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The Met Cloisters

The Met Cloisters The Met Cloisters, located on four acres overlooking the Hudson River in northern Manhattan's Fort T

The Met Cloisters, located on four acres overlooking the Hudson River in northern Manhattan's Fort Tryon Park, is the branch of the Museum dedicated to the art, architecture, and gardens of medieval Europe. Deriving its name from the medieval cloisters that form the core of the building, it presents a harmonious and evocative setting for more than 2,000 exceptional artworks and architectural eleme

The Met Cloisters, located on four acres overlooking the Hudson River in northern Manhattan's Fort Tryon Park, is the branch of the Museum dedicated to the art, architecture, and gardens of medieval Europe. Deriving its name from the medieval cloisters that form the core of the building, it presents a harmonious and evocative setting for more than 2,000 exceptional artworks and architectural eleme

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 is named for the sculptural elements from five medieval cloisters that are incorporated into the modern building. A clo...
02/04/2021

is named for the sculptural elements from five medieval cloisters that are incorporated into the modern building. A cloister is formed by an open courtyard surrounded by covered passageways that provide access to other spaces in a monastery. The Saint-Guilhem Cloister contains elements from the now-destroyed upper level of the cloister from the Benedictine abbey of Saint-Guilhem-le-Desert (near Montpellier).

Carved from limestone in the late 12th or early 13th century, the delicate nature of the stone needs to be protected from harsh weather conditions, which was recognized when the Museum was designed. A skylight provides natural daylight to the gallery (along with supplemental lighting), and the changing pattern of light throughout the day enhances the deeply-carved sculptural elements. Many of the capitals, columns, pilasters, and abaci are carved with a variety of plant forms, some of which were influenced by antique Roman types. A selection of the plants represented in the sculpture is displayed in the central courtyard of the gallery or elsewhere in the gardens. Nature was clearly a source of creativity for the sculptors.

Among the plant forms that can be identified are: acanthus, palms, ivy, and hops. Our collection of date and fan palms displayed in this gallery was the subject of an earlier post. The second image in this post shows the distinctive layered, rough texture of a palm trunk portrayed in one of the Saint-Guilhem column shafts. is the most commonly represented plant form in the cloister. The curled, textured leaves are deeply carved with drilled accents, and used to create highly decorative patterns.

Saint-Guilhem Cloister, late 12th-early 13th century, France. Limestone. 25.120.1-.134.

[image descriptions, in order: Saint-Guilhem Cloister lit by the large skylight with art objects visible in the surrounding walkway. Two pale gray columns in the St-Guilhem Cloister; one of the columns imitates a palm tree while the other has a tiered, acanthus-leaf pattern capital. A pilaster (rectangular, decorative column projecting from a wall) with an acanthus motif. A potted Acanthus mollis.]

The Met Cloisters collection includes spectacular examples of 14th-century Austrian stained glass, including twenty-thre...
01/21/2021

The Met Cloisters collection includes spectacular examples of 14th-century Austrian stained glass, including twenty-three panels from the Church of St. Leonhard im Lavanttal. Installed in the three central windows in the Gothic Chapel (swipe to see the gallery), the ensemble combines narrative scenes and locally venerated saints. One of the most special features of the museum’s design is the abundance of exterior windows that allow stained glass to be displayed as originally intended, with natural daylight streaming through it. The panel illustrated here represents Saint Agnes, whose feast day is celebrated today. The saint stands within an archway, flanked by columns, and surrounded by a foliate border. She is depicted as a young girl with long blond hair, clothed in a luminous green gown with a light yellow bottom border, and a bright red mantle lined in brilliant yellow.

Saint Agnes was a Roman virgin martyr (symbolized by the palm frond in her right hand). Her name evokes the Latin word for lamb, which she holds in her left hand, alluding to her innocence. According to legend, Saint Agnes was raised in a wealthy Christian family, refused many suitors, claiming she wished to remain chaste, and was put to death at the age of thirteen after she was reported to the authorities. Revered for her innocence and purity, she is the patron saint of young girls.

