George Adams Gallery

George Adams Gallery The George Adams Gallery represents and exhibits the work of both established and emerging artists. George Adams’ association began there in 1980, with Mr.
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The George Adams Gallery traces its origins to the Allan Frumkin Gallery, Chicago, founded in 1952. In 1959 Allan Frumkin opened a second location in New York, which eventually became its principal location. Adams and Mr. Frumkin forming a partnership in 1988 changing the gallery’s name to Frumkin/Adams. Following Mr. Frumkin’s retirement in 1995, the gallery became the George Adams Gallery and in

2005, after 46 years on 57th Street, relocated to West 26th Street in Chelsea. Today, the George Adams Gallery represents the estates of Robert Arneson (1930-1992), Jack Beal (1931-2013), Elmer Bischoff (1916-1991), Joan Brown (1938-1990) and Gregory Gillespie (1936-2000), while regularly exhibiting the work of contemporary artists such as Luis Cruz Azaceta, Chris Ballantyne, Enrique Chagoya, Diane Edison, Amer Kobaslija, Andrew Lenaghan, Peter Saul, Katherine Sherwood, William T. Wiley, and other emerging and under-recognized artists.

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, ...
02/03/2024

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, Viola Frey, M. Louise Stanley, and William T. Wiley is currently on view at our gallery through February 17th.

Robert Arneson skillfully employed everyday objects as a means to explore and critique the distinctions between high and low art, aiming to bridge the perceived gap between fine art and craft. In the 1970s, his sculptures often delved into the representation of concepts rather than the tangible objects themselves. This shift in focus reflected a broader cultural trend after 1970, where artists increasingly sought mental reference points for reality in images rather than direct experiences.
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Pictured: Robert Arneson, ‘Picture Hook with Frame’, 1971

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, ...
02/02/2024

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, Viola Frey, M. Louise Stanley, and William T. Wiley is currently on view at our gallery through February 17th.

Joan Brown was a child of the 1940’s, and had an affinity for ballroom dancing. Her memories inspired the Dancers series, which contains over twenty works, done over approximately three years between 1971-1973. Brown was compelled by the subject, and often honed in on specific gestures or poses, returning to this theme until she had exhausted its possibilities. According to the artist, the Dancers series is about social rituals, relationships, and the universal need for people to connect and communicate with one another.
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Pictured: Joan Brown, ‘Dancers #3’, 1972, Enamel on masonite, 72 x 48 inches

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, ...
02/01/2024

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, Viola Frey, M. Louise Stanley, and William T. Wiley is currently on view at our gallery through February 17th.

M. Louise Stanley painted ‘Yooo Hooo’ in 1969 while attempting to unlearn what she had been taught about Abstract Expressionism. While Stanley was unaware of The Hairy Who and the Chicago Imagists, she attributes the similarities seen in this piece to what she calls a “collective unconsciousness”, as many of her contemporaries were undergoing the process of actively unlearning.

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, ...
01/31/2024

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, Viola Frey, M. Louise Stanley, and William T. Wiley is currently on view at our gallery through February 17th.

Early in her career, Joan Brown received praise for dense Abstract Expressionist paintings; however, she ultimately pivoted from the style in favor of autobiographical figurative paintings. Brown adapted a cartoon-like technique to achieve more direct and sharp figurative compositions. In ‘The Misunderstanding’, Brown places George Herriman’s cartoon character Krazy Kat in an expressive all-over composition that uses minimal color, line, and form. “I want the utmost simplicity that I can find here to grasp me, to seize the elements that excite me, or stimulate me, or give me energy,” Brown said regarding this work.

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Pictured: Joan Brown, ‘The Misunderstanding’, 1978, Enamel on canvas, 96 x 78 inches 

Join us in wishing Amer Kobaslija the happiest of birthdays!Kobaslija’s most recent body of work focuses on people and p...
01/30/2024

Join us in wishing Amer Kobaslija the happiest of birthdays!

Kobaslija’s most recent body of work focuses on people and places in the state of Florida, a place he views as his adopted homeland. His latest series is reflective of fleeting encounters, often scenes he views from the vantage point of his car. Painted on aluminum, ‘Yellow Dress’ depicts a figure with a pumpkin in the place of its head being mocked by a clown amidst a stylized Floridian landscape.
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Pictured: Amer Kobaslija, ‘Yellow Dress,’ 2020. Oil on aluminum, 15 x 17 inches.

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, ...
01/26/2024

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, Viola Frey, M. Louise Stanley, and William T. Wiley is currently on view at our gallery through February 17th.

