Historic Huguenot Street

Historic Huguenot Street A National Historic Landmark District helping visitors understand the historical forces that have shaped America. Today a National Historic Landmark District, Historic Huguenot Street encompasses 30 buildings across 10 acres that was the heart of the original New Paltz settlement, including seven stone houses that date to the early eighteenth century.
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It was originally founded in 1894 by the descendants of the first settlers as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve what remained of their French and Dutch heritage. Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York, that is dedicated to protecting our historic buildings, conserving an important collection of artifacts and manuscripts, and promoting the stories of the Huguenot Street families, from the sixteenth century to today.

Mission: To preserve a unique Hudson Valley Huguenot settlement and engage diverse audiences in the exploration of America’s multicultural past in order to understand the historical forces that have shaped America.

Operating as usual

09/03/2020

For those who have been following the roof restoration of the Jean Hasbrouck House on Huguenot Street, we hope you enjoy this informative video about the outstanding progress made over the last several weeks! Hear from historic preservationists Jeff Nanista and David Gengo of Salem Preservation LLC to learn about the historic house’s new custom shingles, their application, and the project’s finishing touches. Thank you to our generous supporters who have made this project possible, and for helping us keep history alive!

Historic Huguenot Street is pleased to present this petite painting from the Permanent Collection attributed to Dutch pa...
09/01/2020

Historic Huguenot Street is pleased to present this petite painting from the Permanent Collection attributed to Dutch painter Paulus Potter (1625-1654). The painting is a recent gift from the George Way Collection of Dutch fine and decorative art, which was featured in the “Living in Style” exhibition at HHS in 2017.

Paulus Potter is considered a pioneer of Dutch genre painting in that he made farm animals the focus of his compositions. Cows, sheep, and other domestic animals appear prominently in all of his works, usually in small groups silhouetted against romantic skies. Paulus is believed to have received his early training from his father, painter Pieter Potter (1597-1652). The younger Potter’s earliest works date from 1640, when he was just fifteen. Paulus later attended the guild school in Delft, moved to The Hague, and eventually settled in Amsterdam, where he was encouraged by surgeon and politician Dr. Nicolaes Tulp (the subject of Rembrandt’s famous painting “The Anatomy Lesson”). Paulus is said to have found inspiration wandering in the Dutch countryside with a sketchbook, sensitively recording the landscape with farm animals at various times of day. The artist died in 1654 at age 28 of tuberculosis. Despite such a short life, Paulus had a prolific career, producing over 100 paintings and at least two dozen etchings. His paintings appear in many major museums in the U.S. and in Europe, including the monumental work, “The Young Bull,” in the Mauritshuis, The Hague.

Attributed to Paulus Potter (Dutch, 17th century), “Cows in a Meadow.” Oil on wood panel, 10.5 x 8 inches. HHS Permanent Collection, Gift of the George H. Way Collection.

To enjoy more great paintings from the George Way collection, check out the “Living in Style” exhibition catalogue at our Museum Shop or purchase it online. Also available: individual postcards and notecard/postcard sets from the exhibition, including landscapes, tavern scenes, portraits and more. https://historic-huguenot-street-museum-shop.myshopify.com/collections/living-in-style

08/28/2020
Don't forget to purchase your raffle tickets for Friday's drawing - visit our page tomorrow at noon to find out...
08/27/2020

Don't forget to purchase your raffle tickets for Friday's drawing - visit our page tomorrow at noon to find out if you've won!

Raffle Announcement!

Don’t miss your chance to win Vaune Sherin’s beautiful pastel painting of the Crispell Memorial French Church! Created at this year’s Artists on the Street event, this one-of-a-kind piece was generously donated to Historic Huguenot Street by the artist. All raffle entries will directly support our preservation of the historic houses and structures on Huguenot Street!

Vaune Sherin resides in Maybrook, NY. She is a pastel painter focusing on plein air landscapes and still life drawing. Sherin is a represented artist at the Wallkill River School of Art and a member of the Goshen Art League.

Raffle tickets start at $10 for 1 ticket. The raffle will close on Thursday, August 27 at 11:59 PM and the winner will be drawn live on our page the following morning.

To enter, visit https://huguenotstreet.z2systems.com/np/clients/huguenotstreet/donation.jsp?campaign=1220&.

Good luck!

Where can an internship at Historic Huguenot Street take you? Next up in our "Interns to Innovators" series, HHS is catc...
08/27/2020

Where can an internship at Historic Huguenot Street take you? Next up in our "Interns to Innovators" series, HHS is catching up with Khaddija Jobe, a curatorial intern in spring 2018.

