American Numismatic Society

American Numismatic Society The mission of the American Numismatic Society shall be to promote and advance the study, research, and appreciation of numismatics.
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Operating as usual

One name I always have to double-check is that of revered American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens. (Hyphenated or not? ...
06/24/2021
Trouble with Names | Pocket Change

One name I always have to double-check is that of revered American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens. (Hyphenated or not? Or is it St. Gaudens?) Curious about the sculptor’s own usage, I had a look at some of his documents in our collection.

Modern, Numismatic History, United States Trouble with Names June 22, 2021 David Hill Augustus Saint-Gaudens by Kenyon Cox (Metropolitan Museum of Art) Du Bois was a big name at the U.S. mint in the nineteenth century. Or was it DuBois? Dubois? du Bois? This kind of thing can drive you crazy when wr...

“Entrance” by Mashiko, 1993ANS 1994.137.2
06/23/2021

“Entrance” by Mashiko, 1993
ANS 1994.137.2

“Entrance” by Mashiko, 1993
ANS 1994.137.2

A new episode of Greatest Coins!  Jesse Kraft discusses the United States silver dollar of 1804. There may be rarer coin...
06/23/2021
The ANS’s Greatest Coins: The 1804 Silver Dollar

A new episode of Greatest Coins! Jesse Kraft discusses the United States silver dollar of 1804. There may be rarer coins, but none that challenge the fame, tradition, and glory given to the 1804 silver dollar.

Please consider a donation to the ANS or becoming a member. Visit us at http://numismatics.org/membership/ The ANS's Greatest Coins series examines coins in ...

This medal came nearly thirty years after the British had ended the slave trade. The abolitionist movement was still str...
06/19/2021

This medal came nearly thirty years after the British had ended the slave trade. The abolitionist movement was still strong in England and this medal was created to spread the message, stating “A voice from Great Britain to America.” It was nearly thirty years before the United States abolished slavery on September 22, 1862 and it was not until June 19, 1865, when Union Army general Gordon Granger, proclaimed freedom for the last slaves in Texas.

ANS 1987.122.24

All those counter stamps! A tray of diverse 15th-18th century coins from the states and provinces of Groningen is gettin...
06/18/2021

All those counter stamps! A tray of diverse 15th-18th century coins from the states and provinces of Groningen is getting photographed today as a part of our project improve the records of our early modern collection.

All those counter stamps! A tray of diverse 15th-18th century coins from the states and provinces of Groningen is getting photographed today as a part of our project improve the records of our early modern collection.

This bronze coin weighs in at a whopping 53.87 grams! The reverse shows three temples that were dedicated in the city of...
06/17/2021

This bronze coin weighs in at a whopping 53.87 grams! The reverse shows three temples that were dedicated in the city of Smyrna in Asia Minor in the third century. This unique iconography commemorates the rare urban achievement that Smyrna earned the right to build not one temple dedicated to the imperial cult, but three. The obverse features a laureate portrait of the Roman emperor Caracalla.

numismatics.org/collection/1944.100.47075

This bronze coin weighs in at a whopping 53.87 grams! The reverse shows three temples that were dedicated in the city of Smyrna in Asia Minor in the third century. This unique iconography commemorates the rare urban achievement that Smyrna earned the right to build not one temple dedicated to the imperial cult, but three. The obverse features a laureate portrait of the Roman emperor Caracalla.

numismatics.org/collection/1944.100.47075

Of the cistophori, named for the cista mystica that serves as the standard obverse type, 146 (27% of the cistophori in t...
06/15/2021
The Aedes of Vesta on Cistophori of C. Fannius | Pocket Change

Of the cistophori, named for the cista mystica that serves as the standard obverse type, 146 (27% of the cistophori in the collection) belong to a special class known as Later Republican cistophori. These were struck in the relatively brief period from 58 to 49 BC and are distinguished by their inclusion of the names of Roman governors written in Latin. Issues naming T. Ampius Balbus (58–57 BC) and C. Fannius (49 BC) are also notable for their modifications to the traditional cistophoric reverse type.

