Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

Institute for the Study of the Ancient World Old world, new vision. https://linktr.ee/isawnyu The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University is a center for advanced scholarly research and graduate education, intended to cultivate comparative and connective investigations of the ancient world from the western Mediterranean to China, open to the integration of every category of evidence and relevant method of analysis.

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Operating as usual

Have you ever hit a wall in your research?Co-curators Anastasia Amrhein, Clare Fitzgerald, and Elizabeth Knott hit a pro...
08/23/2021

Have you ever hit a wall in your research?

Co-curators Anastasia Amrhein, Clare Fitzgerald, and Elizabeth Knott hit a proverbial and literal wall when working on an exhibition on Babylon's Ishtar Gate two years ago. The colorful walls of Babylon's Ishtar Gate with raised relief animals were composed of multiple clay bricks that were molded, baked, glazed, and baked again. Brick making is still practiced in many regions of the world today, and we know that the simplest method of production is to use a rectangular wooden mold. However, these wooden molds do not work for bricks with raised relief like those found on the Ishtar Gate.

Since no original brick molds have been found by archaeologists in Babylon, the curators turned to Conservator Jean-François de Lapérouse of the @metobjectsconservation. J-F was familiar with these bricks, as examples of animals from Babylon's Ishtar Gate are on display at the @metmuseum and one was included in ISAW's exhibition. Using an experimental archaeology approach, J-F created his own brick mold following the production steps proposed by the German excavators that consists of the typical 4-sided wooden mold described above with a removable side featuring a mold attached with bitumen. When in use, the sides may have been held together with rope. He discovered during this process that clay shrinkage during drying was greater than expected and more experimentation needs to be done to determine the exact amount of plant and mineral tempering that was added to the clay.

Experimental archaeology and scientific research often provide us new insights into objects from the ancient world. In this case, J-F's approach shed light on an otherwise lost technological innovation: the modification of existing brick-making practices to create bricks with raised reliefs. Further scientific research could perhaps help determine whether the same mold was used again and again, or whether different workshops used similar but slightly different molds. Thank you J-F for this exciting research!

#ConnectingCollections #IshtarGate #museumsfromhome #isawnyu

Images: J-F de Lapérouse / Metropolitan Museum of Art; Creative Commons image of VA Bab 01976

Check out what ISAW Professor Antonis Kotsonas is up to this summer!#isawabroad
07/28/2021
Excavations are beginning in ancient Lyttos

Check out what ISAW Professor Antonis Kotsonas is up to this summer!
#isawabroad

For the first time in almost 40 years, new excavations are starting in ancient Lyttos, a city that could upstage Knossos in the future.

For this month's #ConnectingCollections theme of fakes and forgeries.  We are taking a look back at this object from our...
07/21/2021

For this month's #ConnectingCollections theme of fakes and forgeries. We are taking a look back at this object from our previous exhibition, Restoring the Minoans: Elizabeth Price and Sir Arthur Evans.

The archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans excavated Knossos on the Greek island of Crete and was the first to recognize the distinctiveness of Bronze Age Minoan culture. His early 20th century discoveries ignited such a demand for Minoan artifacts among European and American curators and collectors that it gave rise to the production of forgeries. Some clever forgers even fooled Evans himself! A number of questionable "Minoan" statuettes can be found in museums across North America.

Fakes and forgeries are often understood to be objects created in modern times to deceive curators and collectors for monetary gain. But stories of #FakesAndForgeries in both the past and present are much more complex—for example, we also have modern replicas of objects created for educational and research purposes, forgeries created in antiquity, and questions of how scholars today can identify when a given object was created.

Unidentified Artist
Statuette of a Minoan Goddess (Our Lady of the Sports)
Probably early 20th century
Ivory and gold
Crete (?)
H. 19.1 cm; W. 12.5 cm; D. 3.9
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto: 931.21.1
Photo: With permission of the Royal Ontario Museum © ROM

#connectingcollections #isaw #isawnyu #restoringtheminoans #sirarthurevans #minoans #ancienthistory #fakesandforgeries #museumsfromhome

For this month's #ConnectingCollections theme of fakes and forgeries. We are taking a look back at this object from our previous exhibition, Restoring the Minoans: Elizabeth Price and Sir Arthur Evans.

The archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans excavated Knossos on the Greek island of Crete and was the first to recognize the distinctiveness of Bronze Age Minoan culture. His early 20th century discoveries ignited such a demand for Minoan artifacts among European and American curators and collectors that it gave rise to the production of forgeries. Some clever forgers even fooled Evans himself! A number of questionable "Minoan" statuettes can be found in museums across North America.