What drew you to HHS?
From the moment I visited HHS I was fascinated by the history of the houses and the people who lived in them. I especially loved that HHS has, over the years, faced its history and has become even more inclusive.

What did you do while interning for HHS?
As an intern, I photographed and inventoried historical artifacts into the HHS database and assisted Ashley, the Collections Manager, with projects she was working on at the time. However, my favorite project was conducting genealogical research into the lineage of W.E.B Dubois. Having access to family genealogy books and census records was an incredible experience that I'll never forget.

How did HHS inspire what you do now?
The research I was able to conduct at HHS has inspired me to pursue a career in becoming a migrant researcher and analyst. Being immersed in the world of the houses and people at HHS has led to me to want to travel further and learn more about migration, hence why I am now pursuing my Masters in International Migration in Brussels, Belgium.

Thank you for all your hard work, Khaddija!

Historic Huguenot Street is excited to celebrate Women’s Equality Day, today! Each year, August 26th commemorates the ra...
08/26/2020

Historic Huguenot Street is excited to celebrate Women’s Equality Day, today! Each year, August 26th commemorates the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The 19th Amendment granted women the right to vote on August 18th, 1920. However, it was not certified by a government official, in this case, Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby, until a week later on August 26th. This year, this date holds a particular weight as it marks the centennial anniversary of the Amendment’s ratification! It is important to remember that, while the passing of this Amendment was a pivotal day in history, many groups of marginalized women continue to experience barriers in exercising their right to vote and receiving fair representation in government.

In celebration of the 19th amendment’s ratification, the HHS Curatorial Team is excited to share a suffrage-themed poem written by Mary Deyo. Born to Jonathan N. Deyo and Maria LeFevre in 1858, Mary Deyo spent 18 years teaching literature and English at the Ferris Seminary in Yokohama, Japan. HHS’s archives house several writings by Deyo, including multiple poems. The pieces explore her feelings on a variety of subjects including her faith, growing older, social events, and farm life. An exhibit on her ​experience as a missionary and educator in Japan will be released later this fall.

Poem by Mary Deyo, 20th Century. HHS Archives.

There are 23 statues of historical figures in Central Park, but not one honors a woman - until now. On Wednesday, August...
08/24/2020
Monumental Women

There are 23 statues of historical figures in Central Park, but not one honors a woman - until now. On Wednesday, August 26, tune in (7:45 AM EDT) to see the first statue of real women - Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony - unveiled in Central Park. The ceremony is not open to the public due to COVID-19 gathering limitations, but can be streamed live on the Monumental Women website, Facebook, and YouTube.

The monument’s sculptor, Meredith Bergmann, was schedule to speak alongside fellow artist Vinnie Bagwell at Historic Huguenot Street this past April. Their program, “Breaking the Bronze Ceiling,” is set to be rescheduled for 2021. Be sure to subscribe to our mailing list to stay up-to-date on all of our program and event postponements and changes.

http://monumentalwomen.org/

23 statues of historical figures in Central Park, but not one honors a woman. We are changing that. Donate to Monumental Women to break the bronze ceiling!

Mary is the Collections Care and Retail Assistant at Historic Huguenot Street. She began her time at HHS while she was a...
08/23/2020

Mary is the Collections Care and Retail Assistant at Historic Huguenot Street. She began her time at HHS while she was a student in the Anthropology Department at nearby SUNY New Paltz. Mary interned with the Curatorial team at HHS throughout her senior year. During this time she assisted on a variety of Collection’s related projects including re-cataloging the on-site burying ground, and assisting in object care and preservation. In May of 2019, Mary joined the HHS staff in the part-time role of Museum Shop Assistant. A few months later, she took on a full-time position serving both the Curatorial and Programming Departments. She now happily divides her time between writing HHS’ weekly object highlights, assisting visitors in the Museum Shop, and helping to care for and preserve the historic homes on the street.

Gender was never the only battleground for women’s voting rights. Amended, a podcast from Humanities NY, launching next ...
08/21/2020

Gender was never the only battleground for women’s voting rights. Amended, a podcast from Humanities NY, launching next Wednesday, August 26, goes back to the 1800s and up to the present day, to follow a fight for women's full equality that's always been as diverse, complex and unfinished as the nation itself.

Listen to the trailer now: https://humanitiesny.org/our-work/amended/

After more than five years of planning and consultation, timber frame restoration, shingle installation, and more, the J...
08/20/2020

After more than five years of planning and consultation, timber frame restoration, shingle installation, and more, the Jean Hasbrouck House roof preservation project is in its final stages and almost ready for its big reveal! For a #ThrowbackThursday, we're remembering the hard work on Huguenot Street over the past couple years to preserve the house for future generations.

