Brief Histories

Brief Histories Based in New York City, Brief Histories presents art exhibitions, curatorial and publishing projects.

Pushpakanthan Pakkiyarajah’s Straddling Ocean and Sky opens at Brief Histories on March 11 and on view through April 8, ...
03/02/2023

Pushpakanthan Pakkiyarajah’s Straddling Ocean and Sky opens at Brief Histories on March 11 and on view through April 8, 2023.

Including video, mixed media and works on paper, the exhibition centers on Pakkiyarajah’s iterative system of collating and creating images that weave cycles and ecologies of nature, legacies of colonial histories, and the fallout of globalization.

Pakkiyarajah works through the material residues of colonial legacies and its effects on Sri Lanka’s civil war (1983-2009) and their continued consequences on communities and the natural environment. Pakkiyarajah is featured in Thinking Historically in the Present, Sharjah Biennial 15 (2023), and has participated in group exhibitions including Of Love and War, Linden Museum, Stuttgart (2022); Ouroboros, Gallery 400, Chicago (2022); Love Thy Neighbour, Asia Triennial Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan University (2021). Solo shows include, The Red Carpet, Institut für Alles Mögliche, Berlin (2022); Wounded Landscapes, Saskia Fernando Gallery, Colombo, Sri Lanka (2019); and The Disappearance of Disappearances, History of Art Gallery, Cornell University, Ithaca (2018). He lives and works between Chicago and Batticaloa, Sri Lanka.

Opening: Saturday, March 11, 3-7pm
Brief Histories 115 Bowery
pushpakanthan

It’s all about the shifting formats ▪️   with Brief Histories out now in the March issue of  Guest editor  🔗 in bio
03/01/2023

It’s all about the shifting formats ▪️ with Brief Histories out now in the March issue of
Guest editor
🔗 in bio

Thank you  and  for sharing space with  in this issue❣️——Repost from •The March issue is online! Really excited to share...
03/01/2023

Thank you and for sharing space with in this issue❣️
——
Repost from

The March issue is online! Really excited to share with you this issue, that includes wonderful contributions by artists that are taking care of others and a few of the gallerists that make the Lower East Side the never ending counterculture that it is. Hope that you all can make it to the launch party at Europa Gallery tomorrow night, 6-8!
And thank you to all of the hard work behind the scenes to make this issue possible .rae and of course .h.bui !

The March issue is online! Really excited to share with you this issue, that includes wonderful contributions by artists...
03/01/2023

The March issue is online! Really excited to share with you this issue, that includes wonderful contributions by artists that are taking care of others and a few of the gallerists that make the Lower East Side the never ending counterculture that it is. Hope that you all can make it to the launch party at Europa Gallery tomorrow night, 6-8!
And thank you to all of the hard work behind the scenes to make this issue possible .rae and of course .h.bui

Today with Ali Eyal at Sharjah Biennial 15 🫶Ali Eyal, 𝘿𝙤𝙣’𝙩 𝙡𝙚𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙗𝙚𝙖𝙪𝙩𝙞𝙛𝙪𝙡 𝙘𝙤𝙡𝙤𝙧𝙨 𝙛𝙤𝙤𝙡 𝙮𝙤𝙪, 𝙬𝙝𝙤 𝙬𝙤𝙪𝙡𝙙 𝙙𝙧𝙖𝙬 𝙂𝙤𝙤𝙛𝙮 𝙞𝙣𝙨𝙞...
02/09/2023

Today with Ali Eyal at Sharjah Biennial 15 🫶

Ali Eyal, 𝘿𝙤𝙣’𝙩 𝙡𝙚𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙗𝙚𝙖𝙪𝙩𝙞𝙛𝙪𝙡 𝙘𝙤𝙡𝙤𝙧𝙨 𝙛𝙤𝙤𝙡 𝙮𝙤𝙪, 𝙬𝙝𝙤 𝙬𝙤𝙪𝙡𝙙 𝙙𝙧𝙖𝙬 𝙂𝙤𝙤𝙛𝙮 𝙞𝙣𝙨𝙞𝙙𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙧𝙤𝙤𝙢𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙜𝙧𝙤𝙬𝙣 𝙪𝙥𝙨? 𝘼𝙣𝙙 (2021)

Performance and installation: acrylic on canvas, Band-Aid, sofa, carpet, soap, toothbrush, lighting, broom, and plants.

