Historic Huguenot Street

Historic Huguenot Street A National Historic Landmark District helping visitors understand the historical forces that have sh
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This week, HHS shares a collection of items associated with Captain David Catlin (1747-1839) and his descendants. Catlin...
01/09/2024

This week, HHS shares a collection of items associated with Captain David Catlin (1747-1839) and his descendants. Catlin was a Revolutionary War veteran and ancestor of local artist Emily DuBois Hoysradt.

David served as 1st Lieutenant in the Militia of the State of Connecticut and was present for the Battle of Danbury on April 27, 1777, a raid by the British forces, led by Major General William Tyron, on rebel supplies. It was 16-year-old Sybil Ludington’s famous night ride that alerted the local militia, commanded by her father, to defend the city. David was promoted to Captain in 1783.

David was born and lived most of his life in Litchfield, Connecticut. He married Ann Peck (1751-1784) in 1774 and later married Ann Parmalee in 1786. He is probably the David Catlin that appears in the first US census of 1790; there are 7 other members of the household, likely his second wife and 6 children.

The HHS Archives holds a collection of documents relating to David and his son Pierce consisting of personal letters, legal documents, and 20th century genealogical notes. These provide a glimpse into David’s life, including his promotion to the rank of Captain, as well as a letter from his son David Jr. (1780-1810) regarding plans to travel to Barbados on business, and his transfer of a land deed to his father.

David Jr. urged his father to “give no anxiety to me.” This assurance presaged his death overseas and his father’s subsequent trials in acquiring his son’s estate and collecting from his debtors. In his final year of life, David Sr. moved to Kingston, NY to live with his other son Pierce, who married Ann Winegar.

The table in this post was owned by David Sr. The chair is a copy of one also owned by David Sr.; this copy was made by Pierce for his daughter Emily DuBois and both objects appear in a painting by her granddaughter, Emily Hoysradt.

Certificate, June 14, 1783, and Letter, Nov 25, 1807. David and Pierce Catlin Family Papers (1767 - ca. 1890), HHS Archives. Gift of Rueben Crispell.

Table, 18th Century, and Chair, 19th Century. HHS Permanent Collection. Gift of Emily DuBois Hoysradt.

This week’s curatorial spotlight features papers of Lewis O. DuBois (1832-1879). Lewis (Louis Oliver) was born in New Pa...
01/02/2024

This week’s curatorial spotlight features papers of Lewis O. DuBois (1832-1879). Lewis (Louis Oliver) was born in New Paltz in 1832 to Jacob M. DuBois and Rachel DuBois and is listed in census records in 1850 and 1855 as a farmer, along with his father and some of his brothers.

By 1860, Lewis, then 28, had gone west, where he qualified for a teacher’s certificate in Clay County, Missouri. Clay County was founded in 1822, and in 1860, approximately 25 percent of the population were enslaved people.

Lewis enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 2nd Regiment Cavalry of the Missouri State Militia on March 5, 1862, and was promoted to 1st Lieutenant by Governor Hamilton R. Gamble on April 15, 1862. Papers in this collection locate Lewis in Macon City, Shelbina, Proctor, and Cape Girardeau, Missouri, during the war. The “government gray gelding” that Lewis provided as his mount was appraised at $30 in 1863.

Slavery was abolished in Missouri on January 11, 1865. Lewis served in the 2nd MSM Cavalry until he was mustered out with the rest of the regiment at the end of the Civil War in April 1865. That fall, he passed another teacher’s examination, in Platte County, Missouri.

In 1870, U.S. Census records locate him across the Missouri River in Rock Creek, Jefferson County, Kansas, which lay within the lands “ceded” by the Kanza (Kaw Nation) in the Treaty of 1825. There, he filed a claim for land and returned to farming. Notice was filed for him to prove his claim shortly before his death in 1879. No heirs are apparent, and his estate was assigned to an administrator for probate, according to the Valley Falls New Era on October 4, 1879.

Military orders and teacher’s certificates, Hendricus DuBois Family Papers, HHS Archives. https://bit.ly/3RxUJzv Clippings, Kansas Historical Society.

This document is part of a project to conserve and digitize New Paltz’s historic documents from the HHS Archives and partner institutions, made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. View some of these documents online at https://nyheritage.org/collections/new-paltz-historic-documents.

We hope that everyone is staying warm and enjoying hearty meals with friends and family during this winter season. Today...
12/26/2023

We hope that everyone is staying warm and enjoying hearty meals with friends and family during this winter season. Today, the Curatorial Department presents a reflector oven, or tin kitchen, that originally belonged to the Elting family in the 19th century.