Saint Agnes Eve was a traditional time for love divination, when various rituals were performed to encourage dreams of one’s future husband. They included saying prayers to the saint, fasting, walking backwards to bed, sleeping with a Dumb Cake (a salty biscuit) beneath your pillow, and leaving a sprig of rosemary and thyme sprinkled with urine in each of your shoes. We’ve missed our chance this year, but perhaps one of these options will appeal to an adventurous reader next January 20.

Saint Agnes, Austria, 1340-50. Pot-metal glass, colorless glass, and vitreous paint. 65.98

[ID: A bright photo of the stained glass panel depicting Saint Agnes is followed by a photo of the Gothic Chapel, a gallery at in the form of a 13th-century chapel with tomb effigies.]

Many Orthodox churches around the world, including the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, celebrate Christmas today, on January ...
01/07/2021

Many Orthodox churches around the world, including the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, celebrate Christmas today, on January 7, rather than December 25 like many western traditions. This double-sided manuscript leaf was once part of a complete, illustrated gospel book made in in the 14th century in what is now the Tigray region of Ethiopia. One thousand years before the creation of this leaf, the region converted to Christianity under King Ezana of Aksum and became a key stop along trade routes between Constantinople (capital of the Byzantine empire) and India. Aksum’s location along such routes allowed political leaders and artists greater access to cultural centers of the larger Christian world such as Alexandria and Jerusalem, resulting in a flourishing exchange of goods and artistic ideas.

The artist of this manuscript leaf employed bright colors and bold forms to present an evocative image of the Crucifixion. The striking detail of the empty cross is a common feature of 14th-century Ethiopian images of the Crucifixion. To medieval Ethiopian Christians, the absence of Christ’s body reflected their hope in Christ’s triumph over death and his resurrection. Comparisons have been made between illuminated images such as these and Ethiopian processional crosses. Swipe left for an example in from the collection. Also attributed to the Tigray region, this intricate cross—which excludes any image of Christ’s crucified body—would have been carried through liturgical processions.

Double-Sided Gospel Leaf, first half 14th century, Tigray, Ethiopia. Tempera on parchment. 2006.100.

Ezra (Ethiopian, 1460–1522). Processional Cross, ca. 1500, Tigray, Ethiopia. Wood and tin. 1999.103.

[Image description: A photo of one side of a Double-Side Gospel Leaf. The Crucifixion is represented by a monumental jeweled cross topped by a Lamb of God and at the sides are the two thieves bound to their crosses. the parchment is yellowed and the painting in dramatic reds and a dark blue-black. The second slide is a photo of an intricately carved wood Processional Cross, an elaborately carved wood structure inlaid with metal.]

The entrances and galleries of The Met Cloisters are decked with traditional holiday decorations through January 4. Arch...
12/24/2020

The entrances and galleries of The Met Cloisters are decked with traditional holiday decorations through January 4. Arches, wreaths, and other embellishments are made from fresh greenery and other plants and nuts associated with the Christmas season, inspired by research on medieval Christmastide. The handsome wheat sheaf in the Langon Chapel is based on visual evidence found in many works of medieval and later art. Many depictions of the Nativity include a sheaf of wheat near the manger where baby Jesus lies, or he even rests upon a heap of wheat. This grain has been identified with life and renewal since antiquity and was later incorporated into Christian iconography and liturgy. The inclusion of wheat in scenes from Jesus’s infancy alludes to the sacramental aspect of his birth, foreshadowing the bread of the Mass.

A detail from a tiny, precious Book of Hours by Simon Bening illustrates the connection between the holiday decorations and the museum’s collection. Bening’s Nativity scene is set at night in a courtyard between a ruined wall and a church façade. The Virgin and Joseph kneel, hands raised in prayer, with the newborn Child between them. A bundle of wheat lies on the ground behind the infant. The second image from this manuscript depicts the Adoration of the Magi, the opening that is now on view.

