Notes.

The Second New Hampshire Regiment Flag (image one) was first raised under the command of Brigadier General Enoch Poor in 1775. The gold interlaced rings bear the name of the 13 colonies, symbolizing the strength, power, and unity of the new nation. Inside the sunburst, one of the earliest Union mottos declares, “WE ARE ONE.”

Curator’s Notes: The flag's striking design also appears on the Fugio Cent, the first coin authorized by the Continental Congress in 1787. The national copper cent was how Congress combated the growing number of counterfeit coins in circulation.

Designed by Benjamin Franklin, the coin was likely based on the 1776 Continental Dollar Coin, which was never circulated. The coin's front side (image two) features the word Fugio, which is Latin for "I fly," with a sundial and the phrase, "Mind Your Business" underneath. The bold statement has been purported as Franklin’s way of warning the British to stay away. The back of the coin (image three) features the same imagery as the Second New Hampshire Regiment Flag. The interlocking circles of each colony represent their individual identities as part of a larger and stronger alliance. Together, the thirteen colonies indicated "we are one" against the Crown.

Explore the full exhibition: https://bit.ly/2TM7gFS

#OnThisDay, July 14, 1776, British Admiral Richard Howe, head of a commission to negotiate peace with the former America...
07/14/2021

#OnThisDay, July 14, 1776, British Admiral Richard Howe, head of a commission to negotiate peace with the former American colonies, sent a barge over to the Continental stronghold on Manhattan Island with a letter addressed to a “George Washington, Esq.”

Following the reading of the Declaration of Independence to General George Washington’s troops in New York City on July 9, the United States severed all colonial ties to the British Empire. Three days later, Howe entered New York harbor to join forces with his brother General William Howe, Commander of the Royal Army in North America, at the English base on Staten Island. After landing, Admiral Howe sent a naval officer, under a flag of truce, to deliver a letter to General Washington to begin possible peace talks.

The officer was greeted on the Manhattan shore by two of Washington’s trusted aides, Colonels Joseph Reed and Henry Knox. Upon glancing at the letter to “George Washington, Esq.” Reed replied, “we have no person in our army with that address.”

Howe, addressing the letter as such, denied American sovereignty by refusing to recognize Washington’s military title and the Continental Army as legitimate combatants. Days later, Howe sent another letter, addressed to “George Washington, Esq., and etc., etc.” Washington’s aides again declined the letter. Howe’s attempt at peace officially came to an end, and an ill-fated summer awaited Washington and his men in the battle for New York City.

Image: Admiral Richard Howe, 1726-99, 1st Earl, John Singleton Copley, 1794. National Maritime Museum.
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#AmericanRevolution
#GeneralWashington
#HenryKnox
#RevolutionaryHistory
#RevolutionaryNewYork
#NewYorkCityHistory

#OnThisDay, July 14, 1776, British Admiral Richard Howe, head of a commission to negotiate peace with the former American colonies, sent a barge over to the Continental stronghold on Manhattan Island with a letter addressed to a “George Washington, Esq.”

Following the reading of the Declaration of Independence to General George Washington’s troops in New York City on July 9, the United States severed all colonial ties to the British Empire. Three days later, Howe entered New York harbor to join forces with his brother General William Howe, Commander of the Royal Army in North America, at the English base on Staten Island. After landing, Admiral Howe sent a naval officer, under a flag of truce, to deliver a letter to General Washington to begin possible peace talks.

The officer was greeted on the Manhattan shore by two of Washington’s trusted aides, Colonels Joseph Reed and Henry Knox. Upon glancing at the letter to “George Washington, Esq.” Reed replied, “we have no person in our army with that address.”

Howe, addressing the letter as such, denied American sovereignty by refusing to recognize Washington’s military title and the Continental Army as legitimate combatants. Days later, Howe sent another letter, addressed to “George Washington, Esq., and etc., etc.” Washington’s aides again declined the letter. Howe’s attempt at peace officially came to an end, and an ill-fated summer awaited Washington and his men in the battle for New York City.

Image: Admiral Richard Howe, 1726-99, 1st Earl, John Singleton Copley, 1794. National Maritime Museum.
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#AmericanRevolution
#GeneralWashington
#HenryKnox
#RevolutionaryHistory
#RevolutionaryNewYork
#NewYorkCityHistory

07/12/2021

#OTD July 12, 1804, Major General Alexander Hamilton passed away from a fatal gunshot wound following an affair of honor with Vice President Aaron Burr the day prior.

Alexander Hamilton was honored at his final resting place at Trinity Church with a graveside remembrance ceremony hosted by the AHA Society, Trinity Church Wall Street, and fellow partners and features a memorial wreath from the Museum of American Finance. The video of the ceremony will be shared on July 14th, the 217th anniversary of his funeral.