For those that just celebrated Christmas, the observances of the 17th and 18th centuries would have been much different. Many early European settlers in New Paltz shunned Christmas celebrations. Their Calvinist Protestant religious beliefs rejected excesses; many believed that celebrating the holiday was a sin and akin to participating in pagan rituals. Some communities went as far as to outlaw Christmas festivities, like in Boston from 1659-1681.

Those with more relaxed religious views brought over old European traditions that evolved and homogenized over time. 18th -century celebrations included a range of activities from church services, hunts, mumming performances, wassailing, parties, and feasts decorated with holly, laurel, and mistletoe.

Food and drink at these gatherings would feature mulled wine, ales, hot cider, baked goods with choice dried fruits and nuts, and roasted meat.

Though this reflector oven is a bit more modern, the form is similar to those used by earlier generations. The half-cylinder roasting oven is open on one side so it could be placed to face the fire or an open hearth. The oven could be used as a rotisserie, or instead of using the rotating metal rod, meat could be placed on the hooks attached to the top of the oven. Food like fish or quick breads could be placed on the bottom shelf of the oven to bake. The handles on the oven made the device more portable, and the rear door would be used much like a modern oven door to tend food during the cooking process.

Examples of reflector ovens in everyday life are depicted in the paintings, “The Cook,” by Gabriel Metsu’s, and in the lower left corner of Gillis van Tilborgh’s, “A Barn Interior.”

Reflector oven. HHS Permanent Collection. Gift of Jesse Elting (1838-1922).
The Cook, ca. 1657-1662, by Gabriel Metsu. Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza.
A Barn Interior, oil on panel, by Gillis van Tilborgh (1625-1678), Private collection.

From all of us here at HHS, we would like to wish everyone a Very Merry Christmas and Season's Greetings to all!
12/25/2023

From all of us here at HHS, we would like to wish everyone a Very Merry Christmas and Season's Greetings to all!

From community events to interpretive planning to a large-scale restoration project on the Bevier-Elting house, 2024 is ...
12/22/2023

From community events to interpretive planning to a large-scale restoration project on the Bevier-Elting house, 2024 is going to be our most ambitious year yet at Historic Huguenot Street--and we need your help to make it happen! Please consider making a gift today!

https://www.huguenotstreet.org/donate

As a reminder, our regularly scheduled guided tour season has come to a close. Additionally, our Museum Shop is closed f...
12/22/2023

As a reminder, our regularly scheduled guided tour season has come to a close. Additionally, our Museum Shop is closed for the winter season. However, online sales are ongoing!

We look forward to welcoming visitors back in the Spring of 2024. Until then, we invite you to book a private tour experience by contacting [email protected]. As always, we thank you all for your continued support!

This week, the Curatorial Department is pleased to share with you an 18th-century desk from the Anne C. Bienstock Collec...
12/19/2023

This week, the Curatorial Department is pleased to share with you an 18th-century desk from the Anne C. Bienstock Collection. The desk was gifted to HHS in 2020 and is currently on display in the grote kamer (great room) at the Jean Hasbrouck House. This important example of early Hudson Valley furniture is said to have descended in the Stevens family by marriage with the Van Wort family of Coxsackie in Greene County, New York.

Crafted of gumwood with pine secondary, the desk features a slant lid and ball-and-ring turned legs. The interior is fitted with step-down shelves on either side of two tiers of drawers below four compartments in the center, useful for storing documents, writing implements, and other personal items. The desk retains much of its original brown finish. The brass drop pulls are probably an early alteration.

The desk was featured in the landmark 1986 exhibition, “Remembrances of Patria: Dutch Arts & Culture in Colonial America 1609-1776,“ curated by Roderic H. Blackburn and Ruth Piwonka for the Albany Institute of Art and History. In the exhibition catalogue, Blackburn wrote that the desk related to others made of gumwood found in the Kingston, New York area. The turnings may relate to tables made in Kingston as well, including those attributed to the Elting and Beekman workshops. Jan Eltinge, witness to the 1677 Esopus-Huguenot Land Agreement, and his descendants were known to be woodworkers, as were Thomas Beekman and his sons. Based on the records, both families were associated with making items including kasten (Dutch-style cupboards), drop-leaf tables, coffins, and more.

Desk, 18th century. HHS Permanent Collection, Anne C. Bienstock Collection.

