Yale University Art Gallery

Yale University Art Gallery Yale University Art Gallery is the oldest college art museum in America. FREE and open to the public. Free membership!
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The Yale University Art Gallery was founded in 1832 as an art museum for Yale and the community. Today it is one of the largest museums in the country, holding more than 300,000 objects and welcoming visitors from around the world. The museum’s encyclopedic collection can engage every interest. Galleries showcase artworks from ancient times to the present, including vessels from Tang-dynasty China

, early Italian paintings, textiles from Borneo, treasures of American art, masks from Western Africa, modern and contemporary art, ancient sculptures, masterworks by Degas, van Gogh, and Picasso, and more. Exhibitions present new scholarship and offer thematic perspectives on the collection. Spanning one and a half city blocks, the museum features more than 4,000 works on display, multiple classrooms, a rooftop terrace, a sculpture garden, and dramatic views of New Haven and the Yale campus. The entrance building, which was designed by renowned architect Louis Kahn and was completed in 1953, is a masterpiece of modern architecture. The Gallery’s mission is to encourage an understanding of art and its role in society through direct engagement with original works of art. Programs include exhibition tours, lectures, and performances, all free and open to the public. Learn about membership benefits and join online at: https://artgallery.yale.edu/support/membership

“Recent Acquisitions of Prints and Drawings” is now on view!The works in this display showcase some the extraordinary ad...
01/19/2024

“Recent Acquisitions of Prints and Drawings” is now on view!

The works in this display showcase some the extraordinary additions to the Yale University Art Gallery’s collection over the past five years. Dating from the sixteenth century to the present day, these prints, drawings, and illustrated books represent a wide range of periods, nationalities, media, and subject matter. They illustrate the encyclopedic approach to collecting undertaken by the Department of Prints and Drawings and the plurality of histories and cultures that it represents.

Come see these works on the Gallery's fourth floor. They will be on view through June 2, 2024.

Today is Museum Selfie Day!Here, graduating Senior Gallery Guide Ida Brooks PC '24 takes a selfie in front of Kazimir Ma...
01/17/2024

Today is Museum Selfie Day!

Here, graduating Senior Gallery Guide Ida Brooks PC '24 takes a selfie in front of Kazimir Malevich's "The Knife Grinder or Principle of Glittering" (1912-13), one of the artworks on her Highlights Tour (swipe to see the full painting).

Join our undergraduate guides for interactive Highlights Tours focused on a selection of objects from the Gallery’s global collection. No two tours are the same. Click the link in our bio to view our calendar for specific dates and times.

Next time you visit, send us a selfie in front of one of your favorite artworks in the Gallery and tag us using .

The Gallery is free and open Tuesday through Sunday.

Lee Friedlander’s photographs of the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom document the 1957 gathering at the Lincoln Memorial. ...
01/15/2024

Lee Friedlander’s photographs of the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom document the 1957 gathering at the Lincoln Memorial.

On May 17, 250,000 civil rights activists rallied in Washington to urge the government to fulfill its commitment to desegregation. The demonstration, organized by Bayard Rustin, HON 1984, featured speeches by prominent civil rights leaders, including Adam Clayton Powell, and a performance by Mahalia Jackson. The final speech “Give us the Ballot” was delivered by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and marked his ascension as a leader of the civil rights movement. Despite the prominence of the occasion and the artistry apparent in photography, Friedlander, then 22 years old, found little interest from the mainstream press for publishing these images.

In addition to memorializing the day’s events, Friedlander also documented the many participants who traveled from across the United States to attend the pilgrimage.


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📷 Lee Friedlander, “Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. (at podium); first row: Roy Wilkins, A. Philip Randolph, Reverend Thomas J. Kilgore, Jr., unknown, and Ralph Abernathy; Vivian Carter Mason (second row right),” from the series “Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom,” 1957, printed later. Gelatin silver print. Gift of Maria and Lee Friedlander, HON. 2004

📷 Lee Friedlander, “Untitled,” from the series “Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom,” 1957, printed later. Gelatin silver print. Gift of Maria and Lee Friedlander, HON. 2004

📷 Lee Friedlander, “Elmer Carter and Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.,” from the series “Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom,” 1957, printed later. Gelatin silver print. Gift of Maria and Lee Friedlander, HON. 2004

📷 Lee Friedlander, “Untitled,” from the series “Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom,” 1957, printed later. Gelatin silver print. Gift of Maria and Lee Friedlander, HON. 2004

Now on view!“Photographic Storytelling: Photographs from the Permanent Collection”This installation focuses on photograp...
01/11/2024

Now on view!

