Historic Huguenot Street

Historic Huguenot Street A National Historic Landmark District helping visitors understand the historical forces that have shaped America. Today a National Historic Landmark District, Historic Huguenot Street encompasses 30 buildings across 10 acres that was the heart of the original New Paltz settlement, including seven stone houses that date to the early eighteenth century.
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It was originally founded in 1894 by the descendants of the first settlers as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve what remained of their French and Dutch heritage. Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York, that is dedicated to protecting our histori

It was originally founded in 1894 by the descendants of the first settlers as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve what remained of their French and Dutch heritage. Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York, that is dedicated to protecting our histori

Operating as usual

The storms held off Wednesday, so campers could spend the morning fishing at SUNY New Paltz campus!
07/22/2021

The storms held off Wednesday, so campers could spend the morning fishing at SUNY New Paltz campus!

Campers made their very own "tin" lamps and took a tour of the Jean Hasbrouck House on Tuesday!
07/21/2021

Campers made their very own "tin" lamps and took a tour of the Jean Hasbrouck House on Tuesday!

The first day of Camp Huguenot was full of seedlings, snacks, and spooky stories! Campers worked in the garden beds, pai...
07/20/2021

The first day of Camp Huguenot was full of seedlings, snacks, and spooky stories! Campers worked in the garden beds, painted flower pots, and took their very own "Boos & Juice" tour with Megan Stacey.

Today’s 10:30 AM tour is reserved for Camp Huguenot participants. If you are in the area and plan on paying us a visit, ...
07/20/2021
Visit — Historic Huguenot Street

Today’s 10:30 AM tour is reserved for Camp Huguenot participants. If you are in the area and plan on paying us a visit, please consider reserving a spot on the 12 PM or 2:30 PM tour before space fills up!

https://www.huguenotstreet.org/visit

HHS does not require visitors to provide proof of vaccination in order to enter the Visitor Center or take a tour. With that being said, we respectfully ask that visitors wear appropriate face covering when inside any of our buildings. Such structures include: the DuBois Fort Visitor Center, the Roo...

It is with deep sadness that Historic Huguenot Street acknowledges the passing of Dr. A.J. Williams-Myers on July 12, 20...
07/16/2021

It is with deep sadness that Historic Huguenot Street acknowledges the passing of Dr. A.J. Williams-Myers on July 12, 2021. Dr. Williams-Myers provided invaluable contributions to the museum’s educational programming in his roles as Board Trustee and longtime Scholarly Advisor to HHS. We extend our sympathies to his family, friends, and colleagues.

A.J. Williams-Myers was honored as Pinkster King at HHS in 2018, shown below. His knowledge of the history of Pinkster was instrumental in planning the event.

It is with deep sadness that Historic Huguenot Street acknowledges the passing of Dr. A.J. Williams-Myers on July 12, 2021. Dr. Williams-Myers provided invaluable contributions to the museum’s educational programming in his roles as Board Trustee and longtime Scholarly Advisor to HHS. We extend our sympathies to his family, friends, and colleagues.

A.J. Williams-Myers was honored as Pinkster King at HHS in 2018, shown below. His knowledge of the history of Pinkster was instrumental in planning the event.

There are still spots left for the second week of Camp Huguenot, August 2 to 6!At Camp Huguenot, kids learn about the ag...
07/14/2021

There are still spots left for the second week of Camp Huguenot, August 2 to 6!

At Camp Huguenot, kids learn about the agricultural practices, day-to-day lives, and responsibilities of the diverse lives and cultures of the people of Huguenot Street through hands-on gardening, cooking, baking, and crafting activities.

Learn more and how to register at https://www.huguenotstreet.org/camp-huguenot.

In order to ensure the health and safety of all staff and campers, Historic Huguenot Street will strictly adhere to the guidelines issued in the NYS Department of Health's Guidance for Childcare and Day Camp Programs.

There are still spots left for the second week of Camp Huguenot, August 2 to 6!

At Camp Huguenot, kids learn about the agricultural practices, day-to-day lives, and responsibilities of the diverse lives and cultures of the people of Huguenot Street through hands-on gardening, cooking, baking, and crafting activities.

Learn more and how to register at https://www.huguenotstreet.org/camp-huguenot.

In order to ensure the health and safety of all staff and campers, Historic Huguenot Street will strictly adhere to the guidelines issued in the NYS Department of Health's Guidance for Childcare and Day Camp Programs.