Roman The Aedes of Vesta on Cistophori of C. Fannius June 15, 2021 Oliver Hoover Anyone who has been paying attention to the ANS Pocket Change blog or to the ANS Magazine over the last while will be aware that over the course of this year a lot of work has been going on with respect to the large bod...

06/11/2021

Who’s excited for the next episode of the Greatest Coins!? Watch Jesse Kraft, our American Curator, discuss the peculiar tale of the 1804 dollar next week.

Happy #museumweek! Do you want to see ANS coins in New York? Visit the Met! Around 300 specimens a from the ANS collecti...
06/11/2021

Happy #museumweek! Do you want to see ANS coins in New York? Visit the Met! Around 300 specimens a from the ANS collection are scattered around various galleries.

Happy #museumweek! Do you want to see ANS coins in New York? Visit the Met! Around 300 specimens a from the ANS collection are scattered around various galleries.

A token commemorating the USS Maine—Growing tensions between the US and Spain over Cuban independence finally erupted in...
06/10/2021

A token commemorating the USS Maine—Growing tensions between the US and Spain over Cuban independence finally erupted in the spring of 1898 when the USS Maine, an armored cruiser reclassified as a 2nd class battleship soon after launching, blew up in Havana harbor with great loss of life, where it had gone to show the flag for American business interests in Cuba.

At the time the cause of the explosion was determined to be a Spanish mine, just cause for Congress to declare war, although it may well have been an internal explosion as later naval historians have suggested. By the end of the summer, the New Navy had scored two remarkable and crushing victories over the Spanish navy, one under Commodore George Dewey leading the Asiatic Squadron in Manila harbor in the Philippines (May 1, 1898), and the other under Commodore William T. Sampson leading the North Atlantic Squadron near Santiago in Cuba (July 3, 1898). Both naval battles set the United States on its course to become an 20th century imperial power. At the Treaty of Paris (December 10, 1898), Spain ceded the Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico to the US; both warring parties agreed to let the Cubans have their independence.

Learn more about the US Navy and numismatics on the ANS blog—numismatics.org/pocketchange/the-new-navy-in-new-york/

Today’s ANS Lyceum course is currently underway! Our Roman Curator, Lucia Carbone, is teaching students about Roman prov...
06/09/2021

Today’s ANS Lyceum course is currently underway! Our Roman Curator, Lucia Carbone, is teaching students about Roman provincial coins from 50 BCE–298 CE.

Today’s ANS Lyceum course is currently underway! Our Roman Curator, Lucia Carbone, is teaching students about Roman provincial coins from 50 BCE–298 CE.

Go on a “world tour” of coffee-related numismatics! ☕
06/08/2021
A Caffeinated Tour of the ANS Collection | Pocket Change

Go on a “world tour” of coffee-related numismatics! ☕

East Asian, Islamic, Latin American, Medals & Decorations, Modern, Tokens, United States A Caffeinated Tour of the ANS Collection June 8, 2021 John Thomassen In the world of humorous coffee shop signs, there is one that has always rung particularly true for this numismatic devotee: “I Don’t Drin...

In the photographer’s queue today is a silver thaler of Frederick Augustus II, minted in 1741 in the Electorate of Saxon...
06/08/2021

In the photographer’s queue today is a silver thaler of Frederick Augustus II, minted in 1741 in the Electorate of Saxony.

ANS 1949.1.200

In the photographer’s queue today is a silver thaler of Frederick Augustus II, minted in 1741 in the Electorate of Saxony.

ANS 1949.1.200

Numismatists—they’re just like us! From left to right, Assistant Curator & photographer Robert Robertson, Curator Howlan...
06/04/2021

Numismatists—they’re just like us! From left to right, Assistant Curator & photographer Robert Robertson, Curator Howland Wood, Fellow Farran Zerbe, and President Edward T. Newell stand in front of the ANS doors at our Audobon Terrace headquarters in 1935.

ANS Archives 05-00074

Numismatists—they’re just like us! From left to right, Assistant Curator & photographer Robert Robertson, Curator Howland Wood, Fellow Farran Zerbe, and President Edward T. Newell stand in front of the ANS doors at our Audobon Terrace headquarters in 1935.