M. Louise Stanley’s work often draws from both personal experience and fiction, occasionally blurring the line between the two. In ‘American Bandstand,’ Stanley’s figures are elongated representations of American caricatures, though the painting represents Stanley’s own experience of romantic involvement with an addict, who often would become sick. The work therefore expresses the roles required of women — in Stanley’s own words: “cleaning up after men.”
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Pictured: M. Louise Stanley, ‘American Bandstand’, 1976, Oil on canvas, 36 3/8 x 43 1/2 inches

We’re in booth 602 at  , showcasing paintings and drawings by Craig Calderwood, now on view through Sunday January 21st....
01/19/2024

We’re in booth 602 at , showcasing paintings and drawings by Craig Calderwood, now on view through Sunday January 21st. Come visit!

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, ...
01/18/2024

‘Going Our Way,’ a group exhibition of works by influential Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, Viola Frey, M. Louise Stanley, and William T. Wiley is currently on view at our gallery through February 17th.

Joan Brown’s beloved dog, a bull terrier named Bob, appeared as the subject of several of her works throughout the 1960s. Brown employed animals in her paintings often to serve the role of silent yet wise spectators, illustrating contrasting realities shared between humans and animals. Brown was inspired and influenced by the presence of animals in Old Master paintings such as those by Diego Veláquez, noting “...the connection and psychic response that the animal picks up from the person, is something that continues to fascinate me.”

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Above: Joan Brown, ‘Joan Brown (Bob the Dog Twice)’, 1961, Enamel on museum board, 39 x 29 inches.
Photograph of Joan Brown and her dog, Bob, published in ‘The Art of Joan Brown,’ 1998.

Viola Frey’s work is distinguished by her unique perspective on figurative art conveyed through the versatile medium of ...
01/11/2024

Viola Frey’s work is distinguished by her unique perspective on figurative art conveyed through the versatile medium of ceramics.

Currently showcased in the exhibition ‘Going Our Way,’ Viola Frey’s works, including ‘World Civilization #1,’ ‘Crocker Series III,’ and ‘Pair of Standing Nudes,’ exemplify her feminist perspective on sculpture. While Frey drew inspiration from various interests, her work prominently reflects gender dynamics. Frey’s focus on women empowers them, placing them in commanding positions, while men assume more subservient roles. The lofty ‘World Civilization #1’ features a commanding female figure above suited businessmen, underscoring Frey’s exploration of power dynamics. On a smaller scale, her signature plates showcase female silhouettes, and a modest pairing of nudes centers around the female form.

Explore Viola Frey’s compelling works alongside those of her contemporaries in ‘Going Our Way,’ on view through February 17.
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Pictured: Installation view, ‘Going Our Way,’ George Adams Gallery, New York, NY, 2024; Viola Frey, ‘Crocker Series III,’ 1979. Ceramic sculpture, 20 1/4 x 20 1/4 x 2 3/4 inches. © Artists’ Legacy Foundation/ Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

The George Adams Gallery is pleased to announce our participation in FOG FOCUS 2024. The invitational platform, created ...
01/09/2024

The George Adams Gallery is pleased to announce our participation in FOG FOCUS 2024. The invitational platform, created in conjunction with the 10th anniversary of FOG Design + Art, highlights young and underrepresented artists. Our booth will present a selection of paintings and drawings by the Bay Area artist Craig Calderwood.

Included in the presentation are recent paintings ‘Bad Panacea,’ ‘Bassoon Song for a Sad Baguette,’ and ‘Silver Water Turns Her Blue’ (2023) which depict still lives after models Calderwood created with fruits and vegetables while working at a grocery store. The tapestries are coded with comic-like narratives imbued with personal meaning throughout the intricate borders. Also included are highly detailed drawings, all pen and ink, which portray specific instances from Calderwood’s childhood.

More images and information can be found at the link in our bio.

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Pictured: Craig Calderwood, ‘Bassoon Song for a Sad Baguette,’ 2023. Denim, thread, acrylic, metal clips, bisque ceramic, One Shot enamel paint, 82 1/2 x 61 inches.

Now on view at the gallery is ‘Going Our Way,’ an exhibition of paintings, sculptures, and drawings by Bay Area artists ...
01/06/2024

Now on view at the gallery is ‘Going Our Way,’ an exhibition of paintings, sculptures, and drawings by Bay Area artists Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, Viola Frey, M. Louise Stanley and William T. Wiley. The artists included are connected through the unique influence of the Bay Area on their work, and the title reflects each artist’s response to prevailing trends spanning the 1960s to the 1980s.

More information and images can be found at the link in our bio.

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Pictured: Installation view, ‘Going Our Way,’ George Adams Gallery, New York, NY, 2024.

Happy New Year! We hope everyone had a wonderful holiday season and is looking forward to the year ahead. ‘Going Our Way...
01/02/2024

Happy New Year! We hope everyone had a wonderful holiday season and is looking forward to the year ahead.