56 minutes, dimensions variable.

Ali Eyal is featured in the latest issue of  “This issue, ‘Making Their Mark’, explores the complexities of mark-making ...
01/23/2023

Ali Eyal is featured in the latest issue of “This issue, ‘Making Their Mark’, explores the complexities of mark-making through drawing, calligraphy, mapping and beyond as artists express intentional thoughts, information, values or the subconscious mind.”

Work by Wael Shawky on the cover and other brilliant artists within the pages ✨✨✨✨

“Ali Eyal’s In the Head’s Sunrise” by Dina Ramadan is out now on e-flux Criticism. “‘In the Head’s Sunrise’, a quiet yet...
01/20/2023

“Ali Eyal’s In the Head’s Sunrise” by Dina Ramadan is out now on e-flux Criticism.

“‘In the Head’s Sunrise’, a quiet yet compelling exhibition of Ali Eyal’s recent drawings and paintings, captures the intricacy and complexity of the young Iraqi artist’s practice; the emotional texture of the work, accomplished through rapid, forceful strokes, is immediately striking. Individually and collectively the works recreate moments from life in Eyal’s hometown—referred to only as small farm—where he came of age amidst the violent turmoil of the US-led invasion of Iraq. The titles of the pieces underscore Eyal’s propensity for narrative along with his acute awareness of its limitations; each enigmatic label ends with “and,” indicating its incompleteness, and suggesting that every encounter is a beginning, like tugging on a loose, seemingly extraneous thread that unexpectedly unravels the entire fabric.”

Read the full text on e-flux Criticism, link in bio. 🧿🧿

Today’s sunset. Today’s sketch. The paper was implemented by ‘the frontally.’ -AEAli EyalBerlin's drawing's pad, and, 20...
01/14/2023

Today’s sunset. Today’s sketch. The paper was implemented by ‘the frontally.’ -AE

Ali Eyal
Berlin's drawing's pad, and, 2021
Colored pencil and ink on paper
8.3 x 11.7 inches (11x14 inches framed)

Ali Eyal: 𝑰𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝑯𝒆𝒂𝒅’𝒔 𝑺𝒖𝒏𝒓𝒊𝒔𝒆 is on view through January 28, 2023. Gallery hours are Thursday to Saturday 12-6pm.

Inching forward, building steam with a grain of salt. We are seen!  highlights Brief Histories in Hyperallergic - Seven ...
10/12/2022

Inching forward, building steam with a grain of salt. We are seen! highlights Brief Histories in Hyperallergic - Seven New Spaces to Visit in Manhattan. Thank you!

Come by Brief Histories to see Jumana Manna’s Late Night Strollers on view through November 12!

Gallery hours Thursday-Saturday 12-6pm.


Jumana Manna’s 𝘍𝘰𝘳𝘢𝘨𝘦𝘳𝘴 and 𝘞𝘪𝘭𝘥 𝘙𝘦𝘭𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘴 are featured in  💥💥💥“Harassment of people gathering a wild green said to tast...
09/30/2022

Jumana Manna’s 𝘍𝘰𝘳𝘢𝘨𝘦𝘳𝘴 and 𝘞𝘪𝘭𝘥 𝘙𝘦𝘭𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘴 are featured in 💥💥💥

“Harassment of people gathering a wild green said to taste like artichoke, whether or not this particular harassment is still happening, is a perfectly intelligible stand-in for all the other tools a modern state can use to tell people they’re unwanted.” Text by Will Heinrich.

