American Numismatic Society

American Numismatic Society The mission of the American Numismatic Society shall be to promote and advance the study, research, and appreciation of numismatics.
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Happy Cince de Mayo! This medal was created to commemorate Ignacio Zaragoza Seguín’s defeat of the invading French armie...
05/05/2021

Happy Cince de Mayo! This medal was created to commemorate Ignacio Zaragoza Seguín’s defeat of the invading French armies at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862. The obverse feature General Zaragoza labeled “Conqueror of the French.”

Happy Cince de Mayo! This medal was created to commemorate Ignacio Zaragoza Seguín’s defeat of the invading French armies at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862. The obverse feature General Zaragoza labeled “Conqueror of the French.”

The ANS Library and Archives has acquired Mark Salton’s papers and annotated auction catalogs. Dating from the 1940s to ...
05/04/2021
ANS Acquires Mark Salton Papers | Pocket Change

The ANS Library and Archives has acquired Mark Salton’s papers and annotated auction catalogs. Dating from the 1940s to his death in 2006, the acquisition includes fascinating documents ranging from those relating to his efforts in recovering his father’s belongs that were taken by the Nazis, to correspondence with the Dutch dealer Jacques Schulman, to Mark’s scholarly research, including a copy of his master’s thesis.

Library, News ANS Acquires Mark Salton Papers May 4, 2021 David Hill Thanks to the efforts of ANS life fellow Dr. Ira Rezak—and with gratitude to Katharine Conway, executor of the Estate of Lottie Salton Revocable Trust—the ANS Library and Archives has acquired about 20 cubic feet of Mark Salton...

Read the upcoming events and announcements, and take a look at April 2021.
05/04/2021
April 2021 E-News

Read the upcoming events and announcements, and take a look at April 2021.

Bar Kokhba was a rebel Jewish leader in Judaea who led a revolt against Hadrian and the Roman troops from 132–135 CE. His coins differed in many respects from the Judean coins that preceded them—depicting the Jerusalem Temple, which had been destroyed in 70 CE, and many elements of Jewish worshi...

The Byzantine Empire, which lasted more than a thousand years, had one of the most monetized economies in medieval Europ...
05/02/2021
The Changing Iconography of Byzantine Gold Coinage | Pocket Change

The Byzantine Empire, which lasted more than a thousand years, had one of the most monetized economies in medieval Europe. The coinage of Byzantium was an essential element of this unique civilization, which preserved Roman law and state structures and inherited not only the Hellenistic cultural tradition, but also a powerful organizing force—Christianity.

Byzantine The Changing Iconography of Byzantine Gold Coinage April 29, 2021 Elena Stolyarik The Byzantine Empire, which lasted more than a thousand years, had one of the most monetized economies in medieval Europe. The coinage of Byzantium was an essential element of this unique civilization, which....

More information at numismatics.org/brenner-cfp
04/30/2021

More information at numismatics.org/brenner-cfp

More information at numismatics.org/brenner-cfp

A most ancient artifact— a set of 90s lecture slides were recently discovered in the ANS office, featuring some beautifu...
04/28/2021

A most ancient artifact— a set of 90s lecture slides were recently discovered in the ANS office, featuring some beautifully photographed Roman coins.

A most ancient artifact— a set of 90s lecture slides were recently discovered in the ANS office, featuring some beautifully photographed Roman coins.

The time has come for the next chapter in the MACO saga to begin! The ANS is in the planning stages to transfer all of t...
04/27/2021
From Mound House to Manhattan, Part I | Pocket Change

The time has come for the next chapter in the MACO saga to begin! The ANS is in the planning stages to transfer all of the galvanos, die shells, and plasters from Nevada to Manhattan

Medals & Decorations, Modern, News From Mound House to Manhattan, Part I April 26, 2021 Jesse Kraft As many of you know, the American Numismatic Society purchased the archives of the Medallic Art Company (MACO) at a bankruptcy auction in 2018. The sheer size of this purchase, however, did not allow....

From the microbes to the mountains, happy Earth Day! Medal by Louis Patriarche1911numismatics.org/collection/0000.999.51...
04/22/2021

From the microbes to the mountains, happy Earth Day!