#OnThisDay, July 9, 1776, General Washington received a special correspondence from the Continental Congress - it was th...
07/09/2021

#OnThisDay, July 9, 1776, General Washington received a special correspondence from the Continental Congress - it was the long-awaited Declaration of Independence, which had been approved just days earlier in Philadelphia. The cover letter read, “the Congress have judged it necessary to dissolve the Connection between Great Britain and the American Colonies, and to declare them free & Independent States; as you will perceive by the enclosed Declaration, which I am directed to transmit to you, and to request you will have it proclaimed at the Head of the Army in the Way, you shall think most proper.”

Washington called the Continental Army to gather at the City Commons at 6 pm. He ordered for one of the first readings of the Declaration of Independence to be read aloud for the military and all those in the city.

That wasn’t the only major event to happen that evening. After the soldiers cheered, some marched down Broadway with members of the Sons of Liberty to remove the last remaining symbol of the British Empire in the city - the statue of King George III. The mob hacked off the king’s head, severed the nose, clipped the laurels that wreathed the head, and mounted what remained of the head on a spike outside of a tavern in Lower Manhattan.

You can still see the evidence of this protest at Bowling Green Park by touching the top of the original fence by feeling the rough edges where the golden crowns were hastily hacked off.

Image: Pulling down the Statue of George III, 1853. John C. McRae after Johannes A. Oertel. Collection of Fraunces Tavern Museum.
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#IndependenceDay
#DeclarationOfIndependence
#RevolutionaryWar
#NewYorkCityHistory
#BowlingGreenPark
#GeneralWashington
#FrauncesTavernMuseum
#ColonialNewYorkCity
#18thCenturyHistory

#OnThisDay, July 9, 1776, General Washington received a special correspondence from the Continental Congress - it was the long-awaited Declaration of Independence, which had been approved just days earlier in Philadelphia. The cover letter read, “the Congress have judged it necessary to dissolve the Connection between Great Britain and the American Colonies, and to declare them free & Independent States; as you will perceive by the enclosed Declaration, which I am directed to transmit to you, and to request you will have it proclaimed at the Head of the Army in the Way, you shall think most proper.”

Washington called the Continental Army to gather at the City Commons at 6 pm. He ordered for one of the first readings of the Declaration of Independence to be read aloud for the military and all those in the city.

That wasn’t the only major event to happen that evening. After the soldiers cheered, some marched down Broadway with members of the Sons of Liberty to remove the last remaining symbol of the British Empire in the city - the statue of King George III. The mob hacked off the king’s head, severed the nose, clipped the laurels that wreathed the head, and mounted what remained of the head on a spike outside of a tavern in Lower Manhattan.

You can still see the evidence of this protest at Bowling Green Park by touching the top of the original fence by feeling the rough edges where the golden crowns were hastily hacked off.

Image: Pulling down the Statue of George III, 1853. John C. McRae after Johannes A. Oertel. Collection of Fraunces Tavern Museum.
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#IndependenceDay
#DeclarationOfIndependence
#RevolutionaryWar
#NewYorkCityHistory
#BowlingGreenPark
#GeneralWashington
#FrauncesTavernMuseum
#ColonialNewYorkCity
#18thCenturyHistory

New York City during the summer of 1776 was a microcosm of the burgeoning nation, and reflected major issues occurring i...
07/08/2021

New York City during the summer of 1776 was a microcosm of the burgeoning nation, and reflected major issues occurring in other colonies. The blog post Summer of 1776 chronicles the events of that fateful summer 245 years ago, detailing a plot to assassinate General Washington, the tearing down the statue of King George III in Bowling Green, and the first reading of the Declaration of Independence. Read the full story: https://bit.ly/3jX1OKN

Image: Reading the Declaration before Washington’s Army, New York, July 9, 1776 by Howard Pyle

New York City during the summer of 1776 was a microcosm of the burgeoning nation, and reflected major issues occurring in other colonies. The blog post Summer of 1776 chronicles the events of that fateful summer 245 years ago, detailing a plot to assassinate General Washington, the tearing down the statue of King George III in Bowling Green, and the first reading of the Declaration of Independence. Read the full story: https://bit.ly/3jX1OKN

Image: Reading the Declaration before Washington’s Army, New York, July 9, 1776 by Howard Pyle

Join us on Zoom this Thursday, July 8 at 6:30pm EDT for Espionage and Enslavement in the Revolution: The True Story of R...
07/07/2021

Join us on Zoom this Thursday, July 8 at 6:30pm EDT for Espionage and Enslavement in the Revolution: The True Story of Robert Townsend and Elizabeth. In this free virtual lecture, author Claire Bellerjeau will talk about her new book “Espionage and Enslavement in the Revolution” and the history behind it.