For additional information about the holiday decorations and their context, follow the link in our bio to our new digital brochure. https://www.metmuseum.org/met-cloisters-holidays

Simon Bening. Book of Hours. Netherlandish, made in Bruges ca. 1530-35. Tempera, gold, and ink on parchment; modern red leather binding. 2015.276

[image descriptions: A photo of Langon Chapel during Christmastide. A large candelabra stands by the altar frontal, decorated in fresh ivy, white roses, and other plant materials, with a perfectly gathered sheaf of wheat sitting in the foreground. Slides 2 and 3 feature paintings from Bening's Book of Hours, the Nativity and Adoration of the Magi respectively. Both paintings are exquisitely detailed for their size with bright blues, reds, and gold embellishing each.]

Happy snow day! Here at The  snow days feel especially magical. Swipe through the photos above of our snow-laden gardens...
12/17/2020

Happy snow day! Here at The snow days feel especially magical. Swipe through the photos above of our snow-laden gardens to see what we mean.

If you are feeling intrepid and able to travel through Fort Tryon Park in the snow, we invite you to enjoy the tranquility with us. Timed entry and guidelines for a safe visit are available through our website. Link in bio. Please note that when it snows, M4 bus service to our front doors is suspended until the park is plowed.

[image descriptions: Six photographs of the fresh snow in the outdoor spaces of the Museum. 1. Outside the Museum, a view of the facade and tower through the falling snow. 2. Bonnefont Garden with bare quince trees and an untouched blanket of snow. 3. A glimpse of Bonnefont through a narrow window, taken from Trie Cloister. 4 & 5. Views of the arcades in Trie and Bonnefont, snow drifts spilling onto the walkways through the columns and arches ringing their gardens. 6. A view of Trie Garden through the columns of the cloister, fallen snow covering the ground and sculptural fountain at the center.]

Tearing your hair out this week? Contemplating pulling the hair of another? Don't do it! Explore a work of art instead! ...
11/05/2020

Tearing your hair out this week? Contemplating pulling the hair of another? Don't do it! Explore a work of art instead!

This carved stone corbel, which once supported the overhanging roof of a French church, shows interlocking figures of different sizes pulling each other's long hair and beards. Hair- and beard-pullers were popular subjects of medieval art. Though their significance is not always clear today, as with many examples of medieval body language, the gesture may allude to an inner state of being - in this case, emotional turmoil or spiritual anguish.

Corbel with Five Interlaced Hair-Pulling Acrobats, France, ca. 1150–1200. Limestone. 34.21.2.

[image description: A stone block is carved with one larger central figure flanked by four smaller figures, two on each side. The figures pull long strands of each other's hair as well as the long beard of the largest figure. Slide 2 is a close up of the figures.]

Boo! This spoooky image of an ultraviolet (UV) examination and photography of Christ Child with an Apple is our Hallowee...
10/30/2020

Boo! This spoooky image of an ultraviolet (UV) examination and photography of Christ Child with an Apple is our Halloween treat. Did you ever receive the dreaded apple instead of candy when you trick-or-treated as a child?

This sculpture of the Christ Child in collection is in remarkable condition, retaining most of its original polychromy (fig. 2 and 3). Ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence is commonly used to detect restorations on painted surfaces. Inconsistencies in application of materials, from original paint layers to recently applied adhesives or paint, can be visually distinguished by their different reactions to the radiation. Here, the restored areas of the sculpture --narrow vertical streaks caused by paint loss around cracks, have absorbed the radiation. They appear darker than the aged original lead-based flesh tones, which fluoresce a bluish white.

Circle of Michel Erhart (German, Ulm, active 1464–1522). Christ Child with an Apple, ca. 1470–80. Willow with original paint and traces of gold. 2012.449.

[image descriptions: Slide 1 is an eerily dark photo of a painted wooden sculpture of the Christ Child. His skin appears white and blue and the cracks in the paint are almost black. He is n**e and holds an apple in his right hand. The subsequent slide shows the figure as he appears in our galleries, with his ruddy cheeks, round belly, curly hair and pale complexion. The cracks visible in the UV photograph are no longer readily apparent. Slide 3 is a close up of the red and yellow apple he holds.]