“Photographic Storytelling: Photographs from the Permanent Collection”

This installation focuses on photographs from the 19th century to today that present dramatic scenes through an attention to detail, gesture, and staging.

The 1970s saw a resurgence of forms of theatrical photography that emerged following the medium's invention in the 19th century, from Cindy Sherman’s series critiquing female archetypes to Nan Goldin’s personal chronicles of s*x and intimacy. Meanwhile, narrative photographs grew more cinematic in scale, resolution, and color saturation. Today, a new generation, including Genesis Báez, Tommy Kha, and Cara Romero, use commercial photography’s high production value to create images that reflect on personal identity and social stereotypes.

“Photographic Storytelling” is on view on the fourth floor through June 2.

“Performance and Court in Indonesia” is a new display for the Indo-Pacific department featuring Indonesian shadow puppet...
01/09/2024

“Performance and Court in Indonesia” is a new display for the Indo-Pacific department featuring Indonesian shadow puppets (“wayang kulit”) from the Dr. Walter Angst and Sir Henry Angest Collection. At the center of the gallery is a screen where a selection of puppets depicts scenes from the Indic epic “Mahabharata,” which is popular in Javanese performances.

Currently on view is a scene from the play “Irawan Rabi” (Irawan’s Wedding). Arjuna, shown at left, is accompanied by his two wives, Sumbadra and Srikandhi. They have come to tell Abimanyu, Arjuna and Sumbadra’s son, that he cannot marry his beloved Siti Sundari because her father, King Kresna, has promised her to the son of another king. The young pair is overcome with grief and collapses to the floor. At far right, a spade-shaped “kayon,” a representation of the cosmic mountain and tree of life, frames the action.

The scenes in this shadow puppet display will change regularly, but they will all come from the royal set “Kyai Nugroho,” stored behind the screen in a large wooden box, as used in actual performances in the grand pavilion (“pendhapa”) of Prince Tejakusuma in the city of Yogyakarta. Shadow puppets are presented by a puppeteer, or “dhalang,” who performs all-night renditions of epic tales accompanied by a “gamelan” orchestra. Some spectators watch from behind the screen to appreciate the brightly-colored puppets and the performers in action, while others prefer to watch the shadows.


Image details in the comments.

Three new thematic installations are on view in the second-floor Asian art galleries. “Architectural Spaces in South Asi...
01/05/2024

Three new thematic installations are on view in the second-floor Asian art galleries.

“Architectural Spaces in South Asian Art” features paintings from the 18th and 19th centuries that depict public and private areas at courts throughout India.

“Sight and Sound in Chinese Painting” focuses on artistic representations that illustrate the importance of music in Chinese culture.

“Performance and Court in Indonesia” situates Indonesian shadow puppets within the wider courtly context.

These highlights from the collections of Asian and Indo-Pacific art will be on view through May 2024.

Don’t miss your last chance to see “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space” before it closes this Sunday, Janu...
01/04/2024

Don’t miss your last chance to see “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space” before it closes this Sunday, January 7. Featured in ARTnews, Boston Globe, New York Times, and Vogue, the exhibition has been among the most widely lauded shows of the season. The Gallery is very pleased to thank supporters Clifford Ross, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and the Terra Foundation for American Art for helping to bring this exhibition to visitors from New Haven and beyond.

“Portrait of an Unlikely Space” imagines domestic surroundings reminiscent of the pre-Emancipation era in a multigallery installation. Early American portraits of Black women, men, and children are presented alongside works by Mickalene Thomas and other contemporary artists.