Jumana Manna’s major museum solo exhibition 𝘉𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘬, 𝘛𝘢𝘬𝘦, 𝘌𝘳𝘢𝘴𝘦, 𝘛𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘺 is on view now curated by Ruba Katrib 🍃 🍃 🍃

Today 4-6pm at 115 Bowery  and  in conversation! 𝙇𝙖𝙩𝙚 𝙉𝙞𝙜𝙝𝙩 𝙎𝙩𝙧𝙤𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙧𝙨 is now on view  through November 12! Gallery hours...
09/17/2022

Today 4-6pm at 115 Bowery and in conversation! 𝙇𝙖𝙩𝙚 𝙉𝙞𝙜𝙝𝙩 𝙎𝙩𝙧𝙤𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙧𝙨 is now on view through November 12!

Gallery hours Thursday-Saturday 12-6pm.

☕️ 🫖 💬 Tomorrow, Saturday Sept. 17th, 4-6pm Brief Histories] Jumana Manna and Omar Berrada in conversation! Come and bri...
09/16/2022

☕️ 🫖 💬 Tomorrow, Saturday Sept. 17th, 4-6pm Brief Histories] Jumana Manna and Omar Berrada in conversation! Come and bring your friends, there’s much to talk about: contradiction and improvisation, material ruination and its psychological weight, bodies and the infrastructures that regulate them, and more. Space is limited, so be sure to make it in time. 💋

Brief Histories]

Jumana Manna’s 𝙇𝙖𝙩𝙚 𝙉𝙞𝙜𝙝𝙩 𝙎𝙩𝙧𝙤𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙧𝙨 opens this Thursday, September 15th, with an opening reception from 6-8pm🍷 💐 And on ...
09/13/2022

Jumana Manna’s 𝙇𝙖𝙩𝙚 𝙉𝙞𝙜𝙝𝙩 𝙎𝙩𝙧𝙤𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙧𝙨 opens this Thursday, September 15th, with an opening reception from 6-8pm🍷 💐 And on Saturday, September 17th from 4-6pm join us for a conversation with Jumana Manna and Omar Berrada 🌹

Spread the word 💋

Image:
Jumana Manna
𝘖𝘭𝘥 𝘉𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘥 (𝘋𝘦𝘱𝘰𝘴𝘪𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘴), 2022 (detail)
Ceramics
Dimensions variable


Save the date 📣 📣Thursday,  September 15 — NYC!𝗝𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗮 𝗠𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗮 𝙇𝙖𝙩𝙚 𝙉𝙞𝙜𝙝𝙩 𝙎𝙩𝙧𝙤𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙧𝙨Brief Histories presents Late Night Stro...
09/07/2022

Save the date 📣 📣
Thursday, September 15 — NYC!

𝗝𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗮 𝗠𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗮 𝙇𝙖𝙩𝙚 𝙉𝙞𝙜𝙝𝙩 𝙎𝙩𝙧𝙤𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙧𝙨

Brief Histories presents Late Night Strollers, a solo exhibition by Jumana Manna, opening Thursday September 15, 2022, and on view through November 12, 2022. The exhibition brings together ceramic sculptures, a scaffolding gauze collage, and video installation.

Opening reception 09/15 6-8pm 🥂



Using large spools of thread, Karee Dahl pulls a single line of color at a time, dropping the string onto a flat plane t...
07/23/2022

Using large spools of thread, Karee Dahl pulls a single line of color at a time, dropping the string onto a flat plane that temporarily acts as a surface. The line of thread unrolls, and traveling away from itself, it drops and piles in subtle elevations. With their accumulation, the piles of thread create masses and forms that materialize as familiar silhouettes from both Dahl’s observed natural world and inward, domesticated environment. The winding fibers shape Dahl's landscapes, and still lifes of everyday utensils are reduced to their fundamental silhouettes – for the artist, this is a truth that echoes its own nature. At the same time, the obsessive manipulation of a continuous single line of fiber, pulled, dropped and piled as a means of recollection, channels spaces in the world and corners of our memory. It allows chance, with winding heaps of thread, to unravel an organic rationality and categorization. Dahl’s process distills these images and concentrates the forms, metamorphosing both material and process to tender evocations of a transforming world and its hushed biorhythms. Using a string of thread to travel these new spaces, Dahl considers the process and material relationships between drawing, painting, sculpture and installation in the context of textiles. She lives and works in Urangan, Australia.