Medal by Louis Patriarche
1911
numismatics.org/collection/0000.999.51868

From the microbes to the mountains, happy Earth Day!

Medal by Louis Patriarche
1911
numismatics.org/collection/0000.999.51868

04/21/2021
The ANS: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

This short film was created by photographer-director Pascal Perich and debuted at the 2021 Gala of the American Numismatic Society in honor of the Lottie and Mark Salton.

Happy 2,774th birthday, Rome! We celebrate this dies faustus (happy day) with a denarius issued by S. Pompeius Fostlus, ...
04/21/2021

Happy 2,774th birthday, Rome!

We celebrate this dies faustus (happy day) with a denarius issued by S. Pompeius Fostlus, which represent the discovery of the Capitoline she wolf suckling the twins Romulus and Remus—future founders of Rome—at the hands of the shepherd Faustulus, on the left. One of the sacred trees of Roman tradition (ficus Ruminalis) is visible in the background.

numismatics.org/collection/1944.100.380

Happy 2,774th birthday, Rome!

We celebrate this dies faustus (happy day) with a denarius issued by S. Pompeius Fostlus, which represent the discovery of the Capitoline she wolf suckling the twins Romulus and Remus—future founders of Rome—at the hands of the shepherd Faustulus, on the left. One of the sacred trees of Roman tradition (ficus Ruminalis) is visible in the background.

numismatics.org/collection/1944.100.380

Something medieval from the photographer’s queue—this billon (significantly debased silver) cornado of Sancho IV, of Cas...
04/21/2021

Something medieval from the photographer’s queue—this billon (significantly debased silver) cornado of Sancho IV, of Castile and León, is dated 1284–1295. It was donated to the ANS collection in 1938.

numismatics.org/collection/1938.127.29

Something medieval from the photographer’s queue—this billon (significantly debased silver) cornado of Sancho IV, of Castile and León, is dated 1284–1295. It was donated to the ANS collection in 1938.

numismatics.org/collection/1938.127.29

Six years of martian dustThere is a coin that is currently (and probably forever will be) on the surface of Mars, helpin...
04/20/2021

Six years of martian dust

There is a coin that is currently (and probably forever will be) on the surface of Mars, helping to lead the way towards finding signs of life. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI)—a camera which is primarily used to take microscopic images of rock and soil with the hopes to find microbial evidence—uses a 1909 penny as a size reference. Using the penny is a nod towards less-precise and “on the go” methods of spatial calibration used by early geologists on Earth, who often placed random coins into close-up photographs. Second, it serves as a calibration tool for the general public. While the scientists have more precise ways to calibrate their images, the Lincoln cent, is one of the most ubiquitous objects on Earth and can be instantly recognized by most individuals.

More at: numismatics.org/pocketchange/mars/

Six years of martian dust

There is a coin that is currently (and probably forever will be) on the surface of Mars, helping to lead the way towards finding signs of life. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI)—a camera which is primarily used to take microscopic images of rock and soil with the hopes to find microbial evidence—uses a 1909 penny as a size reference. Using the penny is a nod towards less-precise and “on the go” methods of spatial calibration used by early geologists on Earth, who often placed random coins into close-up photographs. Second, it serves as a calibration tool for the general public. While the scientists have more precise ways to calibrate their images, the Lincoln cent, is one of the most ubiquitous objects on Earth and can be instantly recognized by most individuals.

More at: numismatics.org/pocketchange/mars/

04/20/2021
The Athenian Owl: Dollar of Ancient Greece

In this episode of "Greatest Coins," ANS Chief Curator Dr. Peter van Alfen looks at the mystery of the beginnings of the Athenian “owl” coinage, one of the most widely used and widely circulating coinages of the ancient Greek world, which was introduced around the time that the Athenian democracy was formed after decades under the rule of the tyrant Peisistratus and his sons Hipparchus and Hippias. (Video by Alan Roche)

Support the ANS by joining as a member at numismatics.org/membership.

