Landmark West

Landmark West Landmark West! is a member-based non-profit that works to achieve landmark status for individual buildings and historic districts on the Upper West Side.

As the grassroots voice for historic preservation, we pursue a broad range of community activities, including: Special Events and Public Programs, Advocacy, Leadership, Online Resources, Keeping the Past for the Future, Certificate of Appropriateness Committee, Retail Assistance Program.

Operating as usual

Meet today's modern ghost! In 1963, the American Bible Society purchased a lot on 61st Street off of Broadway for their ...
10/05/2021

Meet today's modern ghost! In 1963, the American Bible Society purchased a lot on 61st Street off of Broadway for their new headquarters. The non-profit organization, which began as an initiative to translate and distribute bibles, hired architectural firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill to design the new structure. The result was a 12 story Brutalist office building completed in 1966.

The design was controversial but significant; the thick horizontal concrete around the facade made the building the first in the city to have a pre-cast concrete load bearing exterior. It only lasted around 50 years, until the American Bible Society announced its move to Philadelphia. The old headquarters was demolished in 2017 and replaced by a 32 story contemporary condominium building. Can you guess who designed it? That’s right: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill! The same firm that created the original Brutalist structure also designed its replacement.

Every day in October, we are highlighting haunted or "ghost" buildings on the Upper West Side. Check back tomorrow and every day this month for more spooky stories! You can always visit our website, www.landmarkwest.org, for more resources and research into the Upper West Side's lost stories.

Meet today's modern ghost! In 1963, the American Bible Society purchased a lot on 61st Street off of Broadway for their new headquarters. The non-profit organization, which began as an initiative to translate and distribute bibles, hired architectural firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill to design the new structure. The result was a 12 story Brutalist office building completed in 1966.

The design was controversial but significant; the thick horizontal concrete around the facade made the building the first in the city to have a pre-cast concrete load bearing exterior. It only lasted around 50 years, until the American Bible Society announced its move to Philadelphia. The old headquarters was demolished in 2017 and replaced by a 32 story contemporary condominium building. Can you guess who designed it? That’s right: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill! The same firm that created the original Brutalist structure also designed its replacement.

Every day in October, we are highlighting haunted or "ghost" buildings on the Upper West Side. Check back tomorrow and every day this month for more spooky stories! You can always visit our website, www.landmarkwest.org, for more resources and research into the Upper West Side's lost stories.

Today's ghost is from a long forgotten era. Before the Upper West Side was the neighborhood we know today, it was a rura...
10/04/2021

Today's ghost is from a long forgotten era. Before the Upper West Side was the neighborhood we know today, it was a rural bastion of farmlands, rocky hills, and country homes. One such home was the grand Mott Mansion, the summer home of a prominent New York doctor. Dr. Valentine Mott was perhaps the most famous doctor in the city in the 19th century, a pioneer of heart surgery and anesthesia access during the Civil War.

Dr. Mott had his mansion built in 1855, on 94th Street and old Bloomingdale Road (now Broadway). Back then, this property was about as far north away from the city as these grand summer residents ever got. The porch of the home had a purportedly expansive view of the Hudson River.

Dr. Mott spent the next decade staying in this home during his time away from his primary residence in Gramercy Park. He died in this house in 1865, the site of which now lies in the middle of bustling Broadway.

Every day in October, we are highlighting haunted or "ghost" buildings on the Upper West Side. Check back tomorrow and every day this month for more spooky stories! You can always visit our website, www.landmarkwest.org, for more resources and research into the Upper West Side's lost stories.

Today's ghost is from a long forgotten era. Before the Upper West Side was the neighborhood we know today, it was a rural bastion of farmlands, rocky hills, and country homes. One such home was the grand Mott Mansion, the summer home of a prominent New York doctor. Dr. Valentine Mott was perhaps the most famous doctor in the city in the 19th century, a pioneer of heart surgery and anesthesia access during the Civil War.

Dr. Mott had his mansion built in 1855, on 94th Street and old Bloomingdale Road (now Broadway). Back then, this property was about as far north away from the city as these grand summer residents ever got. The porch of the home had a purportedly expansive view of the Hudson River.