Karee Dahl
Big Pond, Little Pond, 2020
Polyester thread, water-based acid-free garment adhesive (Helmar Wash and Wear Glue)
43 x 43 inches

Big Pond, Little Pond by Karee Dahl is on view in the group exhibition Inheritance through July 30, 2022.

𝗛𝗼𝘄𝗮𝗿𝗱𝗲𝗻𝗮 𝗣𝗶𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗹𝗹'𝘀 𝘜𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘵𝘭𝘦𝘥  #5, currently on view at 𝗕𝗿𝗶𝗲𝗳 𝗛𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗼𝗿𝗶𝗲𝘀, is an anchor to the group exhibition 𝙄𝙣𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙘𝙚...
07/04/2022

𝗛𝗼𝘄𝗮𝗿𝗱𝗲𝗻𝗮 𝗣𝗶𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗹𝗹'𝘀 𝘜𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘵𝘭𝘦𝘥 #5, currently on view at 𝗕𝗿𝗶𝗲𝗳 𝗛𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗼𝗿𝗶𝗲𝘀, is an anchor to the group exhibition 𝙄𝙣𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙘𝙚. It reminds me of the multi-layered and polyphonic views to creativity and making, and that most of all, art is also about repair and healing. 𝗛𝗼𝘄𝗮𝗿𝗱𝗲𝗻𝗮 𝗣𝗶𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗹𝗹'𝘀 commitment and perseverance to continue exploring both the register of abstraction and narrative, in a way that is true to her own experience and legacy, is an inspiration. In her interview with Louisa Buck in The Art Newspaper she says, "Circles are an iconic form: the planets, Earth, the sun and the moon; and when a fellow graduate student at Yale started playing with the circle, I became mesmerized. Only after I started using them, I remembered a time when I was in north Kentucky with my dad in the early 1950s during segregation. We stopped at a root beer stand and on the bottom of the chilled mugs were giant, red painted circles, maybe three inches wide, which meant that they were designated for people of color. As I started drawing circles and ovals, I think I was also trying to heal that earlier experience in Kentucky as a child."

𝗛𝗼𝘄𝗮𝗿𝗱𝗲𝗻𝗮 𝗣𝗶𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗹𝗹 is an artist, activist, educator and curator, and her work and ideas are critical to contemporary art discourse today. She studied at Yale in the 1960’s, she is a founding member of A.I.R. Gallery in 1972, she was curator at MoMA for over a decade (1967–1979), and she began teaching at Stony Brook University in 1979, where she is now a Distinguished Professor of Art. Her work is represented by Garth Greenan gallery in New York, and her major touring exhibition “A New Language” just opened at Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge, UK.

Images:
𝗛𝗼𝘄𝗮𝗿𝗱𝗲𝗻𝗮 𝗣𝗶𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗹𝗹, 𝘜𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘵𝘭𝘦𝘥 #5, 2013
Mixed media on paper collage
12 x 16.5 inches

Sitting with Howardena at the opening of 𝙄𝙣𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙘𝙚, enjoying 𝗝𝗼𝗲 𝗡𝗮𝗺𝘆’𝘀 installation, Study for Sonic No.7 and No.10.

In 𝘑𝘢𝘴𝘰𝘯'𝘴 𝘙𝘰𝘤𝘬, 𝗝𝗲𝗿𝗲𝗺𝘆 𝗗𝗲𝗻𝗻𝗶𝘀 captures the large glacial erratic boulder named after Jason Hoopte, a member of the Mont...
06/27/2022

In 𝘑𝘢𝘴𝘰𝘯'𝘴 𝘙𝘰𝘤𝘬, 𝗝𝗲𝗿𝗲𝗺𝘆 𝗗𝗲𝗻𝗻𝗶𝘀 captures the large glacial erratic boulder named after Jason Hoopte, a member of the Montaukett Native Americans. Jason Hoopte is described as an old man who used to pause at that spot on his journey between Sag Harbor and East Hampton. On top of the boulder, there is a natural depression that collects rain, ensuring a continual supply of fresh water, which, despite the weather, is always cold. Jason’s Rock is featured with a historic marker that tells its story on the East Hampton Trails Preservation Society’s Deb Foster Trail. 𝗗𝗲𝗻𝗻𝗶𝘀 is an artist and tribal member of the Shinnecock Indian Nation in Southampton, New York, where he lives and works. In his photographs, he explores indigenous culture and assimilation, the experience of living on a sovereign Indian reservation in the United States and the challenges faced. 𝗗𝗲𝗻𝗻𝗶𝘀 leads 𝗠𝗮’𝘀 𝗛𝗼𝘂𝘀𝗲, a studio residency, gallery, and communal art space based on the Shinnecock Indian Reservation in Southampton.

