Nicole Klagsbrun

Nicole Klagsbrun OFFICE:
526 West 26th Street Room 318
www.nicoleklagsbrun.com Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery was established in 1989 in New York City.

An advocate of independent thought, the gallery presents young emerging and mid-career artists who follow a tradition of contemporary innovation. Since its inception, Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery has been a consistent force in the international contemporary art world and has built a reputation for successfully identifying new talent and nurturing careers of artists such as Bas Jan Ader, Matthew Day Ja

ckson, Jay DeFeo, Jimmie Durham, John Giorno, Candida Höfer, Rashid Johnson, Karen Kilimnik, Adam McEwen, John Pilson, Mika Rottenberg and Karlheinz Weinberger.

Installation shot from Nari Ward’s piece Happy Smilers: Duty Free Shopping (1996), showing as part of his current retros...
05/11/2024

Installation shot from Nari Ward’s piece Happy Smilers: Duty Free Shopping (1996), showing as part of his current retrospective at Pirelli HangarBicocca in Milan, Italy. In this specific piece, the perimeter of the room is lined with a corridor constructed of household furniture tied together with fire hose, a recurring theme in Ward’s work. Ward’s juxtaposition of materials meant to invoke multiple associations is especially present in this kind of early work. The use of mixed media with firehose and tire is emblematic of the assemblage works he has created throughout his practice. This installation, created in 1996, criticized tourism and commercialization of cultural identities. The work also includes plastic soda bottles, fire hose, fire escape, salt, audio, speakers, and an aloe vera plant.

Installation shot of Anon; Three Boxes, Two Tires, at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, featuring similar elements of social signification through found and discarded material. Symbolism conveying the complex social and political realities of the neighborhood of Harlem, New York can be found throughout his activity as an artist since the 1990’s. Provocative installations containing numerous themes of race, migration, democracy, continue to elicit complex reactions even as their original narratives become lost to time.

In 1984, Nicole Klagsbrun and Clarissa Dalrymple opened Cable Gallery in the Cable Building at 611 Broadway. The gallery...
05/10/2024

In 1984, Nicole Klagsbrun and Clarissa Dalrymple opened Cable Gallery in the Cable Building at 611 Broadway. The gallery became known for establishing the work of artists such as Ashley Bickerton, Barbara Ess, Christopher Wool, Dan Graham, and Haim Steinbach. Spring of 1984 marks the anniversary of its first show titled "Works on Paper." This first show featured David Deutsh, James Nares, Ellen Phelan, Kiki Smith, Pat Stair, Charles Stockly, and Robin Winters. The gallery was the site of early solo exhibitions of Ashley Bickerton, Steve DiBenedetto, Collier Schorr, Haim Steinbach, Philipe Thomas, and Christopher Wool, among others.

Installation shot from James Nares’s first solo show at Cable Gallery, which opened May 5th, 1984.

Rashid Johnson (Chicago, IL, 1977), works across the disciplines of painting, sculpture, photography, and video, Johnson...
05/09/2024

Rashid Johnson (Chicago, IL, 1977), works across the disciplines of painting, sculpture, photography, and video, Johnson’s practice is defined by its critical evocations and entangling of racial and cultural identity, African American history, and mysticism. Many of his early works took the form of conceptual photography, though Johnson eventually expanded his practice to include wall-based works that engage the legacy of painting, sculptural installation, and assemblage, using materials like soap, wax, and shea butter, books, records, glass, and incense. “The goal,” Johnson explains, “is for all of the materials to miscegenate into a new language, with me as its author.” Johnson also exercises a range of mark-making techniques—like scoring, scraping, engraving, and branding—using self-made tools. In a 2013 interview, Johnson states, “I started thinking about this kind of domestic material and taking it into a place where it would not necessarily expect to find itself. I’ve always considered the artist as almost a magician-like character who grants agency to materials to allow them to be elevated into objects that we admire.”
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Rashid Johnson
“Prayer Song”
2011

Black soap, wax
72.5 x 48.5 x 2.5 inches 184.2 x 123.2 x 6.4 cm (RJ127(NKG))