This weekend, December 16th & 17th, will be the LAST weekend we will be open for regularly scheduled guided tours and in...
12/14/2023

This weekend, December 16th & 17th, will be the LAST weekend we will be open for regularly scheduled guided tours and in-person gift shop sales in 2023!

That also means it is your LAST chance to shop our Holiday Blow Out Sale, happening online and in-store! We have books, jewelry, bedding, and more!

Stop by to shop, or schedule a tour before time runs out!

Please enjoy these photos of the Holiday Hoopla Celebration and Winter Carnival, which took place this past weekend! Tha...
12/13/2023

Please enjoy these photos of the Holiday Hoopla Celebration and Winter Carnival, which took place this past weekend! Thanks to everyone who participated, and to New Paltz Community Wellness, New Paltz Police Department, NPYP, Thriving Together Town of New Paltz, and SUNY New Paltz Union Programming Council for making this all possible. A great time was had by all!

12/13/2023
This week’s curatorial spotlight features a letter dated January 14, 1815 from Abraham J. Hasbrouck, U.S. Representative...
12/12/2023

This week’s curatorial spotlight features a letter dated January 14, 1815 from Abraham J. Hasbrouck, U.S. Representative in Washington, to his brother Philip in New York. The letter addresses personal issues and important national events, and highlights the challenges of early 19th-century communication.

Abraham J. Hasbrouck was born October 16, 1773 in Libertyville, NY, a descendant of New Paltz patentee Abraham Hasbrouck. A merchant known as “Abraham of the Strand,” he also served as president of the Rondout Bank in Kingston. He served in the NY State Assembly in 1811 and in the 13th U.S. Congress from March 1813 to March 1815.

In his letter, Abraham expresses great concern about a business matter that their brother David in Utica, NY was to resolve; his letters to David have gone unanswered and he feels “very apprehensive that I shall have to pay that money, and loose it finally, unless I can prevail on you to attend to it.” He asks Philip to go to Utica immediately and “inform me on the receipt of this what you can or will do.”

Abraham also describes Congressional activities: Congress is “generally in session until sundown and dusk and sometimes after candlelight.” He notes that “great apprehension has been entertained here for the safety of New Orleans, this week past the Enemy having Landed not far from there in great force and our force was represented to be deficient.” The Battle of New Orleans was fought on January 8, 1815 and the British were quickly defeated. Abraham goes on to say that “by private Letters received here last evening the prospect is not as gloomy, considerable force had arrived,” showing that almost a week later Congress was still not aware of the outcome.

After his term in Congress, Abraham returned to his businesses in Kingston, where he died in 1845 at the age of 71.

Letter, January 14, 1815, Abraham J. Hasbrouck to Philip Hasbrouck. HHS Archives, gift of Richard Stokes and Mary Frances Jansen Stokes.
Portrait, Abraham Hasbrouck, by John Vanderlyn. On loan to HHS from the Hasbrouck Family Association.
Painting, Battle of New Orleans, by Jean Hyacinthe de Laclotte, 1815. New Orleans Museum of Art.

HHS memberships are one gift that keeps on giving!  From concerts to tours to innovative educational programming, there ...
12/11/2023

HHS memberships are one gift that keeps on giving! From concerts to tours to innovative educational programming, there is something for everyone on Huguenot Street, and HHS members get unparalleled access to all of it. Gift a membership to your loved ones today!

https://huguenotstreet.app.neoncrm.com/forms/gift-membership-form-2

Attention all Holiday Season gift seekers! HHS's Museum Shop will be holding an end-of-the-year Holiday Blow Out Sale! I...
12/08/2023

Attention all Holiday Season gift seekers! HHS's Museum Shop will be holding an end-of-the-year Holiday Blow Out Sale!

In conjunction with the last two weekends of our 2023 season, AND the Holiday Hoopla Celebration/Winter Carnival taking place TOMORROW December 9th, tons of books, jewelry, clothing, dish-wear, and more will all be on sale! The sale is in-store and online through the 17th, which is the final day of our 2023 season!

The HHS Museum shop is open on Saturdays and Sundays from 10 am to 4 pm and is closed from 1-2 for lunch. Online sales are ongoing.