Dr. Mott spent the next decade staying in this home during his time away from his primary residence in Gramercy Park. He died in this house in 1865, the site of which now lies in the middle of bustling Broadway.

Every day in October, we are highlighting haunted or "ghost" buildings on the Upper West Side. Check back tomorrow and every day this month for more spooky stories! You can always visit our website, www.landmarkwest.org, for more resources and research into the Upper West Side's lost stories.

Day 3 of our #spooky series continues, and the Upper West Side is filled with ghosts...The Corner of Broadway and 72nd S...
10/03/2021

Day 3 of our #spooky series continues, and the Upper West Side is filled with ghosts...

The Corner of Broadway and 72nd Street has had several lives, notably starting with the Victorian Hotel St. Andrew Hotel. Plans were filed in November 1893 and the hotel was completed the following year. Normally rooms would be set aside for the hotel staff, but, according to The Record & Guide, the hotel “was so remarkably successful that [Robertson] was obliged to rent apartments outside to house his various employees.” The Sun reported that the St. Andrew was “the only fireproof hotel on Broadway north of Fifty-ninth street.”

Victorian residence hotels had fallen from favor by the Depression Era. The heirs of Morris Schinasi decided to replace the out-of-date structure with a commercial building. On January 2, 1938 The New York Times reported that Newsreel Theatres, Inc. had signed a lease for the “new two-story building to be erected on the northwest corner of Broadway and Seventy-second Street to replace the old St. Andrew Hotel.” Called the Embassy 72nd Street, the theater held 550 seats and was the fourth in the Newsreel Theater chain in Manhattan. The New York Times noted “It is hailed as another forward step in the development of the Broadway and Seventy-second Street business center.” The building was completed before the year’s end.

The Embassy 72nd operated until 1988 when its doors were closed for the last time. The New York Times recalled that it was “beloved for its foreign, offbeat and provocative films.” In its place an apartment tower, The Alexandria, designed by the architectural firm of Frank Williams & Associates, stands today.

Every day in October, we are highlighting haunted or "ghost" buildings on the Upper West Side. Check back tomorrow and every day this month for more spooky stories!

It's spooky season! Let's celebrate with Day 2 of our Necrology series. Check out this haunting story about 179 C0lumbus...
10/02/2021

It's spooky season! Let's celebrate with Day 2 of our Necrology series. Check out this haunting story about 179 C0lumbus Avenue...

The southeast corner of Columbus and 68th Street is home to a 5 story corner store-and-apartment building built in 1886. In October 1914, the Standard Stationery Company leased 179 Columbus Avenue from Edward D. Palmer. It soon became the Ring & Weitzman stationery store (renamed Weitzman & Lies in June 1920). It was the scene of a terrifying incident in 1919.

Edward Schmidt ran a boarding house down the block at 74 West 68th Street. On the November 17, 1919, he got into a quarrel with two residents, one of whom was an Italian-born barber, Girardo Caponargri. Two nights later a man knocked on Schmidt’s door and told him he was wanted outside. When he walked out, he was ambushed and shot in the chest. Schmidt ran into the Columbus Avenue stationery store. “He then dropped dead,” reported the Daily News.

Caponargri disappeared after the shooting and police searched for him for two years. And then, quite unexpectedly, he walked into the West 68th Street police station on August 13, 1921. He told police he had been tormented by Schmidt’s ghost. “I’ve been all over the world since that time. I’ve tried to get away from the ghost of that man. But I couldn’t. It kept after me, and many times I wanted to give myself up. But as soon as I got near a police station it disappeared again.”

Every day in October, we are highlighting haunted or "ghost" buildings on the Upper West Side. Check back tomorrow and every day this month for more spooky stories! You can always visit our website, www.landmarkwest.org, for more resources and research into the Upper West Side's lost stories.

It's spooky season! Let's celebrate with Day 2 of our Necrology series. Check out this haunting story about 179 C0lumbus Avenue...