Featured artists include Adia Millett (), Betye Saar (), Curtis Talwst Santiago (), Devin N. Morris (), Lebohang Kganye (), Mary Enoch Elizabeth Baxter (), Sula Bermúdez-Silverman (.Sula), Wardell Milan (), and Mickalene Thomas ().


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Image details:

📷 Installation view of “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space,” with exhibition design elements by Mickalene Thomas and “Rose Prentice” (1771–1852) by Sarah Goodridge (on table)

📷 Installation view of “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space,” with “Repository I: Mother” by Sula Bermúdez-Silverman

📷 Installation view of “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space,” with three photographs from Mickalene Thomas’s “Courbet” series (back right)

📷 Installation view of “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space,” with “Capital Gain” by Adia Millett

Happy New Year! We look forward to seeing you at the Gallery soon!
01/02/2024

Happy New Year! We look forward to seeing you at the Gallery soon!

Happy New Year! Many new works of art are on view. Come enjoy with family and friends!

Hi, I’m Mary Ellen Wilson (MEW, for short). I landed my dream job as assistant editor in the Publications and Editorial ...
01/02/2024

Hi, I’m Mary Ellen Wilson (MEW, for short). I landed my dream job as assistant editor in the Publications and Editorial Services department, where I work on the Gallery’s labels and books. I’ve been an editor for nearly three decades, which still amazes my mom who never thought I’d get a job with a degree in art history and French. I sure showed her!

I earned my master’s in historic preservation from Delaware State, a historically black university in Dover. I’m currently a member of Preservation Connecticut and the New Haven Preservation Trust and love learning about the architecture and communities here in my new home.

Free time is spent caring for a pair of always-hungry old lady felines, rearranging furniture in my apartment, and watching nonstop episodes of “Gardeners’ World” (since I no longer have my own garden to tend, plus Monty Don is *adorable*). Swipe to see pictures of my cute but chonky cats, a house I wish I could bring back to life, and a chair I regret not buying at an antiques store recently.

Be sure to visit the Gallery soon—there’s so much to see and enjoy.

The graphic design team at the Gallery employs graduate students from the Yale School of Art every year. This partnershi...
12/29/2023

The graphic design team at the Gallery employs graduate students from the Yale School of Art every year. This partnership is critical to meet the demands of design work at the Gallery and provides professional work experience for the art students.

MFA Graphic Design students Katie Johnson, MFA ’25, and Neeta Patel, MFA ’24, contributed to the research and design for the “Ornament” exhibition identity, seeking a contemporary typeface that shares a formal kinship with the historical artworks. The flourished, calligraphic strokes of the typeface Salter relate to the organic forms that appear in the ornamental elements of the works on view.

Johnson explored other design ideas that incorporated musical staff—a nod to the three keyboard instruments at the center of the exhibition—before arriving at the final concept of typographic ornaments “sprouting” from the title. These decorative glyphs, from the typeface Bodoni, are traditionally used for supplemental elements such as page borders, and section markers, and endsheet patterns. In the spirit of the exhibition, the title design brings the ornaments into focus.

Ken Zhao, MFA ’24, assisted with the installation of the exhibition graphics.

“Ornament” will be on view through February 18, 2024. Come see more than 40 prints and drawings from the Gallery’s collection displaying three centuries of European ornament presented alongside three musical instruments on loan from the Yale School of Music.

Yale School of Art

"Keep making art, keep telling your stories” were the motivational words Mickalene Thomas spoke to a group of local area...
12/27/2023

"Keep making art, keep telling your stories” were the motivational words Mickalene Thomas spoke to a group of local area middle and high school students this fall at the opening celebration of her exhibition at the Gallery, “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space.”

Last spring, the then 7th and 8th-grade students created Mickalene Thomas-inspired portraits. The 8th graders drew their favorite female teachers and staff members at the Betsy Ross Arts Magnet School, an inter-district New Haven public middle school. The 7th graders made self-portraits. The art project was assigned after a field trip to the New Britain Museum of American Art (New Britain Museum of American Art), where Mickalene’s work was on view in the “30 Americans” exhibition. The student’s portraits were displayed in the school’s Black History performance and the end-of-the-year art exhibit.