George Ohr (Biloxi, Mississippi,1857-1918), American ceramic artist and self-proclaimed “Mad Potter of Biloxi” was activ...
05/04/2024

George Ohr (Biloxi, Mississippi,1857-1918), American ceramic artist and self-proclaimed “Mad Potter of Biloxi” was active from 1879 to around 1910. He began to alter his wheel-thrown shapes, forcing pots to twist or buckle while manipulating the forms by hand through folding, indenting, and ruffling. Even with many of the pieces severely burned in an 1894 fire that destroyed his studio, Ohr salvaged many of the works calling them his “burned babies.” After the re-establishment of his studio, Ohr became even more committed to his new approach to form, producing his well-recognized thin-walled, thin-skinned, crushed, folded, and dented vessels. Ohr’s practice shatters the conventions of ceramics, anticipating modern and contemporary movements, including American Abstract Expressionism and Post-Minimalism.
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Left to Right:

George Ohr, “Puzzle Mug,” 1895-96, glazed earthenware, 3 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 3 inches, stamped signature (GO46)

George Ohr, “Vase,” 1897-1900, glazed earthenware, 4 3/4 x 5 inches diameter, stamped signature (GO52)

George Ohr, “Flaring pot, red inside,” 1895-96, glazed ceramic, 2 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches, Stamped G.E. Ohr, Biloxi (GO28)

George Ohr, “”Burnt Baby” Teapot with fused lid,” before 1894, 3 3/4 x 6 1/4 x 3 3/4 inches (GO49)

Keith Sonnier“Curtain Study”1964/1968Double stainless steel mesh over lead 6.5 x 39 x 2.5 inches62.99 x 70.87 inches(KS0...
05/02/2024

Keith Sonnier
“Curtain Study”
1964/1968

Double stainless steel mesh over lead 6.5 x 39 x 2.5 inches
62.99 x 70.87 inches
(KS04(NK)


Keith Sonnier (Mamou, Louisiana, 1941-2020), is a post-minimalist American artist who began his career in New York City in the 1960s, Sonnier redefined sculpture by using materials and techniques that were previously restricted to the hardware store. Sonnier’s wall sculptures from the File Series, before incorporating light and technology, were tied to the five senses; how things felt; how things smelled; and how things could be heard. He was part of a new generation of sculptors who were not using the older sculptural techniques or materials anymore. Sonnier speaks about his approach, “when I approached these new materials, it was as though I was investigating the kinds of techniques that were common to everyday experience, like wrapping, stuffing, mixing or even upholstering.” The construction of the File pieces can be traced to a childhood observation of his mother upholstering living room furniture. The act of upholstering relies on layering and padding and sourcing a variety of materials. Sonnier’s use of transparent and translucent materials emphasizes the layered nature of this series of works, placing one thing in front of another thing, in front of yet another. The basis of this work is upholstery, and then translucency because it was one skin on top of another skin.

Opening May 1st 2024Rashid Johnson George OhrKeith SonnierNari Ward
04/25/2024

Opening May 1st 2024

Rashid Johnson
George Ohr
Keith Sonnier
Nari Ward

Nicole Klagsbrun with Patti Astor, Bill Stelling and Anita Sarko at the opening of Dondi’s exhibition at the Fun Gallery...
04/18/2024

Nicole Klagsbrun with Patti Astor, Bill Stelling and Anita Sarko at the opening of Dondi’s exhibition at the Fun Gallery in the East Village on February 4, 1982

Nicole Klagsbrun loves her work by Fab 5 Freddy (Fred Brathwaite), “Car” that she bought from Patti Astor at the Fun Gal...
04/11/2024

Nicole Klagsbrun loves her work by Fab 5 Freddy (Fred Brathwaite), “Car” that she bought from Patti Astor at the Fun Gallery in 1981.

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Image 1: Fab 5 Freddy (Frederick Brathwaite), “Car,” 1981, spray paint and enamel on canvas, 64 X 48 inches (FB01(NK))
Image 2: Patti Astor at the entrance to the first FUN Gallery space, on East 11th Street, New York, 1982. Photo: Anita Rosenberg

In 2011 Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery presented “Wilderness,” an exhibition of photographs and installation work by Xaviera S...
04/09/2024

In 2011 Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery presented “Wilderness,” an exhibition of photographs and installation work by Xaviera Simmons.