Fakes and forgeries are often understood to be objects created in modern times to deceive curators and collectors for monetary gain. But stories of #FakesAndForgeries in both the past and present are much more complex—for example, we also have modern replicas of objects created for educational and research purposes, forgeries created in antiquity, and questions of how scholars today can identify when a given object was created.

Unidentified Artist
Statuette of a Minoan Goddess (Our Lady of the Sports)
Probably early 20th century
Ivory and gold
Crete (?)
H. 19.1 cm; W. 12.5 cm; D. 3.9
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto: 931.21.1
Photo: With permission of the Royal Ontario Museum © ROM

#connectingcollections #isaw #isawnyu #restoringtheminoans #sirarthurevans #minoans #ancienthistory #fakesandforgeries #museumsfromhome

For our final Object History post from The Empire's Physician we look at this fascinating amuletic mosaic floor. So many...
06/30/2021

For our final Object History post from The Empire's Physician we look at this fascinating amuletic mosaic floor. So many symbols, what could it mean?!

Don't tread on me! Or actually...do! This floor mosaic from the so-called House of the Evil Eye in ancient Antioch (present-day Antakya, Turkey) presents an amuletic illustration meant to ward off evil. The "cursing look" of the evil eye is shown being attacked and inoculated by a panoply of dangerous weapons and animals. The viewer is invited to join in on this damnation by stamping out the evil and perhaps even catch a laugh to further belittle any threat after noticing the risible nature of the dwarf.

Visit our digital exhibition to learn more about ancient medicine and the power of amulets. Link in Bio!

Floor mosaic depicting the evil eye and its attackers. Roman, 2nd century CE. House of the Evil Eye, Antioch (present-day Antakya, Turkey). Hatay Archaeological Museum: Antakya 1024. Photo: Wikimedia. Public domain.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#amulets #isawgalen #isawnyu #ancientmedicine

For our final Object History post from The Empire's Physician we look at this fascinating amuletic mosaic floor. So many symbols, what could it mean?!

Don't tread on me! Or actually...do! This floor mosaic from the so-called House of the Evil Eye in ancient Antioch (present-day Antakya, Turkey) presents an amuletic illustration meant to ward off evil. The "cursing look" of the evil eye is shown being attacked and inoculated by a panoply of dangerous weapons and animals. The viewer is invited to join in on this damnation by stamping out the evil and perhaps even catch a laugh to further belittle any threat after noticing the risible nature of the dwarf.

Visit our digital exhibition to learn more about ancient medicine and the power of amulets. Link in Bio!

Floor mosaic depicting the evil eye and its attackers. Roman, 2nd century CE. House of the Evil Eye, Antioch (present-day Antakya, Turkey). Hatay Archaeological Museum: Antakya 1024. Photo: Wikimedia. Public domain.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#amulets #isawgalen #isawnyu #ancientmedicine

For this last #amuletmonday, we take a look at loans in the time of COVID-19, at how digital exhibitions facilitate #con...
06/28/2021

For this last #amuletmonday, we take a look at loans in the time of COVID-19, at how digital exhibitions facilitate #connectingcollections in innovative ways, and at a helpful healing demon named Chnoubis on this green jasper stone from the @kelseymuseum

Chnoubis may look scary at first glance, but this lion-headed demon with the tail of a serpent was believed to be extremely beneficial in preventing and curing digestive troubles. Galen himself was a bit unconvinced of the apotropaic healing powers of Chnoubis, but he did give credence to the ability of a green stone like this to help treat stomach conditions. Chnoubis was one of the most popular additions to amulets, and we see this in the second image in this post, an incredibly similar amulet from the @yalebabyloniancollection

Although we miss seeing objects such as these in person, digital exhibitions like ISAW’s The Emperor’s Physician(link in bio) and online collections like the @kelseymuseum and @yalebabyloniancollection help us stay connected. Here’s hoping Chnoubis might ward off any digestive ills before the holiday weekend!

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

Chnoubis amulet. Roman, 1st–5th century CE. Steatite. Egypt. H. 2.5 cm; W. 1.7 cm; D. 0.5 cm. Kelsey Museum of Archaeology: Alexander G. Ruthven; KM 1963.04.0008. Photo: Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.

Amulet. Ob. Chnoubis. Rev: Chnoubis sign surrounded by - chgoymi?. Green stone. Egypt.
BC number 38186; original catalog number YBC 02473 2473.
Photo: BC.038186 (photo by Kaufman, C., 2019).

#isawnyu #isawgalen #ancientmedicine #museumsfromhome #amulets #connectingcollections

For today's #amuletmonday we take a look at this bright blue amulet from BnF - Bibliothèque nationale de France and ask ...
06/21/2021

For today's #amuletmonday we take a look at this bright blue amulet from BnF - Bibliothèque nationale de France and ask what in the world does a cluster of grapes and a uvula (that dangling bit of flesh at the back of your throat) have in common?