𝗝𝗲𝗿𝗲𝗺𝘆 𝗗𝗲𝗻𝗻𝗶𝘀, 𝘑𝘢𝘴𝘰𝘯'𝘴 𝘙𝘰𝘤𝘬, 2016
Archival inkjet print
18 x 24 inches

Inheritance installation view:
𝗝𝗲𝗿𝗲𝗺𝘆 𝗗𝗲𝗻𝗻𝗶𝘀, 𝘑𝘢𝘴𝘰𝘯'𝘴 𝘙𝘰𝘤𝘬, 2016
Archival inkjet print
18 x 24 inches

𝗝𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗮 𝗠𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗮, 𝘚𝘬𝘺, 2022
Collage on paper from cleaning product labels
23 x 31 inches (Framed)


06/26/2022
In a series of collage works that weave into her artistic practice and inform her process, 𝗝𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗮 𝗠𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗮 methodically ren...
06/25/2022

In a series of collage works that weave into her artistic practice and inform her process, 𝗝𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗮 𝗠𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗮 methodically renders imaginary landscapes cut out from chemical home cleaning containers. These collages evoke a sunny and bright outlook, their composition in reference to classical painting genres that depict still-life and idealized landscapes. Though from Manna’s perspective, these landscapes, seeping with household chemicals are in disrepair, a fantasy copy of pasture, a sky, or a sea, all synthetic non-places, they set out to conjure the freshness of nature. Manna is a visual artist, working primarily in sculpture and film, she explores how power is articulated through relationships, often focusing on the body and materiality in relation to narratives of nationalism and histories of place. Her collage on paper, 𝘚𝘬𝘺, is featured in the group exhibition 𝙄𝙣𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙘𝙚, on view at 𝗕𝗿𝗶𝗲𝗳 𝗛𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗼𝗿𝗶𝗲𝘀, until July 30, 2022.

𝗝𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗮 𝗠𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗮, 𝘚𝘬𝘺, 2022
Collage on paper from cleaning product labels
23 x 31 inches (Framed)







Images:
𝗝𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗮 𝗠𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗮, 𝘚𝘬𝘺, 2022 (Detail)
Collage on paper from cleaning product labels
23 x 31 inches (Framed)

Inheritance installation view 1:
𝗝𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗮 𝗠𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗮, 𝘚𝘬𝘺, 2022
Collage on paper from cleaning product labels
23 x 31 inches (Framed)

𝗝𝗲𝗿𝗲𝗺𝘆 𝗗𝗲𝗻𝗻𝗶𝘀, 𝘑𝘢𝘴𝘰𝘯'𝘴 𝘙𝘰𝘤𝘬, 2016
Archival inkjet print
18 x 24 inches (Framed)

Inheritance installation view 2:
𝗝𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗮 𝗠𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗮, 𝘚𝘬𝘺, 2022
Collage on paper from cleaning product labels
23 x 31 inches (Framed)

𝗔𝗻𝗮𝗵𝗶𝘁𝗮 𝗩𝗼𝘀𝘀𝗼𝘂𝗴𝗵𝗶, 𝘌𝘹𝘰𝘴𝘬𝘦𝘭𝘦𝘵𝘰𝘯 4 𝘗𝘳𝘰𝘵𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯, 2021
(Installation) Media and dimensions variable

𝗦𝗮𝗵𝗿𝗮 𝗠𝗼𝘁𝗮𝗹𝗲𝗯𝗶, 𝘙𝘦𝘴𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘰𝘳 4 (𝘚𝘱𝘦𝘤𝘶𝘭𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘐𝘯𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘶𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵), 2022
Acrylic, colored pencil, sharpie, spray paint on found board
Dimensions variable