The press release for the show read, “observations on natural and urban environments as they relate to social, political, personal and art histories set the stage for Simmons’ photographs. Alluding to traditions of American landscape painting and depictions of the human presence within it, carefully chosen scenery is employed as a hybrid, multivalent character harboring complex immigrant and migrant histories, an agent affecting and affected by the figures that inhabit it. Sages and nomads pose and roam through archetypal locales as conduits for the “nebulous” and “nonlinear” narratives embedded in the ground, allowing entrance into, in the artist’s terms, “other characters, narratives, and geographies.”
Hand-lettered, locally found wooden scraps affixed directly to the gallery wall comprise a sculptural installa- tion of materials chosen for their ubiquitous use in vernacular signage worldwide. Simple painted signposts are re-imagined in a tangled matrix of fragmented, visually compelling text gleaned from notes, conversation, news articles, myth, folklore, poetry and literature, forming a disjointed tableau imbued with collective and personal memory. A lyrical, obscure landscape emerges from the cacophonous accrual of language, leaving accumulated association and uncanny, conjured atmosphere to form meaning and perception.

Established or potential identities and histories are revealed to be as unstable as they are embedded, question- ing notions of idealism and the fallibility of truth and falsehood. Reflecting on the ways photographers collect and own images, and how people define and are marked by their environs, Simmons offers a deluge of details in place of narrative to construct familiar landscapes from disparate parts.”

Installation shots of “Something Like This,” Clara William’s first solo exhibition in New York at Nicole Klagsbrun Galle...
04/08/2024

Installation shots of “Something Like This,” Clara William’s first solo exhibition in New York at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, on view from January 4 to February 2, 2002.
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In a New York Times article by Roberta Smith wrote, in “‘Something Like This,’ Clara Williams’s solo debut, is at once clever and sincere. It turns the ubiquitous white-cube gallery into a winter wonderland. It conflates 19th-century history painting with the 19th-century natural-history diorama. And it restates installation art, 1980’s appropriation art and 90’s abject art in the terms of her own generation’s penchant for hyperrealism, history and academic art.

There are indications of a middle road in the form of two engaging, less hyperreal sculptures of Nicole Klagsbrun’s perky West Highland terrier, Mimosa, one stationed in each gallery. They stand around expectantly, as dogs do, connecting the gallery’s real white space with the artist’s imaginary one.”

Nicole Klagsbrun presented “Dough,” a solo exhibition of videos, sculptures, and drawings by Mika Rottenberg from Januar...
04/08/2024

Nicole Klagsbrun presented “Dough,” a solo exhibition of videos, sculptures, and drawings by Mika Rottenberg from January 27th to February 25th in 2006.

Roberta Smith for the NYT wrote “in her New York gallery debut, and her third major piece to be seen in New York in two years, Mika Rottenberg continues to combine video and installation to create a claustrophobic, boxed-in space that feels like the center of an alternative but all-too-familiar universe.

In addition to its rich social, physiological and sculptural metaphors, Ms. Rottenberg’s work is distinguished by an elaborate interplay of hisses, plops and creaking. Conflating creation myth, sweatshop and beauty parlor, the work also combines real and video space. Viewers are confined to a small, tacky structure like those on the screen, yet we also move through the system with the all-seeing camera — like a parasite. On the way out, crossing a raised platform covered with linoleum, you may notice water falling drop by drop on a heated square, incessantly ceasing to exist.”
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Installation shots of “Dough,” January 27 thru February 25, 2006 at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, 526 West 26th Street, room 213, New York.

The summer of 2006, Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery presented “DELIGHT,” an exhibition of paintings by Alona Harpaz and the sol...
04/06/2024

The summer of 2006, Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery presented “DELIGHT,” an exhibition of paintings by Alona Harpaz and the solo debut of her work in the United States. Harpaz’s work transcends the legacy of the figurative painting tradition into new means of expression. Recalling the collages of Matisse, she paints her subjects in high contrast of saturated colors, suggesting the urbanity of their surroundings. The subject’s existential attitude combined with the works electric background create and alluring tension. Harpaz’s paintings are a collection of familial characters that are contemporary satyrs with engaging games, human hybrids of flora and fauna sporting curious small horn-like protuberances.