Shaped like a miniature chapel, this incredibly rare reliquary shrine is one of the jewels of . On October 30, 1940, eig...
10/29/2020

Shaped like a miniature chapel, this incredibly rare reliquary shrine is one of the jewels of . On October 30, 1940, eighty years ago this week, the N**i regime began the systematic plunder of thousands of artworks from Jewish families in France. Hermann Göring, a leading N**i official during World War II, stole this reliquary from the Paris residence of Edmond de Rothschild for his private collection filled with artworks he unlawfully seized. Thankfully, “monuments men,” dispatched by the U.S. and British governments for the first time in the history of warfare to restitute works of art to their rightful owners, located the shrine at the war’s end and returned it to Edmond de Rothschild’s heirs on June 3, 1948. Come see it in the 150th anniversary exhibition, “Making The Met,” through January 3, 2021 alongside other works in the Museum’s collection associated with World War II.

Attributed to Jean de Touyl (French, died 1349/50). Reliquary Shrine, ca. 1325–50. Gilded silver, translucent enamel, paint. 62.96.

[image descriptions: Slides 1 and 2 are studio photographs of the reliquary front and back, respectively. It sits against a soft gray backdrop with the wings open to show the interior of the chapel. The Virgin and Child are accompanied by angels in the central "building" with gilded arches, vaults, and other architectural elements. The wings are of translucent enamel, depicting Mary's life and the Infancy of Christ and evoking stained glass. Slides 3 and 4 show the reliquary, along with other objects, installed in Making The Met.]

Tune in Saturday, October 24th at 10 am Eastern to learn about behind-the-scenes activities that close out our growing s...
10/23/2020

Tune in Saturday, October 24th at 10 am Eastern to learn about behind-the-scenes activities that close out our growing season and pave the way for next year's bounty and display. Horticultural staff will walk us through the importance of the harvest season, bulb planting and propagation for spring, and the time-intensive holiday decorations they create and display in our galleries at the close of the calendar year.

Above: Delicious and bountiful during the fall harvest, grapes like the ones grown in our courtyard were transformed into wine, an important beverage in the Middle Ages which was regularly consumed and enjoyed.

Check our link in bio to visit the event page for more information and direct links to YouTube and Facebook.

[image description: A photo of the concord grapes growing at The Met Cloisters. These pale green grapes hang in full bunches from twisting vines with broad, dark green leaves, against the stone of the Museum facade.]

 is proud to announce the completion of a book on The Conservation of Medieval Polychrome Wood Sculpture. With this publ...
10/16/2020

is proud to announce the completion of a book on The Conservation of Medieval Polychrome Wood Sculpture. With this publication, Met conservator Lucretia Kargère and professor Michele Marincola from the Conservation Center (and former staff member) fill a gap in the conservation literature, which has no comprehensive English-language reference. A real challenge in creating this publication was distilling an enormous body of literature, mostly in four languages, on the materials and methods of medieval polychrome wood sculptures, and their treatment. The authors conducted research and interviews with conservators in America and Europe and incorporated their own experience at The Met Cloisters in examining and conserving polychrome wood sculpture. Rather than being a recipe book, the volume provides access to the decision-making processes, the history of care, the scientific rational, and the types of materials and treatments that might be appropriate today. Many images from The Cloisters Collection are included, and four case studies illustrate key moments in a sculpture’s treatment history reconsidered in the light of current practices.

Those interested may find the book at the Getty store website.

Tilman Riemenschneider (German, 1460–1531). Seated Bishop, ca. 1495. Limewood and gray-black stain. 1970.137.1.

Enthroned Virgin and Child, France, ca. 1130–1140. Birch with paint and glass. 47.101.15.

[image descriptions: Slide 1, the cover of The Conservation of Medieval Polychrome Wood featuring The Visitation from the Medieval Department collection at The Met, a painted and gilded wood sculpture of Mary and Elizabeth that was highlighted in a collections post just last week. Slide 2, the Seated Bishop from The Cloisters Collection during treatment circa 1970, halfway through the removal of a more modern coat of paint. Slides 3 and 4, detail of Mary's face from The Enthroned Virgin and Child, another piece from The Cloisters Collection, before and after treatment respectively. Treatment included compensation of crack and remodeling of proper left eye.]