The impetus for designing the Squared Quarter appears to be rooted in Reagonomics. According to the artist’s website, “P...
04/20/2021
Squaring The Circle: The Andor Orand Squared Quarter | Pocket Change

The impetus for designing the Squared Quarter appears to be rooted in Reagonomics. According to the artist’s website, “President Reagan’s attempt to bring Supply-Siders and Monetarists, two mutually exclusive economic schools, together in his fiscal policy, was seen by many observers as trying to square the circle.”

Modern, United States Squaring The Circle: The Andor Orand Squared Quarter April 20, 2021 John Thomassen Quite often, coming across a previously unknown (to you) numismatic object can send one spiraling down a rabbit hole of investigative digging in order to uncover and learn as much as possible abo...

We had a great Long Table discussion today! Gilles Bransbourg presented on the Franc: one of the oldest and most widespr...
04/16/2021

We had a great Long Table discussion today! Gilles Bransbourg presented on the Franc: one of the oldest and most widespread currency units in the world. He brought a huge number of beautiful examples to share with our members.

We had a great Long Table discussion today! Gilles Bransbourg presented on the Franc: one of the oldest and most widespread currency units in the world. He brought a huge number of beautiful examples to share with our members.

John Gibbs was born in Birmingham, England in 1809 and came to the United States as a young man with his father, William...
04/16/2021

John Gibbs was born in Birmingham, England in 1809 and came to the United States as a young man with his father, William, having settled in Belleville, New Jersey. He proved to be very skillful and competent at a young age, and by 22 years old he owned and operated a stagecoach line that ran from Belleville to Newark (3 miles), and to New York City (8 miles). While little is known about the coach itself, Gibbs had a token struck for passengers to use. After purchasing a token, a passenger could simply exchange the piece for fare, and allowed Gibbs and other operators to not waste time waiting for customers to find the correct amount due or to have to provide change to customers. In 1831, this truly was an innovation and considered the first transportation token struck in the United States.

ANS 0000.999.2281

More at: numismatics.org/pocketchange/gibbs/

John Gibbs was born in Birmingham, England in 1809 and came to the United States as a young man with his father, William, having settled in Belleville, New Jersey. He proved to be very skillful and competent at a young age, and by 22 years old he owned and operated a stagecoach line that ran from Belleville to Newark (3 miles), and to New York City (8 miles). While little is known about the coach itself, Gibbs had a token struck for passengers to use. After purchasing a token, a passenger could simply exchange the piece for fare, and allowed Gibbs and other operators to not waste time waiting for customers to find the correct amount due or to have to provide change to customers. In 1831, this truly was an innovation and considered the first transportation token struck in the United States.

ANS 0000.999.2281

More at: numismatics.org/pocketchange/gibbs/

From Pocket Change past—Visual Artist Mark Wagner exclusively uses US dollar bills in his work, and has done so for deca...
04/15/2021
Artist Mark Wagner is Reinventing the US Dollar Bill | Pocket Change

From Pocket Change past—Visual Artist Mark Wagner exclusively uses US dollar bills in his work, and has done so for decades. From creating collage-style portraits, still lives, and sculptures to an actual money tree, Wagner attempts to meticulously use every detail of the banknotes he works with. Wagner’s humorous, approachable, and culturally relevant pieces have made him a favorite of the New York City art world and beyond.

Modern, North America, United States Artist Mark Wagner is Reinventing the US Dollar Bill September 29, 2017 The American Numismatic Society Fig. 1. Ben Bernanke. Commissioned and rejected by Time magazine for their 2009 “Person of the Year” cover. Later purchased and exhibited by the National P...

The third and final day of the conference, chaired by Joel Allen and Liv Yarrow, was dedicated to Roman Republican coina...
04/14/2021
Coinage of the Roman Provinces: Conference Highlights, Part 3 | Pocket Change

The third and final day of the conference, chaired by Joel Allen and Liv Yarrow, was dedicated to Roman Republican coinage and its imitations in the Roman World.

Events, Roman Coinage of the Roman Provinces: Conference Highlights, Part 3 April 14, 2021 Lucia Carbone The third and final day of the conference, chaired by Joel Allen and Liv Yarrow, was dedicated to Roman Republican coinage and its imitations in the Roman World. Figure 1. ANS 2015.20.2535. Beque...