Image 1-2: Installation images of “ALONA HARPAZ, PROJECT ROOM: DELIGHT,” June 22 to August 18, 2006, Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, 526 West 26th Street, Room 213, New York.
Image 3: Alona Harpaz, “Self Portrait,” 2006, acrylic on canvas, 39.4 X 27.6 Inches

In 2004, 2005, and 2008 Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery presented solo shows of Beth Campbell’s work.Image 1- In 2004 Nicole Kl...
04/04/2024

In 2004, 2005, and 2008 Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery presented solo shows of Beth Campbell’s work.

Image 1- In 2004 Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery presented an installation project including “I was thinking (a living room),” 2004, on view from January 23 - February 28, 2004.

Image 2- In 2005 Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery presented “How Did We End Up Here?” an exhibition consisting of a series of watercolors, a new video piece and two sculptures by Beth Campbell, on view from October 7 - November 5, 2005.

Image 3- In 2008 Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery presented Beth Campbell’s latest series of mobiles, on view from October 24 - December 6, 2008.

In 1993 Nicole Klagsbrun in conjunction with A/C Project Room presented a selection of photographs from twenty years of ...
04/02/2024

In 1993 Nicole Klagsbrun in conjunction with A/C Project Room presented a selection of photographs from twenty years of the private performance work of Mary Beth Edelson. The body/site performances of the early 1970’s presented at Nicole Klagsbrun were created when Edelson lived in Washington, D.C., and include a series to be shown for the first time in NYC. Return-to-the site photographic performances of the past summer are being shown along with recent silk-screens on chiffon at the A/C Project Room.

Beginning in 1970, Edelson’s precedent-setting photographic performances laid claim to her own body as a legitimate subject and site for the construction of a positive and critical female identity. In this work, Edelson also sought redress for the censorship and objectification of the female body by what is now referred to as the male gaze. Not without a sense of humor, Edelson “played god(dess)” through the assumption of different guises which invoked the incarnation and withdrawal of a goddess in an effort to reclaim her body and to access a new spiritual ground for women.

Installation images of “Mary Beth Edelson,” February 13 to March 13, 1993, Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, 51 Greene Street, NY in conjunction with A/C Project Room.

On September 6th, 2001, Nicole Klagsbrun presented a series of photographs by Nancy Davenport entitled “The Apartments.”...
03/30/2024

On September 6th, 2001, Nicole Klagsbrun presented a series of photographs by Nancy Davenport entitled “The Apartments.” Although any current critical discussion of the work is tied to the events that took place on September 11th, the original intention of the digital collages was to portray the collapse of modernist ideals and ideology, and certainly not to sensationalize violent action.

The body of work featured digitally altered photographs of modernist apartment facades combined with references to iconic documentary photographs from the late sixties/early seventies. Davenport’s stated intention was to recontextualize these icons within architecture, to downplay the superficial and sensationalistic quality of the mass media image and reflect the dilemma of desiring social and political change in a culture where only totalizing ideologies hold sway.

“The Apartments” were intended to evoke a sense of repeated crisis, not only in terms of political engagement but also regarding the medium of photography. Consistent in Nancy Davenport’s work is photography focusing on architecture as a symbolic and highly charged social space, the territory between photography and film, and the impact of new technology.
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Image 1- Nancy Davenport, “Bombardment,” 2001, C-print, 38.25 x 50.25 inches
Image 2- Nancy Davenport, Revolutionary (night), 2001, C-print , 38.25 x 34.25 inches
Image 3- Nancy Davenport, Revolutionary (day), 2001, C-print , 38.25 x 34.25 inches
Image 4- Nancy Davenport, 747, 2001, C-print , 34.25 x 26.25 inches
Image 5- Article titled “Photo Realism” by Vince Alleti, published in The Village Voice September 25, 2001.