In January 1785, a young, enslaved woman from Oyster Bay named Elizabeth was put on board the Lucretia in New York Harbor, bound for Charleston, where she would be sold to her fifth enslaver in just 22 years. She had no idea that Robert Townsend, a son of the family she was enslaved by, would locate her, safeguard her child, and return her to New York — nor how her story would help turn one of America’s first spies into an early abolitionist. Register: https://bit.ly/2SUC1rF

Join us on Zoom this Thursday, July 8 at 6:30pm EDT for Espionage and Enslavement in the Revolution: The True Story of Robert Townsend and Elizabeth. In this free virtual lecture, author Claire Bellerjeau will talk about her new book “Espionage and Enslavement in the Revolution” and the history behind it.

In January 1785, a young, enslaved woman from Oyster Bay named Elizabeth was put on board the Lucretia in New York Harbor, bound for Charleston, where she would be sold to her fifth enslaver in just 22 years. She had no idea that Robert Townsend, a son of the family she was enslaved by, would locate her, safeguard her child, and return her to New York — nor how her story would help turn one of America’s first spies into an early abolitionist. Register: https://bit.ly/2SUC1rF

Address

54 Pearl St
New York, NY
10004

Fraunces Tavern Museum is located at 54 Pearl Street, at the corner of Broad Street, in Lower Manhattan. Subway: R to Whitehall St., 4/5 to Bowling Green, 2/3 to Wall Street, 1 to South Ferry, J/M/Z to Broad Street Buses: M1, M6, M15

General information

Adult (18+): $7.00 Seniors (65+): $4.00 Students (w/ proof of ID): $4.00 Children (6-18): $4.00 Children (under 5): FREE Active Military (w/ proof of ID): FREE

Opening Hours

Wednesday 12pm - 5pm
Thursday 12pm - 5pm
Friday 12pm - 5pm
Saturday 12pm - 5pm
Sunday 12pm - 5pm

Telephone

(212) 425-1778

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Comments

Excellent food, Excellent service, Beautiful historic environment! Highly recommend!
Hi. I was reading The Unexpected George Washington by Harlow Unger and heard of Fraunces Tavern, I had no idea the establishment which Washington gave his farewell to his officers was still standing. Hopefully one day I'll be able to visit, only been in your state a few times. I'm related to Washington myself. Thought I'd share this article with you, https://www.toddsarchives.com/division-of-washington-estate-revealed-in-an-obscure-spotswood-letter/.
FLAG DAY 2018
John Adams may have said it all: “Without the pen of Paine, the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain.” Read the astonishing story of the man who freed American minds in “Thomas Paine and the Clarion Call for American Independence” at harlowungerbooks.com and all booksellers.
Had dinner after seeing Hamilton today. Appetizers were good, but the menu is limited and the chef did not allow any changes to be made. We had lamb and filet mignon, food good but not good enough to go back again. Really wanted to like this place as the staff were great.
PHOTOS. Today's big Flag Day parade down Broadway and ceremonies at historic Fraunces Tavern.
History has its eyes on Nina at the Fraunces Tavern Museum!
New York City's First Public celebration of George Washington's birthday, February 11th 1784. The conversion from the old calendar to the new was also a problem. Washington's birthday was moved from February 11th to February 22nd. This apparently caused a great deal of confusion throughout his lifetime. Frequently one finds dates shown with (New Style, Gregorian Calendar) or (Old Style, Julian Calendar) after it, denoting it as either new style or old style. During his career as a public official and after his retirement to Mount Vernon, Washington appears to have celebrated his birthday on either date. On February 14th 1790, Tobias Lear, Washington's faithful private secretary, responded to a letter of inquiry by writing: "In reply to your wish to know the President’s birthday it will be sufficient to observe that it is on the 11th of February, Old Style; but the Almanac makers have generally set down opposite to the 22nd day of February of the present style; how far that may go towards establishing it on that day I don't know; but I could never consider it any other way than as stealing so many days from his valuable life as is the difference between the old and new styles. With sincere esteem, etc. Tobias Lear" Washington appears to have accepted the new style date in the last years of his life. On February 6, l799, he wrote John Trumbull and mentioned that his granddaughter, Nelly Custis was marrying Lewis, his nephew on his birthday, the 22nd,
Hope everyone enjoys this teacher's creativity! What a fun way to engage students. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10101169492675935&id=183404261