‘Going Our Way,’ our upcoming group exhibition of Bay Area art from the 60s-80s opens this Friday, January 5th. M. Louise Stanley’s ‘American Bandstand, Bicentennial’ reflects the idiosyncratic, personal approach that characterizes the Bay Area style from the period. Also included are paintings, sculptures, and drawings by Stanley’s contemporaries Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, Viola Frey and William T. Wiley.

We hope to see you at the opening reception this Friday from 6 - 8 pm!

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Pictured: M. Louise Stanley, ‘American Bandstand, Bicentennial,’ 1976. Oil on canvas, 37 x 42 inches.

This is the final week to view our exhibition of tapestries and drawings by Craig Calderwood: ‘Ambrosia Salad, Bad Panac...
12/19/2023

This is the final week to view our exhibition of tapestries and drawings by Craig Calderwood: ‘Ambrosia Salad, Bad Panacea and Other Works.’ Also closing is our exhibition in the back gallery of works on paper by Peter Saul dating to the 1960s and a short documentary film providing context about his early work.  

Both exhibitions will be on view through December 22. We are closed December 23 - January 1 and will reopen with normal hours on Tuesday, January 2. Happy Holidays and we look forward to seeing you in the New Year!

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Pictured: Installation view, Craig Calderwood, ‘Ambrosia Salad, Bad Panacea and Other Works, George Adams Gallery, New York, NY, 2023; Installation view, Peter Saul, ‘Selected Works on Paper from the 1960s,’ George Adams Gallery, New York, NY, 2023.

We are pleased to announce ‘Going Our Way,’ our upcoming group exhibition of paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Robe...
12/14/2023

We are pleased to announce ‘Going Our Way,’ our upcoming group exhibition of paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Robert Arneson, Joan Brown, Roy De Forest, Viola Frey, M. Louise Stanley, and William T. Wiley, opening January 5.

Known for its enduring commitment to art from the San Francisco Bay Area, the exhibition maintains the gallery’s tradition of championing the region’s artistic heritage. The artists included are connected through the unique influence of the Bay Area on their work, and the title reflects each artist’s response to prevailing trends over a span of three decades. In their own way, each celebrates an intimate, subjective, and idiosyncratic autobiographical expression – an approach that the exhibition traces from their earliest work in the 1960s and continues through the 1970s and 1980s.

Please join us for an opening reception on Friday, January 5, from 6 - 8 pm!

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Pictured: Viola Frey, ‘Pair of Nudes,’ 1970. Glazed earthenware, 8 5/8 inches; Joan Brown, ‘Dancers #3,’ 1972. Enamel on masonite, 72 x 48 inches.

Works by Robert Arneson, Luis Cruz Azaceta, Roy De Forest, and William T. Wiley are included in ‘Nuts and Who’s: A Candy...
12/09/2023

Works by Robert Arneson, Luis Cruz Azaceta, Roy De Forest, and William T. Wiley are included in ‘Nuts and Who’s: A Candy Store Sampler,’ currently on view at the San Jose Museum of Art.

The exhibition focuses on the artistic ideas and trends in the Bay Area in the ‘60s to ‘80s, in opposition to those on the East Coast, which converged at the Candy Store Gallery in Folsom, California. Founded by Adeliza McHugh, the gallery became a focal point for collaboration and interaction among artists associated with California’s Funk and Nut art, as well as Chicago’s Hairy Who, leading to the unintentional emergence of unique alternatives to the prominent art movements of the era.

The exhibition will be on view through February 25, 2024.

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Pictured: Installation views of ‘Nuts and Who’s: A Candy Store Sampler,’ San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose, CA, 2023. Photo: Glen Cheriton, Impart Photography.

The traveling retrospective ‘Juan Francisco Elso: Por América' is now on view at its final stop at the Museum of Contemp...
12/05/2023

The traveling retrospective ‘Juan Francisco Elso: Por América' is now on view at its final stop at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Miami.

Organized by El Museo del Barrio, it is the largest survey of the late Cuban artist’s career to-date and highlights the evolution of Elso’s practice, including his experimentation with new materials and incorporation of Indigenous traditions, Afro-Caribbean beliefs, and post-colonial perspectives. The exhibition features interrelated thematic sections with works by more than 30 artists, offering vital crosscurrents between Elso’s art and the creative output of close colleagues as well as those who demonstrated parallel affinities.

The exhibition will be on view through March 17, 2024.
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Pictured: Installation view, Juan Francisco Elso, Transparency of God gallery through El Rostro de Dios, 1987-1988. Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio.

Related to Peter Saul’s ‘Icebox’ series of paintings, this study captures the artist's unique iteration of Pop art.In th...
11/18/2023

Related to Peter Saul’s ‘Icebox’ series of paintings, this study captures the artist's unique iteration of Pop art.