Nicole Klagsbrun presented the work of Los Angeles-based artist, Jacci Den Hartog in her first New York gallery exhibiti...
03/28/2024

Nicole Klagsbrun presented the work of Los Angeles-based artist, Jacci Den Hartog in her first New York gallery exhibition, May 13 - June 26, 1999, entitled, “The Liminal Garden”. Liminality has been described as the state when ‘the individual is poised on the boundary between the finite and the infinite’, or as ‘the powerful experience of unboundedness’. Jacci Den Hartog’s work explores the potential of manufactured materials to simulate nature and reconstitute a comparable sublime.

Den Hartog’s interest in what is ‘scenic’ takes the form of sculptural works that exploit the emotive and sentimental effects that nature has on us. Her excessively artificial landforms of craggy mountain peaks, flowing rivers, rolling hills, and misty clouds are forged to re-enact the drama and physical prowess of ‘the great outdoors’ in action. Made by manipulating poured polyurethane and hydrocal, with gem-like pigments, the works often leap from the wall with solid liquidity, and twist into multiple perspectives and shifting vistas. “Passing a Pleasant Summer II,” a work spanning nearly thirteen feet across the wall and about two feet out into space, is a blue and white fakery of a mountain stream as it stumbles over rocks and slides through the crevices of a stream bed, like a Disney-esque adventure ride.
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Image 1: Jacci Den Hartog, “Passing A Pleasant Summer II”, 1997, Polyurethane, Steel, 29 x 137 x 20 inches.
Image 2: Jacci Den Hartog, “Green Rolling Hills with Yellow Wildflowers #3,” 1999, Hydrocal, polyurethane, steel, 50 x 28 x 29 inches.

An exhibition of works on paper from the 1950’s by Jay DeFeo, shown in 1993 at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery at 51 Greene St....
03/23/2024

An exhibition of works on paper from the 1950’s by Jay DeFeo, shown in 1993 at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery at 51 Greene St.

Though DeFeo is best known for her monumental sculpture, “The Rose,” she worked in a variety of mediums from drawing, photographic collage, and sculpture. The ritualistic overtones evoked in her work give her art shamanistic qualities. The 1993 show at Nicole Klagsbrun showcased the core drawing practice of DeFeo, including large scale canvases which exemplified her treatment of imagery, form, texture, and tonality, through a range of exploration with materials- graphite, oil, pastel, tempera, watercolor, acrylic, and collage. Nicole Klagsbrun’s work with

Robert C. Morgan writes in April 1993, in “What are the Symptoms,” “The Jay DeFeo show at Nicole Klagsbrun is a testament to how painting can appear when it is divested of external pressures and discourse… DeFeo was a member of the San Francisco Renaissance group in the 1950s and had a remarkable influence on an entire generation of Bay area artists, film-makers and poets. Her paintings are deeply internalized expressions that avoid the formalist legacy concurrent in New York at the time. It is a small, but important show- a sign of hope amid the regressions uptown.”

Images: Install shots from “Works on Paper from the 1950’s” by Jay DeFeo. The show was on view in 1993 at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery on 51 Greene St.

Susan Hiller exhibition at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, Jan 5 - Feb 2, 1991, 51 Greene St, New York, featuring recent wallp...
03/20/2024

Susan Hiller exhibition at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, Jan 5 - Feb 2, 1991, 51 Greene St, New York, featuring recent wallpaper paintings ran concurrently with “An Entertainment” by Susan Hiller on view at Pat Hearn Gallery. Nicole Klagsbrun is proud to have worked with Pat Hearn, the amazing art dealer, throughout the 90s.

Roberta Smith wrote in the New York Times, Jan 25, 1991, “In these two gallery shows, Susan Hiller reveals two different but not unrelated sides of her sensibility… At Klagsbrun, there is a series of paintings involving cheerful wallpaper, often suggestive of a child’s room, that has been over painted with a mysterious script that seems at times Arabic, at times simply illegible… The writing and other kinds of painting cover the innocent wallpaper with a hint of violence from out side or from within the painting, as if the less controllable aspects of human existence were seeping through the surface.”