The southeast corner of Columbus and 68th Street is home to a 5 story corner store-and-apartment building built in 1886. In October 1914, the Standard Stationery Company leased 179 Columbus Avenue from Edward D. Palmer. It soon became the Ring & Weitzman stationery store (renamed Weitzman & Lies in June 1920). It was the scene of a terrifying incident in 1919.

Edward Schmidt ran a boarding house down the block at 74 West 68th Street. On the November 17, 1919, he got into a quarrel with two residents, one of whom was an Italian-born barber, Girardo Caponargri. Two nights later a man knocked on Schmidt’s door and told him he was wanted outside. When he walked out, he was ambushed and shot in the chest. Schmidt ran into the Columbus Avenue stationery store. “He then dropped dead,” reported the Daily News.

Caponargri disappeared after the shooting and police searched for him for two years. And then, quite unexpectedly, he walked into the West 68th Street police station on August 13, 1921. He told police he had been tormented by Schmidt’s ghost. “I’ve been all over the world since that time. I’ve tried to get away from the ghost of that man. But I couldn’t. It kept after me, and many times I wanted to give myself up. But as soon as I got near a police station it disappeared again.”

Every day in October, we are highlighting haunted or "ghost" buildings on the Upper West Side. Check back tomorrow and every day this month for more spooky stories! You can always visit our website, www.landmarkwest.org, for more resources and research into the Upper West Side's lost stories.

October is here! To celebrate the spookiest month of the year, we are starting a new series: the Necrology of the Upper ...
10/01/2021

October is here! To celebrate the spookiest month of the year, we are starting a new series: the Necrology of the Upper West Side! Every day, we will highlight a building that is either lost to time or development (a ghost!) or has a ghost story of its own! Let's kick things off with the 212th Coast Artillery Armory, a ghost lost to urban renewal.

The Lincoln Center was the brainchild of urban renewal and, like many products of that era, owes its location to the systematic destruction of individual buildings, streets, and neighborhoods. One of the buildings cleared was the 212th Coast Artillery Armory, the home base of a coast artillery regiment in the New York Army National Guard, once located on Columbus Avenue, between West 61st and West 62nd streets.

The 212th Coast Artillery Armory was most likely commissioned as part of the federal government’s implementation of the ‘Endicott system.’ The American Civil War had prompted great technological advancements in the military; in 1885 the Endicott Board was convened by the federal government “to create a new system of defense using the latest weaponry.” This new defensive system called for the installation of forts at every major harbor in the nation, each armed with Endicott system weapons. Beyond serving as a literal armory, the Coast Artillery Armory building was also the location where at least five different military units have been stationed.

The historic building was demolished in 1958 to make way for Fordham University’s Lincoln Center campus (one of four separate campuses). It is not clear exactly which building(s) replaced the historic armory, and no memory of the building or the events it witnessed remains.

Check back tomorrow and every day this month for more spooky stories! You can always visit our website, www.landmarkwest.org, for more resources and research into the Upper West Side's lost stories.

It's back to school season! Teachers and students across the city are making it through the first week back, and Landmar...
09/15/2021
Back to School with Landmark West!

It's back to school season! Teachers and students across the city are making it through the first week back, and Landmark West! is excited for Keeping the Past for the Future, our youth education program, to start back up again. Check out our latest newsletter below, filled with recaps from last year and things we are excited for this fall. Subscribe to never miss another update, and email us at [email protected] if you have any questions, or are interested in booking a class!

Ease into the new year with our enrichment education programs A new school year begins... Welcome back to school! After an eventful summer, filled with heat waves and big storms, students and teachers

Who can name this Central Park arch? There are 31 bridges and arches sprinkled throughout the park, not including those ...
08/30/2021

Who can name this Central Park arch? There are 31 bridges and arches sprinkled throughout the park, not including those carrying park traffic over the transverses. This particular span is a birdwatcher's heaven, made of gneiss stone set in ashlar masonry. Put your guess in the comments below!

Who can name this Central Park arch? There are 31 bridges and arches sprinkled throughout the park, not including those carrying park traffic over the transverses. This particular span is a birdwatcher's heaven, made of gneiss stone set in ashlar masonry. Put your guess in the comments below!