The top of this block of limestone was transformed into a four-sided capital in southern Italy by a skilled stone carver...
10/15/2020

The top of this block of limestone was transformed into a four-sided capital in southern Italy by a skilled stone carver working in the first part of the 13th century. Its sides evoke an era in which different cultures mingled together in trade, travel, and conflict. In 863 a monk named Theodosius wrote of the grandeur of Palermo, describing it as “full of citizens and strangers. . . . Blended with the Sicilians the Greeks, the Lombards and the Jews, there are Arabs, Berbers, Persians, Tartars, Africans, some wrapped in long robes and turbans . . . faces oval, square, or round, of every complexion and profile, beards and hair of every variety of color and cut.” The four heads emerging from acanthus leaves to form the corners of this capital attest to Theodosius’ comments. The heads are close in style to other examples by Apulian sculptors working for the court of Frederick II Hohenstaufen.

Capital with Four Heads, Italy, ca. 1225-50. Limestone. 55.66.

[image descriptions: Five photos show the capital, the top portion of a column, at various angles. We start with the top of the limestone capital, bare except for a groove that sections off one quarter of the square plane. The subsequent photos of the the four subjects carved into the corners of this capital show a diversity of features, ages, and dress.]

The meeting of two women, their torsos fitted with rock-crystal cabochons, is the central subject of a profoundly moving...
10/08/2020

The meeting of two women, their torsos fitted with rock-crystal cabochons, is the central subject of a profoundly moving devotional statue. The sculpture was originally made for a community of women at the Convent of Saint Katharinenthal, Lake Constance. Elizabeth, the mother of John the Baptist and cousin to Mary, meets Mary, mother of Jesus, and they share the news of their pregnancy. Mary tenderly places her hand on Elizabeth’s shoulder, while Elizabeth, touching her chest, exclaims, “Who am I, that the mother of the Lord should visit me?” (Luke 1:43). The text of Elizabeth’s statement adorns the hem that unfurls over her left shoulder.

Attributed to Master Heinrich of Constance (German, active in Constance, ca. 1300), ca. 1310–20. The Visitation. Walnut, paint, gilding, rock-crystal cabochons inset in gilt-silver mounts. 17.190.724.

[image descriptions: Two figures, carved from wood, stand at a little over 23 inches high. They are dressed in flowing, gilded robes, their hair covered by draping, ivory scarves, all with painted and gilded geometric patterns at the hems. Large, rock-crystal cabochons (polished and rounded gems with a flat back, as opposed to faceted gems) adorn each of their torsos. Mary and Elizabeth look at each other with kindly expressions and smiling eyes. Their faces are painted in soft pinks. Slides 1 and 2 show the full-length of the figures from front and back, slides 3 and 4 are close-ups of the women's faces, and slide 5 is a detail of the hem of Elizabeth's garment draped across her chest and shoulder with the text of her exclamation.]

During the Middle Ages, did artists of different media share ideas about technique, composition, and style? This certain...
10/01/2020

During the Middle Ages, did artists of different media share ideas about technique, composition, and style? This certainly seems to have been the case in 10th-century Spain. Take, for example, this stone capital and ivory pyxis, or cylindrical box. Although made of different materials, these objects have a lot in common. Both date to ca. 950 CE and both were produced in Córdoba under the royal patronage of Abd al-Rahman III, the Umayyad caliph of al-Andalus. Each surface is decorated with small flowers and climbing, scrolling vines terminating in unfurling leaves. By deeply drilling the stone and carefully carving the ivory, the artists play with contrast, shadow, and positive and negative space. Such lace-like surfaces proved to be a ‘trend’ of 10th-century Córdoba. This fashionable ornamentation can even be found in the architecture of the Great Mosque of Córdoba, where Abd al-Rahman III would have attended Friday prayers.


Capital, ca. 960, Cordoba, Andalusia, Spain. Stone. 25.120.508.

Pyxis, ca. 950–75, Cordoba, Andalusia, Spain. Elephant ivory. 1970.324.5.