Image 1-3: Install shot of Susan Hiller exhibition, Jan 5 - Feb 2, 1991 at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, 51 Greene St, New York.
Image 4: Invitation card to opening reception of Susan Hiller at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery and Pat Hearn Gallery, January 5, 1991, 5-7pm

Judith Barry“Preliminary Sketch for ‘Displacement’”2017/2023Mixed media on pigment paper, 60 x 26.5 inches (JB31)On view...
03/19/2024

Judith Barry
“Preliminary Sketch for ‘Displacement’”
2017/2023

Mixed media on pigment paper, 60 x 26.5 inches (JB31)

On view in WOMEN through March 30th

artists

First US installation of Judith Barry, “Imagination, Dead Imagine,” video projection, Oct 19 - Nov 9, 1991 at Nicole Kla...
03/19/2024

First US installation of Judith Barry, “Imagination, Dead Imagine,” video projection, Oct 19 - Nov 9, 1991 at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, 51 Greene St, New York.

This work was installed to coincide with the ICA publication of “Public Fantasy,” the collected essays of Judith Barry in 1991. Barry writes in “Public Fantasy,” “an androgynous head is projected as if contained within a minimalist cube. Sounds of the head slowly breathing filled the gallery space. The head is serene, waiting. Suddenly a substance pours over it from all 5 slides, drenching it in what appears to be a bodily fluid. The spectator wants to turn away but cannot, the gaze is compelled through the invocation of the scopic drive. Horror at the repulsive nature of the substances replaced by fascination with the beauty of these ‘overwhelming natural energies’ as they seem to transform into majestic but abstract landscapes...”

Image 1: Install shot of Judith Barry, “Imagination, Dead Imagine,” video projection, Oct 19 - Nov 9, 1991 at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, 51 Greene St, New York.
Image 2: Invitation card to Judith Barry’s 1991 installation at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery

Karen Kilimnik“Int. Steed’s Apartment”1998Crayon and acrylic on paper, 39 1/2 x 29 1/2 inches,49 1/2 x 39 1/2 inches fra...
03/12/2024

Karen Kilimnik
“Int. Steed’s Apartment”
1998

Crayon and acrylic on paper, 39 1/2 x 29 1/2 inches,
49 1/2 x 39 1/2 inches framed
(KK04)

On view in WOMEN through March 30th

Karen Kilimnik, “The Hellfire Club Episode of the Avengers,” 1989, Installation, Mixed Media, Dimensions Variable first ...
03/12/2024

Karen Kilimnik, “The Hellfire Club Episode of the Avengers,” 1989, Installation, Mixed Media, Dimensions Variable first solo show in New York at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery at 51 Greene St.

“In its daring opening gambit the Kilimnik show telegraphs the destabilizing nature of her early work with what might be considered a curatorial scatter piece. That first empty-seeming gallery is daunting, double-height and a trifle dark. All you see is glum cement floor, bare walls and, in one corner, a glowering arrangement of black sheets of paper, ornate mirrors and a smashed chandelier. It’s a piece from 1989 titled ‘The Hellfire Club Episode of the Avengers.’ Photocopied images of Diana Rigg as Emma Peel and clubby-looking Georgian-style mansions loom large to the sounds of the Pet Shop Boys and Madonna, as well as “The Avengers” theme song.”

- in Scattered Stories, Shaken and Stirred, 2007. A review of Karen Kilimnik’s survey at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia

Stop by WOMEN at Nicole Klagsbrun Inc. to see Karen Kalimnik’s associated work “Int. Steed’s Apartment,” 1998, Crayon and acrylic on paper, 39 ½ x 29 ½ inches (KK04).


Image 1 - 2: Karen Kilimnik, “The Hellfire Club Episode of the Avengers,” 1989, Installation, Mixed Media, Dimensions Variable at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery.
Image 3: Invitation card from Karen Kilimnik’s first solo show in New York City at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery

The legacy of the women artists who have worked with Nicole Klagsbrun originates in the 80’s at Olsen Gallery on 51 East...
03/08/2024

The legacy of the women artists who have worked with Nicole Klagsbrun originates in the 80’s at Olsen Gallery on 51 East Tenth Street. Throughout her career, Nicole has worked with and developed the careers of numerous well-known female artists.