In the early 1960s, Saul made a number of paintings depicting the contents of fridges, variously titled ‘Icebox.’ Crowded and chaotic, the images could not be further from the deadpan sensibility of the Pop artists such as Warhol. However, the subject matter speaks to the consumerism and greed of American culture in Saul’s inimitable, instantly recognizable style.

See more works by Peter Saul in ‘Peter Saul: Selected Works on Paper from the 1960s,’ on view in the back gallery through December 22.

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Pictured: Peter Saul, Untitled (Study for Ice Box), c. 1963. Ink on paper, 6 3/4 x 9 1/4 inches.

‘Pictures of Peter Saul,’ a short film of an interview with the artist, is currently on view in our back gallery as part...
11/14/2023

‘Pictures of Peter Saul,’ a short film of an interview with the artist, is currently on view in our back gallery as part of an exhibition featuring a selection of Saul’s works on paper from the 1960s. 

Dating to 1969, the footage was taken after Saul’s return to the United States following almost a decade overseas. Complemented by early works on paper in the exhibition, viewers have the unique opportunity to listen to Saul describe seminal paintings such as ‘Typical Saigon’ and ‘Untitled ($62,000)' at the time of their making. 

The exhibition and film will be on view through December 22, 2023.

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Pictured: Still from ‘Pictures of Peter Saul,’ 1969. Produced by Kai Mel de Fontenay.

Two works by Roy de Forest are on view in the exhibition ‘To the Max!’ at the di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art in Nap...
11/09/2023

Two works by Roy de Forest are on view in the exhibition ‘To the Max!’ at the di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art in Napa, CA.

Spanning a variety of media, the works in the exhibition spotlight California artists who defied minimalist dictates in favor of bold layers of color, pattern, material and texture. Depicting rich fantastical imagery, De Forest’s ‘Out of a Misspent Life, A New Future’ and ‘Camp of the Landscape Artists’ encapsulate his sentiment that art is “one of the last strongholds of magic.”

The exhibition will be on view through August 25, 2024.
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Pictured: Installation views of ‘Out of a Misspent Life, A New Future’ (1978) and ‘Camp of the Landscape Artists’ (1991) in ‘To the Max!’ at the di Rosa Center for the Arts, Napa, CA, 2023.

Now on view at the gallery are Craig Calderwood, ‘Ambrosia Salad, Bad Panacea and Other Works,’ and Peter Saul, ‘Selecte...
11/04/2023

Now on view at the gallery are Craig Calderwood, ‘Ambrosia Salad, Bad Panacea and Other Works,’ and Peter Saul, ‘Selected Works on Paper from the 1960s.’ Calderwood’s intricately patterned tapestries and drawings are heavily autobiographical and reference their identity as a q***r and trans individual. Installed in the back gallery, works on paper by Saul in the early stage of his career combine bright color and cartoon-like forms with an all-over composition reminiscent of abstract expressionism.

Both exhibitions will be on view through December 22. More information can be found at the link in our bio.

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Pictured: Installation view, Craig Calderwood, ‘Ambrosia Salad, Bad Panacea and Other Works,’ George Adams Gallery, New York, NY, 2023; Installation view, Peter Saul, ‘Selected Works on Paper from the 1960s,’ George Adams Gallery, New York, NY, 2023.

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38 Walker Street
New York, NY
10013

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10am - 6pm
Wednesday 10am - 6pm
Thursday 10am - 6pm
Friday 10am - 6pm
Saturday 11am - 6pm

Telephone

+1 212-564-8480

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History of the Gallery

The George Adams Gallery traces its origins to the Allan Frumkin Gallery, Chicago, founded in 1952. In 1959 Allan Frumkin opened a gallery in New York, which later became its principal location. George Adams’ association began with the New York gallery in 1980; he and Mr. Frumkin formed a partnership in 1988 when the gallery’s name was changed to Frumkin/Adams. Following Mr. Frumkin’s retirement in 1995, the gallery became the George Adams Gallery and in 2005, after 46 years on 57th Street, relocated to West 26th Street in Chelsea. Today, the George Adams Gallery represents the estates of Robert Arneson (1930-1992), Elmer Bischoff (1916-1991), Joan Brown (1938-1990), Roy De Forest (1930-2007), and Gregory Gillespie (1936-2000), while regularly exhibiting the work of contemporary artists such as Enrique Chagoya, Diane Edison, Amer Kobaslija, Andrew Lenaghan and Peter Saul, as well as with emerging and under-recognized artists. Having a long association with art from the San Francisco Bay Area, the gallery’s program maintains a focus on furthering the appreciation of art from the region.

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