Anahita Vossoughi produces drawings and sketches, using various computer software to design the structure for the series...
06/24/2022

Anahita Vossoughi produces drawings and sketches, using various computer software to design the structure for the series of sculptures, Exoskeleton 4 Protection (2022). After making the laser cuts, the process continues in the studio, Vossoughi allows impulse, desire, touch, and sensitivity to guide her. Seeking to work sustainably, Vossoughi uses found materials that can be upscaled. For example, the color for each Exoskeleton is made from discarded Epson inkjet cartridges. Inkjet paper is reused by shredding and blending it to make paper pulp that the artist mixes with ink or clay. It is an experimental lab process (after all, she grew up with two scientist parents) and an inventiveness that spurs out of necessity, where play with surface, material, scale, and structure are what generate these new organisms.

Exoskeleton 4 Protection: Peacock, 2021
Spider Acrylic latex and oil paint, ink, clay, plaster, glue, sand, glass beads, shells, paper, faux pearls and spandex on laser cut wood
22 x 10 x 5.5 inches

Exoskeleton 4 Protection, installation view.

Exoskeleton 4 Protection: Ocean, 2021
Acrylic, latex and oil paint, ink, clay, plaster, glue, sand, grout, polystyrene be ads, decorative gravel, sequin, faux metal leaf, and bejeweled fishnet stockings on laser cut wood
22 x 10 x 5.5 inches

Exoskeleton 4 Protection: Atom, 2021
Acrylic and latex paint, ink, clay, plaster, glue, sand, grout, and bejeweled fishnet stockings on laser cut wood
22 x 10 x 5.5 inches

Exoskeleton 4 Protection: Study #1, 2022
Bejeweled fishnet stockings, latex, acrylic and oil paint, polystyrene beads, glue, ink, grout and faux leather on laser cut wood

Exoskeleton 4 Protection: Relic
Acrylic and latex paint, ink, clay, plaster, glue, sand, grout, polystyrene beads, faux pearls, polyester, faux metal leaf, tube confetti and bejeweled fishnet stockings on laser cut wood
43 x 12 x 5.25 inches

Inheritance, installation view with:
Jumana Manna
Sky, 2022
Collage on paper from cleaning product labels
23 x 31 inches (Framed)

Sahra Motalebi
Resonator 4 (Speculative Instrument), 2022
Acrylic, colored pencil, sharpie, spray paint on found board
Dimensions variable

𝙄𝙣𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙘𝙚 this Saturday 6-8pm!Consider the tremors of our histories caught in a feedback loop, rippling and reverberat...
06/15/2022

𝙄𝙣𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙘𝙚 this Saturday 6-8pm!

Consider the tremors of our histories caught in a feedback loop, rippling and reverberating. They accumulate and meander to be passed on to new forms, new organisms. This inheritance, this ever-transforming culture, changes us and resonates through us. What possibilities are created in the transmissions of inherited rites, genetics, ecologies, knowledge, and power? What codes are inherited in material histories, and how do we cut across their futures in skills and techniques, aesthetics and forms?

𝙄𝙣𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙘𝙚 is on view June 18 - July 30, 2022.

Gallery Hours: Thur–Sat 12pm–6pm and by appointment.

Image detail:
Joe Namy
Study for Sonic No. 7 & No. 10., 2018.
Audio, orange tree, photographs, text.
Dimensions variable.
kurant











𝘏𝘰𝘸 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘢 𝘭𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘩𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘰𝘳𝘺? 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘭𝘪𝘮𝘪𝘵𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘪𝘯𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦? 𝘊𝘰𝘭𝘦𝘮𝘢𝘯 𝘊𝘰𝘭𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘴 𝘶𝘴𝘦𝘴 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘋𝘕𝘈 𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘢𝘭 𝘵...
06/10/2022