This past September, some of the students and their art teacher met Mickalene and shared with her their portraits. An unforgettable moment! Mickalene’s generous words of encouragement will undoubtedly resonate with the young aspiring artists for years to come.

Come visit “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space” before it closes on January 7, 2024.

Mickalene Thomas Page BRAMS Betsy Ross Arts Magnet School

Season's greetings from all of us at the Gallery!This holiday season, we invite you to visit the Gallery with family and...
12/21/2023

Season's greetings from all of us at the Gallery!

This holiday season, we invite you to visit the Gallery with family and friends. Find the perfect gift in the Museum Store. Stroll through our galleries. Spend time with your favorite works of art or find new ones to enjoy. We thank you for being part of our community

Please note that the museum will be closed on December 24 and 25 as well as on January 1. In addition, the Gallery will close at 5:00 pm every Thursday from December 21 through January 11, during Yale’s winter recess.

We hope to see you soon!


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🖼️ Oscar Florianus Bluemner, “Snow and Glow,” 1935. Oil on canvas. Purchased with the Katharine Ordway and Leonard C. Hanna, Jr., Class of 1913, Funds

Did you know that over 8,500 college and university students visited the Yale University Art Gallery last year in the co...
12/18/2023

Did you know that over 8,500 college and university students visited the Yale University Art Gallery last year in the context of a class?

Every academic year, hundreds of courses—from disciplines as varied as Anthropology, English, and Environmental Studies—come to the Gallery to learn with art. Your Annual Fund contribution supports our educators and our learning-focused mission. Make a gift today: https://artgallery.yale.edu/support/giving/annual-fund


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Image details:
Yale College students in an intermediate French class learn from objects on view in the Laura and James J. Ross Gallery of African Art.

One of my projects as the Betsy and Frank H. Goodyear, Jr., B.A. 1966, Intern in the Department of Prints and Drawings w...
12/14/2023

One of my projects as the Betsy and Frank H. Goodyear, Jr., B.A. 1966, Intern in the Department of Prints and Drawings was to catalogue print portfolios, thus enabling the public to browse their contents on the Gallery’s website. Among them was the 1997 “American Abstract Artists 60th Anniversary Print Portfolio,” containing 40 lithographs, each by a different artist. Many of the prints were black and white and geometric, so the bright yellow color and organic strokes of “Up-Down” by Jean Cohen (American, 1927–2013) caught my attention.

When I googled Cohen’s name, I learned that she had studied painting at the Cooper Union and at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. She was involved in Manhattan’s vibrant 10th Street Galleries in the 1950s and ’60s and was married briefly to the American artist Alex Katz. Little further information was available online, but the vivacity of the print stayed with me. Who was this artist? Where had her paintings gone? Why was it that her friends had gained fame while she had been lost to history? These questions led me to study Cohen in a biography course. I visited her small archive at the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, interviewed Katz, and drove to Hudson, New York, to see her surviving paintings in an old garage.

All of this came from just one piece whose story I happened to pursue. I encourage you to do some poking around—you never know what you might find.

--Elizabeth Levie, B.A. 2023


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Jean Cohen, “Up-Down,” from the “American Abstract Artists 60th Anniversary Print Portfolio,” 1997. Lithograph. Gift of Roger E. Mosesson. © Jean Cohen

Expressionist artist Edvard Munch was born on this day in 1863. “Toward the Forest” is one of Munch’s most visually stun...
12/12/2023

Expressionist artist Edvard Munch was born on this day in 1863. “Toward the Forest” is one of Munch’s most visually stunning and technically experimental woodcuts. Over the course of twenty years, he executed it in a range of color combinations, added strips of wood to the block to widen the composition at left and right, and varied between clothed and n**e depictions of the female figure.

Come see this artwork in person when “Munch and Kirchner: Anxiety and Expression” opens at the Gallery on February 16, 2024. Featuring more than 60 works on paper, this exhibition is the first to examine the prints of Edvard Munch alongside those of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, elucidating the fascinating overlaps in their creative output and personal biographies and demonstrating how these artists suffered from—and attempted to cope with—the anxieties of their age.