Come on in and get something amazing for everyone on your list!

https://historic-huguenot-street-museum-shop.myshopify.com/

https://www.huguenotstreet.org/calendar-of-events/2023/12/9/4th-annual-holiday-hoopla

Here's a sneak peek at one of over a dozen gift baskets and other donated items that will be on display this Saturday at...
12/07/2023

Here's a sneak peek at one of over a dozen gift baskets and other donated items that will be on display this Saturday at the Holiday Hoopla's Silent Auction! The Silent Auction will take place from 1:00 - 3:30 PM. All proceeds go to support future community programming like this!

This basket includes an HHS woven throw blanket, Images of America "Mohonk Mountain House and Preserve" book, a set of 6 note cards featuring the preliminary sketches of The Huguenot Redoubt by Len Tantillo, a Miss Poppet Doll Kit, an American Sampler Kit, and an HHS sticker, pencil, and stylus pen. This basket is valued at $92.49! Be the first to bid, this Saturday! New Paltz Community Wellness

https://www.huguenotstreet.org/calendar-of-events/2023/12/9/4th-annual-holiday-hoopla

Today, the Curatorial Department celebrates the birth of Louis Bevier Hasbrouck, born this day in 1859 to parents Charlo...
12/05/2023

Today, the Curatorial Department celebrates the birth of Louis Bevier Hasbrouck, born this day in 1859 to parents Charlotte Ostrander (1826-1894) and Jansen Hasbrouck (1810-1891) in Kingston, New York. He is a descendant of New Paltz Patentee Abraham Hasbrouck through his son Joseph.

Louis attended Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, and graduated cm laude from Yale College, class of 1883. He was admitted to the New York State Bar Association in 1884 and built a career as an estate lawyer. Louis passed away in 1947 while living as a long-term resident at the Sherman Square Hotel in Manhattan. He never married and there is no record of any children; his estate was divided among his nieces and nephews.

At this time, we do not know much more about Louis’s life other than these basic facts. HHS has in its collections a crazy quilt made by his mother. According to the donor records, this quilt was a gift to Louis in 1885. It is easy to imagine Charlotte making this quilt over many months or years for her 26-year-old son as a celebration of his academic and career achievements.

Crazy quilts such as this became popular in the 1880s and 90s and were largely influenced by Japanese fashion on display at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Expo. This style sports “randomly” placed asymmetrical patches with embroidered seams and hand-painted embellishments as the focus of the piece, sewn directly onto a larger piece of fabric such as muslin or silk. Crazy quilts often lacked batting, a plush inner layer; they were intended more for display, perhaps as a throw or wall hanging, than as a source of warmth.

The first image presented here is an ambrotype showing Louis as a young boy. The portrait seen in the second image is of Charlotte, as painted by John Vanderlyn Jr. in 1840; it is currently on display in the Jean Hasbrouck House.

Photograph, 1860s. HHS Archives.
Portrait, 1840. HHS Permanent Collection. Gift of Robert W. Hasbrouck Jr, 1991.
Crazy Quilt, circa 1885. HHS Permanent Collection. Gift of Mary Ruffin Rogers in memory of her husband Jansen Hasbrouck Rogers, 2017.

HHS is proud to present a 15-minute video tour of the Jean Hasbrouck House, co-produced with Mosaic Visions Production, ...
12/01/2023

HHS is proud to present a 15-minute video tour of the Jean Hasbrouck House, co-produced with Mosaic Visions Production, and led by our very own Tours & Interpretation Manager, Eddie Moran. This video tour can be accessed via our Virtual Programming webpage for the small fee of $3.

https://www.huguenotstreet.org/virtual-programming

Proceeds go to the continued efforts to preserve and interpret this early, multi-cultural community that would become known as New Paltz.

Funding for this video project has been provided by Hudson River Valley Greenway and Americana Corner: Preserving America Grant Program.
HHS’s programming is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Governor and the New York State Legislature.

HHS needs your support this Giving Tuesday!  For more than 125 years, HHS has been a critical site of dialogue and histo...
11/28/2023

HHS needs your support this Giving Tuesday! For more than 125 years, HHS has been a critical site of dialogue and historic education in the mid-Hudson Valley. Next year is going to be our most ambitious yet, with a large-scale preservation project on the Bevier-Elting House, the second phase of our interpretive planning process, and a bevy of programs already planned—and we can’t do any of it without your support. We hope that you’ll make a tax-deductible donation and ensure that this center for community learning stays strong for generations to come!

https://huguenotstreet.app.neoncrm.com/np/clients/huguenotstreet/donation.jsp

This week’s curatorial spotlight features a letter “To the Electors of Ulster County” ca. 1794, signed “The Ghost of Cin...
11/28/2023