If you'd like to support HHS's forthcoming preservation projects, visit our website: https://www.huguenotstreet.org/support

“Never was a Slave”: Jacob Wynkoop, Free and Black in 19th-Century New Paltz was featured in the Daily Freeman: www.dail...
08/19/2020
Huguenot Street exhibit features 19th-century New Paltz Black builder

“Never was a Slave”: Jacob Wynkoop, Free and Black in 19th-Century New Paltz was featured in the Daily Freeman: www.dailyfreeman.com/news/local-news/huguenot-street-exhibit-features-19th-century-new-paltz-black-builder/article_9085b49c-e0b2-11ea-a588-6bd577380354.html

View the exhibit, and all of HHS's online exhibits, via our website: https://www.huguenotstreet.org/exhibits

NEW PALTZ, N.Y. — Historic Huguenot Street will present the online exhibit “Never Was a Slave,” Jacob Wynkoop, Free and Black in 19th-Century New Paltz" and may be viewed at

We are excited to share the outstanding accomplishments of yet another former HHS intern as a part of our “From Interns ...
08/19/2020

We are excited to share the outstanding accomplishments of yet another former HHS intern as a part of our “From Interns to Innovators” series. Tisa Loewen interned with us in the Fall of 2014. She returned to HHS numerous times over the next several years to volunteer her time, knowledge, and talents. She is currently a bioarchaeologist pursuing her Ph.D. at Arizona State University. Here is what she recalls of her time at Huguenot Street…

What drew you to HHS?

I participated in the SUNY New Paltz field school at HHS and was really intrigued by how much depth and variety of history is right under our feet. Media has "exoticized" archaeology, but really it's about community and an acknowledgment of the interface between the past and present. I think some people take their proximity to history and education for granted and I’ve always appreciated how HHS makes it easy and enjoyable to engage with these elements.

What did you do while interning for HHS?

While at HHS, I cleaned, labeled, organized, and catalogued hundreds of archaeological artifacts. This made it easier for curators to be aware of what artifacts were present in the collections so that they could be utilized and conserved. I also volunteered as an occasional consultant, educational presenter, and counselor to incoming interns.

Something that was really important to me was assisting HHS with the further incorporation of the Esopus people’s history into the site’s narrative, bringing visibility to the former Native American residents. Little did I know, HHS was already working on this and more, and I was honored to see that growth in inclusion during my time there.

How did HHS inspire what you do now?

After my internship, I attended the HHS inaugural Spring Celebration, which honored and recognized the Esopus Munsee people whose ancestral lands the site exists on today. This experience really made me appreciate the living history of sites like HHS and consider the impact of our care of the land on living descendants, including those that have been displaced. As I now study and work in Arizona, I regularly engage with material culture subject to the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. My experience at HHS has helped me value the link those sacred objects have to living people, and inspires me as an archaeologist to be a force for ethical, community oriented practices.

I also attended Juneteenth and other events memorializing and recognizing former enslaved residents and their descendants. As a descendant of enslaved African Americans, this event had an enormous emotional impact on me that I still struggle to find words for. However, HHS's commitment to having these difficult and meaningful conversations makes me want to support its vision and duplicate that service in other institutions I work for. I have been moved to see living Huguenot descendants also value and work for these principles, giving me hope for meaningful change in New Paltz and our country.

This week, Historic Huguenot Street’s Curatorial team is excited to share a 19th-century traveling case which belonged t...
08/18/2020

This week, Historic Huguenot Street’s Curatorial team is excited to share a 19th-century traveling case which belonged to Mabel R. Gerow. The bag is composed of brown leather, and lined with blue silk. Stamped just below the handle of the case are the initials “M. R. G.” The case would have been used by Ms. Gerow as a means of transporting a variety of toiletries and useful items. Among the useful tools are a glove stretcher, a small knife, a corkscrew, a shoe horn and a button hook. Also stored in the bag are six glass bottles of various sizes, some of which still contain powder and makeup remnants. An address book and a calling card holder with a card for “Miss Florence Gerow” accompany the storage space for stationary and pens. Traveling cases such as these were ever more popular during the 19th century, as the developing Transcontinental Railroad allowed those in the middle and upper classes ample opportunities for more frequent travel.

Ms. Gerow (1870-1903) resided in Vineland, NJ but passed away in Chicago, IL in 1903. Tragically, Ms. Gerow lost her life in the Iroquois Theater fire. This fire, which occurred only two days before the New Year, is the deadliest single-building fire in United States history. Many of our present-day regulations and fire codes come from this event, where poorly marked exit doors and overcrowding lead to the loss of more than 600 lives.