[image descriptions: The first slide is a studio photo of a beige, carved-stone capital, or topmost portion of a column. The second slide is a studio photo of a pyxis, an often cylindrical box with a lid used to store toiletries, carved of elephant ivory. These objects share stylistic similarities as described above.]

Many of you know us for our gardens and hopefully you’ve heard about one of our newer acquisitions, the Book of Flower S...
09/24/2020

Many of you know us for our gardens and hopefully you’ve heard about one of our newer acquisitions, the Book of Flower Studies (swipe to see one of the paintings in the book). One of our younger visitors was inspired by both and we were lucky enough to see his !

Max even shared his insight, “There was a book at The Cloisters that inspired me - each page had flowers and insects and it was beautiful.” We agree, it’s a beautiful book and we enjoy flowers and insects too (though we ask that the insects stay in the gardens 🐛).

Now that the Museum has reopened, we hope you are able to join us before the season is over. Come enjoy our three gardens and the Book of Flower Studies, on view in the Unicorn Tapestries Gallery. Plan your visit at our link in bio and remember to tag us if you create your own !

Master of Claude de France, French. Book of Flower Studies, ca. 1510-1515. Opaque watercolor, organic glazes, gold and silver paint, iron and carbon-based ink and charcoal on parchment. 2019.197.

[image descriptions: Slide 1 is a photograph of a page from a wide-rule notebook with writing in pencil at the top and a vibrant colored pencil drawing of red flowers and insects on the lower half. The writing reads, “List of [flowers] 1. mums 2. garlick 3. apple tree,” and “2020 incect gardin, max Sept 18.” Slide 2 is a folio from the Book of Flower Studies. A watercolor painting of a red corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas) with a brown fly sitting on the blue-green leaves of the plant fills the parchment page.]

“I ring for breakfast, dinner, and drinks.” The inscription on this unassuming bronze bell proclaims its purpose: assemb...
09/18/2020

“I ring for breakfast, dinner, and drinks.” The inscription on this unassuming bronze bell proclaims its purpose: assembling the community of a monastery for meals and refreshments. Smaller than the taller and more familiar church bell, this rare refectory bell evokes the sounds of life in the medieval cloister. If you flip the bell over (swipe through), you’ll note the absence of a clapper. It makes a beautiful, almost cheerful tone when struck with a mallet, ringing clearly and loudly before fading away. May it bring you together for whatever meals and drinks you might be planning, and may it strike a tone for essential workers. We’ve rung it before and will have the chance to ring it again, now that the Museum has reopened!

Refectory Bell, 13th century, German. Copper alloy. 2014.87.

[image descriptions: An aged, copper bell with a shallow bowl is decorated with four roundels and ringed in a Latin inscription. The roundels are worn, sitting near the crown of the bell, and depict two angels, a winged lion, and the Lamb of God. The final photograph shows the interior of the bell, which is smooth and has no clapper.]

Happy  day! The  is now open to the public and we are excited to welcome everyone back to our galleries and gardens!Swip...
09/12/2020

Happy day! The is now open to the public and we are excited to welcome everyone back to our galleries and gardens!

Swipe through for photos from our members days Thursday and Friday this week for a look at how we are following safety guidelines and protecting our staff and visitors. All are required to wear masks while in the galleries and gardens, follow a predetermined route through galleries to maintain social distancing, and reserve timed entry slots to keep the Museum at 25% capacity or below. Visit our link in bio for more information on these guidelines and to reserve your timed tickets.

Thank you to our community for your support and excitement. We look forward to seeing you again soon!

Photos 1-5 by Paula Lobo.

[image descriptions: Various views of our galleries and gardens, with visitors and staff wearing masks as they join us for The Met Cloisters' members reopening. In order we have: Visitor Experience staff welcoming members at the Admissions desk in the Main Hall with newly installed plexi barriers. Two members pose for a photo on the stairs into the Museum. A view of the Judy Black Garden in Cuxa Cloister with a sign calling for social distancing visible in the foreground. Another view of the Judy Black Garden with two members enjoying the vibrant flowers and greenery as they stand near the central fountain. A visitor stands in the Unicorn Tapestries Gallery, between The Unicorn in Captivity and The Unicorn Purifies Water near our narwhal tusk. Visitors enjoy various art objects in our Glass Gallery while one of our guards keeps his post nearby. A parent and two children stand silhouetted in Langon Chapel as they point and examine the architecture of the gallery.]