ANS Archives 05-00074

Look at these beauts! Our curator of Roman numismatics, Lucia Carbone, selected these coins to illustrate her ANS Lyceum...
06/03/2021

Look at these beauts! Our curator of Roman numismatics, Lucia Carbone, selected these coins to illustrate her ANS Lyceum lecture on the coinage in the Roman provinces before the inception of the so-called Roman Provincial coinage in the second half of the first century BCE. These coins tell the tale of a partial convergence toward the Roman monetary system, spanning from imitations of Roman Republican denarii from Romania and Gaul to the lead tokens of Spain, from Aesillas’ tetradrachms in Macedonia to the Romano-Sicilian coins in Sicily, local coinages and pseudo-mints in Central and Southern Italy. These are only a few of the diverse ways the monetary systems of the Mediterranean basin responded to the Roman conquest in the second and early first century BCE.

Look at these beauts! Our curator of Roman numismatics, Lucia Carbone, selected these coins to illustrate her ANS Lyceum lecture on the coinage in the Roman provinces before the inception of the so-called Roman Provincial coinage in the second half of the first century BCE. These coins tell the tale of a partial convergence toward the Roman monetary system, spanning from imitations of Roman Republican denarii from Romania and Gaul to the lead tokens of Spain, from Aesillas’ tetradrachms in Macedonia to the Romano-Sicilian coins in Sicily, local coinages and pseudo-mints in Central and Southern Italy. These are only a few of the diverse ways the monetary systems of the Mediterranean basin responded to the Roman conquest in the second and early first century BCE.

The latest episode The Planchet features ANS Vice President David Hendin speaking on the SIXTH edition of his book "A Gu...
06/02/2021
S2, Ep. 3: A Conversation with David Hendin – The Planchet

The latest episode The Planchet features ANS Vice President David Hendin speaking on the SIXTH edition of his book "A Guide to Biblical Coins," his personal history with numismatics, and offers some advice on cleaning (and not cleaning) ancient coins.

S2, Ep. 3: A Conversation with David Hendin Season 2, Episode 3 features an interview with David Hendin, ANS Trustee and long-time friend, scholar, and collector. The 6th edition of his book, A Guide to Biblical Coins, will be published by the American Numismatic Society in the summer of 2021. In th...

At the end of the Civil War, the United States had the second largest navy in the world after the Royal Navy of Great Br...
06/02/2021
The New Navy in New York | Pocket Change

At the end of the Civil War, the United States had the second largest navy in the world after the Royal Navy of Great Britain, a result of the Union’s attempt to blockade Southern ports. By 1880, however, the US Navy had dropped to 12th place as Congress became increasingly preoccupied with westward expansion and was unwilling to fund a navy for which it saw little need or purpose

Medals & Decorations, Modern, United States The New Navy in New York May 31, 2021 Peter van Alfen At the end of the Civil War, the United States had the second largest navy in the world after the Royal Navy of Great Britain, a result of the Union’s attempt to blockade Southern ports. By 1880, howe...

Today we honor those who have made the greatest sacrifice. Happy Memorial Day. Plaque by LissiorBelgium, 1920ANS 0000.99...
05/31/2021

Today we honor those who have made the greatest sacrifice. Happy Memorial Day.

Plaque by Lissior
Belgium, 1920
ANS 0000.999.70160

Today we honor those who have made the greatest sacrifice. Happy Memorial Day.

Plaque by Lissior
Belgium, 1920
ANS 0000.999.70160

Today is our ✨50th✨ Long Table! Join us at 1:00 pm ET to hear how Iron Age coins in Britain can teach us about the socie...
05/28/2021

Today is our ✨50th✨ Long Table! Join us at 1:00 pm ET to hear how Iron Age coins in Britain can teach us about the society, trade, religious beliefs, and continental contacts of the time. Dr. Courtney Nimura from the University of Oxford will be hosting, with ANS Director of Data Science Ethan Gruber and Dr. John Talbot of the Celtic Coin Index, Oxford.

