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The Gnat Who Tormented Titus With illustration by Mark PodwalFor , a previously unpublished poem by the Jewish literary ...
08/08/2022
The Gnat Who Tormented Titus

The Gnat Who Tormented Titus With illustration by Mark Podwal
For , a previously unpublished poem by the Jewish literary giant By Cynthia Ozick
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For Tisha B'Av, a previously unpublished poem by the Jewish literary giant

On the 9th of Av, lithograph by Shoshana Neuman, Israel, 1976, Collection of YU Museum This print depicts children playi...
08/01/2022

On the 9th of Av, lithograph by Shoshana Neuman, Israel, 1976, Collection of YU Museum

This print depicts children playing in a synagogue. Upon the back wall hangs an image of people praying at the western wall. On the right hand side of the image a tombstone shaped board is partially within frame with the words, “9th of Av, 5741, Chernovitz” visible.
Neuman grew up in the (then) Romanian city of Czernowitz. The N***s invaded the city on July 5, 1941 (less than a month before Tisha B’av) when she was just nine years old. She and her family were deported in October of the same year and were forced to march across Transnistria to the Bershad Ghetto. Only Shoshana and her mother lived to see the Soviet Liberation of Bershad in 1944. Neuman moved to Israel in 1950 and began to paint her memories in 1970.
This piece is likely autobiographical, depicting a happy moment before the N**i occupation of Czernowitz.

Yitzhak Graff, YU Museum Student Assistant

03/13/2022
חברי: ספר למוד הקריאה והכתיבה לשנת הלמודים הראשונה “My Friend: A Primer for Learning to Read and to Write For the First ...
01/14/2022

חברי: ספר למוד הקריאה והכתיבה לשנת הלמודים הראשונה
“My Friend: A Primer for Learning to Read and to Write For the First Grade”, by A. Ashman and Y. Peled

This 1946 book was published in Jerusalem and contains a children's song for Tu Bi’Shvat, the new year of the trees. The song, “Tu Bi-Shvat Has Arrived” announces the arrival of the festival by describing the awakening nature in the Land of Israel. The almond trees are beginning to bloom while the sun is shining once again. And birds sing along with the children, greeting the rebirth of the land. The picture above the lyrics depicts children with shovels and plants, ready to cultivate the ground and help it prosper. This scene is reminiscent of the larger Zionist dream of reconnecting young Jews with the soil of the land. Also illustrated is a boy who waves a flag with the Star of David - a reference to the importance of nature and the cultivation of the land to the Zionist movement.
Post by Erica Sultan, Research Associate, Rabbi Arthur Schneier Program for International Affairs at Yeshiva University

Collection item of the week:  portrait of Sarah Miriam Solis Carvalho (1824-1894) by her husband, Solomon Nunes Carvalho...
01/04/2022

Collection item of the week: portrait of Sarah Miriam Solis Carvalho (1824-1894) by her husband, Solomon Nunes Carvalho (1815-1897), Baltimore, ca. 1845-1850. Gift of Daniel Friedenberg. This is an intimate, informal portrait, probably done shortly after the couple were married in 1845. It shows the bride in an informal robe or negligee, she is not even wearing a corset! Her hair hangs loosely rather than being formally arranged, and she displays her wedding ring to the viewer.

Collection item of the week:  An aged Father Time reaches towards a winged child, the spirit of the new year, in this Ne...
12/31/2021

Collection item of the week: An aged Father Time reaches towards a winged child, the spirit of the new year, in this New Year's greeting card produced by the Williamsburg Art Co., New York, ca. 1920. The Abraham and Debra Karp Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

Collection items of the week:  a 1918 oil portrait of Elias Rothstein (1873-1932), an actor in the Yiddish theater; a te...
12/21/2021

Collection items of the week: a 1918 oil portrait of Elias Rothstein (1873-1932), an actor in the Yiddish theater; a tefillin bag with his initials; and a photograph of Rothstein in the costume of a Roman soldier, taken in Boston, dated 1896.

Fascinating post from our colleague, Shulamith Berger, Curator of Special Collections at YU's Gottesman Library.
12/21/2021
Chanukah Gelt After World War II | Library

Fascinating post from our colleague, Shulamith Berger, Curator of Special Collections at YU's Gottesman Library.

Chanukah, the holiday of lights, is associated with historic Jewish battles, bravery, and the renewal of the Temple in Jerusalem; a joyous time for children to play dreidel and enjoy Chanukah gelt and gifts. In the aftermath of the Second World War, Chanukah gelt needed to serve other purposes: to h...