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Image detail:
Edvard Munch, “Toward the Forest I (Mot skogen I),” 1897, printed 1913–15. Woodcut printed in pink and green. Collection of Nelson Blitz, Jr., and Catherine Woodard

Did you know that over 8,000 K–12 students visit the Yale University Art Gallery annually? For many of these children, t...
12/08/2023

Did you know that over 8,000 K–12 students visit the Yale University Art Gallery annually?

For many of these children, this is their first encounter with an art museum. A trip to the Gallery is a great place to begin a lifetime of appreciating art, and this enriching experience is possible thanks to your support! Make a gift to the Annual Fund today to sustain educational programming at the Gallery: https://artgallery.yale.edu/support/giving/annual-fund


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Image detail:
Children encounter collection objects while listening to folktales, myths, and exciting stories from around the world during the family program Stories and Art.

Hi, my name is Raymond Carlson, the inaugural Manager of Student Engagement here at the Yale University Art Gallery. Ori...
12/06/2023

Hi, my name is Raymond Carlson, the inaugural Manager of Student Engagement here at the Yale University Art Gallery. Originally from Minnesota, I’m thrilled to be here in New Haven (and not just because of the comparatively mild winters!). In my newly established position, I’m responsible for students’ cocurricular and extracurricular opportunities at the Gallery.

As part of my role, I also lead the training of the undergraduate Gallery Guides, who give Highlights Tours that introduce the Gallery’s global collection to the public. Stop by on Thursday evenings and on Saturday and Sunday afternoons for Tours, which are researched and designed by the Guides.

More student opportunities are on the horizon in 2024, and for now, enjoy our upcoming Study Breaks on December 8 and 14!

Yale University

In recognition of the 2023 Day With(out) Art, the Yale Office of LGBTQ Resources, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Y...
12/01/2023

In recognition of the 2023 Day With(out) Art, the Yale Office of LGBTQ Resources, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Yale Center for British Art, and Public Humanities at Yale are proud to partner with Visual AIDS to present “Everyone I Know Is Sick,” a screening of five short videos highlighting connections between HIV and other forms of illness and disability. The program features work by Dorothy Cheung, Hiura Fernandes and Lili Nascimento, Beau Gomez, Dolissa Medina and Ananias P. Soria, Vasilios Papapitsios, and Kurt Weston.

In order to create a space that is most accessible and welcoming to those in our community who are immunocompromised, face coverings are recommended.

Where: Humanities Quadrangle, 320 York Street, Room L01
When: December 1, 7:00–9:00 pm

Visual AIDS Yale University https://visualaids.org
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Image details:
Hiura Fernandes and Lili Nascimento, still from the video “Aquela criança com AID$” (That Child with AID$), 2023. Commissioned by Visual AIDS for “Everyone I Know Is Sick”

Bring your family and friends to visit the Gallery this holiday season!
11/30/2023

Bring your family and friends to visit the Gallery this holiday season!

Come see “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space” before it closes!

Always FreeThe Yale University Art Gallery is proud to be free and open to everyone, thanks to the support of our Annual...
11/28/2023

Always Free

The Yale University Art Gallery is proud to be free and open to everyone, thanks to the support of our Annual Fund donors! Over 200,000 people enjoyed free admission to the museum last year, along with access to our educational programming, special exhibitions, and digitized publications. Make a gift to the Annual Fund today to help keep the Gallery free and open for generations to come!

https://artgallery.yale.edu/support/giving/annual-fund


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Children encounter art through art-making activities and storytelling on Family Day and in the family program Stories and Art.

Celebrate Museum Store Sunday with a visit to the Gallery today! Special offers include 10% off all merchandise and 30% ...
11/26/2023

Celebrate Museum Store Sunday with a visit to the Gallery today!

Special offers include 10% off all merchandise and 30% off all Gallery publications, including our newest releases.

The Gallery is open today from 11:00 am – 5:00 pm, and admission is free.

