Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

Institute for the Study of the Ancient World Old world, new vision. https://linktr.ee/isawnyu The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University is a center for advanced scholarly research and graduate education, intended to cultivate comparative and connective investigations of the ancient world from the western Mediterranean to China, open to the integration of every category of evidence and relevant method of analysis.
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The official page of ISAW. Spam/ads, profanity, slurs, or attacks will be deleted.

Operating as usual

04/30/2021

Today is the last day to enjoy 25% off all our exquisite exhibition catalogues with promo code "CAT25" at checkout. Click the link in our bio to check out the ISAW Gallery Store and gather together some good reads for summer!

#isawnyu #artbooks #ancienthistory #booksale

04/28/2021

For Today's Object History we hear from ISAW PhD Student and Gallery Docent Mariana Castro as she discusses the origins of the word hysteria and how it relates to ancient perceptions of the female body.

Learn more about women and ancient medicine in our current exhibition, The Empire's Physician. Link in Bio

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF)@snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #snforg #ancientmedicine #womenshealth #isawgalen #objecthistory #etymology

This month's 25% off Exhibition Catalogue Sale ends in a week, but our catalogue bundles are available all the time! Fin...
04/23/2021

This month's 25% off Exhibition Catalogue Sale ends in a week, but our catalogue bundles are available all the time! Find the sale at the link in our bio and take a look back over our recent exhibitions with this bundle of beautiful books:

•A Wonder to Behold: Craftsmanship and the Creation of Babylon's Ishtar Gate
-Marvel at the transformative power of materials and craftsmanship of ancient art in relation to the Ishtar Gate. "The volume is a laudable example of what an exhibition publication should be." - Classical Review

•Romance and Reason: Islamic Transformations of the Classical Past
-Focusing on the portrayal of Alexander the Great as ideal ruler, mystic, lover, and philosopher in Persian poetry and art, learn how Islamic medicine, philosophy, and science contended with and developed the classical tradition.

•Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes
-Explore the role of dance in ancient art and culture and how artists of the Ballets Russes returned to the past as a source for modern expression.

#isawnyu #ancienthistory #museumsfromhome #exhibitioncatalogues #booksale

This month's 25% off Exhibition Catalogue Sale ends in a week, but our catalogue bundles are available all the time! Find the sale at the link in our bio and take a look back over our recent exhibitions with this bundle of beautiful books:

•A Wonder to Behold: Craftsmanship and the Creation of Babylon's Ishtar Gate
-Marvel at the transformative power of materials and craftsmanship of ancient art in relation to the Ishtar Gate. "The volume is a laudable example of what an exhibition publication should be." - Classical Review

•Romance and Reason: Islamic Transformations of the Classical Past
-Focusing on the portrayal of Alexander the Great as ideal ruler, mystic, lover, and philosopher in Persian poetry and art, learn how Islamic medicine, philosophy, and science contended with and developed the classical tradition.

•Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes
-Explore the role of dance in ancient art and culture and how artists of the Ballets Russes returned to the past as a source for modern expression.

#isawnyu #ancienthistory #museumsfromhome #exhibitioncatalogues #booksale

04/21/2021

Have you ever been given the advice that there is nothing a good night’s rest can’t fix? The prescription of a full night of sleep is not just a modern wellness fad. In fact, sleep was embedded into healing practices in Greco-Roman antiquity. People seeking to be relieved of pain would offer votives like this one to Asclepius, a god of healing. Sanctuaries dedicated to the god became healing centers where people would spend a night of rest in hopes that Asclepius would come to their dreams and offer a cure.

Forget Freud, find out what Asclepius has to say about your dreams in The Empire's Physician's recently launched digital game (Link in Bio)!

Votive relief depicting Asclepius healing a patient in her sleep, with Hygieia standing behind the god. Greek, ca. 400–350 BCE. Marble. Temple of Asclepius (Asclepieion), Piraeus, near Athens. H. 42 cm; W. 79 cm. Archaeological Museum of Piraeus: MP 405. Photo: Sites & Photos / Art Resource, NY.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #isawgalen #ancientmedicine #digitalgames #dreamanalysis #sleepstudy #dreamreading #asclepius

Did you know that even in the Ancient Roman world carrots were valued for their medicinal use? This illustration of a ca...
04/14/2021

Did you know that even in the Ancient Roman world carrots were valued for their medicinal use? This illustration of a carrot comes from a copy of a 1st c. medical treatise by Dioscorides. Dioscorides and Galen both believed that a balance between the internal elements of warm, cold, moist and dry would help guard one's health. Diet played a very important role in creating this balance, and all vegetables, including carrots, were believed to have medicinal properties.