Today is our ✨50th✨ Long Table! Join us at 1:00 pm ET to hear how Iron Age coins in Britain can teach us about the society, trade, religious beliefs, and continental contacts of the time. Dr. Courtney Nimura from the University of Oxford will be hosting, with ANS Director of Data Science Ethan Gruber and Dr. John Talbot of the Celtic Coin Index, Oxford.

On the photographer’s queue is a selection of Athenian “New Style” tetradrachms, minted under the domination of the Roma...
05/27/2021

On the photographer’s queue is a selection of Athenian “New Style” tetradrachms, minted under the domination of the Roman Republic

On the photographer’s queue is a selection of Athenian “New Style” tetradrachms, minted under the domination of the Roman Republic

To mark the one year anniversary of George Floyd’s death, the American Medallic Sculptors Association’s 2021 Medal of th...
05/25/2021

To mark the one year anniversary of George Floyd’s death, the American Medallic Sculptors Association’s 2021 Medal of the Year by Jeanne Stevens-Sollman: “George Floyd, Black Lives Matter.”

Stevens-Sollman wrote: “I am an artist, working in my studio, listening to the news of these distance killings in my country that is supposed to be the land of the free. What can I do? … As an artist I can try to raise awareness of the inequality of these events, to raise the level of consciousness of what people of color face on a daily basis… Physically putting this story into people’s hands helped me fight the anger and helplessness I was feeling at the time. Hopefully, this medal will help our citizens to be moved to find justice, to erase hate, to see more clearly that we need to live together in harmony and peace–and to achieve justice for all.”

Thank you to Trustee Mary Lannin for donating this medal to the ANS collection.

To mark the one year anniversary of George Floyd’s death, the American Medallic Sculptors Association’s 2021 Medal of the Year by Jeanne Stevens-Sollman: “George Floyd, Black Lives Matter.”

Stevens-Sollman wrote: “I am an artist, working in my studio, listening to the news of these distance killings in my country that is supposed to be the land of the free. What can I do? … As an artist I can try to raise awareness of the inequality of these events, to raise the level of consciousness of what people of color face on a daily basis… Physically putting this story into people’s hands helped me fight the anger and helplessness I was feeling at the time. Hopefully, this medal will help our citizens to be moved to find justice, to erase hate, to see more clearly that we need to live together in harmony and peace–and to achieve justice for all.”

Thank you to Trustee Mary Lannin for donating this medal to the ANS collection.

The Franc is one of the oldest and most widespread currency units in the world, currently the official currency of 25 st...
05/24/2021
The Franc: A Coin, A Currency, and Orphan | Pocket Change

The Franc is one of the oldest and most widespread currency units in the world, currently the official currency of 25 states or autonomous territories.

France, Modern, Numismatic History The Franc: A Coin, A Currency, and Orphan May 13, 2021 Gilles Bransbourg The Franc is one of the oldest and most widespread currency units in the world, currently the official currency of 25 states or autonomous territories. However, the Franc was never intended to...

Members—join us at 1PM ET for today's Long Table discussion. This week, the conversation will be led by the artist Mashi...
05/21/2021

Members—join us at 1PM ET for today's Long Table discussion. This week, the conversation will be led by the artist Mashiko, who will review some of her commemorative works, including this cast bronze medal honoring the writer Lou Andreas-Salomé

Members—join us at 1PM ET for today's Long Table discussion. This week, the conversation will be led by the artist Mashiko, who will review some of her commemorative works, including this cast bronze medal honoring the writer Lou Andreas-Salomé

Curator Jesse Kraft identifying a coin with the accession records from 1938-1971.  Since 1981 the database has been the ...
05/21/2021

Curator Jesse Kraft identifying a coin with the accession records from 1938-1971. Since 1981 the database has been the primary system for keeping track of the collection, but these ledger books have been kept up for tradition and continuity.

Curator Jesse Kraft identifying a coin with the accession records from 1938-1971. Since 1981 the database has been the primary system for keeping track of the collection, but these ledger books have been kept up for tradition and continuity.