Today’s Lyceum lesson is now in session!
04/14/2021

Today’s Lyceum lesson is now in session!

Today’s Lyceum lesson is now in session!

Some Swedish silver on the photographer’s queue—this two mark of Charles XI was minted in 1673, and was donated to the A...
04/13/2021

Some Swedish silver on the photographer’s queue—this two mark of Charles XI was minted in 1673, and was donated to the ANS in 1929.

numismatics.org/collection/1929.103.499

Some Swedish silver on the photographer’s queue—this two mark of Charles XI was minted in 1673, and was donated to the ANS in 1929.

numismatics.org/collection/1929.103.499

The second day of the conference,  March 24, 2021, chaired by Pere Pau Ripollès, focused on “new” coinages in the Roman ...
04/13/2021
Coinage in the Roman Provinces: Conference Highlights, Part 2 | Pocket Change

The second day of the conference, March 24, 2021, chaired by Pere Pau Ripollès, focused on “new” coinages in the Roman provinces, namely coinages that featured the names of Roman magistrates. H. Güney focused on the bronze coinages issued in the names of Roman proconsuls beginning in the late 60s BC by the Bithynian cities of Apamea, Bythinium, Nicaea and Nicomedia.

Events, Roman Coinage in the Roman Provinces: Conference Highlights, Part 2 April 13, 2021 Lucia Carbone The second day of the conference,  March 24, 2021, chaired by Pere Pau Ripollès, focused on “new” coinages in the Roman provinces, namely coinages that featured the names of Roman magistrat...

During his short reign (37–41 CE), Caligula declared himself a god and tried to exclude the Senate from the political pr...
04/12/2021

During his short reign (37–41 CE), Caligula declared himself a god and tried to exclude the Senate from the political process to establish an absolute monarchy in Rome. This situation finally led to his murder on January 24, 41 CE. He was so hated that he received the dubious distinction of being the first Roman ruler whose memory was condemned. This damnatio memoriae, “condemnation of memory,” included the destruction of his statues and public inscriptions. His coins did not escape this condemnation; they were pulled from circulation and melted down whenever possible. Some of them were countermarked, like several bronze coins from the ANS collection. These bear the countermark TICA celebrating the new emperor Tiberius Claudius Augustus and also effacing the features of Caligula’s portrait.

More at: numismatics.org/pocketchange/imperial-images/

During his short reign (37–41 CE), Caligula declared himself a god and tried to exclude the Senate from the political process to establish an absolute monarchy in Rome. This situation finally led to his murder on January 24, 41 CE. He was so hated that he received the dubious distinction of being the first Roman ruler whose memory was condemned. This damnatio memoriae, “condemnation of memory,” included the destruction of his statues and public inscriptions. His coins did not escape this condemnation; they were pulled from circulation and melted down whenever possible. Some of them were countermarked, like several bronze coins from the ANS collection. These bear the countermark TICA celebrating the new emperor Tiberius Claudius Augustus and also effacing the features of Caligula’s portrait.

More at: numismatics.org/pocketchange/imperial-images/

The papers, delivered by the foremost scholars in the field, offered a numismatic and historical overview of each region...
04/12/2021
Coinage in the Roman Provinces: Conference Highlights, Part 1 | Pocket Change

The papers, delivered by the foremost scholars in the field, offered a numismatic and historical overview of each region represented by the 4,000 coins included in the R. B. Witschonke Collection.

Events, Roman Coinage in the Roman Provinces: Conference Highlights, Part 1 April 12, 2021 Lucia Carbone For the fact that the Romans did not export their own coinage into the Greek world does not mean that their presence had no effect on existing monetary patterns.(Crawford 1985, p. 119) Figure 1.....

On 1 April 2021, the Associated Press ran a story about a handful of small silver coins from seventeenth-century Yemen f...
04/09/2021
Treasure (Rhode) Island? Henry Every and Yemeni Coins found in New England | Pocket Change

On 1 April 2021, the Associated Press ran a story about a handful of small silver coins from seventeenth-century Yemen found by metal detectorists in New England and the theory advanced by Jim Bailey that these coins actually represent pirate plunder. In fact, he argues that they are the remains of plunder taken by Henry Every in one of the most famous pirate actions of the seventeenth century

Islamic, News Treasure (Rhode) Island? Henry Every and Yemeni Coins found in New England April 9, 2021 Oliver Hoover 1837 woodcut depicting Henry Every receiving the treasure from the Ganj-i-Sawai onto his ship, the Fancy. In a remarkable shift away from the incessant drum-beat coverage of COVID-19....