Collection item of the week:  a haunting snow scene photographed by Anton Hollander, ca. 1950.  Is the man with his back...
12/14/2021

Collection item of the week: a haunting snow scene photographed by Anton Hollander, ca. 1950. Is the man with his back to us the photographer himself?

Collection item of the week:  Renee and Chaim Gross greeting card sent to Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Gartlir and other friends...
12/10/2021

Collection item of the week: Renee and Chaim Gross greeting card sent to Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Gartlir and other friends in 1979. Instead of choosing a holiday theme, Chaim Gross depicted the three Graces. This is a motif found in the Primavera (1470s or 1480s) by Renaissance artist Sandro Botticelli (ca. 1445-1510) and in a Roman wall painting from Pompeii (ca. 1st century C.E.).

Hanukkah Lamp The Max Stern Collection of Yeshiva University MuseumThis Hanukkah lamp hails from Krakow, Poland, and was...
12/03/2021

Hanukkah Lamp
The Max Stern Collection of Yeshiva University Museum

This Hanukkah lamp hails from Krakow, Poland, and was created in 1845, its silversmith unknown. Its artistry embodies the essence of the Hanukkah story - Jewish resilience. Lions guard the luchot (tablets) while flowers blossom around them, indicating that life stems from G-d’s words. More lions are used as the oil lamps. The wicks would have protruded through their mouths, implying that from physical strength, like that of a lion’s, and through a voice which roars, light will be shown. This light is even further guarded with pillars and chains, promoting the idea once again that Jews are protected, just as they were in the second century BCE.

Post by Erica Sultan, Research Associate, Rabbi Arthur Schneier Program for International Affairs at Yeshiva University

Hanukkah, painted by Mathilde Hahn Meyer, late 19th/early 20th century Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of ...
12/02/2021

Hanukkah, painted by Mathilde Hahn Meyer, late 19th/early 20th century
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of Hilda Meyer

Born in Göttingen, Germany in 1861, Meyer produced a collection of still-life art, portraying Jewish holidays. In this painting, one can see the usual Hanukkah artifacts: a lit Menorah and a dreidel. Also present are a bouquet of roses, a single card, and a coffee pot with a mug - all emblematic of life, as the roses bloom, the card seems to be in use for a game due to its upright position, and the mug is not full. This piece connects pre-World War I Jews to Jews all around the world today, showing the resilience of Jewish traditions. You can find more of her work at the YU Museum.

Post by Erica Sultan, Research Associate, Rabbi Arthur Schneier Program for International Affairs at Yeshiva University

Collection item of the week:  Hanukkah Lamp depicting David and Goliath by Eva Samuel (1904-1984) made at her Kad va-Sef...
11/29/2021

Collection item of the week: Hanukkah Lamp depicting David and Goliath by Eva Samuel (1904-1984) made at her Kad va-Sefel studio in Rishon LeZion ca. 1965, gift of David Michaels. Happy Hanukkah!

Yeshiva University Professor Steven Fine and his Stern College students visited the YU Museum for a special session with...
11/01/2021

Yeshiva University Professor Steven Fine and his Stern College students visited the YU Museum for a special session with objects from the Museum's collection including a 5th century C.E. tombstone from Zoar.

Collection item of the week:  At the Yeshiva by Albert Dov Sigal (1912-1970), an expert enamellist who adapted the ancie...
10/24/2021

Collection item of the week: At the Yeshiva by Albert Dov Sigal (1912-1970), an expert enamellist who adapted the ancient medium into a modern art form

With autumn here, how many of you are planning winter vacations?  This matchbook cover in our collection shows some of t...
10/01/2021

With autumn here, how many of you are planning winter vacations? This matchbook cover in our collection shows some of the diversions available around 1960 at the Hotel Brunswick in Lakewood, New Jersey.

Scraps were the Victorian version of today'sstickers.  This charming example in our collection depicts a woman making he...
09/01/2021

Scraps were the Victorian version of today'sstickers. This charming example in our collection depicts a woman making her selection from a peddlar's Rosh Hashanah cards.

Today's collection item is a 1951 stained glass window from a synagogue, designed by Ilya Schor (1904-1961) that is very...
08/26/2021

Today's collection item is a 1951 stained glass window from a synagogue, designed by Ilya Schor (1904-1961) that is very different from the naive style of his paintings, drawings and metalwork.