The elaboration and continuation of Indigenous traditions are key concerns for artist Lehuauakea’s practice. While in re...
11/24/2023

The elaboration and continuation of Indigenous traditions are key concerns for artist Lehuauakea’s practice. While in residency with the master printer Judith Baumann at Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts in Oregon, the artist transferred their experience making kapa (bark cloth) textiles to the medium of lithography. This print honors Polynesian nautical wayfinding, which was revived in the 1970s as part of a broader Hawaiian Renaissance. Seen here is a standard double-hulled voyaging canoe alongside the constellation Makau Nui O Maui (Scorpius, in Western astronomy), which in Pacific Island mythology is the fishhook that the demigod Maui harnessed to pull islands from the bottom of the ocean.

Crow's Shadow Institute of the Arts
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Lehuauakea (Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian)), “Guided by Our Stars (We Were Never Lost),” 2021. Lithograph. Emerson Tuttle, B.A. 1914, Fund. Copyright 2021 Lehuauakea

"A painting to me is primarily a verb, not a noun, an event first and only secondarily an image"-Elaine de KooningOn thi...
11/23/2023

"A painting to me is primarily a verb, not a noun, an event first and only secondarily an image"-Elaine de Kooning

On this Thanksgiving Day, we would like to express our gratitude, as a verb, to everyone who works to make the Yale University Art Gallery a dynamic, engaging, and beautiful museum. Thank you to our staff, visitors, students, scholars, educators, donors, and ever-growing community whose active participation is integral to fulfilling the mission of the Gallery.

If you're in New Haven this holiday weekend, visit the Gallery to see Elaine de Kooning's “Garden with Trees and Stairs” (1965), currently on view in the American paintings and sculpture galleries.


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Elaine de Kooning, “Garden with Trees and Stairs,” ca. 1965. Oil on canvas. Gift of Elliot Sussman, B.A. 1973. © Elaine de Kooning Trust

Check out our Holiday Sale at the Museum Store this weekend!
11/20/2023

Check out our Holiday Sale at the Museum Store this weekend!

Receive special offers on Thanksgiving weekend

Holiday Book Sale at the Museum Store!Friday, November 24–Sunday, December 10Whether you need the perfect thing for that...
11/20/2023

Holiday Book Sale at the Museum Store!

Friday, November 24–Sunday, December 10

Whether you need the perfect thing for that hard-to-shop-for person on your list or an end-of-the-year indulgence for yourself, books make great gifts.

Beginning Friday, November 24, take advantage of holiday promotions at the Museum Store. Enjoy 30% off the Gallery’s celebrated publications, including the new exhibition catalogue “Mickalene Thomas / Portrait of an Unlikely Space.” Visit the Museum Store in person or online, and be sure to make your selections early—these offers are only available through Sunday, December 10.

https://bit.ly/YUAGMuseumStore

On Thanksgiving weekend, the Gallery will be open with normal hours:
Friday, 10:00 am–5:00 pm
Saturday and Sunday, 11:00 am–5:00 pm

The Gallery recently released “Seeing and Not Believing: The Photography of Allan Chasanoff,” the first publication to s...
11/16/2023

The Gallery recently released “Seeing and Not Believing: The Photography of Allan Chasanoff,” the first publication to survey Allan Chasanoff’s highly diverse and often cutting-edge Postmodern experiments in photography. After receiving his B.A. from Yale College in 1961, Chasanoff (1936–2020) pursued a daily photographic practice, producing tens of thousands of images that pushed the limits of the medium and questioned its reliability as a document of reality. The catalogue includes an essay by artist Mónika Sziládi (), Chasanoff’s archivist from 2013 to 2020, that outlines Chasanoff’s life and practice, tracing the development of his art from his early experiments with light, shadow, and color in his lens-shot photographs to his late-career foray into 3D printing, which he viewed as the latest frontier of photography.

The catalogue was designed by the Gallery’s former Director of Graphic Design, Christopher Sleboda (), who also designed the museum’s two prior Chasanoff-related books, “First Doubt: Optical Confusion in Modern Photography” and “Odd Volumes: Book Art from the Allan Chasanoff Collection.” “Odd Volumes” is part of the Gallery’s Online Access project and can be downloaded for free on our website.