Well, to the Romans, the shape of a grape on the vine was the perfect reference for this strange body part. Everything about this amulet, from the engraved grapes, the overall shape of the text, and the very shape of the amulet itself, references this part of the throat. Meant to protect against illness and help heal ailments of the throat, this beautiful blue amulet was one of many such objects used in antiquity for apotropaic medical purposes.

Find out more about the power of amulets at ISAW’s digital exhibition The Emperor’s Physician! Link in bio!

Grape-cluster amulet set in a modern ring. Roman. Lapis lazuli. H. 1.4 cm; W. 1.2 cm; D. 0.2 cm. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Monnaies, Médailles et Antiques: Froehner XIV.36. Photo: Serge Oboukhoff. © BnF-CNRS-Maison Archéologie & Ethnologie, René-Ginouvès. @labnf BnF - Bibliothèque nationale de France

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) Stavros Niarchos Foundation and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #isawgalen #ancientmedicine #museumsfromhome
#amulets #connectingcollections

For today's #amuletmonday we take a look at this bright blue amulet from BnF - Bibliothèque nationale de France and ask what in the world does a cluster of grapes and a uvula (that dangling bit of flesh at the back of your throat) have in common?

Well, to the Romans, the shape of a grape on the vine was the perfect reference for this strange body part. Everything about this amulet, from the engraved grapes, the overall shape of the text, and the very shape of the amulet itself, references this part of the throat. Meant to protect against illness and help heal ailments of the throat, this beautiful blue amulet was one of many such objects used in antiquity for apotropaic medical purposes.

Find out more about the power of amulets at ISAW’s digital exhibition The Emperor’s Physician! Link in bio!

Grape-cluster amulet set in a modern ring. Roman. Lapis lazuli. H. 1.4 cm; W. 1.2 cm; D. 0.2 cm. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Monnaies, Médailles et Antiques: Froehner XIV.36. Photo: Serge Oboukhoff. © BnF-CNRS-Maison Archéologie & Ethnologie, René-Ginouvès. @labnf BnF - Bibliothèque nationale de France

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) Stavros Niarchos Foundation and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawnyu #isawgalen #ancientmedicine #museumsfromhome
#amulets #connectingcollections

Check out ISAW Visiting Scholar Odette Boivin's article on "The Art of Conservative Rebellion: A Short Introduction to t...
06/18/2021
The Art of Conservative Rebellion: A Short Introduction to the First Sealand Dynasty

Check out ISAW Visiting Scholar Odette Boivin's article on "The Art of Conservative Rebellion: A Short Introduction to the First Sealand Dynasty" for ASOR : https://www.asor.org/anetoday/2021/06/conservative-rebellion-sealand/

Until recently, next to nothing was known of the nebulous dynasty of “kings of Urukug” – better known as the Sealand. New tablets and new excavations are now revealing this small southern Babylonian kingdom.

Click through to listen to ISAW Director Alexander Jones discuss Astronomy in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt for the Ithaca...
06/18/2021
Astronomy in Hellenistic & Roman Egypt w. Dr. Alexander Jones

Click through to listen to ISAW Director Alexander Jones discuss Astronomy in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt for the Ithaca Bound Podcast!

Egypt is where astronomy is known to have begun in the Mediterranean Basin. Dr. Alexander Jones, Leon Levy Director & Professor of the History of the Exact Sciences in Antiquity, New York University, joins the show to explore what scholars know a

Galen Today: The MindCheck out the next installment of our Galen Today series featuring Jeffrey Lieberman, Professor and...
06/18/2021
Check out the next installment of our Galen Today series featuring Jeffrey Lieberman, Professor and Chair of Psychiatry at Columbia University. Click to hear his views on how Galen and his work with gladiators laid the foundations for the field of psychiatry.

Stay tuned each Friday in June as we continue to share narratives from modern medical professionals reflecting on their field and its connection to antiquity.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawgalen #isawnyu #Museumsfromhome #ancientmedicine #psychiatry #ptsd #gladiators

Galen Today: The Mind

Check out the next installment of our Galen Today series featuring Jeffrey Lieberman, Professor and Chair of Psychiatry at Columbia University. Click to hear his views on how Galen and his work with gladiators laid the foundations for the field of psychiatry.