If you want to learn more about preventative care in ancient Rome and Galen's description of a healthy lifestyle, check out the exhibition. Link in Bio. Happy national gardening day! 🥕🧑‍🌾

Text describing the uses of medicinal vegetables with an illustration of a carrot.
From Dioscorides (1st century CE), De materia medica (Vienna Dioscorides; Byzantine, ca. 515 CE), 312r. Österreichische Nationalbibliothek: Codex Vindobonensis Med. gr. 1.
Photo: CPA Media Pte Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo. @nationalbibliothek

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#nationalgardeningday #galen #ancientmedicine #nationalbibliothek #isawgalen #isawnyu #botanicaldrawing #museumsfromhome

Did you know that even in the Ancient Roman world carrots were valued for their medicinal use? This illustration of a carrot comes from a copy of a 1st c. medical treatise by Dioscorides. Dioscorides and Galen both believed that a balance between the internal elements of warm, cold, moist and dry would help guard one's health. Diet played a very important role in creating this balance, and all vegetables, including carrots, were believed to have medicinal properties.

If you want to learn more about preventative care in ancient Rome and Galen's description of a healthy lifestyle, check out the exhibition. Link in Bio. Happy national gardening day! 🥕🧑‍🌾

Text describing the uses of medicinal vegetables with an illustration of a carrot.
From Dioscorides (1st century CE), De materia medica (Vienna Dioscorides; Byzantine, ca. 515 CE), 312r. Österreichische Nationalbibliothek: Codex Vindobonensis Med. gr. 1.
Photo: CPA Media Pte Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo. @nationalbibliothek

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#nationalgardeningday #galen #ancientmedicine #nationalbibliothek #isawgalen #isawnyu #botanicaldrawing #museumsfromhome

04/09/2021

If you’re in the market for something beautiful and interesting to spice up your coffee table, click the link in our bio to check out the ISAW Gallery Store. Enjoy 25% off all our exquisite exhibition catalogues with promo code "CAT25" at checkout. Now through April 30th!

#isawnyu #artbooks #ancienthistory #booksale

Did you know that Roman violent spectacle contributed to the advancement of ancient medicine? The mosaic depicted here s...
04/07/2021

Did you know that Roman violent spectacle contributed to the advancement of ancient medicine? The mosaic depicted here shows the fight between two equites (horseman) gladiators named Maternus and Simmachius. Below, the gladiators prepare to fight as they are cheered by their trainers (the lanistae). The register on top reveals the expected outcome of the confrontation, with the inscriptions acting as subtitles. Maternus, his death symbolized by a crossed-out O, lies defeated by Symmachus, whom the inscription hails as a fortunate man ("HOMOFELIX"). Maternus' fate was not an uncommon occurrence in the business of Roman entertainment (chances of survival were one in nine), and Galen saw this as an opportunity to understand the human body without breaking the Roman taboo of touching or dissecting cadavers. He did so by encouraging his students to observe the injuries of gladiators who had been killed in the Roman games, employing the wounds as "windows into the body."

To read more about science and spectacle in ancient Rome visit our online exhibition! Link in Bio.

A mosaic representing gladiatorial combat. Roman, 3rd century CE. Marble. L. 60.5 cm; W. 60.5 cm; D. 10 cm. Museo Arqueológico Nacional, Madrid: 3601. Museo Arqueológico Nacional de España

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation(SNF) and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #isawgalen #gladiators #ancientmedicine #connectingcollections #museumsfromhome

Did you know that Roman violent spectacle contributed to the advancement of ancient medicine? The mosaic depicted here shows the fight between two equites (horseman) gladiators named Maternus and Simmachius. Below, the gladiators prepare to fight as they are cheered by their trainers (the lanistae). The register on top reveals the expected outcome of the confrontation, with the inscriptions acting as subtitles. Maternus, his death symbolized by a crossed-out O, lies defeated by Symmachus, whom the inscription hails as a fortunate man ("HOMOFELIX"). Maternus' fate was not an uncommon occurrence in the business of Roman entertainment (chances of survival were one in nine), and Galen saw this as an opportunity to understand the human body without breaking the Roman taboo of touching or dissecting cadavers. He did so by encouraging his students to observe the injuries of gladiators who had been killed in the Roman games, employing the wounds as "windows into the body."

To read more about science and spectacle in ancient Rome visit our online exhibition! Link in Bio.