This cozy, hand sewn quilt was crafted by Catherine Jane Deyo LeFevre (1828-1891) before or circa 1855. The quilt is cal...
07/13/2021

This cozy, hand sewn quilt was crafted by Catherine Jane Deyo LeFevre (1828-1891) before or circa 1855. The quilt is called “Mariner’s Compass,” named for the 20 colorful compasses that decorate the quilt in red, green, and gold. The border of the quilt features alternating oak leaves and flowers in the same colors, with oak leaves also decorating the spaces between compasses. The compass design is a classic nautical symbol and one of the earliest quilt patterns. Catherine used a quilting technique called applique to create this design, a technique in which quilters sew pieces of fabric to a larger surface to make a pattern.

Catherine Jane Deyo was born in New Paltz to Roelif Deyo and Blandina Freer in 1828. She married Elias LeFevre (1824-1890) in 1855 and documentation states that Catherine made this quilt prior to their marriage. Catherine and Elias had 10 children together and likely lived in Ulster County. She passed away on March 10, 1891 and is buried in the New Paltz Rural Cemetery.

Mariner’s Compass Quilt, before or circa 1855. HHS Permanent Collection, gift of Leslie Mott.

"I'm always reminded that there's great local museums in every municipality and county in this great country. So, you kn...
07/11/2021
Curating Black history

"I'm always reminded that there's great local museums in every municipality and county in this great country. So, you know, please support your local museums.... There's also the ways that I think a museum is a way of connecting with these stories and these objects. And what I see is a real change in museum culture and that museums are starting to understand their public charge in a whole new way. When I started in archives, there was very much a sense that, "We got to protect this material at all costs." And, you know, my experience and my wish -- and I think the field has shifted in this way, too -- was for as many people as possible to know about it and connect with it. If you have this wonderful object, why wouldn't you want more people to see it? And one of the great things about the museum is that you can come in, and, to me, it's your museum. You are seeing the things we're keeping safe for eternity for you and for you to experience, young or old, no matter what."

Listen to the new director of the National African American Museum of History and Culture about what it means to interact directly with history in a recent Post Reports podcast: https://www.washingtonpost.com/podcasts/post-reports/curating-black-history/

As museums open up, we wanted to talk to the new director of the National African American Museum of History and Culture about what it means to interact directly with history. Plus, why air travel feels worse than ever.

"Through archival and genealogical research. . .  the street, to those who know its history, can become very much alive ...
07/09/2021
Historic Huguenot Street leads “Boos & Brews” haunted tours through July

"Through archival and genealogical research. . . the street, to those who know its history, can become very much alive if one takes the time to stop and look and listen closely. To that end, each Friday and Saturday night in July, Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) offers its Boos and Brews haunted tours. There are many tales of murder and mayhem, fascinating folklore and accounts of visitations from the other side of the grave that come to life as the tour guide, HHS arts and interpretation manager Megan Stacey, unspools some of the street’s more macabre history."

https://hudsonvalleyone.com/2021/07/07/historic-huguenot-street-leads-boos-brews-haunted-tours-through-july/

There are still spots left for the second weekend of tours - register now online! https://www.huguenotstreet.org/calendar-of-events/boos-brews-2021

Enjoy a beer or hard cider while being regaled with macabre tales from the past.

The Lutheran Indian Mission school in Gresham, Wisconsin, was built in 1901 and enrolled almost 120 students from the St...
07/08/2021

The Lutheran Indian Mission school in Gresham, Wisconsin, was built in 1901 and enrolled almost 120 students from the Stockbridge Munsee community as well as 11 other tribes. Native American boarding schools, also known as Indian Residential Schools, were established in the United States during the early 19th and mid 20th centuries with a primary objective of forcibly assimilating Native American children and youth into Euro-American culture. Most schools forced removal of indigenous cultural signifiers, including cutting the children's hair, having them wear American-style uniforms, forbidding them from speaking their indigenous languages, and replacing their tribal names with English-language names.

Investigations of the later twentieth century have revealed many documented cases of abuse occurring mostly in church-run schools. Recently, the Cowessess First Nation in Saskatchewan found 751 unmarked graves at the site of a former residential school, just one month after more than 200 unmarked graves were found at another school in British Columbia. You can learn more about the history of Indian Residential Schools here: https://www.npr.org/2021/06/29/1011357949/uncovering-the-unspoken-traumas-of-native-american-boarding-schools.

In addition to its research library, the Arvid E. Miller Library and Museum in Bowler, Wisconsin, has a community librar...
07/07/2021

In addition to its research library, the Arvid E. Miller Library and Museum in Bowler, Wisconsin, has a community library with books relating to United States and Native History as well as children and young adult readers available for checkout. The community library is also filled with photographs and portraits of the community’s elders.