Stay tuned each Friday in June as we continue to share narratives from modern medical professionals reflecting on their field and its connection to antiquity.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawgalen #isawnyu #Museumsfromhome #ancientmedicine #psychiatry #ptsd #gladiators

06/16/2021

According to ancient humoral theory, doctors believed that a balance of the four elements—hot, cold, wet, and dry—were fundamental to good health. RSVP Today for tomorrow's collaborative exhibition lecture with @cbanyu which looks at this ancient medical theory and its modern artistic interpretations. Link in Bio to register for “Humoral Variations: Galen and his Modern Interpreters”.
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Before the lecture, take the quiz to learn about your own constitution according to Galen’s diagnostic criteria from the Art of Medicine. Get your friends and family to take it as well and compare results! Is it genetic? Do you get along best with certain constitutions? Are you Hot or Not? Click the Link in our Bio to Play!

The four humors. From Leonhardt Thurneysser zun Thurn, Quinta Essentia (Leipzig, 1574), clxii. Photo: Chronicle / Alamy Stock Photo.

The Empire's Physician: Prosperity, Plague, and Healing in Ancient Rome is made possible by generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) @snforg and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional support provided by Dr. Angelo D. Reppucci.

#isawgalen #isawnyu #Museumsfromhome #ancientmedicine #objecthistory #humoraltheory #digitalgames

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Friday 11am - 8pm
Saturday 11am - 6pm
Sunday 11am - 6pm

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Opening March 6th: “Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballets Russes”

What can we know about ancient dance? Why did European avant-garde artists look to antiquity at the beginning of the twentieth century? With an array of ancient representations of dance, Hymn to Apollo: The Ancient World and the Ballet Russes explores both the role of dance in ancient culture and the influence of antiquity on the modernist reinventions of the Ballets Russes, the ground-breaking dance company founded in Paris by Sergei Diaghilev.

With about 100 works, including outstanding examples of ancient pottery, sculpture, and metalwork, as well as watercolors, sketchbooks, photographs, costumes, and other archival material from the Ballets Russes, this exhibition—the first on the topic—reveals a rich, multifaceted dialogue between the ancient and the modern. More than a simple story of the reception of antiquity by artists in the twentieth century, Hymn to Apollo shows how artists returned to antiquity not as benighted traditionalists but as radical revolutionaries, intent on creating something new.

http://isaw.nyu.edu/exhibitions/future-list

Our exhibitions are free and open to the public. When we have an active exhibition, the typical gallery hours are as follows: Wednesday-Sunday, 11am-6pm, Friday 11am-8pm Closed Mondays and Tuesdays Free Guided Tour, Fridays at 6pm


Comments

Discovered by A.K. Kuykendall is the Oldest House; YES, Yggdrasil (?)
As for the "Ancient World".....the Voynich Manuscript may finally be opening before our eyes...... https://www.facebook.com/The.Third.Era
You may wish to enjoy this VR experience of one of the oldest Hypogea discovered a century ago in Malta, the Hal Saflieni Hypogeum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQpvMWG9fws&t=259s If your interest lies in the developing of 360 degree VR experiences of the world's heritage site check our website and make contact.
This discovery should be of interest. Facebook.com/stonespeaker
Every exhibit at this place is stimulating and thought-provoking. The connection between the ancient Greeks and modern dance? Of course!
Tiny but wonderful Institute. Lots of really good exhibitions.
Luigi Enrico Rossi κηληθμῷ δ᾽ ἔσχοντο. Scritti editi e inediti (Collected papers) edited by Giulio Colesanti and Roberto Nicolai with the collaboration of Maria Broggiato, Andrea Ercolani, Manuela Giordano, Laura Lulli, Michele Napolitano, Riccardo Palmisciano, Livio Sbardella, Maurizio Sonnino The work collects all scientific writings, including some unpublished works, produced by Luigi Enrico Rossi (1933-2009) in almost fifty years of activity, in which he acted as professor of Greek Literature at the “Sapienza” university of Rome, enlivening the Greek Literature seminar in Rome, speaker at numerous conferences, as well as lecturer at many universities and institutions across the globe. In all his works we can see his characteristic approach to literature, understood as an act of communication within a precise historical context. The topics focus on Greek metric and music, Homer and the archaic epic, lyric poetry and symposium, Attic drama (tragedy and comedy but also satyr play), Hellenistic literature, literary criticism and history of classical studies. On the tenth anniversary of his untimely death, his Roman students, who continue his tradition in the new Seminars of Greek Literature "Luigi Enrico Rossi" at the "Sapienza" university of Rome, want to remember his fundamental work as a scholar collecting all his works, some of which are still unpublished (but already presented by him on various occasions), while others, issued in scientific publications not easy to find, risk with time to become inaccessible. We would therefore be very happy if you would accept our invitation to participate in this enterprise by joining the Tabula in memoriam using the attached form. Rome, 26 November 2018 Giulio Colesanti and Roberto Nicolai
Sito Megalitico ldp, Montarsolo, Alta Valtrebbia (Piacenza-Italy)