𝘏𝘰𝘸 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘢 𝘭𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘩𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘰𝘳𝘺? 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘭𝘪𝘮𝘪𝘵𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘪𝘯𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦? 𝘊𝘰𝘭𝘦𝘮𝘢𝘯 𝘊𝘰𝘭𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘴 𝘶𝘴𝘦𝘴 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘋𝘕𝘈 𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘢𝘭 𝘵𝘰 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘭𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘢𝘥𝘰𝘹𝘦𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘪𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘵𝘺. 𝘽𝙮 𝙈𝙖𝙮 𝙈𝙖𝙠𝙠𝙞

“In the center of the gallery, Data self-portrait 2 ties together all of Collins’s iterative processes. A computer motherboard engraved with the artist’s gene sequence, the work is the most direct instantiation of the artist’s DNA (the exact code needed to produce another Coleman Collins), yet it is also the least guided by his interpretation. In its starkness, the work brings out an existential dimension to the show: “What does it mean to have a body, and specifically this one?” the artist asked when speaking about the exhibition. “Body Errata” presents some hypotheses, finding new forms at the breaking points of data, narratives, and materials.”





06/10/2022

It's the final week for Coleman Collins, 𝘽𝙤𝙙𝙮 𝙀𝙧𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙖. Join us for the closing of the exhibition at Brief Histories. Coleman Collins will be in conversation with writer and editor, Brian Kuan Wood. 4pm-6pm Saturday, June 11 💥





𝙉𝙤 𝙈𝙞𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙠𝙚𝙨 is constructed using a specific MDF material (medium-density fibreboard), a neutral gray engineered wood whi...
06/03/2022

𝙉𝙤 𝙈𝙞𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙠𝙚𝙨 is constructed using a specific MDF material (medium-density fibreboard), a neutral gray engineered wood which combines natural fibres with wax and resin, with a laser-engraved steel plaque positioned in the lower third that reads:

“01-001 called again; he still couldn’t let it go. It was a mistake, he said. I never should have done it. All this generational trauma I got in me, these bad genes. How could I have gone and passed them along? Though she would later complain about his neuroticism–his constant phone calls, his general inability to live without overthinking everything–in that moment, all she said to him was this: God don’t make no mistakes.”

𝘽𝙤𝙙𝙮 𝙀𝙧𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙖 by Coleman Collins is on view at Brief Histories until June 11, 2022. Gallery hours: Thursday-Saturday 12-6pm and by appointment.

Images:

Coleman Collins
𝙉𝙤 𝙈𝙞𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙠𝙚𝙨, 2022
CNC-carved MDF, laser-engraved steel, 28.5 x 21 inches




“01-001 called again; he still couldn’t let it go. It was a mistake, he said. I never should have done it. All this gene...
06/02/2022

“01-001 called again; he still couldn’t let it go. It was a mistake, he said. I never should have done it. All this generational trauma I got in me, these bad genes. How could I have gone and passed them along? Though she would later complain about his neuroticism–his constant phone calls, his general inability to live without overthinking everything–in that moment, all she said to him was this: God don’t make no mistakes.”

𝘽𝙤𝙙𝙮 𝙀𝙧𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙖 by Coleman Collins is on view at Brief Histories until June 11, 2022. Gallery hours: Thursday-Saturday 12-6pm and by appointment.

Detail image 1:

No Mistakes, 2022
CNC-carved MDF, laser-engraved steel, 28.5 x 21 inches

Detail images 2+3:

Tetrad, 2022
CNC-carved MDF
25.5 x 19.75 inches

Detail images 4+5

Mother, board, 2022
CNC-carved MDF
25.5 x 19.75 inches

Detail images 6+7:

Coleman Collins
Sequential shift, 2022
CNC-carved MDF
39 x 26 inches




Congratulations to Coleman Collins for receiving a 2022  research grant!2022 Graham Grantee: Coleman Collins for 𝙏𝙝𝙚 (𝘿𝙚...
05/26/2022

Congratulations to Coleman Collins for receiving a 2022 research grant!