This week’s curatorial spotlight features a letter “To the Electors of Ulster County” ca. 1794, signed “The Ghost of Cincinatus.” With an unlimited character count, the writer minces no words. He considers the body politic of the young United States, expresses grave concerns about the influence of Great Britain in national affairs, and condemns its war with France. A transcript of this fascinating bit of political history is provided in NY Heritage, here: https://bit.ly/49Tlmr2

The bulk of the letter, though, comprises a long list of the faults of Jacob Tremper’s opponent for an unnamed political office, describing Tremper as “his superior in every virtue.” Tremper was one of five Democratic-Republican candidates elected to the New York State Assembly to represent Ulster County in the 1794 election, defeating five candidates from the Federalist party. Tremper died on October 7, 1794, before the next meeting of the Legislature.

According to “The Ghost,” “Coooooe.ooo.Eooooooof” is a “vociferous Brawller,” has an “unguarded and venemous tongue,” and “As a Child, as a Parent and as a Husband his conduct is far from natural, affectionate, and dutifull–As an Individual he is abusive, uncharitable, envious, malicious, unmannerly and irreligious.” And so on.

So who was Jacob’s opponent? Among the Federalist candidates was one Conrad E. Elmendorf. Were the men themselves enemies? Research shows that Conrad’s second wife was Catharina Tremper, Jacob’s daughter, and their first child was named Jacob Tremper Elmendorf.

And who was the Ghost of Cincinatus? Cornelius T. Jansen was a founding member of the Society of the Cincinnati: https://bit.ly/3Rh738f. Might he have been the writer, keeping a copy of the letter for himself?

Letter, Cornelius T. Jansen Family Papers, HHS Archives. Gift of Elaine Kniffen, 1983-85.

This document is part of a project to conserve and digitize New Paltz’s historic documents from the HHS Archives and partner institutions, made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. View some of these documents online at https://nyheritage.org/collections/new-paltz-historic-documents.

Here's wishing you warmth and good company on this Thanksgiving, from our homes to yours!
11/23/2023

Here's wishing you warmth and good company on this Thanksgiving, from our homes to yours!

With the change in season, harvests, and many people heading into the kitchen, today’s Curatorial Spotlight focuses on t...
11/21/2023

With the change in season, harvests, and many people heading into the kitchen, today’s Curatorial Spotlight focuses on two 19th-century apple peelers.

Like many early apple peelers or parers, the device in the first image is mounted on a wood plank that could either be set on a table or placed on a bench and straddled. The rotating hand-crank is attached to an axel with four spikes on the other end to hold the fruit (represented by the faux apple). To pare the apple, the user would manually apply the hinged arm ending in a blade to remove the skin of the fruit.

The second peeler is also hand-guided but of slightly different and smaller construction. The adjustable screw at the base is used to secure the wood plank to a working surface. The hand crank, fork, and turning blade are similar to the previous peeler, but are made from iron rather than wood. Its size suggests it was used for peeling a few apples at a time, rather than for several bushels.

European colonists introduced several new varieties of apple trees to North America in the 17th century. Until then, native fruit bearing apple trees produced what we call crabapples, or “common apples,” a much smaller and sourer fruit.

Orchards were very important for early European settlers who would eat apples raw, dry, baked, as preserves, or fermented for beverages such as cider and applejack (brandy). Come time for harvest in the fall, apples would need to be picked quickly so they could be peeled and cored to be cooked or dried for winter storage.

The two apple recipes pasted into the recipe book page dated 1848, Brown Betty (“Very good” written in pencil) and Delicious Apple Pudding (“Try”) are examples of 19th -century dishes that peelers may have been used for. The third apple recipe in the book, Dried Apple Cake, calls for 3 cups of dried apples, which may or may not have been peeled.

What is your favorite apple dish to make in the fall?

Apple peeler. HHS Permanent Collection. Gift of Henry J. DuBois.
Apple peeler. HHS Permanent Collection. Gift of Howard A. VanVleck.
Recipe book, Abner and Pamela Hasbrouck Papers, HHS Archives. Gift of Francis A. Simpson, in memory of Lois Marion Hasbrouck.

HHS is pleased to present selected letters from the family papers of silversmith and farmer Teunis D. DuBois, on view no...
11/14/2023

HHS is pleased to present selected letters from the family papers of silversmith and farmer Teunis D. DuBois, on view now as part of the exhibit, “Silver by DuBois Makers from the William Bowen Astrop Family,” at the DuBois Fort Visitor Center through December 17.