For more information or to purchase, visit artgallery.yale.edu/publications or click the link in bio.

Hi! I’m Chris Chew, Graphic Designer at the Yale University Art Gallery (). I first joined the department from 2016–19, ...
11/13/2023

Hi! I’m Chris Chew, Graphic Designer at the Yale University Art Gallery (). I first joined the department from 2016–19, departed to tour and record as a drummer while continuing my relationship with the Gallery as a freelance designer, and rejoined as a staff member in early 2023.

I grew up in New Haven County, studied Graphic Design at Lesley University () in Cambridge, MA, where I received my B.F.A., and worked at agencies and small studios in Boston for a few years before returning to the New Haven area.

The Gallery’s Department of Graphic Design establishes, implements, and oversees the museum’s visual vocabulary across physical and digital media. I have the pleasure of collaborating with colleagues in nearly every department to create exhibition graphics, printed matter, wayfinding signage, advertisements, merchandise—the list goes on. One of the most exciting aspects of my job is getting to learn about a new subject for each special exhibition in order to arrive at a conceptually rich identity that resonates with the work, the curator’s narrative, and the visitors.

Outside of the Gallery, I co-run the artists’ shop Chew—Chew () with my sister Allison, play drums in the NYC band Noods (), and am a tennis fanatic. 🎾
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Image 1: Chris Chew, Graphic Designer
Image 2: Chris speaking to a class in the recent “Minimalism” installation alongside Andrew Daubar, Director of Exhibitions.
Image 3: Chris presenting the exhibition title for “Ornament,” currently on view at the Gallery.
Image 4: Chew—Chew at the 2023 Northampton Print and Book Fair ()

New object on view! One of the highlights of the ancient Dura-Europos galleries, a painted Roman shield, is traveling ac...
11/10/2023

New object on view!

One of the highlights of the ancient Dura-Europos galleries, a painted Roman shield, is traveling across the Atlantic to be an important part of "Legion: Life in the Roman Army," an upcoming exhibition at the British Museum in London. This event gives us the opportunity to install another rare shield in its place -- this one never before displayed.

The shield now on view (at right) is made of a series of wooden rods, arranged vertically and held together by rawhide strips. The extraordinary conditions of preservation at Dura-Europos, located in the desert on the plateau west of the Euphrates River in present-day Syria, led to the survival of this artifact. The organic materials, wood and rawhide, would likely not have survived in a different environment. The preservation of such objects from Dura-Europos provides us today with a range of art and artifacts that provide a rare glimpse into the ancient world.


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Image: Roman shield, ca. AD 200-256. Wood and rawhide. Yale-French Excavations at Dura-Europos

The Friends of American Arts at Yale turns 50! Founded in 1973 to support the departments of American Decorative Arts an...
11/08/2023

The Friends of American Arts at Yale turns 50!

Founded in 1973 to support the departments of American Decorative Arts and American Paintings and Sculpture, the Friends host events in New Haven and across the United States that explore the various facets of American art. The Friends have built important endowments that contribute to the museum’s activities and numerous Friends members have donated works of art.

This eye-catching weather vane depicting the Goddess of Liberty is a recent gift to the Gallery from Jane and Gerald Katcher to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Friends. Originally placed atop a building, her fluttering flag would have caught the breeze and turned her to point in the direction of the wind. Lady Liberty was a popular motif for weather vanes, especially after the dedication of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor in 1886.

This weathervane is on view in the American galleries and is also the cover of “American Art: Selections from the Yale University Art Gallery.” Published to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Friends, the book shares highlights of American art in all media from across the museum’s collections. See link in bio to learn more about the book.


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Image: Probably J.L. Mott Ironworks, “Goddess of Liberty Weather Vane,” New York, 1890–1900. Copper, zinc, gilding and painted decoration. Gift of Jane and Gerald Katcher, LL.B. 1950

Book: “American Art: Selections from the Yale University Art Gallery” (Yale University Art Gallery distributed by Yale University Press, 2023)

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