2022 Graham Grantee: Coleman Collins for 𝙏𝙝𝙚 (𝘿𝙚)𝙊𝙣𝙩𝙤𝙡𝙤𝙜𝙞𝙘𝙖𝙡 𝙊𝙗𝙡𝙞𝙦𝙪𝙚

The coastal French landscape that holds the World War II bunkers that so fascinated architect Claude Parent (1923–2016) and philosopher Paul Virilio (1932–2018) of the Architecture Principe group in the 1960s is once more a contested site; it acts as a holding area for migrant workers hoping to travel to England. The sense of skewed (de)horizontal (de)stabilization that Parent and Virilio identified so adeptly now extends beyond the bunker into the societal landscape. Where Parent once attempted to use the oblique to shock late capitalist consumers out of their sense of order and calm, certain subjects might now be considered to be always already obliqued. This interdisciplinary art research project takes as a given Parent’s insistence that space is necessarily active, rather than passive, working within a postcolonial framework to examine the way in which it is active. How does space act upon certain subjects differently? Can we recognize these effects? Just what do we owe those who enter our spaces?

This research project is one of 56 new grants to individuals exploring ideas that expand contemporary understanding of architecture. See the full list of 2022 projects and learn more on the foundation's website: www.grahamfoundation.org

Images:
[1] Coleman Collins "l'oblique ontologique un," 2022.
Digital collage with images from La Camp de la Lande (La Jungle) in Calais, France. Courtesy the artist.

[2] Coleman Collins "l'oblique ontologique deux," 2022.
Digital collage with images from La Camp de la Lande (La Jungle) in Calais, France. Courtesy the artist.

05/23/2022

𝗖𝗼𝗹𝗲𝗺𝗮𝗻 𝗖𝗼𝗹𝗹𝗶𝗻𝘀 | 𝘽𝙤𝙙𝙮 𝙀𝙧𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙖 solo exhibition is on view at Brief Histories gallery through June 11, 2022 | www.briefhistories.art | 115 Bowery | New York City | www.instagram.com/brief_histories

THIS MAY BE THE LAST TIME is inscribed into a set of six black ax heads arranged on an MDF and steel tile surface. The a...
05/06/2022

THIS MAY BE THE LAST TIME is inscribed into a set of six black ax heads arranged on an MDF and steel tile surface. The ax heads reference the paradox of Grandfather’s Axe (also known as The Ship of Theseus) which asks if an object made up of many parts remains the same object if all its parts have been gradually replaced over time. 𝙈𝙖𝙮 𝙗𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙡𝙖𝙨𝙩 𝙩𝙞𝙢𝙚, 𝙄 𝙙𝙤𝙣'𝙩 𝙠𝙣𝙤𝙬, 2022 considers this thought experiment as a metaphor for our own legacies. The ax is a leitmotif throughout 𝘽𝙤𝙙𝙮 𝙀𝙧𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙖, and gestures toward the instability, gaps, and mutations found in both our material and cultural inheritance. When the handle and head have been exchanged over and over again, is it still the same heirloom as it is passed on from generation to generation? Can we liken the copying and recopying of DNA to this process?

Images:

Coleman Collins
𝙈𝙖𝙮 𝙗𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙡𝙖𝙨𝙩 𝙩𝙞𝙢𝙚, 𝙄 𝙙𝙤𝙣'𝙩 𝙠𝙣𝙤𝙬, 2022
Six laser engraved axe heads, steel, MDF
Dimensions Variable





𝙎𝙚𝙦𝙪𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙎𝙝𝙞𝙛𝙩, 2022, by Coleman Collins is made with a computer-aided wood carving process. The gray MDF material is ...
04/16/2022

𝙎𝙚𝙦𝙪𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙎𝙝𝙞𝙛𝙩, 2022, by Coleman Collins is made with a computer-aided wood carving process. The gray MDF material is slowly etched with a relief landscape composed of fragments emerging from the surface. The ACGT sequence is combined with tetrahedral forms and three-dimensional visualizations of West African Ife heads. These visualizations are derived from 3D scans of cultural objects from the artist’s archive, while the text is a small portion of the artist’s fully sequenced genome. The work highlights the unstable nature of information through time, as cultural and biological forms are copied and recopied, and the digital is made material (and vice versa). The exhibition 𝘽𝙤𝙙𝙮 𝙀𝙧𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙖 considers our contemporary condition and the interrelationships between nature, people, and technology.

Sequential shift, 2022
CNC-carved MDF
26 x 39 inches








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