Collection item of the week:  Fire Island Summertime by Ruth Abrams (1912-1986), oil on canvas paper, 1982.
08/17/2021

Collection item of the week: Fire Island Summertime by Ruth Abrams (1912-1986), oil on canvas paper, 1982.

For some unknown reason, S. Rosenbloom & Sons of Syracuse, New York, which sold furniture, carpets, draperies, and inter...
08/03/2021

For some unknown reason, S. Rosenbloom & Sons of Syracuse, New York, which sold furniture, carpets, draperies, and interior decorations, decorated their business card with a picture of two girls on a beach.

Collection item of the week:  Postcard depicting The Breakers,  Atlantic City, postmarked 1940. Although Jews were origi...
07/28/2021

Collection item of the week: Postcard depicting The Breakers, Atlantic City, postmarked 1940. Although Jews were originally excluded, the Breakers became the “Aristocrat of the kosher hotels.” It was the last Atlantic City hotel to offer salt water baths when it was demolished in 1974.

1910 wedding Dress of Florence Rothenberg.  The glass beads of the elaborate bodice would have sparkled in the gaslight....
07/21/2021

1910 wedding Dress of Florence Rothenberg. The glass beads of the elaborate bodice would have sparkled in the gaslight. The beaded decoration was in poor shape when this dress came to the Museum and Helene Horwitz z’l, an expert needlewoman who volunteered with our textile crew, restored it.

Collection item of the week:  motion picture poster for Ben Hur at the Ophir Theater in Tel Aviv ca. 1925
07/14/2021

Collection item of the week: motion picture poster for Ben Hur at the Ophir Theater in Tel Aviv ca. 1925

Collection item of the week:  early 20th century souvenir textile depicting Rachel's tomb.
07/06/2021

Collection item of the week: early 20th century souvenir textile depicting Rachel's tomb.

Shabbat Shalom!Tefillin bag, Morocco, 19th centuryCollection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of Abraham PintoWhat’s t...
06/11/2021

Shabbat Shalom!

Tefillin bag, Morocco, 19th century
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of Abraham Pinto

What’s the point of a Tefillin bag?
Tefillin or phylacteries are black leather boxes containing parchment scrolls that are inscribed with verses from the Torah. They are worn by observant adult Jews during weekday morning prayers. Tefillin are made of leather and because of that they can be easily warped due to sun exposure or various factors. A tefillin bag is used to protect the tefillin while they are not in use.

Post by Deborah Coopersmith, Research Associate, Rabbi Arthur Schneier Program for International Affairs of Yeshiva University
Schneier Program for International Affairs of Yeshiva University

This atarah was a gift from Jewish Cultural Reconstruction, an organization charged with the distribution of “orphaned” ...
06/04/2021

This atarah was a gift from Jewish Cultural Reconstruction, an organization charged with the distribution of “orphaned” Jewish objects after the Holocaust.

The atarah is a long, narrow strip of decorated fabric that is attached to the middle of the top edge of a tallit, prayer shawl. Atarah in Hebrew means crown or diadem, but people usually refer to it as a neck band, as the atarah is placed on the neck. The atarah displayed here is decorated in the spanier arbeit technique. Spanier arbeit in Yiddish means spun work which is fitting as lamella (metal strips) is wrapped over or wound around a cotton or linen core in dense schematized floral or geometric patterns.
The spanier arbeit technique, which was prominent in Eastern Europe in the 19th century, also has roots within Spanish history. Jews in 15th century Spain would create lace while incorporating silver and gold threads. The direct connection hasn’t been found yet, but perhaps more research into this area will shed some light.
Post by Deborah Coopersmith, Research Associate, Rabbi Arthur Schneier Program for International Affairs of Yeshiva University
Schneier Program for International Affairs of Yeshiva University

Cover and inside page of memorial book for a soldier named Eric, killed in action in 1943
05/31/2021

Cover and inside page of memorial book for a soldier named Eric, killed in action in 1943

Shabbat Shalom!Kiddush cup, Germany, c. 1900, silverCollection of Yeshiva University Museum, The Max Stern Collection   ...
05/28/2021

Shabbat Shalom!

Kiddush cup, Germany, c. 1900, silver
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, The Max Stern Collection

Chag Shavuot Sameach! Happy Shavuot!Photograph of the interior of the synagogue in Neckarbischofsheim decorated for Shav...
05/16/2021

Chag Shavuot Sameach! Happy Shavuot!