A mosaic representing gladiatorial combat. Roman, 3rd century CE. Marble. L. 60.5 cm; W. 60.5 cm; D. 10 cm. Museo Arqueológico Nacional, Madrid: 3601. Museo Arqueológico Nacional de España

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation(SNF) and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #isawgalen #gladiators #ancientmedicine #connectingcollections #museumsfromhome

Closing out the last week of Women's History Month, this terracotta votive was molded and carved into the shape of a ute...
03/31/2021

Closing out the last week of Women's History Month, this terracotta votive was molded and carved into the shape of a uterus. This object is dated to the Roman period, but anatomical votives like this (and of countless other body parts) are known from across the Mediterranean world. These objects were thought to be pleas for help or votives of thanks in relation to various illnesses or ailments, most often left at temples – especially to the god of healing, Asclepius. This votive of a uterus speaks to the presence of women’s health issues as a prominent concern in the ancient Mediterranean. It is possible that the ridges appearing on this votive could represent contractions, indicating the act of childbirth. Left by visitors to temples, it is possible to imagine a Roman woman, hoping for a smooth birth or thanking the gods for its aftermath, leaving an object such as this.

To read more about women’s health in ancient Rome visit our online exhibition!

Anatomical votive of a uterus. Roman. Terracotta. Wellcome Collection: A636107. Photo: Wellcome Collection. CC BY 4.0.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #isawgalen #wellcomecollection #ancientchildbirth #midwives #ancientmedicine #womenshistorymonth #connectingcollections #museumsfromhome

Closing out the last week of Women's History Month, this terracotta votive was molded and carved into the shape of a uterus. This object is dated to the Roman period, but anatomical votives like this (and of countless other body parts) are known from across the Mediterranean world. These objects were thought to be pleas for help or votives of thanks in relation to various illnesses or ailments, most often left at temples – especially to the god of healing, Asclepius. This votive of a uterus speaks to the presence of women’s health issues as a prominent concern in the ancient Mediterranean. It is possible that the ridges appearing on this votive could represent contractions, indicating the act of childbirth. Left by visitors to temples, it is possible to imagine a Roman woman, hoping for a smooth birth or thanking the gods for its aftermath, leaving an object such as this.

To read more about women’s health in ancient Rome visit our online exhibition!

Anatomical votive of a uterus. Roman. Terracotta. Wellcome Collection: A636107. Photo: Wellcome Collection. CC BY 4.0.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #isawgalen #wellcomecollection #ancientchildbirth #midwives #ancientmedicine #womenshistorymonth #connectingcollections #museumsfromhome

03/30/2021

We are happy to share that ARISC President's Distinguished Lecture Series inaugural lecture by art historian & archeologist, Dr. Karen S. Rubinson (NYU ISAW) is now available: https://arisc.org/events/presidents-distinguished-lecture-series-2/ Thank you Dr. Rubinson for presenting on horses in the Bronze Age South Caucasus! #ARISClectureseries @isawnyu

ISAW is proud to participate in NYU One Day today, a university-wide day of giving, in support of the ISAW Archaeologica...
03/25/2021

ISAW is proud to participate in NYU One Day today, a university-wide day of giving, in support of the ISAW Archaeological Excavation Fund.
This fund enables our faculty, researchers, and doctoral students to engage in the discovery and analysis that advances our understanding of the ancient works.

We hope that you will consider participating in #nyuoneday by donating today, link in bio!

Visit our website isaw.nyu.edu to see what our scholars and students are up to!

#isawnyu #archaeology #ancientstudies #dayofgiving

ISAW is proud to participate in NYU One Day today, a university-wide day of giving, in support of the ISAW Archaeological Excavation Fund.
This fund enables our faculty, researchers, and doctoral students to engage in the discovery and analysis that advances our understanding of the ancient works.

We hope that you will consider participating in #nyuoneday by donating today, link in bio!

Visit our website isaw.nyu.edu to see what our scholars and students are up to!

#isawnyu #archaeology #ancientstudies #dayofgiving

This peaceful intimate scene shows a Roman woman resting after childbirth. A midwife is holding the newborn and a basin ...
03/24/2021

This peaceful intimate scene shows a Roman woman resting after childbirth. A midwife is holding the newborn and a basin used during the labor is standing behind her. Midwives were the unsung heroes of the ancient world. Midwives gained knowledge by witnessing childbirths and through extensive women to women knowledge networks.

However, this knowledge has left no historical record. We know about midwives and their practices through texts written by Roman male intellectuals. Soranus describes in his treatise on gynecology how the ideal midwife had to be learned, hardworking and calm, robust and with slender fingers. Pliny writes about folk remedies, such as placing the right foot of a hyena on a mother giving birth.

To read more about childbirth in ancient Rome or other of Pliny’s unconventional recommendations visit our online exhibition!