A few of the French francs that are out of the vault in preparation for the upcoming episode of "Greatest Coins" with ou...
04/08/2021

A few of the French francs that are out of the vault in preparation for the upcoming episode of "Greatest Coins" with our Executive Director, Gilles Bransbourg. 🇫🇷

A few of the French francs that are out of the vault in preparation for the upcoming episode of "Greatest Coins" with our Executive Director, Gilles Bransbourg. 🇫🇷

From Pocket Change past—In 1952, Robert Cox, a hardware store operator from Clay City, Kentucky, found an exotic coin in...
04/07/2021
FINDING BAR KOKHBA COINS IN KENTUCKY (or NOT) | Pocket Change

From Pocket Change past—In 1952, Robert Cox, a hardware store operator from Clay City, Kentucky, found an exotic coin in a pen he was using for pigs just outside of town along Kentucky Highway 15. The pig pen was part of a field that he had plowed the summer before. It was the first time older residents of the city could remember that this land had ever been turned over. He seemed an honorable man and had nothing to do with ancient coins, and it appears that Mr. Cox legitimately found the coin just where he said he found it.

Numismatic History FINDING BAR KOKHBA COINS IN KENTUCKY (or NOT) March 8, 2016 David Hendin In the last few weeks, I have been preparing a gift of my personal coin collection to the American Numismatic Society. Among the coins was a fascinating piece that is an exact twin to one of the most notoriou...

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New York, NY
10013

1, Canal Street; ACE, Canal Street

General information

The ANS is an organization dedicated to the study of coins, currency, medals, tokens, and related objects from all cultures, past and present. The Society's headquarters in New York City has the foremost research collection and library specialized in numismatics in the United States. These resources are used to support research and education in numismatics, for the benefit of academic specialists, serious collectors, professional numismatists, and the interested public. The ANS does not appraise coins, currency, or related objects.

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Tuesday 09:30 - 16:30
Wednesday 09:30 - 16:30
Thursday 09:30 - 16:30
Friday 09:30 - 16:30

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(212) 571-4470

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Our Story

The American Numismatic Society is dedicated to the study and public appreciation of coins, currencies, medals, and other related objects. Since its founding in 1858, the ANS has assembled a permanent collection with over 800,000 objects dating from 650 BCE to the present. Our numismatic collection is of international caliber, rivaled only by the largest state collections of Europe. Abounding in both large study collections and great rarities, the Society‘s cabinets are particularly strong in Ancient Greek coinage, where the Hellenistic section is particularly notable; Roman Republican period issues; Islamic, of exceptional breadth and depth; Far Eastern, particularly the Chinese material; Latin American, developed over the past 40 years; and United States, both the Colonial series and Federal issues, as well as private coinages.

The library houses more than 100,000 items, comprising bound volumes, pamphlets, manuscripts, auction catalogues, and microforms. Access to the fully catalogued collections is facilitated by a specially designed subject guide and authority file.

These resources are used to support publications of books and periodicals, lectures, academic seminars, and exhibitions. The ANS publishes in a variety of series, prominent among which are two journals, the American Journal of Numismatics and the Journal of Early American Numismatics, the annual bibliography of the profession, Numismatic Literature, two monographic series, which have accounted for a total of 201 titles to date, as well as special series such as exhibit catalogues and conference proceedings volumes. In 2002 the ANS launched The American Numismatic Society Magazine which presents regular columns from the Society‘s various departments, including contributions from individual curators, feature length articles on numismatic or related topics, announcements about upcoming events, and highlights from conferences and functions. This full-color publication is issued four times a year.

The ANS is a constituent member of the American Council of Learned Societies, the International Numismatic Commission, the American Association of Museums, as well as a supporting member of the American Academy in Rome and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.