Photograph of the interior of the synagogue in Neckarbischofsheim decorated for Shavuot, Germany, ca. 1930
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig Jesselson

Shabbat Shalom!Torah Crown, Russia (?), 1834. Silver: gilt, stamped, cast, punched.Collection of Yeshiva University Muse...
05/14/2021

Shabbat Shalom!

Torah Crown, Russia (?), 1834. Silver: gilt, stamped, cast, punched.
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, The Max Stern Collection

Lag BaOmer illustration from HAGEINU: SEFER TEMUNOT (Our Festivals, A Book of Pictures), New York, 1928Collection of Yes...
04/30/2021

Lag BaOmer illustration from HAGEINU: SEFER TEMUNOT (Our Festivals, A Book of Pictures), New York, 1928
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of Vera and Jack Wilner Sundelson

The book was authored by Avi-Shai, illustrated by Ze’ev Raban, and published by Miller-Lynn Publishing Co. Raban’s illustrations show children celebrating Jewish holidays. This Lag BaOmer observance was depicted on the shores of the Kinneret.

Samson Schames (1898-1967), “Unknown Victim.” Mosaic. London, ca. 1941 Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of ...
04/27/2021

Samson Schames (1898-1967), “Unknown Victim.” Mosaic. London, ca. 1941
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of Edith Schames

German-Jewish artist Samson Schames fled from Germany to England in 1939. Using improvised materials, he continued to create art during his internment as an enemy alien in a camp near Liverpool in 1940. After his return to London, Schames created mosaics with shards and pieces of debris from bombed houses.

Shabbat Shalom!Torah mantle, Fez, Morocco, ca. 1930Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of Mark Samoil         ...
04/23/2021

Shabbat Shalom!

Torah mantle, Fez, Morocco, ca. 1930
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of Mark Samoil

Customized Israeli flag by Ita Aber, New York, ca. 1970, cotton Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of the art...
04/14/2021

Customized Israeli flag by Ita Aber, New York, ca. 1970, cotton
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of the artist

Textile artist Ita Aber customized this flag by attaching symbols celebrating New York City – the city skyline and a red apple. She brought it to the Israel Day Parade where then-Mayor John Lindsay (1921-2000; Mayor of N.Y.C. 1966-1973) autographed it for her.

Pictured here is Genia Poliakoff in Berlin in 1935. Genia and her son Leo were among the millions who perished during th...
04/08/2021


Pictured here is Genia Poliakoff in Berlin in 1935. Genia and her son Leo were among the millions who perished during the Holocaust.

Take a look at this old can of tooth powder from our collection, gift of Augusta Krieger Rudnick! Most Americans use too...
04/01/2021

Take a look at this old can of tooth powder from our collection, gift of Augusta Krieger Rudnick!

Most Americans use toothpaste for their dental hygiene nowadays, but for a long time tooth powders were the most popular way to polish your teeth. The one shown here was made kosher for Passover.

Shabbat Shalom and Happy Passover from the staff at Yeshiva University Museum!From the collection: Seder plate with cere...
03/26/2021

Shabbat Shalom and Happy Passover from the staff at Yeshiva University Museum!

From the collection:
Seder plate with ceremonial foods, matzah, and wine cups. Sculpture by fiber artist Ina Golub (1938-2015), Mountainside, New Jersey, date unknown
Gift of the Estate of Ina Golub

Matzah cover, Germany, ca. 1880Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of Mrs. Nathan MeyerWhat’s that writing on ...
03/25/2021

Matzah cover, Germany, ca. 1880
Collection of Yeshiva University Museum, gift of Mrs. Nathan Meyer

What’s that writing on the matzah cover?
Matzah, unleavened bread, is eaten during the holiday of Passover when chametz, leavened goods, are forbidden. Matzah takes bread’s place in the festive meals and as a result has its own cover. The words on this matzah cover read “That you may remember the day you left Egypt all the days of your life.” The Sages debate the purpose behind the word “all” if it then says “days of your life”. The Sages conclude that “all” teaches that one must remember Egypt in this world and the world to come.

Post by Deborah Coopersmith, Research Associate, Rabbi Arthur Schneier Program for International Affairs of Yeshiva University
Schneier Program for International Affairs of Yeshiva University

Address

15 W 16th Street
New York, NY
10011

Opening Hours

Monday 9:30am - 8pm
Tuesday 9:30am - 5pm
Wednesday 9:30am - 8pm
Thursday 9:30am - 5pm
Friday 9:30am - 3pm
Sunday 11am - 5pm

Telephone

+12122948330

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