Kristine Gillespie has the pleasure of having worked for HHS for over 6 years. As the Retail and Tourism Manager she can...
08/16/2020

Kristine Gillespie has the pleasure of having worked for HHS for over 6 years. As the Retail and Tourism Manager she can usually be found walking the street with group tours or stationed in the Museum Shop greeting visitors, arranging merchandise or buying awesome products for the gift shop. Having grown up locally, Kristine has a deep appreciation for the rich history of the area and Huguenot Street in particular. When asked what she loves most about working at HHS she said “It’s the people. I love interacting with our visitors and hearing their stories, learning about why they came to Huguenot Street. I want everyone who visits to walk away with the same sense of awe that I experience each time I am on the street.” Next time you are on site, pop into the Museum Shop and say “Hi” to Kristine!

Historic Huguenot Street's cover photo
08/14/2020

Historic Huguenot Street's cover photo

Listen to today's podcast episode from TMI Project on "Reclaiming Our Time," an immersive program on Juneteenth 2017. Ac...
08/14/2020
Bonus Episode: Reclaiming Our Time - TMI Project

Listen to today's podcast episode from TMI Project on "Reclaiming Our Time," an immersive program on Juneteenth 2017. Accompanied by Terry James, living historian and board member of the Slave Dwelling Project, five writers from the project performed at the Reformed Church and stayed overnight in the cellar kitchen of the Abraham Hasbrouck House where enslaved Africans once lived. This special podcast episode features the five personal accounts that came out of the TMI Project workshop. #reclaimingourtime #blackstoriesmatter #blacklivesmatter #defendblacklives #1619Project

Join TMI Project Podcast hosts Eva Tenuto and Micah as they discuss and share stories from “Reclaiming Our Time,” a live storytelling performance from 2017 featuring stories and monologues by five storytellers responding to their overnight stay in a preserved cellar kitchen on Huguenot Street in...

Raffle Announcement!Don’t miss your chance to win Vaune Sherin’s beautiful pastel painting of the Crispell Memorial Fren...
08/14/2020

Raffle Announcement!

Don’t miss your chance to win Vaune Sherin’s beautiful pastel painting of the Crispell Memorial French Church! Created at this year’s Artists on the Street event, this one-of-a-kind piece was generously donated to Historic Huguenot Street by the artist. All raffle entries will directly support our preservation of the historic houses and structures on Huguenot Street!

Vaune Sherin resides in Maybrook, NY. She is a pastel painter focusing on plein air landscapes and still life drawing. Sherin is a represented artist at the Wallkill River School of Art and a member of the Goshen Art League.

Raffle tickets start at $10 for 1 ticket. The raffle will close on Thursday, August 27 at 11:59 PM and the winner will be drawn live on our page the following morning.

To enter, visit https://huguenotstreet.z2systems.com/np/clients/huguenotstreet/donation.jsp?campaign=1220&.

Good luck!

Address

81 Huguenot Street
New Paltz, NY
12561

UCAT, Trailways

General information

Historic Huguenot Street offers special programs year-round - check our calendar of events for more information. Private group tours, school group tours, and specialized group tours are available by appointment. When you get to Historic Huguenot Street, please park in the parking lot on Broadhead Avenue. Following the directional signs from the parking lot onto the carriage path, you will arrive at the DuBois Fort Visitor Center. At the Visitor's Center, you can purchase tour tickets, browse special exhibitions, watch our new informational video, and visit the Museum Shop.

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Comments

Our Fochee Ancestors arrived from France in the 1680’s and landed in New Jersey.
Hey, did you guys see this?
The sheep of Patchwork Pastures Farm love visiting Historic Huguenot Street for the holidays. We met lots of festive folks today. Thanks for inviting us!
Final week to enter the historic Hudson Valley architecture photo exhibit, benefitting Calvert Vaux Preservation Alliance. Amateur and professional photographers are invited to submit their favorite shots of our local heritage: historic sites, mansions, mills, barns, churches, main streets, ruins, abandoneds, etc. Https://www.calvertvaux.org/photoexhibit/submit-your-photos
Well-deserved bows!
With a New Paltz celebration coming this Sept, the following book might come in handy https://www.amazon.com/Munsee-Indian-1712-1732-Iroquois-Neighbors/dp/0815633165
Please pray for my great-grandson Walter Ludick who was born prematurely at 4 lbs on Jan 10 in Maryland. He was air-lifted to Walter Reed on January 14 Thank you Adrienne
I enjoyed the Haunted Tour last night, thanks.
Crispell Family in NM
May I present Mr and Mrs Burnett Ralph Crispell III