To learn more about the library and how to make a donation, plus the Stockbridge Munsee community, visit www.mohican.com/library-museum.

The Arvid E. Miller Library consists of written materials, including books, manuscripts, correspondence, handwritten let...
07/06/2021

The Arvid E. Miller Library consists of written materials, including books, manuscripts, correspondence, handwritten letters, maps, microfilm, microfiche, photographs, and more to help in research. Director of Cultural Affairs at Stockbridge Munsee Community Heather Bruegl showed off the amazing collection in the library archives last month.

To learn more about the library and how to make a donation, plus the Stockbridge Munsee community, visit www.mohican.com/library-museum.

Late last month, staff from Historic Huguenot Street visited the Arvid E. Miller Library Museum and Cultural Affairs Dep...
07/05/2021

Late last month, staff from Historic Huguenot Street visited the Arvid E. Miller Library Museum and Cultural Affairs Department in Bowler, Wisconsin, the official repository for the archives of the Stockbridge Munsee community, one of the descendent communities of the original inhabitants of New Paltz. The Stockbridge Munsee community supports HHS’s related programming, research, and scholarship. The Arvid E. Miller museum’s primary goal is to preserve and protect the history and culture for the community and general public. The museum contains collections of objects and documents related to the Stockbridge Munsee people that date from pre-contact to present day, including objects from the Hudson Valley and Northeast region of the United States.

To learn more about the library and how to make a donation, plus the Stockbridge Munsee community, visit www.mohican.com/library-museum.

Have you ever been on our site and wondered what happened here exactly on July 4, 1776? Well, at that time, news travele...
07/04/2021

Have you ever been on our site and wondered what happened here exactly on July 4, 1776? Well, at that time, news traveled slowly. The people of New York City didn’t find out about our newfound independence until July 10 and, for people in Connecticut, news arrived a couple days later on July 12. So for New Paltz, it was business as usual for roughly another week, as we see here with Simon’s receipt for the purchase of deerskin. Several men in New Paltz signed the Articles of Association in 1775, which were written in response to the “intolerable acts” imposed by the British government, so they knew the colonies were in opposition. One of the signers of the Articles was Simon DuBois. By 1776, Simon was one of the Twelve Men governing New Paltz and had inherited the DuBois Fort, which was built by his father, Daniel, and now serves as the HHS Visitor Center.

The receipt reads:

“Received the 4th July 1776 from Mr. Simon Duboy by the Hand of his Son One Pound Ten Shilling in full for [one?] Dear Skin

[J.?] Cornl E. Wynkoop

£1.10”

Receipt dated 4th July 1776. HHS Archives, Daniel and Simon DuBois Family Papers

Have you ever been on our site and wondered what happened here exactly on July 4, 1776? Well, at that time, news traveled slowly. The people of New York City didn’t find out about our newfound independence until July 10 and, for people in Connecticut, news arrived a couple days later on July 12. So for New Paltz, it was business as usual for roughly another week, as we see here with Simon’s receipt for the purchase of deerskin. Several men in New Paltz signed the Articles of Association in 1775, which were written in response to the “intolerable acts” imposed by the British government, so they knew the colonies were in opposition. One of the signers of the Articles was Simon DuBois. By 1776, Simon was one of the Twelve Men governing New Paltz and had inherited the DuBois Fort, which was built by his father, Daniel, and now serves as the HHS Visitor Center.

The receipt reads:

“Received the 4th July 1776 from Mr. Simon Duboy by the Hand of his Son One Pound Ten Shilling in full for [one?] Dear Skin

[J.?] Cornl E. Wynkoop

£1.10”

Receipt dated 4th July 1776. HHS Archives, Daniel and Simon DuBois Family Papers

Due to the weather forecast tomorrow, Saturday, July 3, HHS has decided to cancel the encampment. Hope to see you on the...
07/02/2021
CANCELED Annual Revolutionary War Encampment — Historic Huguenot Street

Due to the weather forecast tomorrow, Saturday, July 3, HHS has decided to cancel the encampment. Hope to see you on the street soon for the other great events this summer!

https://www.huguenotstreet.org/calendar-of-events/encampment-2021

Due to the weather forecast tomorrow, Saturday, July 3, HHS has decided to cancel the encampment. Hope to see you on the street soon for the other great events this summer! Historic Huguenot Street’s annual Revolutionary War encampment returns on Saturday, July 3, with the 1st Ulster Mili

We've added more spots to Camp Huguenot so if you were worried about missing out on the summer fun, register today!At Ca...
07/01/2021

We've added more spots to Camp Huguenot so if you were worried about missing out on the summer fun, register today!