The Met Cloisters’ doors are opening again! Get ready to cross the threshold into the Middle Ages on September 12.  Did ...
09/10/2020

The Met Cloisters’ doors are opening again! Get ready to cross the threshold into the Middle Ages on September 12.

Did you know that most of the doorways connecting Cloisters galleries were made during the Middle Ages? That’s right – you can pass through stone portals carved hundreds of years ago! When the museum was built in the 1930s, many fragments of medieval architecture were incorporated into the modern building fabric.

Your visit to The Met Cloisters follows a chronological path traversing each of these portals through time. But don’t just walk through them! Be sure to take a close look at their many finely carved details and intricate metalwork fittings.

Visit our link in bio for more information on our new open hours and days, safety guidelines, and how to reserve a time for your visit. As always, the health and safety of our visitors remains our top priority. See you soon!

Doorway from the Abbey of Notre-Dame at Nevers, France, 13th century. Limestone. 54.164.87.
Doorway from Saint-Sulpice at Coulangé, France, mid-12th century. Limestone. 25.120.878.
Doorway from Notre-Dame at Reugny, Loire Valley, France, late 12th century. Limestone. 34.120.1–.120.
Arch with Beasts, from Languedoc-Rousillon, France, ca. 1150-75. Marble. 22.58.1a.
Pair of Doors with Ironwork, made in France or Spain, 12th century. Oak and iron. 25.120.291, .292.
Doorway from Moutiers-Saint-Jean, Burgundy, France, ca. 1250. White oolitic limestone with traces of paint. 32.147.
Doorway, from Gascony, France, 15th-16th century. Limestone. 35.35.14.
Doorway, from Poitou, France, ca. 1520-30. Limestone. 40.147.3.
Unicorn Doorway, from Auvergne, France, early 16th century. Volcanic stone. 48.28.

[Image description: Nine photographs of carved stone doorways with different decorative details, including flowers, animals, and figures.]

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Join us for a virtual tour of The Met Cloisters! Registration required: https://bit.ly/3bOIGg0
Cheers for the weekend! So much family fun happening around town, including Garden Day at The Met Cloisters. Explore medieval herbs and gardens with tours, demonstrations, and family-friendly art-making activities in a magical castle-like setting. Last time we went we discovered the kids like sorrel (and the goblets we made with the amazing museum educators).

Details on this on so many more awesome options on our site:

https://kidonthetown.com/

What are you doing this weekend?
BIDUINO XII Century
From San Leonardo al Frigido, Massa - Italy
If you wish to be greeted by an unwelcoming, stoic staff--everyone from the reception desk, security, and those who man the counter in the cafe--then visit the Met Cloisters. If you wish for your requests for directions to be met by a staff who responds as if you are a nuisance; as if you are interfering with their thoughts about being anywhere other than at their job, then visit the Met Cloisters.

If you want to feel as if your $25 fee, or suggested fee for NYS residents, is appreciated, then please skip the Met Cloisters and visit the many world-class cultural institutions that line the streets of NYC, awaiting your patronage with the courtesy and smile that the Met Cloisters so painfully lacks.

As a native New Yorker and educator in NYC schools for more than 25 years, I have visited multiple cultural institutions across this great city, and I have never experienced a staff that is as curt, unwelcoming, and dismissive to their patrons as those at the Met Cloisters...it is most unfortunate.
If you wish to be greeted by an unwelcoming, stoic staff--everyone from the reception desk, security, and those who man the counter in the cafe--then visit the Met Cloisters. If you wish for your requests for directions to be met by a staff who responds as if you are a nuisance; as if you are interfering with their thoughts about being anywhere other than at their job, then visit the Met Cloisters.