Relief representing a midwife attending a birth. Roman, 2nd century CE.
Photo: Wellcome Collection. CC BY 4.0.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #isawgalen #wellcomecollection #ancientchildbirth #midwives #ancientmedicine #womenshistorymonth

This peaceful intimate scene shows a Roman woman resting after childbirth. A midwife is holding the newborn and a basin used during the labor is standing behind her. Midwives were the unsung heroes of the ancient world. Midwives gained knowledge by witnessing childbirths and through extensive women to women knowledge networks.

However, this knowledge has left no historical record. We know about midwives and their practices through texts written by Roman male intellectuals. Soranus describes in his treatise on gynecology how the ideal midwife had to be learned, hardworking and calm, robust and with slender fingers. Pliny writes about folk remedies, such as placing the right foot of a hyena on a mother giving birth.

To read more about childbirth in ancient Rome or other of Pliny’s unconventional recommendations visit our online exhibition!

Relief representing a midwife attending a birth. Roman, 2nd century CE.
Photo: Wellcome Collection. CC BY 4.0.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #isawgalen #wellcomecollection #ancientchildbirth #midwives #ancientmedicine #womenshistorymonth

Address

15 E 84th St
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10028

Opening Hours

Wednesday 11:00 - 18:00
Thursday 11:00 - 18:00
Friday 11:00 - 20:00
Saturday 11:00 - 18:00
Sunday 11:00 - 18:00

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Opening March 6th: “Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes”

What can we know about ancient dance? Why did European avant-garde artists look to antiquity at the beginning of the twentieth century? With an array of ancient representations of dance, Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballet Russes explores both the role of dance in ancient culture and the influence of antiquity on the modernist reinventions of the Ballets Russes, the ground-breaking dance company founded in Paris by Sergei Diaghilev.

With about 100 works, including outstanding examples of ancient pottery, sculpture, and metalwork, as well as watercolors, sketchbooks, photographs, costumes, and other archival material from the Ballets Russes, this exhibition—the first on the topic—reveals a rich, multifaceted dialogue between the ancient and the modern. More than a simple story of the reception of antiquity by artists in the twentieth century, Hymn to Apollo shows how artists returned to antiquity not as benighted traditionalists but as radical revolutionaries, intent on creating something new.

http://isaw.nyu.edu/exhibitions/future-list

Our exhibitions are free and open to the public. When we have an active exhibition, the typical gallery hours are as follows: Wednesday-Sunday, 11am-6pm, Friday 11am-8pm Closed Mondays and Tuesdays Free Guided Tour, Fridays at 6pm


Comments

You may wish to enjoy this VR experience of one of the oldest Hypogea discovered a century ago in Malta, the Hal Saflieni Hypogeum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQpvMWG9fws&t=259s If your interest lies in the developing of 360 degree VR experiences of the world's heritage site check our website and make contact.
This discovery should be of interest. Facebook.com/stonespeaker
Every exhibit at this place is stimulating and thought-provoking. The connection between the ancient Greeks and modern dance? Of course!
Tiny but wonderful Institute. Lots of really good exhibitions.
Luigi Enrico Rossi κηληθμῷ δ᾽ ἔσχοντο. Scritti editi e inediti (Collected papers) edited by Giulio Colesanti and Roberto Nicolai with the collaboration of Maria Broggiato, Andrea Ercolani, Manuela Giordano, Laura Lulli, Michele Napolitano, Riccardo Palmisciano, Livio Sbardella, Maurizio Sonnino The work collects all scientific writings, including some unpublished works, produced by Luigi Enrico Rossi (1933-2009) in almost fifty years of activity, in which he acted as professor of Greek Literature at the “Sapienza” university of Rome, enlivening the Greek Literature seminar in Rome, speaker at numerous conferences, as well as lecturer at many universities and institutions across the globe. In all his works we can see his characteristic approach to literature, understood as an act of communication within a precise historical context. The topics focus on Greek metric and music, Homer and the archaic epic, lyric poetry and symposium, Attic drama (tragedy and comedy but also satyr play), Hellenistic literature, literary criticism and history of classical studies. On the tenth anniversary of his untimely death, his Roman students, who continue his tradition in the new Seminars of Greek Literature "Luigi Enrico Rossi" at the "Sapienza" university of Rome, want to remember his fundamental work as a scholar collecting all his works, some of which are still unpublished (but already presented by him on various occasions), while others, issued in scientific publications not easy to find, risk with time to become inaccessible. We would therefore be very happy if you would accept our invitation to participate in this enterprise by joining the Tabula in memoriam using the attached form. Rome, 26 November 2018 Giulio Colesanti and Roberto Nicolai
Sito Megalitico ldp, Montarsolo, Alta Valtrebbia (Piacenza-Italy)