Have you seen the latest in our legal fight to close mechanical loopholes that bolster supertalls? In January of 2015 we...
08/25/2021
West 66th Street Appeal: How We Will Beat the Voids

Have you seen the latest in our legal fight to close mechanical loopholes that bolster supertalls? In January of 2015 we began monitoring the development at 50 West 66th St. and challenging the loopholes that resulted in its design. This was never a fight about aesthetics, nor even merely tall buildings, but about zoning protections which apply city-wide.

Our lawyers are on appeal and planning to file our papers early next month. Your support to impact not only our neighborhood but inappropriate development city-wide is greatly needed.

Check out our latest explanation of the legal challenge we have launched here, and join our email list to make sure you never miss another update: https://myemail.constantcontact.com/West-66th-Street-Appeal--How-We-Will-Beat-the-Voids.html?soid=1102771162711&aid=su26zIOwk7k

For the UWS and Citywide Long, long ago, in a land (not so) far, far away... In January of 2015 LW! began monitoring the development at 50 West 66th St. and challenging the loopholes that resulted in

If you passed through the corner of West 72nd and Broadway in 1892, this would have been your impressive view. Built in ...
08/19/2021

If you passed through the corner of West 72nd and Broadway in 1892, this would have been your impressive view. Built in that same year, the Colonial Club, seen here in fabulous images from NYPL The New York Public Library collections, was demolished in 2006. The former exclusive men's club included a ballroom, an opera house, a ladies gallery, billiard and smoking rooms, and even 4 bowling alleys. A different world indeed!

72nd Street is home to some of New York's coolest histories, buildings, and businesses. Check out the 72 Crosstown Series on our website, where you can learn all about this street's storied past and present: https://www.landmarkwest.org/72crosstown/

Hold on to your hats: Charles Gabriel, the long-time chef and Harlem based restaurateur, is bringing his iconic pan-frie...
08/11/2021

Hold on to your hats: Charles Gabriel, the long-time chef and Harlem based restaurateur, is bringing his iconic pan-fried chicken to the Upper West Side! Charles Pan Fried Chicken, Inc. is coming to 146 West 72nd Street in September, and you won't want to miss this. Lovers of soul food will be happy to know that the all-fresh menu (in addition to chicken) includes classic sides and vegetables made without animal products for vegan customers as well.

Every week, we spotlight a local business and historic building in our West Seventy Today series. Make sure you follow our newsletter (https://conta.cc/3scaCia) and social media to never miss an installment. You can read more about Charles Gabriel and our other features over on our website! Click here to explore all of our featured businesses and buildings: https://www.landmarkwest.org/w72day/

Who else remembers the original façade of 2 Columbus Circle? Edward Durell Stone's design was controversial when it was ...
07/23/2021

Who else remembers the original façade of 2 Columbus Circle? Edward Durell Stone's design was controversial when it was erected in 1964, a stark example of mid-century Modernism. Perhaps more controversial was its extensive renovation, completed in 2008 by the Museum of Art and Design, that never saw a public hearing. How do you feel about this building?

Landmark West! has a long history of advocacy for communities and buildings across the Upper West Side. We maintain resources for neighbors who wish to learn more about or protect the places they care about. You can help us in that mission today by becoming a member. Head over to our website to find out more about how you can support us: https://www.landmarkwest.org/membership/

Who else remembers the original façade of 2 Columbus Circle? Edward Durell Stone's design was controversial when it was erected in 1964, a stark example of mid-century Modernism. Perhaps more controversial was its extensive renovation, completed in 2008 by the Museum of Art and Design, that never saw a public hearing. How do you feel about this building?

Landmark West! has a long history of advocacy for communities and buildings across the Upper West Side. We maintain resources for neighbors who wish to learn more about or protect the places they care about. You can help us in that mission today by becoming a member. Head over to our website to find out more about how you can support us: https://www.landmarkwest.org/membership/

Address

45 W 67th Street
New York, NY
10023

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Opening Hours

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Tuesday 9am - 6pm
Wednesday 9am - 6pm
Thursday 9am - 6pm
Friday 9am - 6pm

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(212) 496-8110

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