At Camp Huguenot, kids learn about the agricultural practices, day-to-day lives, and responsibilities of the diverse lives and cultures of the people of Huguenot Street through hands-on gardening, cooking, baking, and crafting activities.

Sessions last one week starting July 19 and August 2 and are intended for children ages 8 to 12. Learn more and how to register at https://www.huguenotstreet.org/camp-huguenot.

In order to ensure the health and safety of all staff and campers, Historic Huguenot Street will strictly adhere to the guidelines issued in the NYS Department of Health's Guidance for Childcare and Day Camp Programs.

We've added more spots to Camp Huguenot so if you were worried about missing out on the summer fun, register today!

At Camp Huguenot, kids learn about the agricultural practices, day-to-day lives, and responsibilities of the diverse lives and cultures of the people of Huguenot Street through hands-on gardening, cooking, baking, and crafting activities.

Sessions last one week starting July 19 and August 2 and are intended for children ages 8 to 12. Learn more and how to register at https://www.huguenotstreet.org/camp-huguenot.

In order to ensure the health and safety of all staff and campers, Historic Huguenot Street will strictly adhere to the guidelines issued in the NYS Department of Health's Guidance for Childcare and Day Camp Programs.

This week, the Curatorial Department is pleased to present four silver teaspoons made by Frederick Francis Quintard, a j...
06/29/2021

This week, the Curatorial Department is pleased to present four silver teaspoons made by Frederick Francis Quintard, a jeweler and silversmith active in Poughkeepsie, New York between 1845 and 1865. Frederick was a descendant of Isaac Quintard, a Huguenot weaver who immigrated to North America in the 1690s and became a merchant. His son Pierre, born in New York in 1699, became a well-known silversmith in the City. Later, Pierre was active in Norwalk, Connecticut. Despite Pierre’s renown as a silver- and goldsmith, the craft seems to have skipped several generations. While Frederick and two of his brothers, Charles and William, were silversmiths, their father George had been a shoemaker.

The teaspoons are marked on the back of the handle “FF Quintard.” They feature upturned fiddle handles and rounded shoulders and were made from “coin silver.” Coin silver is an alloy of 90% silver and 10% copper. Until around the 1870s, American silversmiths had no reliable source of silver to work from, so they often bought and melted existing silver pieces (including coins) to make objects for their clients. This accounts, in part, for the rarity of early American silver pieces.

Set of four coin silver teaspoons, mid-19th century. HHS Permanent Collection, Bequest of Phyllis DuBois.

Detail from the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Poughkeepsie, NY, listing Frederick Quintard, age 26, jeweler.

Address

81 Huguenot Street
New Paltz, NY
12561

UCAT, Trailways

General information

Historic Huguenot Street offers special programs year-round - check our calendar of events for more information. Private group tours, school group tours, and specialized group tours are available by appointment. When you get to Historic Huguenot Street, please park in the parking lot on Broadhead Avenue. Following the directional signs from the parking lot onto the carriage path, you will arrive at the DuBois Fort Visitor Center. At the Visitor's Center, you can purchase tour tickets, browse special exhibitions, watch our new informational video, and visit the Museum Shop.

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 4pm
Tuesday 10am - 4pm
Thursday 10am - 4pm
Friday 10am - 4pm
Saturday 10am - 4pm
Sunday 10am - 4pm

Telephone

(845) 255-1660

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Comments

Our Fochee Ancestors arrived from France in the 1680’s and landed in New Jersey.
Hey, did you guys see this?
The sheep of Patchwork Pastures Farm love visiting Historic Huguenot Street for the holidays. We met lots of festive folks today. Thanks for inviting us!
Final week to enter the historic Hudson Valley architecture photo exhibit, benefitting Calvert Vaux Preservation Alliance. Amateur and professional photographers are invited to submit their favorite shots of our local heritage: historic sites, mansions, mills, barns, churches, main streets, ruins, abandoneds, etc. Https://www.calvertvaux.org/photoexhibit/submit-your-photos
Well-deserved bows!
With a New Paltz celebration coming this Sept, the following book might come in handy https://www.amazon.com/Munsee-Indian-1712-1732-Iroquois-Neighbors/dp/0815633165
Please pray for my great-grandson Walter Ludick who was born prematurely at 4 lbs on Jan 10 in Maryland. He was air-lifted to Walter Reed on January 14 Thank you Adrienne
I enjoyed the Haunted Tour last night, thanks.
Crispell Family in NM
May I present Mr and Mrs Burnett Ralph Crispell III