As a native New Yorker and educator in NYC schools for more than 25 years, I have visited multiple cultural institutions across this great city, and I have never experienced a staff that is as curt, unwelcoming, and dismissive to their patrons as those at the Met Cloisters. If you want to feel as if your $25 fee is appreciated (or suggested fee for NYC residents), then please skip the Met Cloisters and visit the many world-class cultural institutions that line the streets of NYC, awaiting your patronage with the courtesy and smile that the Met Cloisters so painfully lacks.
The “unofficial start of summer” is here — and what better way to celebrate than a walk through the garden? 🌸🌼🌷

Stroll (or scroll) through this beautiful flora on the app: bloombg.org/3LYNvzR

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1. Vincent van Gogh, Entrance to the Public Gardens in Arles, 1888, Oil on canvas, 28 1/2 x 35 3/4 in., The Phillips Collection, Acquired 1930. The Phillips Collection

2. View of the Bonnefont Cloister Herb Garden, The Met Cloisters. The Met Cloisters

3. Rosa ‘Excelsa’ (hybrid wichurana rose) blooming in BBG's Rose Garden. 📸: Michael Stewart. Brooklyn Botanic Garden
Works of faith,hope and love,www.faopal.hu
Earlier this week, World Languages Chair Dr. Kevin Kelton and Upper School Principal Mr. Kieran Daly took our Latin 1 Superior Talent Enrichment Program students to The Met Cloisters of the The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, where they explored the Latinate culture of the Medieval period.
The Met Cloisters - At long last—Garden Tours are back! 🌱⁣ ⁣ ⁣

Explore the sights, sounds, and scents of the gardens, and learn how medieval plants and gardens served medicinal, artistic, and even magical purposes.⁣ ⁣ ⁣

Garden Tours are offered on Mondays, Fridays, and Saturdays from May through September. Free with Museum admission. ⁣ ⁣⁣
Transport yourself to the Middle Ages with Bloomberg Connects, the free arts and culture app. 🤳

Explore The Met Cloisters by accessing our Audio Guide, object information, high-resolution photography, videos, and more from wherever you are.
THERE ARE NO WORDS

Another look at The Met Cloisters Museum in NYC on this special weekend. The reconstructed Italian sanctuary is breathtaking, and humbling. Worth a visit any time of the year. Here's a peek at our visit:
https://museumaccess.com/season-1/
Transport yourself to the Middle Ages with Bloomberg Connects, the free arts and culture app. 🤳

Explore The Met Cloisters by accessing our Audio Guide, object information, high-resolution photography, videos, and more from wherever you are.
Pono students recently completed an enriching mentorship in medieval art history at The Met Cloisters and learned how to curate an exhibition.
Lions and tigers and bears, oh my! 🦁 🐯 🐻

Mark with a peek at some of the many animals currently on display in our halls.

Discover depictions of your favorite friends from the animal kingdom with a virtual deep-dive into The Met collection: https://met.org/3KcTctl

🦁 Unidentified German maker. Aquamanile in the Form of a Lion, ca. 1400. On view at The Met Cloisters in Gallery 10.

🐯 Unidentified Chinese maker. Rank badge with tiger, 18th–19th century. On view in Gallery 207.

🐻 Roman or Byzantine. Vessel in the Shape of a Bear, 3rd–4th century. On view in Gallery 301.
Did you know the design, layout, and ambiance of the Met Cloisters are intended to evoke a sense of medieval European monastic life? ✨ The museum has 4 cloisters, the Cuxa, Saint-Guilhem, Bonnefont and Trie, that were acquired by American sculptor and art dealer George Grey Barnard in 1913. Barnard's collection was bought for the Met by financier and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller, Jr.

📸 The Met Cloisters
Transport yourself to the Middle Ages with Bloomberg Connects, the free arts and culture app. 🤳

Explore The Met Cloisters by accessing our Audio Guide, object information, high-resolution photography, videos, and more from wherever you are.
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Other Art Museums in New York (show all)

The Cloisters The Cloisters The Cloisters The Cloisters Cloisters, Manhattan Creative Arts Workshop U*Space Gallery The Hispanic Society Museum & Library smARTpower Program Bronx Museum Teen Council The Bronx Museum of the Arts Bronx Museum of Art Bronx Museum of the Arts Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling Uranian Phalanstery