Install shots from the group show “Eight Women Artists,” organized by Nicole Klagsbrun in June 1983 showcased painting, photography, and sculpture by eight artists. The plurality of approaches in this show range from the political to the sensual, the historical to the personal. The choice to exclusively present women stresses their position as artists profoundly involved in questions of contemporary art. The show featured artists Ellen Carey, Sarah Charlesworth, Jane Dickson, Angela Ho, Rebecca Howland, Suzanne Joelson, Barbara Kruger, and Kiki Smith.

First photo- Invitation

Second photo- Kiki Smith

Third photo- left to right Sarah Charlesworth, Barbara Kruger, Ellen Carey

Congratulations to kurimanzutto and the Giorno Poetry Systems (GPS) for their wonderful new partnership, and for the ope...
03/07/2024

Congratulations to kurimanzutto and the Giorno Poetry Systems (GPS) for their wonderful new partnership, and for the opening of “John Girono: Jasmine Burn,” at kurimanzutto, New York, March 7, 2024.

I am very proud that the first solo show of John Giorno in New York took place at the Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery in 2010, with black paintings and drawings as well as performance poetry.

Photo: “John Giorno: Black Paintings and Drawings,” April 30 - June 12, 2010, Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery.
# kurimanzutto

WOMEN, through March 30thMarch Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 11am -6pm
02/29/2024

WOMEN, through March 30th

March Hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 11am -6pm

WOMENExtended through March 29, 2024 Ryoko AokiJudith BarryHeidi BucherCameronSarah CharlesworthN. DashJay DeFeoMary Bet...
02/20/2024

WOMEN
Extended through March 29, 2024

Ryoko Aoki
Judith Barry
Heidi Bucher
Cameron
Sarah Charlesworth
N. Dash
Jay DeFeo
Mary Beth Edelson
Katharina Fritsch
Maureen Gallace
Candida Höfer
Sheree Hovsepian
Karen Kilimnik
Turiya Magadlela
Ana Mendieta
Sana Musasama
Elaine Reichek
Mika Rottenberg
Brie Ruais
Xaviera Simmons


From left to right:
1. Judith Barry, “Preliminary Sketch for “Displacement,”” 2017/2023
Mixed Media on pigment paper 60 x 26.5 inches
(JB31)

2. N. Dash, “Commuter (2),” 2019-2020
Acrylic, paper 52.4 x 37.8 cm
(NDa19)

3. Elaine Reichek, “Swatches, Riley 1-4,” 2007
digital embroidery on linen
overall dimensions: 26.5 x 22.5 inches each panel: 12 x 10 inches
Edition 1/3
(ER81.1)

Turiya Magadlela (b. 1978, South Africa) utilizes techniques of sewing and embroidery, traditionally associated with fem...
02/08/2024

Turiya Magadlela (b. 1978, South Africa) utilizes techniques of sewing and embroidery, traditionally associated with femininity and craft, to create swirling geometric abstractions including a maze of references. The subject matter of her pieces ranges from narratives of colonization on the bodies of black South African women and articulations of personal experiences. She employs conceptually weighted materials like pantyhose and service uniforms and formally explores their materiality through cutting, stitching, and stretching. The subversive power of using methods associated with femininity are present through all of her work. Her transformed materials incorporate a multiplicity of experiences; from the economic conditions of South Africa, feminism, the workplace, capitalism, and motherhood, examining the pain of human existence.

Turiya Magadlela
“Untitled”
2016

Nylon- and cotton pantyhose, thread and sealant on canvas 39.37 x 39.37 inches
100 x 100 cm
(MTu03)

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526 W 26th Street Room 318
New York, NY
10001

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About Us

Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery was established in 1989 in New York City. An advocate of independent thought, the gallery presents young emerging and mid-career artists who follow a tradition of contemporary innovation. Since its inception, Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery has been a consistent force in the international contemporary art world and has built a reputation for successfully identifying new talent and nurturing careers of artists such as Bas Jan Ader, Matthew Day Jackson, Jay DeFeo, Jimmie Durham, John Giorno, Candida Höfer, Rashid Johnson, Karen Kilimnik, Adam McEwen, John Pilson, Mika Rottenberg and Karlheinz Weinberger.

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