After apprenticing as a silversmith and establishing a successful business with his brother Joseph in New York City, Teunis DuBois married Sarah Vanderveer in 1796. The couple moved two years later to Freehold Township in New Jersey, where they purchased a farm. Sadly, Sarah died in 1806, leaving Teunis with four young children, all under the age of nine. In a letter to family, Teunis wrote, “I now sit in the place whare my Affectionate spouse took her last [?] of her Dear Parents … farewell She said to her ageed Father I hope the Lord would be with you in your old days and that we may meet in the presence of the Lord whare thare would be no more parteing.”

Eventually, Teunis remarried and had seven more children with his second wife Sarah Smock. In September 1812, Teunis received a letter from his brother Benjamin DuBois. Benjamin was living in Ohio near Lake Erie, which the British had taken control over at the start of the War of 1812. The letter mentions that "the Army on the Lakes and northern frontiers have got possession of the British fleet … with a great number of prisoners, we have not the particulars as authentic as yet.” The letter references the victory of American Naval forces under the command of Oliver H. Perry over the British fleet.

The last letter shown here was received from Teunis’s eldest daughter “Caty,” who wrote to her family in 1826 about an outbreak of “disentary” that she and others were enduring where they lived in Penfield, New York. Caty wrote, we “have every reason to bee very thanck full that we are all spared till this present moment whilst many of our friends and acquaintance have been called to the toom [sic] it is a sollom [sic] warning to us.”

S***f box, ca. 1795. Marked “T.D.D.” for Teunis D. DuBois. HHS Permanent Collection, gift of the William Bowen Astrop Family.

Letters dated 1806, 1812, and 1826 from the Teunis D. DuBois Family Papers, HHS Archives.

In recognition of Veteran’s Day, HHS honors one of New Paltz’s Civil War veterans, Captain Peter Eltinge of Company B, 1...
11/07/2023

In recognition of Veteran’s Day, HHS honors one of New Paltz’s Civil War veterans, Captain Peter Eltinge of Company B, 156th Regiment of the Union Army. Today we present Eltinge’s power of attorney authorizing his father, Edmund, to cast a ballot on his behalf in the general election on November 8, 1864.

Peter Eltinge was born in 1841 to Edmund Eltinge (1817-1897) and Magdalene DuBois Deyo (1819-1878). After attending New Paltz Academy, he worked as a clerk in New York City. He enlisted in 1862 and served with the 156th Regiment in the Department of the Gulf in 1863 and 1864, in Maryland and Virginia in 1864, in Georgia and the Carolinas in 1865, and on occupation duty in Georgia after the war.

In October 1864 Captain Eltinge was stationed at Cedar Creek in Virginia, the site of one battle among many that advanced the Union cause in the fall of 1864. There were no provisions for absentee voting prior to the Civil War, but with about a million soldiers serving and a closely fought election, 19 Union states passed legislation allowing soldiers to vote. Most sent election officials into the field, but a few, including New York, set up voting by mail. Captain Elting was to send home his proxy, ballot, and signed affidavit of voting eligibility in a sealed package, which his father would deliver to the polling place on Election Day to be verified.
In 1866 Peter moved to Memphis, TN to run a grocery store with his brother-in-law, but after the latter’s death he returned to New Paltz. He worked in banking and insurance, and married Magdalene LeFevre (1844-1932) in 1874; they had one daughter who died in infancy. Peter died in 1877 at the age of 35 from consumption, which he contracted during the war in Louisiana. His obituary noted that “no better-hearted man…ever ‘wore the blue.’” The local post of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), a fraternal organization of veterans of the US Civil War, was named for him after his death.

Soldier’s Power of Attorney for Captain Peter Eltinge, October 21, 1864. New Paltz Town Records Collection, HHS Archives.
Photo, Captain Peter Eltinge, Elting Memorial Library, New Paltz, NY.

Please note: Starting today, and throughout the months of November and December, our regularly scheduled guided tours wi...
11/01/2023

Please note: Starting today, and throughout the months of November and December, our regularly scheduled guided tours will take place on Saturdays and Sundays only.

For more information and to register for a tour please visit:

The Dubois Fort Visitor Center and Museum Gift Shop Hours are:Wednesdays through Sundays: 10 am-4 pm, with a break from 1 pm-2 pm to allow for the staff to take lunch.

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81 Huguenot Street
New Paltz, NY
12561

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