The ANS Lyceum on Roman coins began today. Gilles Bransbourg brought out seven trays worth of coins to illustrate the le...
05/19/2021

The ANS Lyceum on Roman coins began today. Gilles Bransbourg brought out seven trays worth of coins to illustrate the lesson! ✨🪙✨

The ANS Lyceum on Roman coins began today. Gilles Bransbourg brought out seven trays worth of coins to illustrate the lesson! ✨🪙✨

The Byzantine Empire, which lasted more than a thousand years, had one of the most monetized economies in medieval Europ...
05/19/2021

The Byzantine Empire, which lasted more than a thousand years, had one of the most monetized economies in medieval Europe. The coinage of Byzantium was an essential element of this unique civilization, which preserved Roman law and state structures and inherited not only the Hellenistic cultural tradition, but also a powerful organizing force—Christianity. By the late fifth century, the images of the emperor on coins didn’t have any personal features. This absence of personalized portraiture was connected with a belief that the imperial image represented the emperor’s “eternal body” rather than his physical features.

Gold Solidus of Anastasius I
Constantinople
491–498 CE
1948.19.132

more at: numismatics.org/pocketchange/byzantine-iconography/

The Byzantine Empire, which lasted more than a thousand years, had one of the most monetized economies in medieval Europe. The coinage of Byzantium was an essential element of this unique civilization, which preserved Roman law and state structures and inherited not only the Hellenistic cultural tradition, but also a powerful organizing force—Christianity. By the late fifth century, the images of the emperor on coins didn’t have any personal features. This absence of personalized portraiture was connected with a belief that the imperial image represented the emperor’s “eternal body” rather than his physical features.

Gold Solidus of Anastasius I
Constantinople
491–498 CE
1948.19.132

more at: numismatics.org/pocketchange/byzantine-iconography/

Address

75 Varick Street
New York, NY
10013

1, Canal Street; ACE, Canal Street

General information

The ANS is an organization dedicated to the study of coins, currency, medals, tokens, and related objects from all cultures, past and present. The Society's headquarters in New York City has the foremost research collection and library specialized in numismatics in the United States. These resources are used to support research and education in numismatics, for the benefit of academic specialists, serious collectors, professional numismatists, and the interested public. The ANS does not appraise coins, currency, or related objects.

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Tuesday 9:30am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 9:30am - 4:30pm
Thursday 9:30am - 4:30pm
Friday 9:30am - 4:30pm

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(212) 571-4470

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Our Story

The American Numismatic Society is dedicated to the study and public appreciation of coins, currencies, medals, and other related objects. Since its founding in 1858, the ANS has assembled a permanent collection with over 800,000 objects dating from 650 BCE to the present. Our numismatic collection is of international caliber, rivaled only by the largest state collections of Europe. Abounding in both large study collections and great rarities, the Society‘s cabinets are particularly strong in Ancient Greek coinage, where the Hellenistic section is particularly notable; Roman Republican period issues; Islamic, of exceptional breadth and depth; Far Eastern, particularly the Chinese material; Latin American, developed over the past 40 years; and United States, both the Colonial series and Federal issues, as well as private coinages.

The library houses more than 100,000 items, comprising bound volumes, pamphlets, manuscripts, auction catalogues, and microforms. Access to the fully catalogued collections is facilitated by a specially designed subject guide and authority file.

These resources are used to support publications of books and periodicals, lectures, academic seminars, and exhibitions. The ANS publishes in a variety of series, prominent among which are two journals, the American Journal of Numismatics and the Journal of Early American Numismatics, the annual bibliography of the profession, Numismatic Literature, two monographic series, which have accounted for a total of 201 titles to date, as well as special series such as exhibit catalogues and conference proceedings volumes. In 2002 the ANS launched The American Numismatic Society Magazine which presents regular columns from the Society‘s various departments, including contributions from individual curators, feature length articles on numismatic or related topics, announcements about upcoming events, and highlights from conferences and functions. This full-color publication is issued four times a year.

The ANS is a constituent member of the American Council of Learned Societies, the International Numismatic Commission, the American Association of Museums, as well as a supporting member of the American Academy in Rome and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

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